Issuu on Google+

           

   

GRASSROOTS  LEADERSHIP   SURVEY  Findings of the 2011 Questionnaire  Submitted April 2012 by  M. Lynette Fleming, Ph.D.  Independent Evaluator  Research, Evaluation & Development Services  11220 E. Stetson Place  Tucson, AZ  85749‐9550  520‐749‐4909  fleming@cox.net         

 


Table of Contents  Tables of Data Displays ....................................................................................................................................................... 3  Table of Tables .................................................................................................................................................................... 3  Table of Charts .................................................................................................................................................................... 4  Executive Summary ............................................................................................................................................................ 5  Overview of Study .............................................................................................................................................................. 8  Methods ............................................................................................................................................................................. 8  Questionnaire Results ........................................................................................................................................................ 8  Children and Nature Initiatives ....................................................................................................................................... 8  Organization (Question 2) .......................................................................................................................................... 8  Financial Support (Question 3) ................................................................................................................................... 9  Total Resources:  Budget, In‐kind Products or Services, Volunteer Hours (Question 4) .......................................... 15  Formation (Question 5) ............................................................................................................................................ 17  Demographic Data for Geographic Areas Served ......................................................................................................... 20  Areas Served (Question 6) ........................................................................................................................................ 20  Population (Question 7) ........................................................................................................................................... 22  Ethnicity and Race Distribution in Geographic Areas Served (Question 8) .............................................................. 22  Income Level Distribution in Geographic Areas Served (Question 9) ...................................................................... 24  Population by Age Group Distribution in Geographic Areas Served (Question 10) ................................................. 26  Methods of Communication Used (Questions 11‐19).............................................................................................. 26  Outputs, Activities and Participants ............................................................................................................................. 28  Activities in the Last 12 Months (Question 20) ........................................................................................................ 28  Total Audience in the Last Year (Question 21) ......................................................................................................... 30  Underserved Youth Reached in the Last Year (Question 22) ................................................................................... 31  Distribution of Children and Nature Network Tools (Question 23) ......................................................................... 32  New Nature and Place‐based Efforts (Questions 24 and 25) ................................................................................... 33  Audiences Reached by New Efforts (Question 26 and 27) ....................................................................................... 35  Participating Audiences and Organizations (Question 29) ....................................................................................... 41  Programs and Activities(Questions 30 and 31) ........................................................................................................ 42  Outcomes ..................................................................................................................................................................... 45  Observed Changes (Question 28) ............................................................................................................................. 45  Key Findings of Statistical Analyses .................................................................................................................................. 47  Appendix ........................................................................................................................................................................... 49 

2  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 


Tables of Data Displays  Table of Tables  Table 1.  Comparison of 2009 and 2011 Organization Findings ......................................................................................... 9  Table 2. Financial Support by Organization Structure ...................................................................................................... 10  Table 3. Total Financial Support or Budgeted Resources ................................................................................................. 15  Table 4. Total In‐kind Products or Services Committed to Initiatives in the Past 12 Months .......................................... 16  Table 5. Total Number of Volunteer Hours ...................................................................................................................... 17  Table 6. Ethnicity and Race Distribution in Geographic Areas Served, 2011 ................................................................... 23  Table 7. Race and Ethnicity Distribution in U.S. Compared with Majority of Grassroots Initiatives ................................ 24  Table 8.  Income Level Distribution in Geographic Areas Served, 2011 ........................................................................... 24  Table 9. Income Distribution in U.S. Compared with Majority of Grassroots Initiatives .................................................. 25  Table 10. Population by Age Group .................................................................................................................................. 26  Table 11. Age Distribution in U.S. Compared with Majority of Grassroots Initiatives ..................................................... 26  Table 12. Numbers Reached by Communication Methods Used ..................................................................................... 27  Table 13. Comparisons of 2009 and 2011 Activities Engaged in by Grassroots Initiatives in the Last Year ..................... 30  Table 14. Estimated Participants Reached by Children and Nature Initiatives in the Last Year ....................................... 30  Table 15.  Underserved Youth Reached in the Last Year .................................................................................................. 31  Table 16. Comparisons of 2009 and 2011 C&NN Tools Used by Grassroots Initiatives in the Last Year ......................... 33  Table 17.  New Nature and Place‐based Efforts Started by Children and Nature Initiatives ........................................... 33  Table 18. Participant Numbers Reached by 6 New Children and Nature Activities and Opportunities including  Community Gardens, Natural Play Areas, Nature Clubs for Families, Neighborhood Parks, School Gardens or Habitat  Projects, Trails or Trail Projects, 2011 .............................................................................................................................. 36  Table 19. Participant Numbers Reached by 4 New Children and Nature Activities and Opportunities including Nature  Clubs for Families, School Gardens, Natural Play Areas, and Community Gardens, 2009 ............................................... 37  Table 20. Cross Tabulations of 6 New Activities and Opportunities with Estimates of Total Audience Reached ............ 37  Table 21.  Comparison of 2009 and 2011 Estimates of Audience Numbers Reached by Children and Nature Activities  and Opportunities ............................................................................................................................................................. 39  Table 22.  Underserved Youth Reached by 6 New Children and Nature Activities and Opportunities including  Community Gardens, Natural Play Areas, Nature Clubs for Families, Neighborhood Parks, School Gardens or Habitat  Projects, Trails or Trail Projects, 2011 .............................................................................................................................. 40  Table 23.  Underserved Youth Reached by 4 New Children and Nature Activities and Opportunities including Nature  Clubs for Families, School Gardens, Natural Play Areas, and Community Gardens, 2009 ............................................... 40  Table 24.  Comparison of 2009 and 2011 Estimates of Number of Underserved Youth Reached by New Children and        Nature Activities and Opportunities ................................................................................................................................. 41  Table 25. Programs and Activities by Hour and Day (Question 30a) ................................................................................ 43  Table 26. Programs and Activities by Week ..................................................................................................................... 43  Table 27.  Programs and Activities by Season .................................................................................................................. 44  Table 28. Best Attended Programs and Activities by Hour ............................................................................................... 44  Table 29. Best Attended Programs and Activities by Day (Question 31b) ....................................................................... 44  Table 30. Best Attended Programs and Activities by Week ............................................................................................. 45  Table 31. Best Attended Programs and Activities by Season (Question 31d) .................................................................. 45  Table 32. Comparisons of 2009 and 2011 Changes as a Result of Children & Nature Initiatives ..................................... 47  3  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 


Table of Charts  Chart 1. Organization Structure .......................................................................................................................................... 9  Chart 2. Financial Support by Organization Structure ...................................................................................................... 12  Chart 3. Total Financial Support or Budgeted Resources Committed in the Past 12 Months .......................................... 15  Chart 4. Total In‐kind Products or Services Committed to Initiatives in the Past 12 Months .......................................... 16  Chart 5. Total Number of Volunteer Hours Committed to Initiatives in the Past 12 Months .......................................... 17  Chart 6. Number of Children & Nature Initiatives Formed by Year .................................................................................. 18  Chart 7. Organization Structure by Formation Year ......................................................................................................... 18  Chart 8. Geographic Areas Served .................................................................................................................................... 20  Chart 9. Geographic Area Served by Organization Structure ........................................................................................... 21  Chart 10. Population of Geographic Area Served by Children & Nature Initiative ........................................................... 22  Chart 11. Communication Methods Used ........................................................................................................................ 27  Chart 12. Reported Activities of Grassroots Initiatives in the Last Year ........................................................................... 29  Chart 13. Estimated Participants Reached by Children & Nature Initiatives in the Last Year .......................................... 31  Chart 14. Children & Nature Network Tools Used ............................................................................................................ 32  Chart 15. Participant Numbers Reached by New Children and Nature Activities and Opportunities, 2011 .................... 36  Chart 16. Audiences and Organizations Participating in Children & Nature Initiatives ................................................... 42  Chart 17. Changes as a Result of Children & Nature Initiatives ........................................................................................ 46 

   

 

