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T H E C H R I S T I A NA CA R E WAY

Expert

|       Respectful

Partners in your health

2012 YEAR IN REVIEW

|       Caring


In this  report

34 The Center for Heart & Vascular Health 114 Research at The Center for Heart & Vascular Health 134 The Helen F. Graham Cancer Center 174 Research at The Helen F. Graham Cancer Center 214 Community Care 314 Education and Research  394 Philanthropic Support  424 Achieving Excellence: Awards & Appointments 474 Service Statistics

Christiana Care offers a wide range of health care services in Delaware and surrounding communities, at a glance: O N T H E C H R I S T I A NA H O S P I TA L CA M P U S Christiana Hospital (907 beds) Center for Heart & Vascular Health in the Bank of America Pavilion Helen F. Graham Cancer Center and Center for Translational Cancer Research Christiana Care Breast Center Christiana Surgicenter O N T H E W I L M I N G TO N CA M P U S Wilmington Hospital (241 beds) Wilmington Hospital Health Center Center for Advanced Joint Replacement Center for Rehabilitation Roxana Cannon Arsht Surgicenter Swank Memory Care Center First State School D E L AWA R E A N D T H E C O M M U N I T Y 14 school-based health centers Home Health & Community Services—Visiting Nurse Association 2 Alzheimer’s day programs Eugene du Pont Preventive Medicine & Rehabilitation Institute 18 primary care centers (2 in New Jersey) 9 Christiana Care Physical erapy PLUS sites 15 Christiana Care imaging services locations


T H E C H R I ST I A N A CA R E WAY We serve our neighbors as respectful, expert, caring partners in their health. We do this by creating innovative, effective, affordable systems of care  that our neighbors value.

Dear Neighbors, In all that we do, Christiana Care Health System strives to serve everyone as respectful, expert and caring partners in their health. We do this by creating innovative, effective, affordable systems of care that our neighbors value. This is The Christiana Care Way, and it is our promise to all neighbors who trust us to care for them. Embedded in this promise is a commitment to transform how we deliver that care, to make it more meaningful for patients and families. As you read our 2012 Year in Review, it is clear that our commitment to patient and family centered care is the foundation of our national reputation for excellence. This report highlights many of Christiana Care’s accomplishments and community partnerships, as well the honors bestowed on the dedicated and talented people who work in the health system. Our neighbors rely on us to deliver their babies and provide care for them throughout every stage of life, regardless of their ability to pay. We are steadfast in our commitment to provide the very best, from heart care to cancer research, to prevention to the latest technology. Most important, we are increasing the value of care for our patients because we work with them and not merely for them. This is a  testament to the power of The Christiana Care Way.

Robert J. Laskowski, M.D., MBA PRESIDENT AND CHIEF ExECUTIVE OFFICER

As a private not-for-profit regional health care system, we rely in part on the  generosity of individuals, corporations and foundations to fulfill our mission to serve.  To learn more about how you can help, visit www.christianacare.org/donors. 

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Showing we care in 2 million ways Christiana Care Health System is one of the largest health care providers in the nation, delivering medical care in more than  2 million encounters with patients last year. Despite our large size and advanced technology, we strive to make each encounter a personal experience. Our patients are our neighbors, as well as our partners in patient and family  centered care, from routine screenings to complex surgeries  to cutting-edge clinical trials. The Christiana Care Way is the foundation of all we do,  working diligently with patients to meet their needs, as the  patients perceive them. In Delaware and the surrounding area, people trust Christiana Care to care for them when they are sick, promote ways to keep them well and provide the highest quality regardless of their ability to pay.

ACCORDING TO THE AMERICAN HOSPITAL ASSOCIATION’S LATEST  SURVEY  OF  MORE  THAN  6,000 U.S.  HOSPITALS,  CHRISTIANA CARE RANKS AMONG THE LEADERS BY VOLUME IN SEVERAL CATEGORIES.

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Christiana Care

IN THE U.S.:

ON THE EAST COAST:

ADMISSIONS   21

ADMISSIONS   11

BIRTHS   33

BIRTHS   15

EMERGENCY VISITS   25

EMERGENCY VISITS   12

TOTAL SURGERIES   24

TOTAL SURGERIES   12


T H E C H R I ST I A N A CA R E WAY

e Center for Heart & Vascular Health  offers expert care in a nationally recognized program

FACTS & FIGURES OPEN-HEART CASES    588 VENTRICULAR ASSIST DEVICE CASES    3 TRANSAORITC VALVE  REPLACEMENT CASES    9 CARDIAC CATHETERIZATION CASES    4,790  ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY CASES

1,666 VASCULAR SURGERY CASES

1,504 VASCULAR INTERVENTION CASES

4,426 CARDIOVASCULAR NON INVASIVE STUDIES    21,606 VASCULAR ULTRASOUND STUDIES

30,837  CARDIAC REHABILITATION  MONITORED VISITS    17,876

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The Center for Heart & Vascular Health

Christiana Care’s Center for  Heart & Vascular Health is  the only center in the region  to integrate services under  one roof, including cardiac  surgery, vascular surgery,  vascular interventional  radiology, cardiology and  interventional nephrology.

AC H I E V E M E N T S

L E A D E R S I N CA R D I OVA S C U L A R CA R E Our prestigious cardiovascular program has earned a national reputation, with a  three-star rating for open-heart surgery from the Society of Thoracic Surgeons.  Christiana Care ranks in the top 2 percent in the United States for advanced heart  arrhythmia capabilities and is sixth in volume for stroke cases. We partner with our patients to achieve optimal heart and vascular health, through  the prevention of heart disease, planned care, emergency care, rehabilitation and  ongoing support.

Once again, Gold Seal of Approval as a Primary Stroke Center Christiana Care has earned continued Gold Seal of Approval for recertification as a  Primary Stroke Center by the Joint Commission, the leading accreditor of health care  organizations in America. The national agency recognized Christiana Care on the basis of an on-site evaluation  and demonstration of compliance with nationally developed standards for stroke care. This is Christiana Care’s second time achieving the honor.

“Providing patients with  exceptional stroke care  requires quick and efficient treatment because time lost is brain loss.” — ANTHONY E. MUNSON, M.D.

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Christiana Care

Christiana Care is a high-volume stroke center, ranking number 6 in the nation for  the number of people it treats. According to the latest Medicare data, Christiana Care treated 1,090 people in 2009. “This award of distinction validates all the hard work by our stroke and vascular care  team in implementing processes to help us consistently deliver quality care,” says  Anthony E. Munson, M.D., medical director, Stroke Program. “Providing patients with  exceptional stroke care requires quick and efficient treatment because time lost is brain loss.”


The award also notes the early recognition of stroke by paramedics in the  community who notify the Emergency Department to prepare the Stroke Alert Team for a patient’s arrival.

Gold Plus in stroke care from Get With The Guidelines Christiana Care’s Center for Heart  & Vascular Health has received the American Heart Association–American Stroke Association’s Get With The Guidelines–Stroke Gold Plus Quality Achievement Award. The award recognizes commitment and success in implementing excellent care, according to evidence-based guidelines, for patients who have had strokes.  Christiana Care achieved scores of  85 percent or higher for adherence to Stroke Quality Achievement indicators for two or more consecutive 12-month intervals and achieved compliance scores of 75 percent or higher for six of 10 Stroke Quality Measures, which include aggressive use of medications aimed at  reducing death and disability rates and improving the lives of patients who have had strokes.

“The Get With The Guidelines–Stroke Gold Plus Quality Achievement Award demonstrates Christiana Care’s commitment to being one of the top hospitals  in the country for providing aggressive, proven stroke care,” says Timothy J. Gardner, M.D., medical director of the Center for Heart & Vascular Health and past national president of the American Heart Association.

American Heart Association gold quality achievement in heart failure care For the third consecutive year, Christiana Care’s Center for Heart & Vascular Health has received the American Heart Association’s Get With The Guidelines– Heart Failure Gold Quality Achievement Award. The honor signifies that for at least  24 months Christiana Care has met an ambitious goal of treating patients with heart failure at a level of 85 percent  compliance with core standard levels  of care outline by the American Heart Association–American College of  Cardiology secondary prevention guidelines for patients with heart failure. Under this initiative, patients with heart failure work with a multidisciplinary team to improve their outcomes and  reduce readmissions to the hospital.  Patients also receive counseling on  smoking cessation, healthy eating and managing depression and anxiety.  When needed, patients receive referrals for follow-up home care. “Patients are getting the right care they need when they need it, resulting in  improved survival,” says Mitchell Saltzberg, M.D., medical director,  Heart Failure Program.

“The Get With The Guidelines–Stroke Gold Plus Quality  Achievement Award demonstrates Christiana Care’s commitment  to being one of the top hospitals in the country for providing  aggressive, proven stroke care.” — TIMOTHY J. GARDNER, M.D.

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The Center for Heart & Vascular Health AC H I E V E M E N T S

A lifeline for patients with end-stage heart failure The Center for Heart & Vascular Health is the first center in Delaware to offer the latest generation of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs), the most advanced technology for patients with end-stage heart failure short of a transplant. During surgery, an LVAD is attached to the patient’s heart and aorta, and the pump is placed in the patient’s chest. A battery-powered controlling device connects the pipe through a driveline, which  exits through the patient’s abdomen. The patient wears the controller on an external belt. The Crystal Trust provided funding to make this technology available at the Center for Heart & Vascular Health.

The Center for Heart & Vascular Health is the first in the state of Delaware to offer left ventricular assist devices to patients.

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Christiana Care


Highest-quality ranking from Society of Thoracic Surgeons For the third consecutive year, the  Center for Heart & Vascular Health has been awarded three stars—the highest designation for hospitals—from the  Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS). Fewer than 15 percent of heart programs in the United States achieve this status, widely considered the gold standard by which to evaluate surgical programs.  STS data show that Christiana Care  performs more than twice as many heart procedures than the national average.

“Our higher surgical volumes, combined with increasingly complex and challenging conditions in patients being operated on here, account for our national  leadership among heart programs,”  says Timothy Gardner, M.D., medical  director of the Center for Heart &  Vascular Health and past national  president of the American Heart  Association.

Heart valve replacement without open-heart surgery Christiana Care is among a select group of hospitals implanting the first heart valve replacement approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration that does not require open-heart surgery.

The Sapien Transcatheter Heart Valve  is a new option for patients with severe  aortic stenosis for whom surgery is too risky. As a top U.S. health system for  cardiac care, Christiana Care has the  patient volume, medical expertise,  equipment and facilities required to  implant the device. The procedure offers a less-traumatic  and potentially life-saving alternative for patients with age-related aortic stenosis,  a narrowing of the valve that allows blood to flow from the major artery of the heart. Because there is less stress on the body with the procedure than in open-heart surgery, patients recover  more quickly.

STAR unit steps up level of stroke care A new unit at Christiana Hospital offers highly specialized “stepdown” nursing  care for patients requiring more frequent monitoring, such as those who have had a stroke and those who have had neurointerventional procedures. “Christiana Care treats more than 1,000 stroke patients a year, sixth highest among U.S. health systems,” says Anthony E.  Munson, M.D., medical director, Stroke Program. “We believe the 6C stepdown unit is a significant step forward in enhancing the quality of care.” The stepdown unit is part of the Stroke Treatment and Rehabilitation (STAR) Unit. The unit provides care for patients with stroke and nontraumatic hemorrhages,  as well as interventional procedures, such  as carotid stents or coiling, a minimally  invasive endovascular procedure performed to treat a cerebral aneurysm.

