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Carolina Chrome

The #1 Magazine for South Carolina Bikers! Issue #134 August 2019

FREE

NOT FOR RESALE


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Cassett, SC

Photographer Retread

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Ms. Chrome August 2019

Ms. Nicole Barton

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Bobby

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CONTENTS Cover Photographer Robert Holley Owner of Robert Vance Photography 3 Ms Chrome Nicole Barton Photographer Retread 6-7 Back to School Motorcycle Facts 10 Lessons from the Open Road ; Danger…Entering Curves 11 The Nation of Patriots Ride By Tammy G Pierce 14 Biker Kids 16-17 Centerfolds Gerry & Tammy Pierce Photographer Tony Culpepper; Owner of TLC Photography 18-21 Calendar of Events 24 Dr. DILLIGAF 26 Bartenders Around SC 28 2nd Annual Homeless Veteran Benefit Ride By Wally Wersching ADVERTISING SALES & MARKETING

803 931-2613 803 238-8258 carolinachrome@yahoo.com

Carolina Chrome LLC ® PO Box 85293 Lexington, SC 29073

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Cover Photography by Robert Holley Owner of Robert Vance Photography Carolina Chrome Magazine™ (CCM) is a FREE publication printed monthly, Distributed in South Carolina & Border Towns to Biker Friendly Businesses & Watering Holes.

CHROMESC.COM

CAROLINACHROME CHANNEL * #CAROLINACHROME

CHROMESC.COM * CAROLINA CHROME MAGAZINE

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CCM IS CREATED BY SOUTH CAROLINA BIKERS IN AN ECOLOGICALLY FRIENDLY & ENVIRONMENTALLY CONSCIOUS NATIONAL AWARD WINING MANNER

WE WERE BORN GREEN

INFORMATION CONTAINED HEREIN IS PROVIDED BY ADVERTISERS AND READERS AND IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. WHILE EVERY REASONABLE EFFORT HAS BEEN MADE TO INSURE THAT THE INFORMATION IS ACCURATE AS OF PUBLICATION DATE, CCM AND ITS EMPLOYEES, AGENTS, CLIENTS, AND DISTRIBUTORS SHALL NOT BE LIABLE FOR ANY DAMAGES ARISING FROM THE USE OF OR RELIANCE ON THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS PUBLICATION OR FROM THE OMISSIONS OF INFORMATION FROM THIS PUBLICATION. CCM’S PARTICIPATION IN THIS PUBLICATION IS NOT AN ENDORSEMENT OF THE VIEWS, OPINIONS, PRODUCTS OR SERVICES OF ANY ADVERTISER OR OTHER PARTICIPANT APPEARING HEREIN. NO PART OF THIS PUBLICATION SHALL BE REPRODUCED IN ANY FORMAT WITHOUT THE EXPRESSED WRITTEN CONSENT OF THE PUBLISHER. CCM DOES NOT PROMOTE THE CONSUMPTION OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES. CCM IS TO BE HELD HARMLESS FOR FAILURE TO PRODUCE ANY ISSUE ON SCHEDULE DUE TO REASONS BEYOND OUR CONTROL INCLUDING ACTS OF NATURE; TO BE HELD HARMLESS FROM SUITS OR CLAIMS DUE BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE UNAUTHORIZED USE OF A PERSONS NAME OR PHOTOGRAPH, PLAGIARISM, LIBEL, OR COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT. THE CAROLINA CHROME NAME AND LOGO IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK AND IS THE PROPERTY OF THE OWNER AND PUBLISHER NICOLE GANTT AND CAROLINA CHROME LLC.

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In South Carolina, motorists are required by law to stop for a school bus when traveling on any highway with two lanes, one going each direction. ... Failure to comply with these laws will result in a minimum of $500 in fines and 6 points added to your license.