4  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 


Executive Summary  The Children & Nature Network (C&NN) conducted the second Grassroots Leadership Survey in fall 2011 to  continue learning about efforts underway in communities, regions, states and provinces throughout the U.S.,  Canada and the United Kingdom to reconnect children and families with nature.   The 2011 questionnaire  follows a similar questionnaire administered in 2009 so that C&NN can monitor growth and change in children  and nature activities.  Support for development of this questionnaire, analysis and reporting was provided by the  W.K. Kellogg Foundation.  Representatives of seventy‐eight children and nature initiatives throughout the U.S.  and Canada, and one in Scotland, completed the questionnaire.  From their responses the following is known.  •

• •

• • •

The total population in the geographic areas served by the 78 grassroots initiatives responding to the  2011 Grassroots Leadership Survey is between 128 million and 260 million.   In 2009, the 72 grassroots  initiatives that completed the questionnaire operated in geographic areas with total populations  estimated between 185 million and 300 million.     The total number of participants reached in the past twelve months by questionnaire respondents from  seventy‐two grassroots initiatives is between 2.7 and 4.25 million.  Sixty‐eight initiatives reported  participant numbers in 2009; the estimate of total audience reached in 2009 was between 900,000 and  1,500,000 in the previous year.  The numbers reached on an annual basis are considerably higher in  2011 than in 2009.   Although the number of participants is growing, the number of grassroots initiatives started is not.  No  new initiatives were started in 2011; whereas in 2009, the year of the last questionnaire, twelve new  initiatives started.  More than 25% of the grassroots initiatives are informal collaboratives of organizations, agencies and  individuals.  About one fourth of the grassroots initiatives are organized as a formal collaborative of  organizations, agencies and individuals.  Less than a fifth of the initiatives are organized by a single  agency or organization sponsor; a similar number are lead agencies with cooperating partner  organizations.  Funding support for most grassroots initiatives comes from a diversity of sources.  Nearly half or more of  the initiatives, however, receive no support from businesses, federal agencies, state agencies or local  public agencies.  Individuals appear to be the biggest source of support for informal collaborative  initiatives.  Support for single agency or organization initiatives comes primarily from individuals and  foundations. Nearly all of the initiatives classified as lead agency with partners received support from  foundations and more than two‐thirds were supported by state agencies.  Formal collaboratives had  support from the greatest diversity of sources.  In the last year approximately a quarter of the initiatives  reported financial support or budgeted  resources of $1,000 or less; another quarter between $1,000 and $10,000; about a third between  $10,000 and $100,000; and 14% over a quarter‐of‐a‐million dollars.  In the last year approximately a quarter of the initiatives reported in‐kind products or services of $1,000  or less; another third between $1,000 and $5,000; another third between $5,000 and $50,000; and 14%  over $50,000.  Two initiatives reported in‐kind contributions in excess of $500,000.  Volunteer hours for the seventy‐eight grassroots initiatives reporting ranged from none (1) to 100,000  hours.  Nearly a quarter of the initiatives recorded between 1,001 and 5,000 volunteer hours.  Over 40%  selected between 101 and 1,000 hours.  More than two‐thirds of the grassroots initiatives started in 2007, 2008 or 2009.  Most early initiatives  were organized by a single agency/organization sponsor or by a formal collaborative of organizations,  agencies and individuals with the trend toward both formal and informal collaboratives.  Of the  reporting initiatives, none started in 2011.     5  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 


• •

• •

Approximately a third of the initiatives serve one or more of the following: cities, rural areas, and states.   About a fourth of the initiatives serve one or more of these geographic areas:  neighborhoods, suburban  and metropolitan areas, multi‐county and single county/parish.  Approximately half or more of the children and nature initiatives are in geographic areas where the  Asian (64%), Black (62%), and Hispanic or Latino (49%) populations are between 1‐20% of the  population.  More than half (52%) of the initiatives are underway in geographic areas where 61‐100% of  the population is white.  These statistics are comparable to the U.S. race and ethnicity distributions  reported by the U.S. Census Bureau.  These demographics are essentially the same as 2009.  A majority of the children and nature initiatives occur in geographic areas where income levels are  distributed in the following range of percentages, which are somewhat similar to income statistics  reported by U.S. Census Bureau for 2010.    o $24,000 or less: 1‐20%  o $24,001‐$45,000: 1‐40%  o $45,001‐$90,000: 1‐40%  o $90,001‐$150,000: 1‐20%  o $150,001 or more: 1‐20%  The distribution of age groups in the geographic areas served by the children and nature initiatives is  aligned with the 2010 U.S. population distribution by age.  Children and nature initiatives report using several communication methods including websites (88%),  social networking tools (67%), e‐newsletters (63%), and print newsletters (18%).  Since 2009 the number  of initiatives using websites, social networking tools and e‐newsletters has increased; the number  distributing print newsletters has decreased.  In the last year nearly all of the grassroots initiatives were engaged in at least one of the nineteen  activities listed in the questionnaire.  Eighty‐six percent of the initiatives provided children’s outdoor  programs and events.  Approximately two thirds offered exhibits or booths and family events.  More  than half developed supporting materials and were involved in media interviews and organizational  development activities.    More than a quarter of the grassroots initiatives used or distributed thirteen of the nineteen C&NN  Tools made available to the movement.  Of particular note is that nearly two‐thirds of the initiatives  used or distributed the research and studies available through C&NN.  Nearly half of the grassroots  initiatives reported using the C&NN electronic newsletters and Facebook.  A third or more of the  initiatives used the Nature Clubs for Families Toolkit, C&NN Community Action Guide, Let’s G.O.! (Get  Outside) Toolkit, C&NN Report on the Movement to Re‐Connect Children with the Natural World and  blogs.    Between 1,000 and 3,000 new nature and place‐based opportunities for children have been established  in the areas served by these grassroots initiatives, including community gardens for children, nature  clubs for families, natural play areas, neighborhood parks, school gardens, and trails or trail projects.   These numbers indicate at least a 50% growth in nature and place‐based opportunities in two years.  Although 19% of the respondents are unsure of the size of the audiences reached by their new activities,  63 grassroots initiatives (81%) reported the total audience numbers participating in new community  gardens, natural play areas, nature clubs for families, neighborhood parks, school gardens or habitat  projects, trails or trail projects is at least two million and may be as large as five million.    Fifty grassroots initiatives (64%) reported the number of underserved youth reached by new children  and nature activities and opportunities including community gardens, natural play areas, nature clubs  for families, neighborhood parks, school gardens or habitat projects, trails or trail projects.  The majority  of the reporting children and nature initiatives estimated their activities reached audiences comprised of  between 1% and 25% underserved youth.  The estimates of underserved youth participating in various  6  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 


• •

children and nature activities and opportunities range from 94,000 in nature clubs for families to over  1.6 million in school gardens or habitat projects.   Comparison of the 2009 and 2011 data indicate considerable increases in the number and percentage of  initiatives that included underserved youth in their children and nature activities and opportunities. In  2011 C&NN campaigns engaged up to 1.2 million underserved youth in community garden projects (up  from 176,600 in 2009); 856,000 in natural play areas (up from 316,100 in 2009); and 1.6 million in school  gardens/habitat projects (up from 401,500 in 2009).   In two years, the estimates are at least 2.5 times  larger for underserved youth using natural play areas.  The number of underserved youth participating  in nature clubs for families at least tripled.  The numbers quadrupled for underserved youth involved in  school gardens and habitat projects and are at least six times larger for underserved youth with access  to community gardens.  More than half of the grassroots initiatives named these thirteen audiences and organizations as  participants in their children and nature efforts: educators, nature centers, local non‐profit  organizations, colleges or universities, parks, public school teachers, natural resource professionals,  state agencies, childcare providers, scouts, community organizers, grandparents, and businesses.  Initiatives most frequently offered activities weekly, on weekends and year‐round.  The best attended  programs or activities were offered monthly in the afternoon and occurred on Saturdays in spring.    All of the questionnaire respondents saw at least one of twenty observed changes or outcomes since  their children and nature initiatives started.  Most grassroots initiatives (81%) reported increased  awareness of the importance of nature for children’s healthy development, followed by two‐thirds who  reported media attention, educational benefits to participants, and community support.  Nearly two‐ thirds observed development or enhancement of places to play and learn outdoors in nature,  partnerships with new allies, community improvements to provide access to nature‐based experiences,  and increased engagement of non‐formal educators.  More than half the grassroots initiatives reported  increased engagement of formal educators, engagement of early childhood professionals and  caregivers, and repeat participation by children and youth in nature‐based events and programs.  A  larger number of initiatives than in 2009 reported these changes: awareness of the importance of  nature for children’s healthy development, number of children playing outdoors, and engagement of  pediatricians and others in the medical community.  A smaller number of initiatives than in 2009  reported these outcomes: funding for the children and nature initiatives and partnerships with new  allies.  Several statistically significant relationships or correlations between characteristics of the grassroots  children and nature initiatives emerged from nonparametric inferential statistical analyses.  The findings  indicate the following relationships.   o The earlier a grassroots initiative formed, the more activities the initiative is likely to have  engaged in during the past 12 months.    o The earlier a grassroots initiative formed, the larger the estimate of the total participants  reached in the past 12 months is likely to be.    o The larger the number of grassroots activities engaged in during the last 12 months, the greater  the likelihood is that an initiative uses social networking tools such as Facebook and twitter.     o The larger the number of C&NN tools used or distributed, the larger the number of grassroots  activities engaged in during the last 12 months is likely to be. o The larger the number of grassroots activities engaged in during the last 12 months, the greater  the number of changes likely to be seen since the start of the children and nature initiative.   