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The Center for Heart & Vascular Health AC H I E V E M E N T S

Keeping a watchful eye on patients with heart failure through telemonitoring Patients with heart failure can stay at home and still get an extra layer of care through the Christiana Care Visiting Nurse Association telemonitoring  program. In the program, nurses from the  association work closely with patients to electronically monitor such vital signs as weight, blood pressure and oxygen levels in the blood so that patients can make adjustments as soon as their numbers  indicate a problem. Nurses also help patients to maintain heart-healthy diets and establish personal goals. In addition, monitored patients  are significantly less likely to require readmission to the hospital than those who are not monitored.

Navigating arrhythmia through stereotaxis The Gerret and Tatiana Copeland  Arrhythmia Center at the Center for Heart & Vascular Health is the only  center in Delaware to offer stereotaxis 

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Christiana Care

remote navigation, technology with  the capability to perform a new type  of ablation, a corrective procedure  that cures atrial fibrillation in up to  80 percent of patients who have it. Atrial fibrillation affects more than  2 million Americans and is difficult to treat. Stereotaxis remote navigation  creates real-time, three-dimensional  pictures that allow a cardiologist to diagnose and regulate the heart’s rhythm. What makes stereotaxis technology so revolutionary are magnetic fields that  allow physicians direct control of the tip of soft catheters. These extremely flexible and easily manipulated catheters allow physicians to work through patients’ veins more quickly and effectively.

Grant targets heart health of African-American teens and women Thanks to a grant of more than $152,000 from the AstraZeneca  HealthCare Foundation, Christiana Care’s Cardiovascular Outreach Prevention Program is better serving underserved, low-income African-American teens and adult women. The program

engages teens to increase both their knowledge and their confidence in their ability to make healthy lifestyle changes, as well as to teach them skills to improve the heart health of their mother or another important adult female in their lives.

Cardiology appointments and tests within 24 hours The Center for Heart & Vascular Health is making first-rate cardiology care more convenient and accessible for patients. At the Christiana Care Cardiology  Consultants Same Day Clinic at  Christiana Hospital, patients who have cardiovascular issues that require speedy attention can make appointments within 24 hours of their call. Most are scheduled the same day. Same-day cardiac diagnostic testing also is available. Christiana Care Cardiology Consultants also provide care at the Smyrna Health & Wellness Center. Cardiologists work with primary care physicians to coordinate primary and cardiac care, provide a direct link to advanced heart support through the Center for Heart & Vascular Health, and provide pacemaker and defibrillator management.


Our cardiologists work with primary care physicians to coordinate care for their patients, providing a direct link to advanced heart support.

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The Center for Heart & Vascular Health AC H I E V E M E N T S

William Weintraub, M.D.

Dr. Weintraub attends White House briefing on “Million Hearts” campaign William S. Weintraub, M.D., the John H. Ammon Chair of Cardiology at Christiana Care and president-elect of the American Heart Association Great Rivers Affiliate, was one of 70 experts  invited to the White House in February for a briefing on cardiovascular health as part of American Heart Month. Dr. Weintraub, also the director of the Christiana Care Center for Outcomes Research, participated in a workshop  on the “Million Hearts” campaign, a  national initiative to prevent 1 million heart attacks and strokes over the next five years. The initiative brings together communities, health systems, nonprofits, federal agencies and private-sector  partners from across the nation to fight heart disease and stroke.

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Successful treatment for chronic deep vein thrombosis Patients with post-thrombotic syndrome are getting relief from pain and an improved quality of life through treatment with minimally invasive interventional radiology techniques. “Many people suffering from postthrombotic syndrome once heard that  no treatment options were available to treat their clots and help to relieve their symptoms, but that is no longer true,” says Mark J. Garcia, M.D., chief of  Vascular Interventional Radiology at Christiana Care’s Center for Heart & Vascular Health. About half the people who have deep vein thrombosis develop post-thrombotic syndrome, characterized by leg pain, swelling, fatigue and skin changes. In a three-year study, more than 100  patients with the condition received  minimally invasive treatments to relieve blockages and restore blood flow, with  93 percent reporting significant improvement, Dr. Garcia announced at the 2011 annual meeting of the Society of Interventional Radiology in San Francisco.

A pioneer in stent system for peripheral artery disease Christiana Care is one of the first health care systems in the United States to take part in a unique international medical trial involving a stent system developed in Japan for treating peripheral artery disease, which restricts blood flow to  extremities. Named OSPREY—for Occlusive/Stenotic Peripheral artery REvascularization studY—the initiative focuses on a flexible stent system for use in the superficial femoral artery, a long, curvy artery in  the thigh. Traditional stents typically are not flexible enough to fit in that artery. Patients have reported immediate and significant reduction in cramping, pain and leg fatigue.


Research at the Center for Heart & Vascular Health

Dr. Weintraub, ASCERT study in national spotlight

Among the elite in clinical heart failure research centers

Older patients with clogged heart arteries have less risk of dying over time if they undergo bypass operations instead of  angioplasty and stent placement,  according to a study led by William S. Weintraub, M.D., John H. Ammon Chair of Cardiology at Christiana Care and director of the Christiana Care  Center for Outcomes Research.

Christiana Care is teaming with two  major Philadelphia health systems to form a new National Institutes of Health Heart Failure Clinical Research Center.

In a bypass, physicians move healthy  vessels from other parts of the body to detour around clogged arteries. In angioplasty, a tiny balloon pushed through a vessel is inflated to flatten the clog and a stent is placed to hold the artery open.

The seven-year project focuses on small to intermediate randomized clinical trials devoted to improving outcomes for  patients with heart failure. Christiana Care’s Heart Failure Program will provide scientific leadership and team with Thomas Jefferson University and Temple University to pool data from patients as one of nine regional centers collaborating as a national network.

Researchers compared these approaches using records on 190,000 patients with two or three blockages in the largest study ever of this issue, titled “Survival After PCI or CABG in Older Patients With Stable Multivessel Coronary  Disease: Results From the ACCF-STS Database Collaboration on the Comparative Effectiveness of Revascularization Strategies,” or ASCERT. Death rates were about equal one year  after either treatment. But after four years, nearly 21 percent of the patients who underwent angioplasty had died, compared with 16 percent of patients who underwent bypass surgery. Results were discussed in March at an American College of Cardiology conference in Chicago and published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

The principal investigator is William  Weintraub, M.D., the John H. Ammon Chair of Cardiology and CCOR director. The American College of Cardiology, in partnership with the Society of Thoracic Surgeons, received the grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood  Institute of the National Institutes of Health.

Dr. Weintraub authors JAMA study William S. Weintraub, M.D., the John H. Ammon Chair of Cardiology at Christiana Care, is an author of a study in published in the October 5, 2011,  issue of JAMA (formerly known as  the Journal of the American Medical Association) showing that older, lowerrisk patients undergoing elective  percutaneous coronary intervention  can be safely discharged from the  hospital on the same day that they  undergo the procedure. Among selected patients eligible for Medicare, same-day discharge is still  uncommon, but investigators observed nearly equivalent rates of hospitalization and mortality at two days and at 30 days when compared with patients who stayed overnight.

Study compares effectiveness of cardiac procedures The Christiana Care Center for  Outcomes Research (CCOR) shares in  a $4.026 million grant in a pioneering study that compares the effectiveness of catheter-based and surgery-based cardiac procedures. The research compares data from more than 10 million patients and will help physicians to improve care for people with coronary artery disease.

The study evaluated the prevalence and outcomes of same-day discharge among 107,018 patients age 65 years or older undergoing elective percutaneous  coronary intervention in the United States. Data were collected from the American College of Cardiology  CathPCI Registry (November 2004  to December 2008), which includes Christiana Care’s Center for Heart & Vascular Health, and were linked with Medicare Part A claims.

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T H E C H R I ST I A N A CA R E WAY

e Helen F. Graham Cancer Center  is transforming cancer care

FACTS & FIGURES PATIENT VISITS    196,706 NEWLY DIAGONSED AND/OR NEWLY TREATED PATIENTS

3,100 RADIOLOGY ONCOLOGY VISITS

2,057 ExTERNAL BEAM TREATMENTS

31,584 PATIENTS ENROLLED IN  CLINICAL TRIALS    748

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The Helen F. Graham Cancer Center

One of the most technologically advanced and largest cancer  programs on the East Coast,  the Helen F. Graham Cancer Center recorded more than 195,000 visits last year from  patients who benefit from a unique model of care that  includes a patient-navigation system and quick access to a world-class team of cancer  specialists.

AC H I E V E M E N T S

A NAT I O NA L M O D E L F O R CA R E The Helen F. Graham Cancer Center is one of the original National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Center Program sites selected in the United States and is a national model for other health systems to follow, with a patient accrual rate into clinical trials that is six times the national average. Our passion for delivering the highest-quality care is reflected in advanced medical  technology, an on-site laboratory that allows researchers and oncologists to collaborate  in developing unique treatments for individual patients, and a comprehensive slate of services to make diagnosis and treatment as convenient and comfortable as possible.

Leading the way in reducing cancer and saving lives in Delaware The Helen F. Graham Cancer Center is leading the way in the state’s dramatically  declining cancer rate and in deaths from cancer, through evidence-based medicine,  research and community outreach.

“Cancer deaths per capita are falling faster in Delaware than anywhere else in the country.” — NICHOLAS J. PETRELLI, M.D.

Delaware was formerly first in the nation in both rates of cancer incidence and  mortality. The cancer death rate in Delaware dropped 18 percent from 1993-1997 to 2003-2007, according to the report “Cancer Incidence and Mortality in Delaware, 2003-2007.” Delaware’s progress outpaces the U.S. rate of a 12.1 percent drop during the same 10-year period. Between 1993-1997 and 2003-2007, Delaware’s all-site cancer mortality rate for males decreased 22.4 percent, compared with a decrease in the U.S. rate of 15.7 percent.  During the same period, Delaware’s all-site cancer mortality rate for females decreased 15.2 percent, compared with a decrease in the national rate of 10.9 percent. The most impressive results have been in colorectal cancer. The Delaware Cancer  Consortium, formed in 2001 to advise the governor and lawmakers on ways to reduce cancer rates, prioritized screening for colorectal cancer through colonoscopies and  sigmoidoscopies.  CONTINUED 2 0 1 2  Ye a r   i n   Revie w 

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The Helen F. Graham Cancer Center AC H I E V E M E N T S This initiative has decreased both the  incidence and death rate from colorectal cancer and has eliminated ethnic  disparities through outreach and  education efforts. “Cancer deaths per capita are falling faster in Delaware than anywhere else in the country,” says Nicholas J. Petrelli, M.D., Bank of America endowed  medical director of the Helen F. Graham Cancer Center. “That is due, in part,  to effective screening programs that are diagnosing more cancers at an earlier, more curable stage.” Dr. Petrelli also credits the work of  Community Health Outreach and  Education Program navigators, a team dedicated to helping Delawareans learn more about what causes cancer and the risk factors involved.

Nicholas J. Petrelli, M.D., medical director of the Helen F. Graham Cancer Center, greeting cancer survivor Regina Marini.

Additionally, Delaware is a leader in laws and policies that save lives and money by funding screenings for breast, cervical and colorectal cancer, as well as offering tobacco prevention initiatives, according to the American Cancer Society. Last year, the adult smoking rate dropped to 17.8 percent, the lowest in state history. PATIENT VISITS TO THE HELEN F. GRAHAM CA NC E R C E NTE R FROM 2003 TO 2011 200,000 thousand

196,706 >

100,000

60,112 >

American Cancer Society Hometown Heroes The American Cancer Society honored its Hometown Heroes, local advocates  and volunteers who have helped the organization save more lives from cancer.  Honorees are Bill Bowser, Esq., recognized for his work with the Delaware  Cancer Consortium; Nora Katurakes, RN, for community outreach and her  impact on the community; and Stephen Grubbs, M.D., for work with the Delaware Cancer Consortium. Congressman John Carney was also honored. Nicholas Petrelli, M.D., Bank of America endowed medical director of the  Helen F. Graham Cancer Center, presented the award. Hometown Heroes honorees Bill Bowser, Esq., Stephen Grubbs, M.D., Nora Katurakes, RN, OCN, and Nicholas Petrelli, M.D., Bank of America endowed medical director of the Helen F. Graham Cancer Center, who presented the award.