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On THE COVER

Photographer Robert Holley Owner of Robert Vance Photography Loaation Antique Bikes on Main Chesnee SC 2018

Although you can encounter deer at any time of the day or night, they are most active between dusk and midnight, then again at first light. They typically spend the middle of the day in deep cover, but most deer are not really forest dwellers. www.revzilla.com

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Q:Can I still get a ticket in a work zone when

workers aren't present?

Yes:

A: for up to 10 mph over the limit, $76.50; 11-15 mph, $128.75; 15-24 mph, $180.50; 25 mph or more, $355 (S.C. Code 56-5-1520) www.scdot.org

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Photography by Robert Holley

Photography by Robert Holley 8

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Photography by Robert Holley

Photography by Robert Holley

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danger…entering curves

Lessons from the Open Road: A Devotional for Motorcycle Riders By K. D. Byrd

Danger…entering curves. Many motorcycle accidents occur when riders misjudge curves. They can’t see the lay of the curve until they’re in it. Sometimes opportunities come our way that look good, but we can’t see the end from the beginning. There’s no way to know the “lay of the land” until you’ve jumped in. Danger! Maybe that business opportunity is not such a good idea. Maybe the new relationship that seems so promising will end in heartache. We should enter these situations only with much prayer and wait upon the Lord to give us the green light.

strength; they shall mount up with wings as eagles; they shall run, and not be weary; and they shall walk, and not faint.” ~Isaiah 40:31 “The Lord is good, a strong hold in the day of trouble; and he knoweth them that trust in Him.” ~Nahum 1:7 Prayer: Dear God: Help me to wait upon you and to see the end from the beginning.

“But they that wait upon the Lord shall renew their Byrd, K. Dawn. Lessons from the Open Road: A Devotional for Motorcycle Riders (Kindle Locations 237-239). Sixteenth Street Publishing. Kindle Edition.

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The Nation of Patriots Ride

By: Tammy Pierce The 10th Annual “Patriot Tour” launched on May 18th from Beaver Dam, WI on its 15,000-mile journey across 48 states. The flag will go to already preplanned Harley Davidson dealerships on its journey to raise donations for Disabled Veterans. From the West Coast to the East Coast, from North to South this 1 flag will make this journey. The flag will return to Beaver Dam, WI on September 7th after its journey. On Monday August the 5th the flag will make its way to Harley Haven in Irmo, SC from Lowcountry Harley Davidson in Charleston SC. After a brief ceremony the passing of the flag to the next flag bearer (which is a great honor) we will accompany the flag to Falcon’s Fury Harley Davidson in Conyers GA. Mr. Bernie will be the flag bearer again this year. Mr. Bernie is a WWII veteran and still rides today. At each city, members sign a banner before turning the flag over. KSU at 8:00 AM for those of you who would like to attend this event. As one rider said in California this year “It’s that moment that you realize what you represent, all that has happened and that we’re a free nation and still are. We want to hang on to the feeling of the patriot. We must keep that protection of the country to remain free, and that’s why we do this.” Another said “It’s a sense of pride. I’m proud to be an American and what we actually stand for.” Nation of Patriots is an all-volunteer organization. This 501(C)3 nonprofit organization has helped over 378 veterans, logged 166,000 miles and has raised $860,735 in its 10-year existence. The organization contributes 100% of all donations received to go to disabled veterans struggling to support their families. Working with donations they track every donation by state and locations. They work with VA Hospitals, American Legions, VFW’s and other nonprofits and many more veteran associated groups to find veterans and help the military families with support. There are guidelines that these veterans must meet before they are granted funds. Their goal is to raise as much money as possible every calendar year and give it ALL away by December 31st. Funds that are not able to be given out gets rolled over into the next year to be given to needed veterans and families.