7  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 


Overview of Study  The Children & Nature Network (C&NN) conducted the second Grassroots Leadership Survey in fall 2011 to  continue learning about efforts underway in communities, regions, states and provinces throughout the U.S. and  Canada to reconnect children and families with nature. The 2011 questionnaire follows a similar questionnaire  administered in 2009 so that C&NN can monitor growth and change in children and nature activities.   In‐person  invitations issued at the annual conference in September 2011 and email invitations issued to designated points  of contact and known leaders of children and nature initiatives within the children and nature movement  created a snowball sample by encouraging potential respondents to send the questionnaire on to others to  complete.  The goal was to determine the scope and scale of the growing movement.  During the sixteen weeks the questionnaire was available on Zoomerang (through January 6, 2012),  representatives of seventy‐eight grassroots initiatives completed the questionnaire and reported about their  work and program participants.  The initiatives operate throughout the U.S. and Canada, plus one in Scotland.   Respondents were encouraged to keep a record of their answers to the questions, so that comparisons could be  made to the results.  The 2011 questionnaire is very similar to the 2009 questionnaire. In addition, the same or a  similar questionnaire will be administered in the future, so that the Children & Nature Network can monitor  growth and change in children and nature activities.  All of these data will help C&NN understand the  movement’s impact, and will also help with making the case for funding in those cases where funding support is  needed. 

Methods  Content analysis was employed for the qualitative responses on the questionnaire.  Descriptive and inferential  statistical methods were applied to the quantitative responses.   

Content Analyses.  Qualitative data from the open‐ended questionnaire items were analyzed for patterns and  themes. 

Descriptive Statistics.  Frequencies, means and percentages were calculated for each questionnaire item.   Where appropriate, tables and charts are used to illustrate responses.  

Inferential Statistics. Relationships between characteristics of children and nature initiatives and several  questionnaire items were analyzed using nonparametric statistical analyses including Kendall’s tau and  Spearman’s rho.   These analyses enabled us to discern the statistical significant relationships that are reported  in the findings section. 

Questionnaire Results  Children and Nature Initiatives  Organization (Question 2) In 2011 the organization structures of the respondents’ initiatives are divided as follows (see Chart 1):  •

26%‐Informal collaborative of organizations, agencies and individuals;    8  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 


• • • •

24%‐FFormal collab borative of orgganizations, aagencies and�� individuals; 18%‐SSingle agencyy or organization sponsor; 17%‐LLead agency w with cooperating partner o organizationss and  15%‐O Other, includiing individualls (3); family vvolunteering  time; family nature club; ffederal goverrnment;  501 c 3; funder; higgh school eco o club; private e, internationnal, for‐profit company serrving multiplee not‐for‐ es; social ente erprise based d in Scotland ((UK); statewide afterschoo ol network; aand  profitt collaborative mostly separate an nd not‐collaborative effortts.      Chart 1. Orgganization Sttructure  

Total numb ber, percentaage 12, 15%

19, 24%

13, 17%

Formal collaboorative of organizzations, agencies and inndividuals Informal collabborative of organ nizations, agencies and inndividuals Single agency oor organization ssponsor

14 4, 18%

20, 26% Lead agency w ith cooperating partner organizations Other

  A A comparison n of the resultts from 2009 and 2011 app pears in Tablee 1.  In the 20009 questionn naire 4% (3) o of  rrespondents w wrote in the O Other category, “Lead agency with coo perating parttner organizations,” which h led to  tthe addition o of this response option to tthis multiple choice quest ion in 2011 and its selectio on by 17% off the  rrespondents.  The numberrs selecting fo ormal collaboratives and siingle agency ssponsor are d down betweeen 2009  aand 2011, like ely because so ome of the prrevious respo ondents foundd a more accu urate option in 2011.  The number  o of reporting in nformal collaboratives increased in two o years.  Table 1.  Com T parison of 20 009 and 20111 Organization n Findings 

Organization Structure Formal collaborative of organizations, agencies and individual s  Informal co ollaborative o of organizatio ons, agencies and individuaals  Lead agenccy with coope erating partne er organizatio ons (new opt ion in 2011) Single agen ncy or organization sponso or 

2009  Total  numberr,  percentagge  25, 35% %  16, 22% %    22, 31% % 

2011  Tottal  number,  percen ntage  19, 2 24%  20, 2 26%  13, 1 17%  14, 1 18% 

    FFinancial Sup pport (Quesstion 3)  TThis item wass added on 20 011 Questionn naire: “Appro oximately whaat percentagee of your initiiative’s financcial  ssupport for th he organizatio onal structure e you selected d in Questionn 2 comes from the followiing?” The six sources 

9  © 2012 Childre © en & Nature N Network 

 


of financial support from which the initiatives selected to total 100% of their funding are: businesses, federal  agencies, foundations, individuals, local public agencies, and state agencies.    Chart 2 and Table 2 show the sources of financial support by the organization structure selected in Item 2:  formal collaborative, informal collaborative, lead agency with partners, and single agency.  Table 2a‐f is  organized by financial support.  Within each source of financial support, the reader can compare the percentage  distribution of support for all initiatives by organization structure.      Table 2. Financial Support by Organization Structure  Table 2a. Business Support by Organization Structure    

What is your organization structure? (check the one that most applies)  Formal  collaborative of  organizations,  agencies and  individuals 

Informal  collaborative of  organizations,  agencies and  individuals 

Lead agency with  cooperating  partner  organizations 

Single agency or  organization  sponsor 

Other, please  specify 

 100%(78) 

100%(19) 

100%(20) 

100%(13) 

100%(14) 

100%(12) 

0% 

44%(34) 

10.5%(2) 

65%(13) 

38.5%(5) 

50%(7) 

58.3%(7) 

1 ‐ 20% 

44.9%(35) 

73.7%(14) 

20%(4) 

61.5%(8) 

42.9%(6) 

25%(3) 

21 ‐ 40% 

1.3%(1) 

0% 

0% 

0% 

0% 

8.3%(1) 

Business  Support 

Total  

41 ‐ 60% 

2.6%(2) 

5(1)% 

0% 

0% 

0% 

8.3%(1) 

61 ‐ 80%% 

0% 

0% 

0% 

0% 

0% 

0% 

>80% 

1.3%(1) 

0% 

5%(1) 

0% 

0% 

0% 

Don't Know 

6.4%(5) 

10.5%(2) 

10%(2) 

0% 

7.1%(1) 

0% 

Table 2b. Federal Agencies Support by Organization Structure     

Federal  Agencies  Support 

 

What is your organization structure? (check the one that most applies) 

Total 

Formal  collaborative of  organizations,  agencies and  individuals 

Informal  collaborative of  organizations,  agencies and  individuals 

Lead agency with  cooperating  partner  organizations 

Single agency or  organization  sponsor 

Other, please  specify 

 100%(78) 