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Christiana Care’s Bone Marrow Transplant Program Team

Leading-edge technology in mammography The Christiana Care Breast Center at  the Helen F. Graham Cancer Center is the first center in Delaware to offer breast tomosynthesis, a 3-D screening and diagnostic technology that acquires images of a breast at multiple angles  during a short scan. The individual  images are then reconstructed into a  series of thin, high-resolution slices, which can be displayed individually or  in a series. Tomosynthesis virtually eliminates  detection challenges associated with overlapping structures in the breast, which is the primary drawback of conventional mammography. In addition, tomosynthesis makes it easier to view lesions and margins, as well as localized structures in the breast. This enhanced accuracy means fewer patients need further testing. The technology also greatly increases cancer detection. In an analysis  presented at the 2011 conference of the Radiological Society of North America, tomosynthesis resulted in a relative  increase of 47 percent in detecting  cancer, compared with two-dimensional mammography alone.

Bone marrow program receives accreditation It’s a fact. Christiana Care’s Bone  Marrow Transplant Program is accredited by the Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy (FACT). That  underscores the high level of training,  education and experience among the physicians and staff members at the  Helen F. Graham Cancer Center, says Frank Beardell, M.D., director of the Bone Marrow Transplant Program. In addition, the National Marrow Donor Program recognized Christiana Care as  a national performance leader in the  collection of bone marrow for 2011,  for excellence in meeting service and quality indicators for donor care,  product integrity, data submission  and overall service.

Advanced four-dimensional program offers more accurate radiation treatment The Helen F. Graham Cancer Center is one of only a handful of institutions in the United States to install RayStation, four-dimensional software for radiotherapy treatment planning that provides more accurate radiation treatments for patients with cancer. The fourth dimension is time, meaning that the software uses special adaptive techniques to adjust for anatomical changes that can occur in both tumors and surrounding normal  tissues over time during the course of treatment, allowing far greater control  in targeting the tumor while sparing  normal tissue.

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The Helen F. Graham Cancer Center AC H I E V E M E N T S Jennifer Sims-Mourtada, Ph.D., and Firas Mourtada M.S.E., Ph.D., D. ABR

Christiana Care and Wistar Institute forge historic partnership The partnership between the Helen F. Graham Cancer Center and the Wistar Institute leverages the strengths of both institutions to benefit patients in Delaware and the surrounding region with the very latest in cancer research. The Graham Cancer Center and the  Wistar Institute, an international leader in biomedical research, are collaborating on translational cancer research with the  goal of bringing the latest discoveries in research to patients in the community. The partnership combines Wistar’s strengths in basic biomedical research with the Graham Cancer Center’s exceptional cancer treatment and patient care. The goal is to “translate” or advance  research discoveries made in Wistar’s labs into early-phase (phase I and II) clinical trials with patients at the Graham Cancer Center. Areas of initial research in the partnership focus on colon cancer stem cells, targeted treatments for melanoma and novel  approaches for molecular profiling, and treatment of advanced and metastatic  disease. Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related deaths. Currently, there is no clinically effective way to screen for lung cancer at an early stage. Recently, Louise C. Showe, Ph.D., a  Wistar professor, showed that it is  possible to detect early-stage non-small cell lung cancer by examining changes  in gene activity in white blood cells. By partnering with the Helen F. Graham Cancer Center and Temple University,  she aims to streamline blood collection and analysis to develop a commercially  viable test.

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Husband-and-wife scientists join Helen F. Graham Cancer Center

Trail-blazing Community Cancer Center

Jennifer Sims-Mourtada, Ph.D., is the Helen F. Graham Cancer Center senior clinical scientist for the Center for  Translational Cancer Research, continuing her pioneering investigation into why some cancers are resistant to treatment and her work in developing the imaging tools to target them for destruction. She  is former director of Molecular Research and Development at RadioMedix, Inc.  in Houston.

The Helen F. Graham Cancer Center  is a pioneer in speeding research and  raising the quality of care for underserved patients in the groundbreaking National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program.

Her husband, Firas Mourtada M.S.E., Ph.D., D. ABR, is the new chief of  Clinical Physics in Radiation Oncology. Previously, he was an associate professor  at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. 

One of the original 16 of only 21 cancer centers in the United States chosen for the program, the Graham Cancer Center is a leader in enhanced quality of care for  patients and advances in cancer research. As a result, more patients have access  to innovative treatments in clinical  trials. The ultimate vision is a dynamic  national network of community cancer centers engaged in research that will  provide the latest evidence-based treatment for patients of all ethnic and  economic backgrounds.


Research at the Helen F. Graham Cancer Center

At a rate of 24 percent, Christiana Care’s  Helen F. Graham  Cancer Center has one of the highest patient accrual rates into cancer clinical trials in the United States, far above the national average  of 4 percent.

In cancer control trials, we are number 1 Christiana Care’s Community Clinical Oncology Program is one of the nation’s top enrollers in cancer clinical trials in the newly formed Alliance for Clinical Trials in  Oncology. Christiana Care is ranked number 1 in cancer control trials that seek to prevent  cancer or control its incidence, and Christian Care ranks sixth in enrolling patients  in treatment trials. Combined, the Christiana Care program ranks third of 210  participating organizations.

Christiana Care leads colorectal cancer trial The Helen F. Graham Cancer Center is leading a national clinical trial to determine  if Crestor, the cholesterol-lowering drug rosuvastatin, can prevent new tumors from forming after colon cancer surgery. Bruce Boman, M.D, Ph.D., director of Cancer  Genetics & Stem Cell Biology at the Helen F. Graham Cancer Center, is the national principal investigator of the study. The study seeks to determine if Crestor can stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes that affect cell growth. The trial will also determine if Crestor can keep new tumors from forming after surgery to remove a patient’s initial colon cancer. Named “P-5: Statin Polyp Prevention Trial in Patients with Resected Colon Cancer,” the study is conducted under the National Cancer Institute by a network of cancer  research professionals, the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project.  It takes place at more than 200 medical centers throughout North America.

Helen F. Graham Cancer Center researchers tapped to lead Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology Christiana Care Medical Oncologist Stephen S. Grubbs, M.D., and Cancer Research Director Kandie Dempsey, MS, RN, were named to  leadership roles with the newly formed Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology. Additional  physician investigators from the Helen F. Graham Cancer Center will serve on Alliance committees. The Alliance merges three National Cancer  Institute funded research cooperative groups: Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB), North Central Cancer Treatment Group (NCCTC), and the American College of Surgeons Oncology Group (ACOSOG).

Bruce Boman, M.D, Ph.D., in the lab 2 0 1 2  Ye a r   i n   Revie w 

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Research at the Helen F. Graham Cancer Center

$2.5 million funds research in artificial salivary glands A research team at the Helen F. Graham Cancer Center and the Center for  Translational Cancer Research plays a key role in a prestigious National Institutes  of Health research project grant of $2.5 million to continue groundbreaking work into the creation of artificial salivary glands. “The purpose of our project is to relieve the debilitating lack of saliva in a patient who has undergone radiation treatments for throat cancer,” says Robert Witt, M.D., chief of the Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Oncology Clinic at Graham Cancer Center and the clinician-scientist principal investigator in the four-year initiative. “These patients have lost the ability to swallow properly and enjoy food and  liquids. They suffer from a lack of taste and are prone to many dental problems.” Already, the team has discovered a laboratory technique for isolating salivary acinar cells in culture. Acinar cells are the  basic building blocks of salivary glands.  Researchers then stimulate the cultured cells with neurotransmitters that support their ability to make water and enzymes. Encasing the cells in an absorbable matrix of hyaluronic acid allows them to grow toward each other and differentiate into structures that are necessary for producing saliva. Ultimately, physicians will reimplant the patients’ own cells back into their damaged salivary glands when radiation is complete. Magnified view of salivary spheroid growing hyaluronic-based hydrogel.

Robert Witt, M.D., and Swati Pradhan Bhatt, Ph.D., research artificial salivary glands. 18

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Clinical studies target breast and lung cancers Two clinical trials in the treatment of breast cancer at the Helen F. Graham Cancer Center are showing great promise in keeping the disease from spreading. In one trial, the drug trastuzumab is linked with an antibody called pertuzumab to create a dual blockade against breast  cancer. In another trial, trastuzumab and  a toxin, maytansine, form a compound that targets and poisons cancer cells while sparing healthy cells. Patients with widespread lung cancer that no longer responds to first-line  therapy can benefit from a combination of erlotinib and the chemical ARQ-197, which targets two different pathways for tumor growth. Spheroids of salivary gland cells releasing the enzyme alpha-amylase in a red stain to show their functionality.

Studies advance therapies to treat melanoma Patients at the Helen F. Graham Cancer Center are helping scientists crack  the code for treating drug-resistant melanoma, the deadliest of skin cancers, by donating tumor samples for study  at the Wistar Institute’s Melanoma  Research Center in Philadelphia, home to the world’s largest melanoma cell  collection. “We are providing tumor samples mostly from patients with advanced disease,  an area where more melanoma research  is needed,” explains Michael Guarino, M.D., director of Pharmaceutical  Clinical Trials. “What is essentially surgical waste potentially could lead scientists to important new discoveries, and we  are in on this right at the ground level.”

Student researchers are stars at health sciences symposium In a separate collaboration, Dr. Guarino anticipates a new clinical trial for  difficult-to-treat melanoma will open for patients at the Graham Cancer Center as a member of Academic and Community Cancer Research Group United, a  clinical research group of some 60  centers in North America.

$1 million funds research for lung cancer test Clinicians at the Helen F. Graham  Cancer Center have joined scientists  at the Wistar Institute and Temple  University to develop the world’s first practical blood test for lung cancer.  A $1 million grant to fund the project for two years comes from Pennsylvania’s Commonwealth Universal Research  Enhancement Program.

Three students at Christiana Care’s  Center for Translational Cancer  Research are award winners at the Delaware Health Sciences Alliance  annual research symposium for their work at the Helen F. Graham Cancer Center. Swati Pradhan Bhatt, Ph.D., and  Vignesh Viswanathan, M.Sc., tied for first place for their posters. Dr. Bhatt  is working on developing an artificial salivary gland. Viswanathan’s research  focuses on colon cancer. Seema Bhatlekar, M.Sc., placed second for  her poster on the role of genetics in  the regulation of stem cell populations  in normal and malignant colon tissue.

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Research at the Helen F. Graham Cancer Center

A team effort in the fight against cancer

Advancing toward better tests for cancer genes

The Center for Translational Cancer  Research at the Helen F. Graham Cancer Center is a dynamic, comprehensive  cancer program that highlights prevention, treatment and laboratory research. A collaborative effort, the center team  includes the University of Delaware, Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital  for Children, and the Delaware  Biotechnology Institute, all of which share a common vision for making great strides in cancer research and treatment.

People who are at higher genetic risk  for colon cancer and other cancers could gain essential information as a result of  a study at the Center for Translational Cancer Research at the Helen F. Graham Cancer Center. The study focuses on MSH2 and MLH1 genes, commonly known as mismatch repair genes. Four  of five people with these genes develop cancer.