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Pictures by Grange Simons Lucas111 12

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What was the longest distance for riding a motorcycle? The longest distance for riding a motorcycle was 2,019.4 miles in a 24 hour period. The record was set by an American and that American was L. Russell Vaughn. L. Russell “Rusty” Vaughn was for the Continental Tire Test Track on August 10, 2011. The location was Uvalde, Texas, USA, and Vaughn did use his own Harley-Davidson FLHTK Electra Glide Limited 2010 bike. He completed 238 laps on the test track and won himself a place in the Guinness Book of World Records.

https://thefactfile.org/motorcycle-facts/

Rusty Vaugh © Guinness World Records


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Photography by Tony Culpepper

CAROLINA CUSTOM CAMO 426 Hwy 601 South, Lugoff SC. 29078

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Anthony Jackson 803-713-7739 Cell 803-243-1091

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The Most Expensive Motorcycle Is currently valued at $3 000000 and it’s a special Harley Davidson which was designed by artist Jack Armstrong.

CERAKOTE

/www.kawasakimerkclub.eu/bikes/interesting-facts-about-motorcycles

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Photography by Tony Culpepper

Gerry Pierce 2018 Road Glide Special


Tammy Pierce


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FIND US


Photography by Retread

Photography by Retread

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Photo by Clint

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Dr. Dilligaf

Got something to ask dr. dilligaf?? send it to carolinachrome@yahoo.com

Dr Dilligaf, I respect your opinion on every post. Even though you chew people up and spit them out. With all the new riders, buying vests, sewing patches on them and trying to have a “biker attitude” I would like a real good description of what a “real” biker is. I have ridden on two wheels over 50 years but never considered myself a “biker”. It seems that nowadays somebody buys a bike, puts on a vest and considers themselves a “biker”. I know you have ridden forever but do you consider yourself a biker and really what is the difference in a biker and a rider enthusiast. Look forward to your answer. Just wondering. Not a biker but I ride one. Just Wondering, Since this is a question and answer column I’ll start with the questions and answer them one by one. Do I consider myself a biker? No, I do not. Do others consider me a biker? Some do, some don’t. I did take a “test” on the internet with fifty questions to determine whether I is or I ain’t. I scored a 100% but a newbie or want to be could possibly score the same. Answering questions is kind of my THING anyway. On occasion Moms hustle their kids away when I come down the store aisle, people avoid making eye contact with me at traffic lights, cops follow me for no apparent reason and people assume the worst of me without knowing me. To all of them I’m a Biker. But to my grandchildren I’m Papa, to my children I’m Dad, to my parents I’m Son and to most others I’m just Assh____. My co-workers and even my employer call me Sir. I give respect and I receive respect. I would rather ride a motorcycle than a car or truck and I will use any excuse that I can to ride. I spend more than I should on motorcycles, and I have more of them than makes sense. I prefer to spend my time with those who appreciate the love of motorcycles and the lifestyle associated with booming down the highway on a big twin. The love and comradery that comes my way is palatable everywhere I travel and my friendships that have been made are almost indestructible. But I don’t consider myself a Biker. Apparently, when someone declares that a given person is not a real biker it is because that person doesn’t meet their ideal or image of what a real biker is. In some circles only outlaws are “real” bikers. If this is true, then who or what are the millions of other people who ride motorcycles? I call them and myself Riders. That’s not to say that just because you belong to a club that I consider you a Biker. I do know club members who meet my definition, but they are few and far between. Typically, they are older than me and almost always are 24