100%(19) 

100%(20) 

100%(13) 

100%(14) 

100%(12) 

0% 

61.5%(48) 

42.1%(8) 

55%(11) 

69.2%(9) 

78.6%(11) 

75%(9) 

1 ‐ 20% 

15.4%(12) 

26.3%(5) 

25%(5) 

7.7%(1) 

0% 

8.3%(1) 

21 ‐ 40% 

5.1%(4) 

5.3%(1) 

10%(2) 

0% 

7.1%(1) 

0% 

41 ‐ 60% 

3.8%(3) 

10.5%(2) 

0% 

0% 

0% 

8.3%(1) 

61 ‐ 80%% 

1.3%(1) 

5.3%(1) 

0% 

0% 

0% 

0% 

>80% 

5.1%(4) 

0% 

0% 

15.4%(2) 

7.1%(1) 

8.3%(1) 

Don't Know 

7.7%(6) 

10.5%(2) 

10%(2) 

7.7%(1) 

7.1%(1) 

0% 

 

10  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 


Table 2c. Foundations Support by Organization Structure    

Foundations  Support 

0% 

What is your organization structure? (check the one that most applies) 

Total 

Formal  collaborative of  organizations,  agencies and  individuals 

Informal  collaborative of  organizations,  agencies and  individuals 

Lead agency with  cooperating  partner  organizations 

Single agency or  organization  sponsor 

Other, please  specify 

 100%(78) 

100%(19) 

100%(20) 

100%(13) 

100%(14) 

100%(12) 

41%(32) 

31.6%(6) 

65%(13) 

7.7%(1) 

35.7%(5) 

58.3%(7) 

1 ‐ 20% 

23.1%(18) 

21.1%(4) 

5%(1) 

46.2%(6) 

28.6%(4) 

25%(3) 

21 ‐ 40% 

5.1%(4) 

10.5%(2) 

5%(1) 

7.7%(1) 

0% 

0% 

41 ‐ 60% 

11.5%(9) 

10.5%(2) 

5%(1) 

15.4%(2) 

21.4%(3) 

8.3%(1) 

61 ‐ 80%% 

5.1%(4) 

10.5%(2) 

5%(1) 

7.7%(1) 

0% 

0% 

9%(7) 

10.5%(2) 

5%(1) 

15.4%(2) 

7.1%(1) 

8.3%(1) 

5.1%(4) 

5.3%(1) 

10%(2) 

0% 

7.1%(1) 

0% 

>80%  Don't Know 

Table 2d. Individuals Support by Organization Structure    

Individuals  Support 

What is your organization structure? (check the one that most applies) 

Total 

Formal  collaborative of  organizations,  agencies and  individuals 

Informal  collaborative of  organizations,  agencies and  individuals 

Lead agency with  cooperating  partner  organizations 

Single agency or  organization  sponsor 

Other, please  specify 

 100%(78) 

100%(19) 

100%(20) 

100%(13) 

100%(14) 

100%(12) 

0% 

33.3%(26) 

26.3%(5) 

25%(5) 

46.2%(6) 

28.6%(4) 

50%(6) 

1 ‐ 20% 

30.8%(24) 

42.1%(8) 

35%(7) 

38.5%(5) 

28.6%(4) 

0% 

21 ‐ 40% 

5.1%(4) 

0% 

5%(1) 

7.7%(1) 

7.1%(1) 

7.7%(1) 

41 ‐ 60% 

11.5%(9) 

10.5%(2) 

5%(1) 

0% 

21.4%(3) 

25%(3) 

61 ‐ 80%% 

1.3%(1) 

0% 

0% 

0% 

0% 

7.7%(1) 

>80% 

11.5%(9) 

10.5%(2) 

20%(4) 

7.7%(1) 

7.1%(1) 

7.7%(1) 

Don't Know 

6.4%(5) 

10.5%(2) 

10%(2) 

0% 

7.1%(1) 

0% 

Table 2e. Local Public Agencies Support by Organization Structure    

Local Public  Agencies  Support 

What is your organization structure? (check the one that most applies) 

Total 

Formal  collaborative of  organizations,  agencies and  individuals 

Informal  collaborative of  organizations,  agencies and  individuals 

Lead agency with  cooperating  partner  organizations 

Single agency or  organization  sponsor 

Other, please  specify 

 100%(78) 

100%(19) 

100%(20) 

100%(13) 

100%(14) 

100%(12) 

0% 

52.6%(41) 

42.1%(8) 

60%(12) 

38.5%(5) 

57.1%(8) 

66.7%(8) 

1 ‐ 20% 

25.6%(20) 

21.1%(4) 

20%(4) 

53.8%(7) 

21.4%(3) 

16.7%(2) 

21 ‐ 40% 

9%(7) 

21.1%(4) 

5%(1) 

7.7%(1) 

0% 

7.7%(1) 

41 ‐ 60% 

5.1%(4) 

10.5%(2) 

5%(1) 

0% 

7.1%(1) 

0% 

61 ‐ 80%% 

1.3%(1) 

0% 

0% 

0% 

7.1%(1) 

0% 

>80% 

1.3%(1) 

0% 

0% 

0% 

0% 

7.7%(1) 

Don't Know 

5.1%(4) 

5.3%(1) 

10%(2) 

0% 

7.1%(1) 

0% 

11  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 


Table 2f. State  T Agencies Supp port by Organ ization Structu ure    

State Agencie es  Support 

What is your orgganization structuure? (check the on ne that most applies) 

Total  

 100%(78) 

Formal  collaborative of  organizationss,  agencies and d  individuals 

Inform mal  collaborattive of  organizattions,  agenciess and  individu uals 

Lead aagency with  coooperating  ppartner  orgaanizations 

Si ngle agency or  organization  sponsor 

Other, please  specify 

100%(19) 

100%(2 20) 

1000%(13) 

100%(14) 

100%(12) 

0% 

47.4%(37) 

31.6% %(6) 

55%(11)  5

30.8%(4) 

57.1%(8) 

66.7%((8) 

1 ‐ 20% 

20.5%(16) 

26.3% %(5) 

15%(3) 

23.1%(3) 

21.4%(3) 

16.7%((2) 

21 ‐ 40% 

7.7%(6) 

15.8% %(3) 

5%(1) 

7.7%(1) 

0% 

7.7%((1) 

9%(7) 

15.8% %(3) 

5%(1) 

15.4%(2) 

7.1%(1) 

00% 

61 ‐ 80%% 

41 ‐ 60% 

6.4%(5) 

5% %(1) 

10%(2) 

7.7%(1) 

7.1%(1) 

00% 

>80% 

2.6%(2) 

0% 

0% 

15.4%(2) 

0% 

00% 

Don't Know 

6.4%(5) 

5% %(1) 

10%(2) 

0% 

7.1%(1) 

7.7%((1) 

  C Chart 2a‐d pre esents findinggs by organizaation structure.  Each of thhe charts disp plays six colorrful columns ffor each  o of the six sourrces of financcial support, w which allows tthe reader too compare thee percentage distribution of  ssupport within one organizzation structu ure. No financcial support iss represented d by the colorr lime green, rust  rrepresents 1‐2 20% of financcial support, ggold displays 21‐40%, purpple shows 41‐‐60% supportt, blue is 61‐8 80%, kelly  ggreen indicate es the numbe er of initiative es that receive e more than 880% of their ffunding from m that source;  don’t  kknow is pink.  Chart 2. FFinancial Supp port by Orga nization Stru ucture  Chart 2a. Form C mal Collaboratiive Structure (n=19) Financiaal Support 

12  © 2012 Childre © en & Nature N Network 

 


Chart 2b. Inform C mal Collaborattive Structure  (n=20) Financial Support 

    Chart 2c. Lead Agency w with Cooperatting Partner Sttructure (n=13) Financial Sup pport 

 

 

13  © 2012 Childre en & Nature N Network 

 


Chart 2d. Single Agencyy or Organizatiion Sponsor Sttructure (n=144) Financial Sup pport 