National Cancer Institute funding advances research The Helen F. Graham Cancer Center is the recipient of $2.8 million from the National Cancer Institute to expand  cancer research. The money is funding community outreach programs,  initiatives aimed at reducing health  care disparities, and efforts to leverage  information technology to benefit  patient safety and enhance survivorship and palliative care. The award also  promotes genetic counseling, breast  cancer research and smoking-cessation  programs for cancer survivors.

The National Cancer Institute awarded $2.8 million dollars to the Graham Cancer Center to expand cancer research.

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The goal is to develop a cheaper, faster blood test to identify individuals who are at risk. Researchers are examining blood samples from patients in the Graham Cancer Center’s Familial Cancer Risk  Assessment Program.

Cancer Genome Atlas charts genetics The Helen F. Graham Cancer Center collects and stores human tissue samples to help scientists learn more about the growth and development of cancer 

through a $4.6 million, four-year role  in the Cancer Genome Atlas Project.  The massive, federally funded project aims to speed up scientific insight  into the molecular basis of cancer so physicians can ultimately diagnose  diseases and treat patients on the basis  of their genetic profiles.

Gene therapy a historic first in Delaware The Helen F. Graham Cancer Center  is one of only 11 sites nationwide and the first East Coast center selected to  participate in an early-phase study  focusing on using genetically engineered cells from the patient’s own blood to  create a personalized melanoma vaccine. A specially designed pill controls the  vaccine’s anti-tumor action. The trial  is open for patients with stage 3 or  4 melanoma whose cancer has not  responded well to chemotherapy or  other treatments and who have tumors accessible for biopsy.


T H E C H R I ST I A N A CA R E WAY

Community Care provides education, outreach and charity care to our neighbors

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Community Care AC H I E V E M E N T S

In fiscal year 2012,  Christiana Care provided  the community with  approximately $28.1  million in charity care. 

A TRADITION OF GIVING Christiana Care exists to take care of our neighbors in our community. Our ability  to deliver on this promise is embodied in the extraordinary talent and dedication of  our physicians, surgeons, nurses, health care professionals, community outreach  coordinators and administrative staff members. Our growing national reputation enables us to attract some of the best health  care specialists in the country. The generous support of our partners in business,  government and the community helps us expand and enhance the care we provide  to all community members, regardless of their ability to pay. In fiscal year 2012, Christiana Care provided the community with approximately  $28.1 million in charity care. Each year, our Wilmington Hospital Health Center  alone provides primary and specialty medical care for more than 74,000 patient visits.  The Helen F. Graham Cancer Center’s Community Health Outreach and Education Program is dedicated to helping Delawareans learn more about what causes cancer.  We also provide information about healthy behaviors and make it easier for people  to get the tests and the care that they need. Every day, professionals throughout Christiana Care demonstrate their exceptional  commitment through innovative programs, initiatives and partnerships. The new  Christiana Care Value Institute represents the next level in patient-focused care,  balancing safety, quality and cost to benefit both patients and the community.

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P E D I AT R I C CA R E

S E N I O R CA R E

25 years of miracle babies

Christiana Care participates in home care program for seniors

Parents can count on the expertise of  the Christiana Care Neonatal Transport Team, which has been saving newborns for 25 years by providing advanced care where the baby is born or by transporting the baby to a hospital that offers a more advanced level of care. Established by Christiana Care and the State of Delaware, the team’s special  ambulance is an intensive care unit on wheels, equipped with the latest technologies, including mobile ventilators, incubators, monitors, intravenous  infusion pumps and a mobile cooling blanket to help stabilize the condition of a baby who is sick. To date, the team has transported more than 7,000 infants.

A lifesaving link in a pediatric emergency care network Each year, more than 15,000 patients  age 15 and younger seek treatment at Christiana Care’s Emergency Department facilities at Christiana and  Wilmington hospitals. Now, through  a new network, the hospital emergency departments will be able to save the lives of even more children. Overall death rates through the Delaware Trauma System—a network of the Delaware Division of Public Health— have been cut by 40 percent, thanks to the efforts of emergency department health care staff at those hospitals. Delaware recently launched the Pediatric Emergency Care Facility Recognition Program and became only the fifth state to create a standard of care that includes equipment, protocols, staffing and  continuing education.

Christiana Care is one of only 16 health care providers nationwide selected to participate in a new home care program for chronically ill seniors. Called the Independence at Home Demonstration Project, the three-year program from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services tests whether  delivering primary care services in the home can lead to better health outcomes and reduce costs for patients living with multiple chronic illnesses. Christiana Care was selected from a  pool of more than 130 applicants representing hundreds of health care providers interested in the delivery of this new model of care.

Visiting Nurse Association behavioral health program improves quality of life for seniors Elderly patients with depression and  anxiety are much less likely to require hospitalization or engage in disruptive behavior when they receive home-based behavioral health care, according to the outcomes of a pioneering program by  the Christiana Care Visiting Nurse  Association.

as a trusted resource for patients and their loved ones. The nurse ensures that  a patient is taking his or her medication properly. On the basis of observations, the nurse also will contact the patient’s physician to suggest a change in a  prescription or its dosage. After a year in the program, patients’ outcomes significantly improve. Of the patients who had been experiencing  anxiety in 2011, none required admission to the hospital for behavioral issues, 17 percent had decreased anxiety and  78 percent were emotionally stable.

Improving mobility, memory and function of seniors The Acute Care for the Elderly Unit at Christiana Hospital has launched TAPE (Tailored Activities Program for the  Elderly), an initiative whose goal is to improve patients’ mobility and function, maintain and improve memory and  attention, and decrease behavioral symptoms associated with dementia. Activities include an All About Me poster, life  history, crafts, a walking and mobility program, and games, including bingo and Wii electronic activities.

That is, in part, because a trained psychiatric nurse sees things in the home that aren’t immediately apparent in the  physician’s office or during a brief  hospital stay. By identifying problems and intervening sooner, the nurse can help patients can avoid readmission to the hospital or visits to the Emergency Department. The nurse is trained in  cognitive behavioral therapy and serves

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Community Care AC H I E V E M E N T S PAT I E N T S F I R S T

Care centers on the patient and the family The Christiana Care Way addresses the needs of patients and their loved ones. “Patient- and family-centered care is an approach to the planning, delivery and evaluation of health care that is grounded in mutually beneficial partnerships among health care providers, patients and families,” says Janice Nevin, M.D., chief medical officer. Core concepts include sharing information and empowering families to be  partners in care. These principles are  behind initiatives in Wilmington and Christiana hospitals, including: • AIDET (“acknowledge, introduce,  duration, explanation and thank you,”) a communication tool that ensures that patients and visitors feel welcome  and at ease, and that promotes open communication among families and hospital staff members • Bedside shift reporting, which eases patient anxiety and engages the  patient and family in decision making • Hourly rounding, a practice that helps nurses and support staff members better anticipate and meet patient needs • Patient whiteboards, a shared  communication tool that invites everyone involved in the patient’s care to communicate openly.

In-patient hospice care Christiana Hospital is serving patients  nearing the end of their lives and their  families with a new in-patient hospice unit. Operated by Seasons Hospice & Palliative Care, the unit features 12 private rooms with wheelchair-accessible bathrooms, plus a family dayroom and dining area in a home-like setting where families can stay with their loved one 24 hours a day. 24 

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Medical Home without Walls reaches ‘super users’ Christiana Care is launching an initiative to reach “super users” of the acute care system, a group of patients who comprise less than 10 percent of all patients but account for more than 20 percent of  all visits. The Medical Home without Walls  program is modeled on a successful  program in Camden, N.J., that reduced health care costs by 56 percent by  dramatically decreasing the need for emergency care. A dedicated multidisciplinary team identifies super users and works with the individual to connect them with a medical home, coordinate their clinical care and address their psychological and social needs. In its initial stage, the program will focus on patients who do not have health insurance.

Value Institute symposium highlights the patient The medical profession must refocus  attention on the patient to deliver quality care at greater value. That message came through loud and clear at the Christiana Care Value Institute’s inaugural symposium, “Value: Medicine’s New Frontier,” held April 30. The Value Institute’s inaugural symposium speakers

More than 200 health care experts from top institutions in the nation discussed how returning���to the basics of medicine— listening to the patient, better use of resources and a greater emphasis on quality and safety—can transform patient care and deliver far greater value. Christiana Care established the Value Institute in 2012 to study and design solutions to the questions of value in the real-world settings of health care delivery. The institute aims to implement strategies to achieve better health outcomes at lower costs.

Christiana Care welcomes patient and family advisers Volunteer advisers are helping hospital staff members gain insights and make suggestions on how to better care for  patients and their families. More than  40 advisers are serving in various areas, among them the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Christiana Hospital, the Helen F. Graham Cancer Center, and the Center for Rehabilitation and the Intensive Care Unit at Wilmington Hospital. “This is an opportunity for us to advance our goal to better work with patients rather than for patients and their families,” says Diane Bohner, M.D., medical director of Patient and Family Centered Care and Resource Management.


WO M E N ’ S H E A LT H

Excellence in Women’s Health Christiana Care has been recognized  by the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services as the region’s only  National Community Center of  Excellence in Women’s Health. The  designation of excellence is based on • Improving the health and well-being of women through partnership with community-based organizations • Providing integrated, coordinated care with strong links to existing community programs • Offering comprehensive care in a  way that reduces fragmentation and recognizes the complexity of women’s lives Additionally, Christiana Care provides excellent clinical and preventive services, training for health care professionals, and public outreach and education, as well as research into women’s health.

Expectant mothers get flu vaccine To protect mothers and their babies from influenza, Christiana Care’s Delaware Center for Maternal & Fetal Medicine is administering the flu vaccine to pregnant patients. Even healthy women with low-risk  pregnancies can develop serious  complications after contracting the flu. Last year, only 49 percent of mothersto-be in the United States received  vaccination, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Among local patients, 80 percent of women  offered the vaccine chose to receive it.

Healthy Beginnings is 5 years old and growing More than 4,000 expectant moms have participated in Christiana Care’s Healthy Beginnings since the program was born five years ago. Healthy Beginnings was established to address Delaware’s high infant mortality rate among women at risk for problem pregnancies. In 2011, nearly 1,000 women were enrolled in the program. Healthy Beginnings’ holistic approach to prenatal care addresses housing, relationships and other issues, in addition to health. Women receive care from a team that includes obstetricians and nurses, a registered dietician, a clinical social worker and a perinatal educator.

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Community Care AC H I E V E M E N T S DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION

Reaching out to the Chinese community Reaching Delaware’s population of  Chinese immigrants is not an easy task because they are spread out in various communities instead of clustered in neighborhoods. So xiangfen “Fen” Gu, an outreach and education worker, goes directly to the people, visiting Chinese restaurants. Many restaurateurs and their workers are not insured. Most do not speak English. Gu, who is bilingual, educates Chinese people about free screenings and other resources available through the Helen F. Graham Cancer Center. She also focuses on houses of worship and other places people gather. At the New Castle  Chinese Evangelical Church, 48 women received information about breast cancer screening during 2012. One Friday each month, members of the outreach team visit the New Castle Farmers Market, where there a number of Asian vendors. On March 10, a health fair reached more than 65 people at the Chinese American Community Center in Hockessin.

Christiana Care reaches out to Hispanic neighbors By providing free tests and bilingual  education in a community setting,  Christiana Care and partners are working together to remove barriers to care in the Hispanic community. Through Christiana Care, Latinas are learning about breast health and cancer screenings, essential information they can share as “promotoras”—promoters of health education—to Delaware’s rapidly growing Hispanic community. At the Vive tu Vida—“Get Up, Get Moving”—

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event  in Kennett Square, Christiana Care partnered with La Comunidad  Hispana, a social service agency, to promote exercise and heart health. “Latinas Fuertes Y Saludables”—“Latinas: Strong and Healthy”—is an annual breast health and life-affirming event for Hispanic women, who are empowered with  education about healthy living and  encouraged to share their knowledge with others. Our bilingual outreach staff and community partners make these  programs a success.