veterans. But there are certainly exceptions. I used to run with those types back in the 70’s before I joined the service. As a matter of fact, that is how I wound up enlisted. It’s a good thing that things have changed since then. But those guys and their “old ladies” were the real deal. We fixed and modified our own stuff, no custom shops, no internet purchases and no time for BS. Two things mattered, the Bikes and your Brothers. Much less talk and a lot more action. The lifestyle that I’m talking about began with WWII guys coming home, buying surplus war motorcycles and replacing the adrenaline, BROTHERHOOD and excitement of war with the pleasure and danger of riding. It was the best treatment for PTSD long before it was identified. To me these are the TRUE bikers. The rest of us are motorcycle riders or enthusiast. But labels have always been misleading so I neither judge nor label. Call yourself what you please but take note. If I see you on your bike just shined up for the weekend with a copycat vest on riding a couple of miles to be seen hanging out with others doing the same, I’m laughing on the inside. And if your crap has a steering wheel I ain’t even talking to you. Always in the wind and sometimes breaking it. Dr Dilligaf Dr. Dilligaf, What is your take on riding in shorts? It is hotter than Satan’s arm pit. I don’t plan on burning my leg on my pipes I know right where they are and if I go down jeans are only good for one bounce anyway. Dressed for the ride not the slide. Dressed, Not so many years ago if you were to wear shorts on a motorcycle every Biker and most grandmas would flat call you out on it. But most people tend to mind their own business nowadays. But, I’m not most people. Put some darn pants on and don’t wear no stupid Crocs or slip on shoes either. Next thing you know I’ll be attending some benefit to raise money for your skin grafts. Most motorcycle accidents are relatively minor. You know drops in parking lots, bumping another bike at a light or fall overs at low speed. Murphy’s Law guarantees feet or leg involvement. I’ve got two burned leg photos on my phone from friends over the weekend. I wear shorts when I’m not riding but they aren’t that much cooler than jeans. Swamp Butt or Monkey Butt is real, but I’ve never heard of calf sweat or swamp knees. Is the small extra measure of comfort worth the risk? Certainly not but you knew that before you asked. If you’re looking to add another measure of discomfort to your life just get a roommate and protect your legs and feet. You might have to get up and make someone a sandwich. Dr. Dilligaf

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2nd Annual Homeless Veteran Benefit Ride By Wally Wersching Established in 2014, the is an Association of Combat Veterans from all branches of the United States Armed Forces who ride motorcycles as a hobby. Their mission is to support and defend those who have defended our country and our freedoms. Their focus is to help veteran care facilities provide a warm meal, clothing, shelter, and guidance; or simply say “Thank You” and “Welcome Home”. They have partnered with “Fellow Countrymen” and the “Alston Wilkes Society” for their 2nd Annual Homeless Veteran Benefit Ride. All proceeds of the ride will be donated equally to the two charities. The “Fellow Countrymen” is striving to end Veteran suicide and homelessness in upstate South Carolina. They are working towards creating a Refuge for Homeless Veterans by the fall of 2020 which will provide any homeless Veteran a safe and secure place to live. The Refuge will provide climate controlled shelter, bedding, access to hot showers, and 3 square meals a day. Alston Wilkes Society - Veterans Transition Homes and Supportive Services for Veteran Families program prevents homelessness by helping qualified veterans and their families gain access to the resources they need in order to successfully transition to or maintain permanent housing. The ride started at Harley-Davidson of Greenville, 30 Chrome Drive in Greenville, SC. Registration was from 9:00 AM to 11:00 AM. The first bike left at 10:30 AM, and all bikes were to be at the end location by 5:00 PM. All motorcycles were welcomed. There were five stops along the way; The Boneyard in Anderson, SC; Sue’s Wings and Things in Anderson, SC; The American Legion in Williamson, SC; Steddy’s in Easley, SC; and ending at Thomas Creek Brewery in Greenville, SC with raffles, 50/50 drawings, live music, BBQ dinner, and more. There was even a special limited edition small batch veterans’ brew.

When I pulled into the lot, there were only a few motorcycles parked in front of the stage. I walked up on stage, and gave them my donation, then started walking around taking pictures and talking to people as they rode in. One thing I noticed was the Combat Vets had a piece of black tape across the back of their vests. I asked about it, and was told that one of their club members passed away, and it was their way of honoring his memory. A group of bikers rode in together. It was “Squid” and his friends. They were having breakfast at the Peach Blossom Diner when I passed them earlier. Now they were ready for the all day run for the veterans. There were many unusual bikes at the event, some with beautiful, and meaningful paint jobs. One Harley had the New York Twin Tower and pentagon on the gas tank and other patriotic images on the front fender and saddlebags. It was very detailed and masterfully done.