  D Diverse sources of fundingg support mosst initiatives rregardless of  organization structure. Tw wenty‐four (31%)  initiatives, however, report that more than 80% of th heir funding ccomes from o one source an nd in this ordeer:  individuals (9)), foundations (7), federal agencies (4), state agenciees (2), busineess (1) and loccal public ageencies (1).    N Nearly half (44%, 34) of the e initiatives re eceive no finaancial supporrt from busineesses; nearly the same number  (45%, 35) rece eive between n 1 and 20% o of their fundin ng from businnesses.  Almost two‐thirds (62%, 48) of the  ort from fede eral agencies, but 20% of t he initiatives  rely on federral agencies ffor 1‐40%  initiatives receive no suppo o of their fundin ng.  Foundatio ons provide n no support to o 41% (32) of tthe initiativess and betweeen 1 and 20% of the  ssupport of another 18 (21% %) of the initiatives.  One tthird of the innitiatives repo ort no funding from individ duals;  aanother third report betwe een 1 and 20% % of their fun nding comes ffrom individu uals.  More than half (53%)) the  initiatives report no fundin ng from local public agenciies; another qquarter (26%)) of the initiattives receive between  1 1 and 20% of their fundingg from this sou urce.  Nearly half (47%) thhe initiatives gget no funding from state agencies,  b but a fifth (21 1%) of the inittiatives receivve between 1 and 20% of ttheir funding from state aggencies.    Initiatives that reported be eing formal co ollaborative o organizations  (n=19) receivve a bit of sup pport from eaach of the  ssix sources, w with 74% relyin ng on businessses for 1‐20% % of their funnding.  More tthan half of the informal  ccollaborativess (n=20) receiived no funding from busin nesses, federral agencies, ffoundations, local public agencies,  aand state agencies.  Individ duals appear to be the bigggest source oof support forr informal collaboratives.  Nearly all  (99%) of the initiatives classsified as lead d agency with h partners (n==13) received support from m foundations, more  tthan two‐third ds were supp ported by statte agencies, aand 30% receiived support from federal agencies.  Su upport for  initiatives cate egorized as siingle agency or organizatio on (n=14) com mes primarilyy from individ duals and foun ndations. 

14  © 2012 Childre © en & Nature N Network 

 


TTotal Resourrces:  Budge et, In‐kind Prroducts or Services, Volunteer Hours (Question n 4) A Also new to th he 2011 Quesstionnaire waas this item ab bout the tota l resources co ommitted to initiatives in the last  yyear.   This three‐part quesstion asked about financial support or bbudgeted resources, in‐kin nd products o or  sservices and vvolunteer hou urs.  B Budget.  The financial support or budgeted resource es committedd to initiatives in the last yyear are displaayed in  TTable 3 and Chart 3.  The findings indicaate budgets fo or grassrootss initiatives raanged from no o budget to m more than  $ $500,000.   In the last yearr approximate ely a quarter of the initiati ves  reported d budgeted reesources of $1,000 or  leess; another quarter betw ween $1,000 aand $10,000; about a thirdd between $10,000 and $1 100,000; and 14% over  aa quarter‐of‐aa‐million dollaars.   Table 3. To otal Financial Support or B Budgeted Ressources   Committed to Initiaatives in the PPast 12 Montths  Budgete ed Resources More than $50 M 0,001 $250,001 ‐ $50 $ 0,000 $100,001 ‐ $25 $ 0,000 $50,001 ‐ $100 $ ,000 $20,001 ‐ $50,0 $ 000  $10,001 ‐ $20,0 $ 000  $5,001 ‐ $10,00 $ 00  $1,001 ‐ $5,000 $ 0  $101 ‐ $1,000  $ Less than $100  L None  N Unknown  U Total  T

Freequency 5 4 2 11 7 6 8 12 8 8 2 5 78

P Percent  6% 5% 3% 14% 9% 8% 10% 15% 10% 10% 3% 6% 100%

 

Support/Resources

Cha art 3. Total Financial Supp port or Budge eted Resourcces Committeed in the Pastt 12 Months More e than $500,001 $250,,001 ‐ $500,000 $100,,001 ‐ $250,000 $50,,001 ‐ $100,000 $20 0,001 ‐ $50,000 0,001 ‐ $20,000 $10 $5,001 ‐ $10,000 $1,001 ‐ $5,000 $101 ‐ $1,000 Less than $100 None Unknown

0

2

4

6

8

10

12

of Initiatives Number o

  15  © 2012 Childre © en & Nature N Network 

 


IIn‐kind Prod ducts or Serv vices.  Table 4 4 and Chart 4 4 display the i n‐kind products or servicees committed to  rresponding initiatives durin ng the last ye ear.  Although h about 10% oof the initiativves were uncertain about their in‐ kkind productss or services, tthe other 90% % reported be etween nonee and in‐kind p products and services valu ued at  m more than half‐a‐million dollars.  In the last year app proximately aa quarter of th he initiatives  reported in‐kind  ccontributions of $1,000 or less; anotherr third between $1,000 an d $5,000; ano other third beetween $5,00 00 and  $ $50,000; and 14% over $50 0,000.    Tablle 4. Total In‐‐kind Productts or Servicess  Committed to Initiaatives in the PPast 12 Montths More thaan $500,001 $250,001 1 ‐ $500,000 $100,001 1 ‐ $250,000 $50,001 ‐ $100,000 $20,001 ‐ $50,000 $10,001 ‐ $20,000 $5,001 ‐ $10,000 $1,001 ‐ $5,000 $101 ‐ $1 1,000 Less than n $100 None  Unknown  Total 

2 1 4 4 110 8 8 113 112 5 3 8 778

3% % 1% % 5% % 5% % 133% 100% 100% 177% 155% 6% % 4% % 100% 1000%

 

In‐kind Products or Services

Chart 4. Total In n‐kind Products or Service es Committed d to Initiativees in the Pastt 12 Months

More e than $500,00 01 $250,,001 ‐ $500,00 00 $100,,001 ‐ $250,00 00 00 $50,,001 ‐ $100,00 00 $20,001 ‐ $50,00 00 $10,001 ‐ $20,00 $5,001 ‐ $10,00 00 $1,001 ‐ $5,00 00 $101 ‐ $1,00 00 Less than $10 00 Non ne Unknow wn 0

2

4

6

8

110

12

14

Numberr of Initiatives

 

  V Volunteer Ho ours.  The ap pproximate nu umber of hou urs volunteereed to grassroots initiativess in the last yeear is  rreported in Taable 5 and Ch hart 5.  Voluntteer hours for the seventyy‐eight grassro oots initiativees reporting rranged  16  © 2012 Childre © en & Nature N Network 

 


ffrom none (1)) to 100,000 h hours.  Nearlyy a quarter off the initiativees recorded b between 1,000 and 5,000 vvolunteer  h hours.  Over 4 40% selected between 1,001 and 5,000 0 hours; in 8‐hhour days, 5000 hours is th he equivalentt of nearly  2 2 full time staff members. 

Tablle 5. Total Nu umber of Volu unteer Hourss  Committed to Initiaatives in the PPast 12 Montths Mo ore than 500,0 001 hours 250,001 to 500,0 000  100,001 to 250,0 000  50,001 to 100,00 00  20,001 to 50,000 0  10,001 to 20,000 0  5,0 001 – 10,000  1,0 001 ‐ 5,000  101 ‐ 1,000  Lesss than 100 ho ours  No one Un nknown  Total 

0 0 0 2 1 2 7 18 32 8 1 7 78

0%  0%  0%  3%  1%  3%  9%  23%  41%  10%  1%  9%  100% 

 

Volunteer Houts

Chart 5. Total N Number of Vo olunteer Hourrs Committed d to Initiativees in the Pastt 12 Months

50,,001 to 100,00 00 20 0,001 to 50,00 00 0,001 to 20,00 00 10 5001 ‐ 10,00 00 1,001 ‐ 5,00 00 101 ‐ 1,00 00 Less than 100 hourrs None Unknow wn 0

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

Numberr of Initiatives

  FFormation (Q Question 5) N Nearly a quarter of the inittiatives reporting on the 2011 Questionnnaire (18 or 23%) started  in 2006 or eaarlier (13  in 2005, 6 in 2 2006), the sam me number o of initiatives th hat started inn 2008.  2009 saw the nextt largest number of  or 22%, and 9 9 in 2010. Non ne of the initiiatives complleting this questionnaire started in  initiatives starrted with 17 o 2 2011.  See Chart 6.   