We’re diverse—and inclusive At Christiana Care’s Center for  Diversity, Cultural Competency and Communications, interpreters and  dual handset phones empower patients and health care providers to access  interpreters in more than 150 languages, 24 hours a day. Most documents are available in Spanish. And there is a  Spanish-language version of the  Christiana Care website at http://es.christianacare.org. The Diversity & Inclusion Council addresses the needs of an increasingly diverse population of patients and staff members. Christiana Care has been recognized as a 

“Leader in LGBT Healthcare Equality”  in the Healthcare Equality Index 2012  report, an annual survey conducted by the Human Rights Campaign Foundation.

Project SEARCH earns community partner award from Goodwill Christiana Care is the recipient of the 2011 Community Partner of the Year Award from Goodwill of Delaware and Delaware County. The award recognizes Christiana Care’s leadership in partnership with Goodwill, the Red Clay Consolidated School  District and the Delaware Departments of Labor and Education to be the  inaugural employer in the state to host Project SEARCH. This innovative,  nine-month school-to-work program  enables students with intellectual  disabilities to obtain real-life work  experiences, combined with training in employability and independent living skills to make successful transitions  from school to productive adult life. Gov. Jack Markell visited the Project SEARCH classroom at Christiana  Hospital in March, where he praised the unique collaboration of government, business, education and the community.


O U T R E AC H

Christiana Care enhances partnership with Westside Family Healthcare Christiana Care is partnering with  Westside Family Healthcare in a transformational initiative that will provide an  innovative model for both communitybased primary care and physician training.

hospital treatment programs for drug use, alcohol abuse or mental health issues. Patients with addictions are frequently admitted to hospitals, and their care is expensive. Project Engage is designed to intervene earlier and to help patients overcome obstacles to recovery, such as housing, insurance and transportation. In the first six months after discharge, readmissions for 30 patients decreased  48 percent, an estimated savings of $6,000 per patient in health care costs.

Under the new initiative, two family medicine faculty members will split time between Christiana Care and Westside for combined academic–clinical roles. Resource manual focuses on These positions and the higher level of domestic violence collaboration they enable will expand Christiana Care’s ability to provide  Health care professionals now have  family medicine services and training at a manual that provides them with  Westside and help residents gain insights information to help them with the and experience in providing care in  screening and treatment of patients  traditionally underserved communities. involved in domestic violence. The initiative is The Domestic Violence consistent with Resource Manual for Healthcare reforms under Our collaboration Professionals, designed by the the Affordable with Westside Family Domestic Violence Coordinating Care Act. The Healthcare will Council, in partnership with partnership also expand our care Christiana Care and the Medical provides a trainin traditionally Society of Delaware, educates ing ground for underserved providers on the signs of domesnurse practitioncommunities. tic violence, the unique medical ers and physician and mental health needs of  assistants to help victims, and the resources  meet the primary available to patients. care needs of  patients.

An engaging approach to addiction outreach Project Engage takes a dynamic, fresh  approach to treating addiction through on-site peer-to-peer engagement specialists at Christiana and Wilmington  hospitals who counsel patients while  they are still in the hospital, when studies say efforts are more successful. A social worker also links patients to after-

Christiana Care number 1 in tri-state region in organ donations Of the 130 hospitals in the tri-state  region served by the Gift of Life Donor Program, Christiana Care ranks first in the number of families that have chosen to donate organs. In 2011, 45 donors and their families gave 141 patients the lifesaving gift of a heart, lung, liver, pancreas or kidney. 

Another 94 donated bone, skin, cornea and heart-valve tissue benefiting 6,000 patients, a record level of participation from the communities Christiana Care serves. The success of the program stems from Christiana Care’s strong support of the donation and transplantation process, and the collaboration of Christiana Care’s critical care teams and Gift of  Life staff members.

TECHNOLOGY

Meaningful use of electronic health record energizes safe, efficient, high-quality care On the great frontier of health care  reform, Christiana Care is making  strides with Meaningful Use, a powerful initiative that harnesses the electronic health record system to give providers  the information they need to deliver  the best possible care. Christiana Care has completed stage 1 of the extensive certification process, well before the  January 1, 2013, deadline to receive  the government’s full incentive. The measure will provide $18.3 million in stimulus money for Medicare and Medicaid payments to the health system and 150 medical providers who are able to demonstrate meaningful use of health technology. The initiative is part of the Health Information Technology for  Economic and Clinical Health Act. Already in place are computerized provider order entry and electronic  medication administration record. Electronic procedures enhance patient safety and make the system more efficient by reducing duplications and errors. The goal is to have the entire health care  system ordering, delivering and verifying tests and medications electronically.  2 0 1 2  Ye a r   i n   Revie w 

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Community Care AC H I E V E M E N T S E M E R G E N C Y D E PA RT M E N T

Emergency care faster and more efficient Christiana Care is moving more patients through the Emergency Department (ED) while reducing length of stay, thanks to multiple ongoing efficiency  initiatives using a Lean process approach.

diagnosis and treatment before patients are released from the ED or admitted to the hospital. In Super Track, patients with minor injuries and ailments receive care in a separate process from the regular emergency stream to provide rapid treatment.

The results: Christiana Hospital treated 118,704 patients in the ED in 2011, an  increase of more than 19,000 from 2005, SPEED, the Synchronized Provider  without adding rooms Evaluation and Efficient to the ED. Length  Disposition program, of stay for patients  The SPEED program teams an emergency  discharged from the medicine physician, a  synchronizes hospital was reduced resident and a physician  patient care in from 3.83 hours in assistant with three to the emergency 2005 to 3.72 hours in four nurses to synchronize department with 2011. At Wilmington care from assessment a medical team Hospital, a newly  through treatment and from assessment implemented SPEED disposition. Physicians  through treatment process reduced average receive test results faster,  and disposition. length of stay by  facilitating a timely  25 percent.

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Emergency Department aims to reduce secondary fragility fractures Various units within Christiana Care are coordinating a pilot program to ensure that patients coming to the ED with fragility fractures caused by osteoporosis know what type of injury they have, why a fragility fracture is important and how to reduce the risk of future fractures.  The pilot project will address the issue  by following up with both patient and primary care provider. Currently, the follow-up rate for fragility fractures in the United States is only around 20 percent. Understanding  fractures is important because patients who have broken a wrist are three to four times more likely to fracture a hip or  sustain another break.


E X PA N S I O N

ENVIRONMENT

Growing environmentally by ‘Greening the OR’ Studies estimate that 20 to 30 percent  of the total waste generated by a hospital comes from its operating rooms.

Wilmington Hospital expansion building healthy community

Middletown emergency center under construction

Christiana Care is expanding and  renovating its Wilmington Hospital  campus—a $210 million investment  that helps us continue building a healthy community for our neighbors in the  city and will add nearly 600 jobs.

Patients in lower New Castle County and northern Kent County will have greater access to emergency care when Christiana Care’s new Middletown  Freestanding Emergency Department is  complete. Currently, patients living in the area can face an average drive of  25 minutes to hospital EDs.

Wilmington Hospital will grow  by 337,000 square feet, creating a  1-million-square-foot, state-of-the-art  medical center. The project will be  complete in 2014. The hospital remains fully operational during construction.

Expanding services in Delaware County, Pennsylvania Christiana Care will begin  offering health care services in Delaware County,  Pennsylvania, starting late  in 2013. At the 72,000square-foot multidisciplinary medical office complex on Route 202 in Concord Township, patients will be able to receive care from  primary and specialty care practices as well as cancer care, imaging and laboratory  services and outpatient  rehabilitation.

The 36,500-square-foot facility, located at Route 299 and Brick Mill Road, will include 18 treatment bays and eight  observation-unit beds and will be staffed by board-certified physicians and  specially trained nurses 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The center also will feature imaging and laboratory facilities, as well as a pharmacy and space for  respiratory therapy and support.

Christiana Care’s new Middletown Freestanding Emergency Department is expected to serve more than 86,000 residents each year.

The emergency  department is  expected to serve more than 86,000 residents each year. The opening of the new facility will  create about 90  permanent positions when construction  is complete in  early 2013.

Christiana Care is one of only 116  hospitals in the world that have signed  on to the Greening the OR Initiative  of Practice Greenhealth, a national organization promoting efficiency through  environmental sustainability. In that spirit, staffers are looking to reduce, reuse and  recycle waste from Christiana Care’s operating rooms. Greening the OR provides direction on how to reduce and prevent waste, buy environmentally friendly  products, and modify working spaces  and systems to use less and recycle more. Operating rooms recycle cardboard,  plastics, irrigation bottles, paper and blue wrap, which fills ten 40-gallon bins twice per shift, five days a week, thus diverting it from landfills.

Garbage out, compost in Wilmington Hospital serves more than 600 meals each day, which makes for lots of leftovers. Twice weekly, Food and Nutrition staff members fill eight special receptacles, each holding 96 pounds of leftover food and food by-products: peels, rinds, coffee grounds, eggshells and table scraps. What makes the receptacles special is that the contents are composted to transform them into natural fertilizers for local  gardens, including several gardens at Christiana Hospital. A vendor picks up the food scraps  and adds worms and pests to catalyze  decomposition. In just a few weeks, the mixture becomes natural fertilizer for farms and gardens. 2 0 1 2  Ye a r   i n   Revie w 

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T H E C H R I ST I A N A CA R E WAY

Education and research lead to scientific discovery  and clinical excellence

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Christiana C a re


Education and Research

Christiana Care is  one of the largest  community-based teaching hospitals  conducting research  in the United States. 

A DVA N C I N G M E D I CA L CA R E Christiana Care’s commitment to exploring the science of medicine keeps clinicians at the top of their specialty and attracts the brightest and the best to serve as faculty and mentors in our fully accredited graduate medical education programs and undergraduate student rotations, where tomorrow’s health providers learn state-of-the-science medical care. Robust partnerships in clinical, translational and outcomes research boost the health  system’s national reputation and speed new ideas, technologies and treatments to  communities challenged by today’s most pressing health concerns. The following includes a sample of the education and research programs from the past year at Christiana Care. See the research sections on the Center for Heart & Vascular Health and the Helen F. Graham Cancer Center for an overview of studies in those areas.

AC H I E V E M E N T S

Four physicians join academy of distinguished educators Several Christiana Care physicians are now members of the Jefferson Academy of  Distinguished Educators, a service organization dedicated to promoting faculty teaching and excellence, recognizing and rewarding excellence in teaching, making contributions  to the educational mission, promoting scholarship in medical education and fostering a community of scholars. The four physicians are Matthew Burday, D.O.; Virginia Collier, M.D., the Hugh R.  Sharp, Jr. Chair of Medicine; Moses Hochman, M.D.; and Michael Rosenthal, M.D.,  chair of the Department of Family & Community Medicine.

17 complete first Certificate in Healthcare Leadership program Seventeen managers completed Christiana Care’s first Certificate in Healthcare  Leadership joint program with the University of Delaware. The program is an important  element in the commitment of the  Christiana Care Learning Institute Center  for Transforming Leadership to develop  the next generation of top Christiana Care  leaders. In addition to completing classwork, the managers worked in teams on a capstone project. In a final lesson, the teams presented their findings and recommendations and  discussed the leadership lessons they learned.