I left home at about 8:00AM heading south on some back Another unusual bike roads to I85. Once on I85, I continued heading toward was a Harley trike Greenville. There is a lot of road construction on I85 between with a very large air Gaffney and Greenville which makes riding a motorcycle a horn mounted to it. little challenging. Luckily, there wasn’t much traffic at that time It appeared to be a of the morning. I stayed to the right and followed the old I85 horn from a large Bypass through Spartanburg. I noticed a few motorcycles semi or even a train. parked in front of the Peach Blossom Diner as I passed. I’d hate to be in front I exited I85 at Pelham Road, and turned left. At the first of that bike when he road (Garlington Road), I turned right. I used to go all the way blew the horn. It was to Woodruff Road, and fight the traffic to get to Greenville H-D. probably scare me to It’s much easier, & faster to take Garlington Rd to Chrome Dr. death. WWW.CHROMESC.COM 28


After a while, I walked into the dealership. It had been a few years since I visited it. Other than the motorcycles were new models, it looked the same with bikes on one side and clothes on the other – with a parts section in the middle. It is very similar to all the other Harley dealerships. One thing that was a little different was a 1965 Harley Panhead on a stand in the parts area. The 1965 Panhead was one of the most desirable bikes when I was young. It was the only year that a Panhead had an electric start. They made great choppers because of that. The one on the stand was stock, and in great condition. After I left the dealership, I noticed that a couple men rode in on their Victory motorcycles. One was a Victory Vision called the “Dark Knight” because it had images of Batman and Robin on the front along with Batman strangling the Joker. I talked with the owner about his bike. They were not sure that they wanted to go on the Veteran Benefit Ride. As I left them, they were still discussing it. I left at 10:30 when other bikes were leaving. I backtracked on Garlington Road. The rest were on their way to Anderson, SC. I got on I85 heading north. Traffic was much heavier than before. I exited at Rt 14, and after a mile or so, I pulled into Cherokee Cycles on the left. That was the dealership where “Miss Vickie” was originally sold. I’ve been dealing with them for years – even before I bought “Miss Vickie”. I talked with the owner, Danny, and the parts manager, Roy. It was good to see old friends again. I didn’t want to get back on I85 again, so I rode south on RT 14, and turned left onto Rt 80. Rt 80 is a four-lane road that intersects with Rt 29 near Lyman, SC. I turned right onto Rt 29, and after a few miles, I turned left onto Rt 292. Rt 292 goes into Inman, SC. After passing through the main part of Inman, I continued on Rt 292, and stopped at Iron Powersports to visit with Carl and Travis. As Carl was telling me about how he plans to add an entertainment center under the trees next to his building, it started to rain. I looked out the door to see blue sky and sun – but it was still raining. They brought in the bikes that had parked in front. Then the rain stopped. In another minute, it was raining again. It was like Mother Nature couldn’t make up her mind what to do. I left while it was raining, and less than a half mile away, the road was dry. I followed Rt 292 until I turned left onto Rt 9. Rt 9 is a scenic road as it passes Lake Bowen. After a few miles, I turned right onto Rt 11. The air was warm, and I was completely dry before long. I arrived home a little after noon. Cindy and I went out for a delicious lunch. It was a great way to spend a Saturday morning – helping homeless vets, and visiting WWW.CHROMESC.COM with friends. 29


Photography by Tony Culpepper

Photography by Tony Culpepper

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Profile for CHROMESC.COM

Carolina Chrome August Issue 134  

Carolina Chrome is the #1 Magazine for SC Bikers!! Find out all upcoming events, and see pictures from past events with good lookin' bikers!...

Carolina Chrome August Issue 134  

Carolina Chrome is the #1 Magazine for SC Bikers!! Find out all upcoming events, and see pictures from past events with good lookin' bikers!...