17  © 2012 Childre © en & Nature N Network 

 


Cha art 6. Numbe er of Children n & Nature In itiatives Form med by Year  23% (18) 2 2% (17) 21% (16)

18

Number of Initiatives

16 14

3) 17% (13

12 12%(99)

10 8 6

6%  (5)

4 2

0%

0 2005 or 2006 earlier

200 07

2008

22009

2010

2011

  A A breakdown of the organiization structure by year the grassrootss initiative forrmed is displaayed in Chartt 7.    A Although the numbers are small, until 2 2010 changess over time arre clear in thee increase in tthe percentagge of  informal collaboratives, the decrease in n the percentaage of single  agency or orgganization sp ponsors of thee  ggrassroots inittiatives, and tthe stability in the percenttage of lead aagency‐coopeerating partneers.   Differen nces in  2 2010 may refllect global economic conditions.    Chart 7. Organization n Structure byy Formation YYear 

Initiativess Formed in 2005 or earllier, n=13

31%(4)

Formal collaborative of orrganizations, agencies aand individuals

23% (3) 8%(1)

Informal ccollaborative of o organizations, agencies aand individuals Single agency or organizattion sponsor

15%(2)

23%(3)

Lead agency with cooperaating partner organizatio ons Other, please specify

 

18  © 2012 Childre © en & Nature N Network 

 


Initia atives Forme ed in 2006, n n=5

Initiaatives Formeed in 2007, n=16

0% % 20%(1)

12%(2) 19%(3)

40%(2 2)

%(2) 12% 19%(33)

40%(2) 4

38%(6) 0% 0

Initiatives Forme ed in 2008, n n=18

Initiaatives Formeed in 2009, n=17

11%(2)

6%(1) 17%(3)

23%(4)

118%(3)

22%(4) 12%(22) 39%(7 7)

41%(7)

11%(2)

Initia atives Forme ed in 2010, n n=9

In nitiatives Fo ormed in 201 11 0% %

11%(1) 22%(2) 0% 4%(3) 34 33 3%(3)

    TThe findings o of the 2009 Grassroots Questionnaire show that neaarly 40% (29) of the initiatiives started in n 2009 or  tthe year before those dataa were gatherred (2009‐12 new initiativees; 2008‐17 n new initiatives).  Contrast tthat with  tthe 2011 dataa that indicate e no initiative es started in tthe year of th e questionnaaire and only 12% (9) started in the  yyear before, 2 2010.    19  © 2012 Childre © en & Nature N Network 

 


D Demographiic Data for G Geographic A Areas Served d  A Areas Served d (Question 6) M Many children n and nature initiatives serrve more than one geograaphic area.  Ch hart 8 displayys the areas served,  o ordered by the number of times each area was seleccted by questtionnaire resp pondents.  Citties, rural areeas, and  sstates are eacch served by aat least a third d of the initiaatives.  Neigh borhoods, meetropolitan and suburban areas are  sserved by abo out a fourth o of the initiativves. In 2009 th he percentag es of rural, m multi‐county aand single  ccounty/parish h areas served d was slightlyy lower; the percentage of  suburban areeas served waas slightly higgher.     Chart 8. Geographic Areaas Served  (checkk all that applly) 

37%(29)

City

33%(26)

Rural Area

32%(25)

State

229%(23)

Neighborh hoods

288%(22)

Metropolitan n Area

288%(22)

n Area Suburban

22%(17)

Multi‐county

21%(16)

County/P Parish 8%(6)

Tribal N Nation

8%(6)

N Nation

4%(3)

Multi SState/Multi Pro ovince 1

Pro ovince 0

5

10

115

20

225

30

Num mber of Children n & Nature Initiaatives

  A A breakdown of the geograaphic areas se erved by orgaanization struucture is displlayed in Chartt 9.   Although the  n numbers are ssmall, the ord der of service e to various ge eographic areeas differs greeatly based on organizatio on  sstructure.   Fe ew informal collaborative initiatives serrve the metroopolitan areass that are servved by the otther three  o organization ttypes.   Single e agency spon nsors serve fe ew cities wherreas initiativees with other organization  sstructures wo ork at that levvel.  Most statte‐wide effortts function thhrough formaal collaborativves or through h a lead  aagency with ccooperating partner organizations.    20  © 2012 Childre © en & Nature N Network 

 


Chart 9. Geographic Area Served by O Organization SStructure  Informal Co ollaborative

Formal Colla aborative 42% State 42% Metropolitan Area 37% 3 City % 32 Multi‐county 26% Rural Area 21% Suburban Area 21% Neighbo orhoods 16% Countyy/Parish 11% Nation 5% Tribal Nation % Multi Statte/Multi… 0% % 0% Province P

Ruraal Area Suburbann Area Neighborrhoods State County//Parish City Multi‐ccounty Metropolitann Area Tribal N Nation N Nation Multi State//Multi… Proovince

30% 30% 25% % 25% % 25% % 15% 10% 55% 0% 0% 0%

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Le ead Agency w with Partnerss

City State n Area Suburban Multi‐county Rural Area Neighborh hoods County/P Parish Metropolitan n Area Tribal N Nation Nation N Multi State//Multi… Pro ovince

40%

Single  Agency or Organization SSponsor 69% 54% 54%

38% 38% 38% 31% 31% 8% 8% 8 8% 0%

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Metropolitann Area Ruraal Area Suburbann Area State Neighborrhoods Tribal N Nation Multi‐ccounty City N Nation Multi State//Multi… Proovince County//Parish

29% 29% 29% 21% 21% 14% 14% 14% 77% 77% 77% 77%

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

  FFew informal collaborative e initiatives se erve the metrropolitan areaas that are seerved by the o other three  o organization ttypes.   Single e agency spon nsors serve fe ew cities wherreas initiativees with other organization  sstructures wo ork at that levvel.  More than half of the lead agenciess with partneers serve city, state and suburban  aareas.  Most sstate‐wide effforts function n through form mal collaboraatives or through a lead aggency with  ccooperating p partner organizations.  Neighborhoods are served prrimarily by infformal collab boratives and lead  aagency with p partner organization structtures. These ffindings differr only slightlyy from the 2009 results.  

21  © 2012 Childre © en & Nature N Network 

 


Population (Question 7) The population of the geographic areas served by the responding children and nature initiatives ranges between  10,000 or less and 10 million or more, with the most frequently reported population being between one and five  million (23 initiatives – 29% of respondents.  See Chart 10.)  A conservative estimate is that the total population  in the geographic areas served by the initiatives that completed the questionnaire is between 128 million and  260 million.   These findings are similar to those from 2009.  Chart 10. Population of Geographic Area Served by Children & Nature Initiative  10,000,001 or more 5,000,001 to 10,000,000 1,000,001 – 5,000,000 500,001 – 1,000,000 100,001 – 500,000 50,001 to 100,000 25,001 to 50,000 10,001 to 25,000 10,000 or less 0

5

10

15

20

25

Number of Children & Nature Initiatives

 

  Ethnicity and Race Distribution in Geographic Areas Served (Question 8) Between 15% and 21% of the respondents did not know the racial or ethnic distribution of the populations in  the geographic areas served by their children and nature initiatives.  Table 6a‐f displays the known distributions  of ethnicity and race in the geographic areas served by the children and nature initiatives that responded to the  questionnaire.     • • •