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Education and Research AC H I E V E M E N T S E D U CAT I O N

Simulation training center moves up to Level I Christiana Care’s Virtual Education and Simulation Training Center has attained Level I accreditation as a Comprehensive Education Institute through the  American College of Surgeons (ACS). The simulation training center first received ACS accreditation at Level II—basic  accreditation for simulation—in 2009.  As a Level I site, the center has moved beyond being able to train a small  number of physicians and staff members. Now, more than 3,500 employees from all departments receive training, gaining crucial experience dealing with simulated high-risk conditions so they can provide the best care when those situations do arise. First responders, including police officers and firefighters, also obtain highly realistic training at the center. The center includes a trauma bay, intensive care unit, operating room and patient rooms. The simulated patients are highfidelity manikins that breathe, speak, blink their eyes and respond to stimuli like real adults and children.

Training magazine ranks Christiana Care among top organizations As a training institution, Christiana  Care ranks 60th among the top 125  organizations, according to Minneapolisbased Training professional development magazine. The recognition reflects Christiana Care’s commitment to learning and development. In 2011, the systemwide Learning and Education Council designed the Christiana Care Learning Institute and launched a three-year strategic plan to  integrate all common learning processes and support services into one easily  accessible system. This virtual institute helps coordinate  E D U CAT I O N the thousands of hours of continuing  education and community, wellness and patient education Christiana Care offers that reaches thousands of people each year. The institute focuses on educator  development, innovation, continuous  professional education, diversity and  inclusion, transforming leadership,  employee development and patient  education.

Christiana Care wins prestigious innovation grant Christiana Care has been awarded  $10 million from the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Innovation to  design a new care model that will harness pioneering information technology to transcend the gaps that currently exist within health care to provide more  coordinated care and greater value for  patients. Christiana Care’s proposal is tailored to use existing hospital and office information systems to trigger alerts specifically for patients who need extra care during hospitalization and upon discharge to their homes. The alerts will help a team of nurses and other health care professionals respond quickly and effectively to the patients, enabling them to recuperate in their homes and safeguarding them from symptoms that can result in readmission. The proposal—known as the Bridging the Divides model—was one  of only 107 projects picked for the  innovation grants from more than 3,000 applicants nationwide.

Christiana Care’s Virtual Education and Simulation Training Center

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Christiana C a re


Medical student class of 2014 joins Jefferson branch campus Christiana Care is participating in Jefferson Medical College’s Delaware Branch Campus program, underscoring the transformative role the health system plays in medical education. This achievement specifically spotlights our core competency in providing clinical education to third- and fourth-year medical students. Christiana Care has a long-standing relationship with Jefferson Medical College in providing first-rate medical education to students from the college, one of the top medical schools in the country.

ACT a model for collaborative learning

Global Health Symposium advances curriculum

An exceptional experiential learning course at Christiana Care is one of the original top six performing sites funded by a prestigious Robert Wood Johnson Foundation grant in 2004. Known as ACT, or Achieving Competency Today, the 12-week course focuses on small groups of employees from multiple  disciplines who explore such topics as  patient safety and health care economics. Participants collaborate on a project, with everyone playing an equal role.  In addition to serving as an incubator for  projects, ACT nurtures respect among colleagues. So far, 304 employees have completed the course.

In 2012 Christiana Care hosted the  first Global Health Symposium of the Delaware Health Sciences Alliance, which examined the challenges and  importance of creating sustainable improvements in public health worldwide. The symposium is part of a new effort  to provide a global-health curriculum  at Christiana Care.

nurses, physicians, researchers and other professionals from disciplines as varied as anthropology, public health, psychology and library science. What unites them is a common interest in improving lives  by eliminating health inequities around the world.

The symposium attracted about 60  attendees from all four of the alliance partners—Thomas Jefferson University, Nemours, the University of Delaware and Christiana Care—including medical and undergraduate students, residents,

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Education and Research AC H I E V E M E N T S N U M B E R O F C L I N I CA L

RESEARCH

& P H A R M AC E U T I CA L

Center for Outcomes Research weighs care and cost to find best treatment

RESEARCH STUDIES

DEPARTMENT

No. of STUDIES

Anesthesia

2

Bone Marrow Transplant

10

Cardiology

79

Community Outcomes

5

Critical Care

5

Diabetes

16

Education

5

Emergency Medicine

64

Family Medicine

7

Genetics

2

Genetics-Oncology

7

GYN Oncology

27

Hematology

6

Infectious Disease

26

Internal Medicine

24

Maternal/Fetal Medicine

8

Neonatology

18

Nephrology/Renal Transplant

4

Neurology/Neurosurgery

9

Nursing

35

Nutrition

2

OB/GYN

43

Oncology

205

Orthopedics

5

Outcomes

37

Pathology

21

Pediatrics

5

Performance Improvement

3

Pharmaceutical Oncology

28

Pharmacy

9

Psychiatry

1

Pulmonary/Respiratory Care

18

Radiation Oncology

47

Radiology/Interventional Radiology

3

Radiology/Cardiology

2

Surgery

15

Surgical Critical Care/Trauma

13

Women’s Health

19

Other Research (noncategorized) (noncategorized)

7 84 84

TOTAL

The Christiana Care Center for  Outcomes Research (CCOR) is a  research center with a dual focus on  epidemiological research and analysis of outcomes in all fields of medicine. In  addition, it is a data-coordinating center for a number of large and small clinical trials in cardiovascular diagnostics and therapeutics. The center features specific expertise in evaluating of quality of life, economic  effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness and takes a multidisciplinary approach to  research. CCOR is one of only a handful of groups involved in the science of  evaluating the consequences of health care delivery by comparing the results  of one type of therapy or treatment with another type of treatment. CCOR’s  mission is to promote and conduct  research aimed at improving patient care,  informing health care policy, or both. CCOR is directed by William Weintraub, M.D., who says that Delaware’s compact, diverse population makes the state ideal  for studies that can benefit patients throughout the United States.

Cancer and cardiovascular research expand Research into the diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular disease is expanding in scope through a $17.4 million, five-year federal grant. In all, the grant supports 15 projects, including cancer biomarkers and stem cell research, as well as the role of kidney function in the link between obesity and heart disease. The National Institutes of Health awarded the grant to the Delaware IDeA

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Network of Biomedical Research, which includes Christiana Care, the Delaware Biotechnology Institute at the University of Delaware, Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Delaware  State University, Delaware Technical Community College and Wesley College. Investigators at Christiana Care were awarded one of the two-year pilot grants to study the cardiovascular risk factors of women after a pregnancy complicated by hypertension. The 6 to 8 percent of women whose pregnancy is complicated by hypertension will have a fourfold to  fivefold higher risk of developing hypertension and a twofold to threefold risk  of cardiovascular mortality later in life. Pregnancy appears to unmask such vulnerability years before it might otherwise be detectable. This study will enable  investigators to develop strategies for early prevention of heart disease in women.

Christiana Care joins ICU infection study The Surgical Critical Care Complex  at Christiana Hospital is one of just 22 intensive care units nationwide chosen  to participate in only the second multicenter, randomized trial in infection  control in the country. The Agency  for Healthcare Research and Quality,  the Centers for Disease Control and  Prevention, the Joint Commission, and  a research team including Yale and the University of Maryland lead and fund the study nationwide. The Benefits of Universal Glove and Gowning study aims to determine whether using gowns and gloves for all patient contacts (instead of only for  patients in contact isolation for known resistant bacteria) decreases acquisition  of the resistant bacteria and health care– associated infections.


Dr. Drees researches infection control practices

of platelet transfusion for traumatic  intracranial hemorrhage.

Marci Drees, M.D., MS, hospital  epidemiologist and medical director of infection prevention at Christiana Care Health System, is the first recipient of a new research award from the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA).

The National Trauma Institute approved the grant to start enrolling patients in June after a two-year application process involving Christiana Care and the  U.S. Department of Defense, a major supporter of the pilot research project.

The $20,000 inaugural grant, called  the SHEA Epi Project Award, seeks  to advance research in health care  epidemiology through the SHEA  Research Network. The network is a  consortium of nearly 200 hospitals  collaborating on multicenter research projects that identify gaps in the health care epidemiology science base.

Joining forces in a collaboration vision The Delaware Health Sciences Alliance enables partner organizations to  collaborate and conduct cutting-edge biomedical research, to improve the health of Delawareans through access to 

health care professionals and to educate the next generation of providers. The  alliance focuses on establishing innovative collaborations among experts in medical education and practice, health economics and policy, population  sciences, public health, and biomedical sciences and engineering. The alliance  includes Christiana Care, Nemours/  Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Thomas Jefferson University and the University of Delaware. Two pilot grants have been awarded  to principal investigators at Christiana Care: one to study the maternal  determinants of childhood obesity and the second to study medication adherence among patients with hypertension.

Dr. Drees’ research focuses on defining variability of infection control practices for multidrug-resistant Gram-negative  organisms. These organisms, which  include Pseudomonas, Klebsiella and Acinetobacter species, are increasingly  reported worldwide and can result in  infections that cannot be treated with currently available antibiotics.

Study focuses on traumatic cranial bleeding among patients receiving antiplatelet therapy Will blood platelet transfusions help stop brain bleeding and fend off neurological damage caused by traumatic head injury in patients taking aspirin or clopidogrel (Plavix)? Christiana Care’s Level-I trauma  center team received a grant to study outcomes for trauma patients receiving antiplatelet therapy, which includes an ever-increasing number of people  prescribed aspirin and clopidogrel to  prevent strokes and heart attacks. This  is the first randomized, controlled trial 

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Education and Research AC H I E V E M E N T S RESEARCH

Obesity and cancer screenings explored in Journal of Obesity

Nursing specialty certification soars The number of nurses at Christiana Care certified in a specialty has increased an impressive 147 percent in only three years, from 552 nurses, or 17 percent of the staff, in 2009 to 1,363 nurses, or 42 percent, in 2012. At the Roxana Cannon Arsht Surgicenter, 83 percent of nurses are certified. Christiana Care’s commitment to excellence in nursing also is reflected in having achieved  Magnet status from  the American Nurses Credentialing Center, joining an elite group of hospitals and health care systems to achieve the  honor.

The relationship between obesity and cancer screening is more complicated than previously thought, according to  a recent study led by Christiana Care’s  Department of Family & Community Medicine.

An article published in the Journal of Obesity by lead author Heather Bittner Fagan, M.D., FAAFP, MPH, director of  Health Services  The number of Research, Department  nurses certified in of Family & Community a speciality has Medicine, noted that the increased an study found that this  impressive 147% relationship depends  in just three years. on the type of cancer screening test used. The study found that obesity is associated with 

higher rates of prostate cancer screening among all races as well as lower rates of cervical cancer screening predominantly in white women. The data on breast and colon cancer screening were contradictory, suggesting the possibility of other determinants such as race, sex, ethnicity and access to care. Original analysis was also conducted examining the role of race, sex and ethnicity in moderating  the relationship between obesity and  colorectal cancer screening and showed that weight status does not contribute to disparities in colorectal cancer screening in race/ethnicity and gender subgroups.

Examining childhood bullying and teen suicide Bullying, once dismissed as a normal part of growing up, is now recognized as far more dangerous and consequential than once believed. High-profile incidents,  including school shootings and suicides, have sparked a national conversation about bullying, placing it topmost in the minds of parents, educators and health care professionals. Preventing adolescent suicide is the life work of Christiana Care’s Gregory D. Cooper, BSN, RN, a crisis interventionalist at Wilmington Hospital. He is the lead author of “Examining Childhood Bullying and Adolescent Suicide:  Implications for School Nurses,”  published in the March issue of the  Journal of School Nursing.

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On the basis of the entirety of the  findings, the investigators recommended  several outcomes that should be tracked, at Christiana Care and at other institutions nationwide, to ensure that there  are no adverse consequences to this broad intervention.

Nationally recognized for quality improvement strategies in neonatology Christiana Care’s neonatology research team highlighted its leading-edge care and quality initiatives among 11 studies presented last spring at the Pediatric  Academic Societies annual meeting. RESEARCH IN WOMEN’S & C H I L D R E N ’ S H E A LT H

Study aims to prevent preterm births Christiana Care received a $400,000 grant from the Thrasher Research Fund to conduct a definitive study of the effectiveness of an antibiotic known as oral clindamycin to prevent preterm births in women with genital tract infections linked to preterm delivery. Christiana Care received the award in partnership with Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College of KLE University in Karnataka, India. The study will examine whether a 5-day dose of 300 mg oral clindamycin for women who are 13 to 20 weeks pregnant will prevent 30 percent of preterm deliveries at minimum. The research will be conducted in South India, an area that accounts for the greatest number of global newborn deaths, 27 percent of which are caused by preterm births. The study will be the first to test whether oral clindamycin prevents preterm births in a community-based setting in a developing country, where most of the world’s annual 3.1 million newborn deaths 

occur. The study results will have broadbased applications to the United States and Europe—as well as at Christiana  Hospital—where the incidence of preterm births is also high and increasing.

Christiana Care data used to study effectiveness of the ‘39-week rule’ Because outcomes for babies are best when they are born full term, there is a national effort to reduce the number  of elective deliveries before 39 weeks.  Adherence to this “39-week rule” is  now a quality measure being tracked by hospitals across the country. Investigators at Christiana Care used five years of data from our electronic medical records to study the effectiveness of this rule at improving outcomes for babies.  In an article published in the November 2011 issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology, they reported significant improvements in the timing of elective deliveries and an associated reduction in admission of term newborns to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

Stephen Pearlman, M.D., director of  the Neonatal Fellowship Program, and his multidisciplinary team successfully instituted a bundle of interventions  that markedly reduced hypothermia among infants admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and lowered the  potential for serious negative outcomes. Director of Neonatal Research David Paul, M.D., presented a report on a rapid-cycle process-improvement effort driven by bedside nurses to reduce serious levels of intravenous infiltrates and associated tissue damage among infants in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Antibiotic therapy for hospital-acquired pneumonia was the subject of a health care utilization study led by Dr. Paul and Kelly Gray, RN. This subproject is part of a five-year collaboration, funded  by the National Institutes of Health, with Columbia University, Cornell  University and The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia that showed that despite similar diagnosis rates and choices of  antibiotic coverage, duration of antibiotic therapy varied greatly, suggesting  the need for a more standardized,  evidence-based approach.

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Education and Research AC H I E V E M E N T S RESEARCH IN WOMEN’S & C H I L D R E N ’ S H E A LT H

Research shows episiotomy not often needed in childbirth Christiana Care is taking a leading role in developing national guidelines for the obstetrical practice of episiotomy, which is a surgical incision to enlarge the  vaginal opening during childbirth, to  aid delivery and prevent tissue damage. Under current guidelines in obstetrics, episiotomy is a routine practice. The  National Quality Forum endorsed  Christiana Care’s petition to consider the incidence of episiotomy as a performance

measure in evaluating the quality of  perinatal services, taking the standard of low episiotomy rates a step closer to adoption by the Joint Commission, the independent, not-for-profit organization that accredits and certifies health care systems. Episiotomy was routine for decades and was a standard part of training for most obstetricians practicing today. In theory, the procedure prevented more serious vaginal tears and reduced the patient’s risk of incontinence. But over time,  evidence didn’t support that theory. In fact, data show that episiotomy increases  the risk of serious lacerations and can contribute to stool incontinence.

A key role in reducing infant mortality Once among the highest in the nation, the infant mortality rate in Delaware has been declining steadily and is now 8.3 deaths for every 1,000 live births. That improvement is due in part to initiatives by Christiana Care, which has been  making available the hormone progesterone, which is effective in preventing premature labor, to obstetric providers since 2007. Christiana Care also offers preconception and prenatal care through its Healthy  Beginnings program, serving women who are at risk for chronic health conditions, have high stress levels and live in high-crime areas.

Pioneering research in fetal growth Christiana Care is a leader in groundbreaking research in fetal growth in a study of women between ages 18 and  40 of all ethnicities. The data that  researchers gather will help to establish a national standard for fetal growth that will help physicians to better determine when to intervene because of suspected abnormal fetal growth.

Improving breastfeeding rates through nationwide collaborative Christiana Care is among 90 U.S. hospitals participating in Best Fed Beginnings, a first-of-its-kind national, 22-month collaborative effort to significantly improve breastfeeding rates in states where they are lowest. Breastfeeding has health benefits. For infants, it decreases the incidence and severity of many infectious diseases, reduces mortality, supports neural development and decreases the risk of becoming obese later in childhood. For mothers, it decreased the risk of breast and ovarian cancers, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and cardiovascular disease. Still, half of all babies born in the United States receive formula within their first week, and only 31 percent of babies are breastfeeding at nine months of age.

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Christiana Care was the first health  system in the United States to enroll  expectant mothers in the program and  is one of only six institutions in the country selected for a $1.136 million grant from the National Institutes of Health. The health system’s large, diverse patient population and track record in research in obstetrics and gynecology make Christiana Care an ideal match  for the project.


T H E C H R I ST I A N A CA R E WAY

Philanthropic support helps us fulfill our mission

The power of giving can start at an early age and have a profound impact on the care we provide to our community.

From left brothers Dean, Sander and Harry Saridakis donated money they earned to help cancer patients in need. 2 0 1 2  Ye a r   i n   Revie w 

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Philanthropic Support AC H I E V E M E N T S

C H A R I TA B L E G I F T S S U P P O R T C H R I S T I A NA CA R E ’ S M I S S I O N O F E XC E P T I O NA L PAT I E N T A N D FA M I LY C E N T E R E D CA R E A N D S E RV I C E Philanthropy is the noble and powerful embodiment of a distinctive spirit that has  engaged generations of Americans in the shared privilege of serving people and  communities. Harnessing our passion to improve the human condition enriches lives across our region who turn to Christiana Care in times of great need for the highest quality medical care.

The first annual report for Christiana Care in 1889 is replete with pages of itemized gifts given from community-minded citizens who knew the profound impact  philanthropy can make in health care. In the decades since then, our community  has supported Christiana Care with generous contributions to support high-tech  diagnostic and treatment equipment, transformational community outreach and  recruitment of the most qualified clinical leaders. The friends of Christiana Care, including the board, trustees, grateful patients,  foundations and corporations, have been incredibly generous, particularly over the  past decade. Their gifts helped fund the opening of the Helen F. Graham Cancer  Center and the bold expansion of Christiana Hospital, including the Center for  Heart & Vascular Health. Our donors are now generously supporting the expansion  of Wilmington Hospital, the second largest transformational project in our history  scheduled for completion in 2014.

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Our focus shifts to supporting the programs and people that are the heart and soul of our buildings— and that benefit all in our region. In 2012, giving from Christiana Care supporters included such heart-felt efforts as: The first patient to receive a left  ventricular assist device at Christiana Care did so thanks in large part to  the generosity of the Crystal Trust, which provided major funding for this advanced technology at the Center for Heart & Vascular Health. Alicia and Brandon Lewandowski, founders of the non-profit organization Kids Kickin’ Cancer, presented a  check for $49,000 to the Center for Translational Cancer Research at the  Helen F. Graham Cancer Center.  The Lewandowskis, sister and brother, founded Kids Kickin’ Cancer as teens  in 2007 in memory of their father, Michael Lewandowski, who died of  cancer in 2006. 

Verizon Delaware presented a gift of  $15,000 to support Christiana Care’s Forensic Nurse Examiner program through continuing education to  enhance their expertise. Since 1997,  Christiana Care nurse examiners have provided compassionate, comprehensive  care for victims of sexual assault, domestic violence, child or elder abuse and neglect and other violent crimes. The AstraZeneca HealthCare Foundation awarded a grant of more than $152,000 to Christiana Care’s  Cardiovascular Outreach Prevention  Program, which focuses on underserved, low-income African-American teens and 

adult females. The strategy is to empower teens with the knowledge and confidence to make healthy lifestyle changes, and to improve the heart health of their mothers or other important women in their lives.

The Battle for the Cure volleyball event, sponsored by athletes from Archmere Academy in Claymont and  St. Elizabeth’s High School in Wilmington, brought in $10,400 to benefit the Helen F. Graham Cancer Center. Total fundraising for the Graham Cancer Center since the event started in 2007 now totals $48,437.

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T H E C H R I ST I A N A CA R E WAY

Awards, honors and appointments reflect our commitment to service G I V I N G O U R P E R S O NA L B E S T Christiana Care’s many recognitions and honors are the sum total of individual efforts of people in the health system giving their best, every day, to provide the best in patient care. Christiana Care excels on many levels, as a quality health care provider, a caring voice in the community and a great place to work.

AWA R D S & R E C O G N I T I O N

Best Hospital ranking from U.S. News & World Report Christiana Care has been ranked one of the  nation’s best hospitals by U.S. News & World Report. In its annual Best Hospital edition, the publication places Christiana Care’s Department of Medicine among the top 50 in the specialty of gastroenterology. Christiana Care is the only adult acute-care hospital in Delaware to make the list. U.S. News & World Report ranks Christiana Care number 4 of the 93 hospitals in the Philadelphia metropolitan area and “high-performing” in 11 specialties.

Christiana Care achieves Magnet status for nursing Christiana Care has been awarded Magnet recognition for the period 2010-2014 for  excellence in nursing by the American Nurses Credentialing Center, joining an elite group of hospitals to achieve the highest level of recognition for sustained excellence in nursing care. Christiana Care is the only hospital in Delaware to achieve Magnet status; only 6 percent of U.S. hospitals have earned  the honor.

Achieving grade of A for patient safety Beacon Award for Critical Care Excellence Christiana Care is the recipient of the Silver Beacon Award for Critical Care Excellence from the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses, the largest specialty nursing organization in the world.

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Christiana Care received a grade of “A” for patient safety in a first-ever report card on safety in the nation’s hospitals from  the Leapfrog Group, an independent, national, not-for-profit organization of employer purchasers of health care and the  nation’s leading experts on patient safety.


Joint Commission awards seal of approval Christiana Care has earned continued Gold Seal of Approval for recertification as a Primary Stroke Center by the Joint Commission.

InformationWeek and Computerworld recognize Insight Christiana Care has been named to InformationWeek magazine’s 2012 InformationWeek 500 list for the second consecutive year. Calling the health system one of the nation’s most innovative users of technology, the magazine spotlights Christiana Care’s Insight program. The tablet-based self-evaluation tool enables patients to report the severity of their symptoms and how they affect quality of life. Insight also won top five honors in the health category from Computerworld magazine earlier this year after the publication named the innovative tool a Laureate Award winner from among 500 nominations.

Leading the way in health care equality Christiana Care has been recognized as a Leader in LGBT Healthcare Equality in the Healthcare Equality Index 2012  report, an annual survey conducted by the Human Rights  Campaign Foundation, the educational arm of the country’s largest lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) organization. Christiana Care earned top marks for its commitment to  equitable, inclusive care for LGBT patients and their families, who can face challenges in accessing adequate health care.

Tops in training and staff development Christiana Care ranks among the top 125  companies in the nation in employer-sponsored training and  development programs, according to Training magazine.

Christiana Care earns top workplace employer Christiana Care has been recognized as one of the top places to work in Delaware and in the nation, according to Workplace Dynamics, Inc., a human resources consulting company. For the competition, surveyors evaluated Christiana Care on the basis of employee responses to 24  different questions on topics about leadership, productivity,

communications, career opportunities, working conditions, management, pay and benefits. Christiana Care employees  were especially positive about compensation and benefits, the direction of the company and innovation.