• • •

More than a quarter (26%) of the children and nature initiatives started in geographic areas where the  white population is between 61‐80% of the population and another fourth of the initiatives (26%) are  underway in geographic areas where 81‐100% of the population is white (Table 6a).    More than sixty percent (62%) of the children and nature initiatives started in geographic areas where  the black population is between 1‐20% of the population (Table 6b).    Approximately a fifth of the initiatives (22%) exist in geographic areas with a native Hawaiian or other  Pacific Islander population between 1‐20%.  In more than half (58%) of the geographic areas, native  Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander populations are not present (Table 6c).  Nearly half (49%) of the initiatives occur in geographic areas where the Hispanic or Latino population is  between 1‐20% (Table 6d).      Half (50%) of the initiatives occur in geographic areas where the Asian population is between 1‐20%  (Table 6e).  Half (50%) of the initiatives occur in geographic areas where the American Indian or Alaska Native  population is between 1‐20%.  In 30% of the areas, these populations are not present (Table 6f).  22  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 


Table 6. Ethnicity and Race Distribution in Geographic Areas Served, 2011  Table 6a.  Initiatives by Percent of White Population in Geographic Area  White Population (not Hispanic or Latino) Number of Initiatives  Percent 0%  1 1% 1‐20%  3 4% 21‐40%  7 9% 41‐60%  15 19% 61‐80%  20 26% 81‐100%  20 26% Don't know  12 15% Table 6b.  Initiatives by Percent of Black or African American Population in Geographic Area Black or African American Population (not Hispanic or Latino) Number of Initiatives  Percent 0%  3 4% 1‐20%  48 62% 21‐40%  8 10% 41‐60%  4 5% 61‐80%  0 0% 81‐100%  1 1% Don't know  14 18% Table 6c.  Initiatives by Percent of Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander Population in Geographic Area Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander Population Number of Initiatives  Percent  (not Hispanic or Latino)  0%  45 58% 1‐20%  17 22% Don't know  16 21% Table 6d.  Initiatives by Percent of Hispanic or Latino Population in Geographic Area  Hispanic or Latino Population  Number of Initiatives  Percent 0%  7 9% 1‐20%  38 49% 21‐40%  8 10% 41‐60%  8 10% 61‐80%  2 3% 81‐100%  1 1% Don't know  14 18% Table 6e.  Initiatives by Percent of Asian Population in Geographic Area  Asian Population (not Hispanic or Latino) Number of Initiatives  Percent 0%  12 15% 1‐20%  50 64% 21‐40%  2 3% Don't know  14 18% Table 6f.  Initiatives by Percent of American Indian or Alaska Native Population in Geographic Area American Indian or Alaska Native (not Hispanic or Latino) Number of Initiatives  Percent 0%  23 29% 1‐20%  39 50% 21‐40%  0 0% 41‐60%  1 1% Don't know  15 19% Total number of initiatives  78

  23  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 


Table 7 combines the U.S. population's distribution by race and ethnicity in 2010 with the findings of this study.   Data from the U.S. Census Bureau in 2010 are compared with the percentages reported by the majority of the  grassroots initiatives.  Approximately half or more of the children and nature initiatives are in geographic areas  where the Asian (64%), Black (62%), and Hispanic or Latino (49%) populations are between 1‐20% of the  population.  More than half (52%) of the initiatives are underway in geographic areas where 61‐100% of the  population is white.  These statistics are comparable to the U.S. race and ethnicity distributions reported by the  U.S. Census Bureau.  These demographics are essentially the same as 2009 and consistent with overall national  demographics for race and ethnicity.    Table 7. Race and Ethnicity Distribution in U.S. Compared with Majority of Grassroots Initiatives  Race and Ethnicity 

U.S. Population Distribution  Percentage* 

Majority of Grassroots  Initiatives 

White alone 

72.4% 

61‐100% 

Hispanic or Latino ethnicity, of any race

16.3%

1‐20%

Black or African American alone 

12.6%

1‐20%

Asian alone 

4.8%

1‐20%

American Indian or Alaska Native alone

0.9%

1‐20%

Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander alone

0.2%

0%

*Source: US Census Bureau, Overview of Race and Hispanic Origin: 2010 http://www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/briefs/c2010br‐02.pdf 

  Income Level Distribution in Geographic Areas Served (Question 9)    Between 36% and 44% of the respondents did not know the income level distribution of the populations in the  geographic areas served by their initiatives.  Table 8a‐e displays the known distributions of income level in the  geographic areas served by the children and nature initiatives that responded to the questionnaire.     Table 8.  Income Level Distribution in Geographic Areas Served, 2011  Table 8a.  Initiatives by percent of population making $24,000 or less per year per family  Population making $24,000 or less in geographic area Number of Initiatives Percent of Reporting Initiatives 0%  2 4%  1‐20%  26 52%  21‐40%  15 30%  41‐60%  5 10%  61‐80%  2 4%  Total number of initiatives reporting   50    Table 8b.  Initiatives by percent of population making $24,001‐$45,000 per year per family Population making $24,001‐$45,000 in geographic area Number of Initiatives Percent of Reporting Initiatives 1‐20%  14 30%  21‐40%  19 40%  41‐60%  11 23%  61‐80%  2 4%  81‐100%  1 2%  Total number of initiatives reporting   47    24  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 


Table 8c.  Initiatives by percent of population making $45,001‐$90,000 per year per family Population making $45,001‐$90,000 in geographic area Number of Initiatives Percent of Reporting Initiatives 0%  2 4%  1‐20%  11 23%  21‐40%  19 40%  41‐60%  10 21%  61‐80%  3 6%  81‐100%  2 4%  Total number of initiatives reporting   47    Table 8d.  Initiatives by percent of population making $90,001‐$150,000 per year per family Population making $90,001‐$150,000 in geographic area Number of Initiatives Percent of Reporting Initiatives 0%  6 14%  1‐20%  31 70%  21‐40%  4 9%  41‐60%  3 7%  Total number of initiatives reporting   44    Table 8e.  Initiatives by percent of population making $150,001 or more per year per family Population making $150,001 or more in geographic area Number of Initiatives Percent of Reporting Initiatives 0%  8 18%  1‐20%  36 82%  Total number of initiatives reporting   44   

  A majority of the children and nature initiatives occur in geographic areas where income levels are distributed in  the following range of percentages, which are similar to income statistics reported by the U.S. Census Bureau for  2010 (see Table 9.)  Wealth distribution in the U.S. has changed slightly from the 2005 Census Bureau data that  was used in the 2009 Grassroots Leadership Survey report; thus, the data from the grassroots initiatives of 2009  and 2011 are similar.    Table 9. Income Distribution in U.S. Compared with Majority of Grassroots Initiatives  Income Range 

U.S. Income Distribution  Percentage* 

Income Range 

Majority of Reporting  Grassroots Initiatives 

$0 to $24,999 

25.7% 

$24,000 or less 

1‐20% 

$25,000 to $49,999 

24.8% 

$24,001‐$45,000 

1‐40% 

$50,000 to $74,999 

17.7% 

$45,001‐$90,000 

1‐40% 

$75,000 to $99,999 

11.4% 

 

 

$100,000 to $149,999 

12.1% 

$90,001‐$150,000 

1‐20% 

$150,000 or more 

8.4% 

$150,001 or more 

1‐20% 

* Source: US Census Bureau, 2010:  Income statistics for the year 2010 

      25  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 


Population by Age Group Distribution in Geographic Areas Served (Question 10)  Approximately one‐third of the respondents did not know the age group distribution of the populations in the  geographic areas served by the children and nature initiatives.  Table 10 displays the known distributions of age  groups in the geographic areas served by the children and nature initiatives that responded to the  questionnaire.   The data from the majority of the reporting grassroots initiatives is aligned with the U.S.  population by age in 2010 (see Table 11.)  This item is new to the 2011 questionnaire.  Table 10. Population by Age Group  Age Group 

  

Birth to under five years 

Five to nine years 

Ten to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

Percentage of Population  1‐  21 ‐  41 ‐  61 ‐  Total     0%  >80%  20%  40%  60%  80%  Reporting  frequency  7  38  5  1  0  2  53  % of  9%  72%  9%  2%  0%  4%     initiatives  frequency  5  26  12  6  2  0  51  % of  6%  51%  24%  12%  4%  0%     initiatives  frequency  2  30  8  11  0  0  51  % of  3%  59%  16%  22%  0%  0%     initiatives  frequency  6  33  10  1  0  1  51  % of  8%  65%  20%  2%  0%  2%     initiatives 