Center for Rehabilitation receives accreditation Christiana Care’s Center for Rehabilitation at Wilmington  Hospital has achieved certification from the Commission on  Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities for its brain injury,  amputation and stroke programs and for comprehensive adult inpatient care. The certification is for the three-year period of June 2012 through June 2015.

Wound Care Center earns distinction Christian Care’s Wound Care and Hyperbaric Medicine Center earned a Center of Distinction Award from Diversified Clinical Services (now known as Healogics) by delivering outstanding  results for 12 consecutive months.

Practice Greenhealth awards sustainability Christiana Care received Partner for Change with Distinction awards for reducing its environmental footprint and producing substantial waste savings from Practice Greenhealth, the nation’s leading membership  association devoted to environmentally responsible health care.

Consumer Choice Award winner For the 17th year in a row, Christiana Care was named the top health care provider of choice in Delaware by the National Research Corporation. Winning  hospitals possess the best doctors, nurses and reputation and provide the best overall quality of care.

CIO magazine honors information technology innovation Christiana Care has been named a recipient of a 2012 CIO 100 Award from IDG Network’s CIO magazine for a twopart breakthrough communication management and workflow solution, changing the way care is coordinated in one of the busiest emergency departments in the nation. 2 0 1 2  Ye a r   i n   Revie w 

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Achieving Excellence APPOINTMENTS

Dr. Laskowski named chair-elect of AAMC Council of Teaching Hospitals and Health Systems Christiana Care President and CEO Robert J. Laskowski, M.D., MBA, is chair-elect of the Council of Teaching Hospitals and Health Systems of the Association of American Medical Colleges. In  this role, Dr. Laskowski also serves on the association’s board of  directors. He is a member of the Health Management Academy Chief Executive Officers Forum and the American Medical  Association Section on Medical Schools. He also serves on  the board of directors of the United Way of Delaware, the Delaware State Chamber of Commerce, and Wilmington HOPE Commission and chairs the board of the Delaware  Public Policy Institute. He is a member of the Economic  Advisory Council of the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.

Dr. Nevin serves United Way Janice E. Nevin, M.D., MPH, chief medical officer for Christiana Care, serves as a campaign cabinet member of the United Way of Delaware. She is a member of  the Delaware Health Care  Commission and a member  of the board of the Delaware  Community Foundation.

Dr. Gardner directs Value Institute Timothy J. Gardner, M.D.,  medical director of Christiana Care’s Center for Heart &  Vascular Health and past national president of the American Heart Association, has been named  director of Christiana Care’s  Value Institute. He is also chair  of the Steering Committee  for the Cardiothoracic Surgery Clinical Research Network of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health.

Dr. Petrelli provides leadership in cancer care Nicholas J. Petrelli, M,D., Bank  of America endowed medical  director of the Helen F. Graham Cancer Center, is a member  of the National Cancer Institute  Gastrointestinal Steering  Committee that oversees and  approves clinical trials in the United States for gastrointestinal cancers. Dr. Petrelli has been named a member of the Medical Advisory Board of Fight  Colorectal Cancer, the leading colorectal cancer advocacy  organization in Washington, DC.

Dr. Collier elected master of the American College of Physicians Dr. Weintraub serves as American Heart Association affiliate president William S. Weintraub, M.D.,  the John H. Ammon Chair of  Cardiology and director of the Christiana Care Center for  Outcomes Research, is serving  as president-elect of the board of directors of the American Heart Association Great Rivers Affiliate.

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Christiana C a re

Virginia U. Collier, M.D., MACP, the Hugh R. Sharp, Jr. Chair of  the Department of Medicine, joins a select group of internists elected to mastership of the American  College of Physicians. She is the fourth master ever elected from  the state of Delaware.


Dr. Galinat serves on Board of the Eastern Orthopaedic Association Brian Galinat, M.D., chairman  of the Department of Orthopedic Surgery, was elected to the Board of the Eastern Orthopaedic  Association. He is an active  member of the American  Orthopaedic Association and serves on the Coding, Coverage, and Reimbursement Committee  of the American Academy  of Orthopaedic Surgeons. He is the American Academy of  Orthopaedic Surgeons alternate to the Resource-Based  Relative Value Scale Update Committee of the American  Medical Association.

Dr. Ehrenthal earns MPH, wins Capstone Award Deborah Ehrenthal, M.D., FACP, director of Health Services  Research for Women and  Children and medical director  of Women’s Health Programs in the Department of Obstetrics and  Gynecology, earned her master’s degree in public health from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. She won a  Capstone Award for Outstanding Achievement for her research on the influence of maternal factors on early childhood obesity. She was also inducted into the Johns Hopkins chapter of  Delta Omega Alpha, a national honor society that encourages excellence in research, scholarship and practice among graduate students in public health.

Dr. Scantlebury appointed to NIH Council Velma Scantlebury, M.D.,  associate chief of Transplant  Surgery, was appointed to the  National Institutes of Health  Advisory Council for Allergy,  Immunology and Transplantation and will serve until 2014. She has been a member of the American Society of Transplant Surgeons  and has served nationally as a member of the Advisory Committee on Transplantation to  the Secretary of Health and served as chair of the committee  until 2012.

Dr. Grubbs elected to board of oncology society Medical oncologist Stephen S. Grubbs, M.D., was elected to a three-year term on the board of  directors of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. He was also named to a leadership role with the newly formed Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology.

Dr. Rizzo chairs lung association board Albert A. Rizzo, M.D., chief of the Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, is the national  volunteer chair of the board of  directors of the American Lung  Association.

Lynn Jones appointed to Joint Commission Advisory Council Lynn C. Jones, FACHE, president of Christiana Care’s Visiting Nurse Association, has been appointed  to the Joint Commission’s Home Care Advisory Council. He is also in his second year of a two-year term as board chair of the Visiting Nurse Associations of America.  He has been on that board for seven years and was previously chair of its Public Policy Council. He is chair-elect of the  American Hospital Association Post-Acute Governing Council. This year he completed his term as regent for Delaware for the American College of Healthcare Executives.

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Achieving Excellence APPOINTMENTS

Dr. Dickson-Witmer vice chair of cancer commission task force Diana Dickson-Witmer, M.D.,  medical director of the Christiana Care Breast Center at the Helen  F. Graham Cancer Center, served as vice chair of the Standards  Revision Task Force for the  Commission on Cancer of the American College of Surgeons. This task force, with input from  50 national organizations,  developed the commission’s new standards for cancer centers throughout the country. She is a member of the Education  Program Committee of the American Society of Breast Disease and of the Education Committee of the American Society  of Breast Surgeons. She is also a member of the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology, serving on both the Prevention Committee and the Cancer Care Standards Development  Committee.

Dr. Meara receives educator award Daniel J. Meara, M.D., D.M.D., chair of the Department of  Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery  and Hospital Dentistry, received the Faculty Educator Development Award from the American  Association of Oral and  Maxillofacial Surgeons and  Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Foundation.

Maureen Seckel serves on national board Maureen Seckel, RN, a clinical nurse specialist in medical pulmonary critical care, is serving a three-year term as a director on the board of the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses through June 30, 2013. She served a  one-year term as secretary in  2011-2012.

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Donna Casey appointed to nursing advisory board Donna Casey, RN, director of Nursing for Cardiovascular/ Critical Care and co-chair of the Ethics Committee, was appointed to the Center for Ethics and  Human Rights Advisory Board of the American Nurses Association for the two-year period 2012-2014. The board recommends policy about issues of concern in ethics and human rights to  the association’s board of directors.

Bonnie Osgood elected to nursing congress Bonnie S. Osgood, MSN, RN, nurse manager of 4 Medical at Wilmington Hospital, was elected to serve on the American Nurses Association Congress on Nursing Practice and Economics. The  congress focuses on establishing nursing’s approach to emerging trends within the socioeconomic, political and practice spheres of the health care industry by identifying issues and recommending policy alternatives to the board of directors.

Patricia Lincoln, RN, receives AIDS educator award Patricia Lincoln, RN, received  the HIV Educator Distinguished  Service Award from the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. The honor recognizes an outstanding  association member who, through education about HIV and  AIDS, has had a great impact  on the lives of those they have  instructed, including patients, clients, families, health care providers, community groups  and the general public.


T H E C H R I ST I A N A CA R E WAY

A not-for-profit health care system  providing value to our community

S E RV I C E S TAT I S T I C S A DM IS S IONS

OUTPATIE NT V IS ITS

2012

2012

*adjusted

E M E RGE NC Y DE PA RTM E NT V IS ITS

2012

5

5

5

WILMINGTON HOSPITAL

CHRISTIANA HOSPITAL

TOTAL VISITS

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Service Statistics

C H R I S T I A NA CA R E ’ S I M PAC T O N D E L AWA R E Christiana Care employees paid more than $25.9 million in taxes to the State of Delaware. On average, a Christiana Care employee returns more than $100,000 to Delaware’s economy every year.

BIRTHS

2012

AV E RAGE INPATIE NT S TAY (NO. OF DAYS)

2012

RADIOLOGY PROC E DURE S

2012

S URGICA L PROC E DURE S

2012

WILMINGTON HOS PITA L HE A LTH C E NTE R V IS ITS

2012

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1,198 Christiana Care volunteers gave a total of 94,294 hours of  service this year. That translates into more than $2 million dollars.

PHYS ICA L THE RA PY PL US V IS ITS

2012

Christiana C a re


C HRIS TIA NA CA RE HOM E HE A LTH AND C OM M UNITY S E RV IC E S

PRIMA RY CA RE PHYS IC IA N OF F IC E V IS ITS

HOME HEALTH CARE VISITS 286,770 HIGH SCHOOL WELLNESS CENTERS AND ALZHEIMER’S DAY PROGRAM VISITS 5,320* *Visiting Nurse Association no longer staffs High School Wellness Centers

C E NTE R F OR A DVA NC E D JOINT RE PLACEMENT A ND C E NTE R F OR RE HA BIL ITATION 2012 TOTAL KNEE AND HIP REPLACEMENTS 2,287 REHABILITATION PATIENTS 656 TOTAL PATIE NT RE V E NUE (BILLIONS OF DOLLARS) PE RS ONNE L S TATIS TIC S CHRISTIANA CARE EMPLOYEES 10,582 MEDICAL-DENTAL STAFF 1,454 MEDICAL & DENTAL RESIDENTS & FELLOWS 262 RNs, LPNs AND PATIENT CARE TECHNICIANS 3,699

W HE RE C HRIS TIA NA CA RE HE A LTH SERVICES’ OPE RATING DOL L A R GOE S

2012

1¢ Other Affiliates

28¢ Therapeutic & Diagnostic Services

CHARITY CA RE (MILLIONS OF DOLLARS)

1¢ Insurance & Other 3¢ Administration 6¢ Depreciation & Interest

1

$

7¢ Support Services

2012

7¢ Facilities & Services

*adjusted **estimated

24¢ Nursing Services

COST C OM PA RIS ON OF AV E RAGE PATIE NT S TAY

HOPKINS

HUP

JEFFERSON

COOPER

8¢ Medical Education & Social Services

15¢ Employee Benefits

TEMPLE

CROZER

CHRISTIANA CARE

Source: American Association of Medical Colleges’Autumn 2011 Databook.

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P.O. Box 1668 Wilmington, Delaware 19899-1668 800-693-CARE (2273)

www.christianacare.org

Christiana Care is a private not-for-profit regional health care system and relies in part on the generosity of individuals, foundations and corporations to fulfill its mission. To learn more about how you can support our mission, please visit www.christianacare.org/donors. 13GEN1


2012 Year in Review