  Table 11. Age Distribution in U.S. Compared with Majority of Grassroots Initiatives  Age Range 

U.S. Age Distribution  Percentage* 

Age Range

Majority of Reporting  Grassroots Initiatives 

Birth to under five years 

7.0%

Birth to under five years 

1‐20% 

Five to nine years 

6.8%

Five to nine years 

1‐20% 

Ten to 14 years 

6.5%

Ten to 14 years 

1‐20% 

15 to 19 years 

6.9%

15 to 19 years 

1‐20% 

* Source: US Census Bureau,  Population by Age and Sex: 2010 

  Methods of Communication Used (Questions 11‐19)  Grassroots initiatives use a variety of communication methods.  Data displayed in Chart 11 and Table 12a‐d are  based on questionnaire items 11 through 19 that asked respondents to estimate the numbers reached by  various methods of communication.  Note that response options with a frequency of zero are not included.    The vast majority of the children and nature initiatives, 88% (69), have a website.  During Fall 2011, those with  websites reported less than 500 unique visitors, although another 25% did not know their total number of  unique visitors.  Nearly two‐thirds (67%, 52) are using social networking tools such as Facebook and Twitter,  26  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 


although nearly one‐third (29%) communicate with fewer than 250 recipients and for nearly that many  initiatives (25%) the number of recipients is unknown.  Nearly two‐thirds have electronic newsletters.  Of those  with electronic newsletters, nearly half (44%) distribute to fewer than 500 recipients.  Only 18% have print  newsletters.    Chart 11. Communication Methods Used 

Website

69 (88%)

Social networking tools

52 (67%)

E‐newsletter

49 (63%) 14 ((18%)

Print newsletter 0

20

40

60

Number of Grassroots Initiatives

80

 

Since 2009 there have been increases in the number of initiatives that have a website (change from 75% in 2009  to 88% in 2011), use social networking tools (64% up to 67%) and distribute e‐newsletters (from 50% to 63%),  and a decrease in the number of initiatives that distribute print newsletters (29% down to 18%.)    Table 12. Numbers Reached by Communication Methods Used   by Children and Nature Initiatives  Table 12a.  Website ‐ Number of unique visitors in the past month  Response Options  Number of Initiatives Percent of Initiatives Reporting Less than 500  21 54%  501‐1,000  4 10%  1,001‐2,500  5 13%  2,501‐5,000  3 8%  5,001‐10,000  3 8%  10,001‐20,000  3 8%  Unknown  30 Total number of initiatives responding  69 Table 12b.  Social Networking Tools – Number of fans or followers  Response options  Number of Initiatives Percent of Initiatives Reporting Less than 50  7 15%  51‐100  10 21%  101‐250  12 25%  251‐500  8 17%  501‐1,000  6 13%  1,001‐2,500  3 6%  2,501‐5,000  2 4%  Unknown  16 Total number of initiatives responding  64 27  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 


Table 12c.  E‐newsletter – Number on distribution list Response options  Number of Initiatives Percent of Initiatives Reporting Less than 500  28 58%  501‐1,000  10 21%  1,001‐2,500  5 10%  2,501‐5,000  2 4%  5,001‐10,000  2 4%  More than 200,001  1 2%  Unknown  16 Total number of initiatives responding  64 Table 12d.  Print Newsletter – Number on distribution list Response options  Number of Initiatives Percent of Initiatives Reporting Less than 500  5 38%  501‐1,000  1 8%  2,501‐5,000  3 23%  5,001‐10,000  3 23%  More than 200,001  1 8%  Unknown  15 Total number of initiatives responding  28 Total number of initiatives  78   

  Outputs, Activities and Participants  Activities in the Last 12 Months (Question 20)  In the last year more than two‐thirds of the grassroots initiatives were engaged in at least one of the activities  listed in the questionnaire.  Nearly three‐quarters of the initiatives provided children’s outdoor programs or  events and exhibits or booths (86% and 71% respectively).  Approximately two‐thirds of the grassroots initiatives  provided family events (65%) and developed collateral materials such as brochures, publications or educational  products (63%).  Approximately half provided organizational development (56%), media interviews (53%), public  lectures (51%) and networking meetings (49%). The activities and number and percentage of initiatives engaged  in these activities appear in Chart 12.   Other reported grassroots activities undertaken in the last year include:     • • • • • • • •

Advocacy for California State Parks, letter writing for a local adventure playground set to close, blog  writing;  Development of website;  Medical education;  Passport to Adventure;  Press releases, social media, web and application design;  Screening of Play Again film;  Teacher training; and  Writing Scottish Government publication ‐ Outdoor Learning Resource Pack. 

28  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 


Chart 12. Reported Activities of Grassroots Initiatives in the Last Year 80

70

Number of Initiatives

60

50

40

30

67,86%

55,71% 51,65% 49,63% 44,56% 41, 53% 40,51% 38,49% 33,42% 32,41% 31,40% 26,33% 27,35% 25,32% 24,31%

20

18,23%

17,22%

15,19%

10 4,5% 0

 

  For the 2011 questionnaire, ten additional choices were listed for this item.   Comparisons of the nine categories  that appear on both the 2009 and 2011 questionnaires appear in Table 13.   The number of grassroots initiatives  increased for three activities between the two administrations of the questionnaires: children’s outdoor  programs or events (up 16 initiatives), exhibits or booths (up 11 initiatives), and family events (up 9 initiatives.)   Six activities decreased but were still engaged in by 40% or more of the initiatives.   

29  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 


Table 13. Comparisons of 2009 and 2011 Activities Engaged in by Grassroots Initiatives in the Last Year  2011 Grassroots  Initiatives  (#,%)  Total number of  initiatives = 78 

Children’s outdoor programs/events 

2009 Grassroots  Initiatives  (#,%)  Total number of  initiatives = 72  51, 71%

Exhibits/booths  Family Events  Public Lectures  Organizational Development  Professional workshops  Media interviews  Capacity building  Networking meetings 

44, 61% 40, 56% 41, 57% 44, 61% 38, 53% 48, 67% 46, 64% 53, 74%

55, 71% 49, 63% 40, 51% 41, 53% 31, 40% 40, 51% 32, 41% 38, 49%

Activities in the Last Year 

Comparison  2009 to 2011 

67, 86% 

 

Total Audience in the Last Year (Question 21)    In the last year more than one‐fourth of the grassroots initiatives reached between 101 and 1,000 participants  and nearly another quarter reached between 1,001 and 5,000.   The number and percentage of initiatives and  the audience numbers reached are displayed in the Table 14 and Chart 13.    Table 14. Estimated Participants Reached by Children and Nature Initiatives  in the Last Year  Response Options Less than 100  101 – 1,000  1,001 ‐ 5000 5,001 ‐ 10,000  10,001 to 20,000  20,001 to 50,000  50,001 to 100,000  100,001 to 250,000  250,001 to 500,000  More than 500,001  Unknown  Total 

Number of Initiatives 2 21 19 8 5 2 6 5 1 3 6 78

Percent  3%  27%  24%  10%  6%  3%  8%  6%  1%  4%  8%  100% 

  A conservative estimate is that the total audience of participants reached by the respondents from the reporting  seventy‐two grassroots initiatives is between 2.7 and 4.25 million.  On the 2011 questionnaire, two additional  response options were added to more accurately capture annual audience numbers that exceeded 100,000  participants.  Sixty‐eight initiatives reported participant numbers in 2009; the estimate of total audience reached  was between 900,000 and 1,500,000 in the previous year.  The numbers reached on an annual basis are  considerably higher in 2011 than in 2009.    

30  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 


Chart 13. Estimated Participants Reached by Children & Nature Initiatives in the Last Year  Total number of initiatives reporting participant estimates = 72 

More than 500,001 250,001 to 500,000 100,001 to 250,000 50,001 to 100,000 20,001 to 50,000 10,001 to 20,000 5001 ‐ 10,000 1001 ‐ 5000 101 ‐ 1000 Less than 100 0

5

10

15

20

25

Number of Children & Nature Initiatives

Underserved Youth Reached in the Last Year (Question 22)  On the questionnaire respondents were asked to estimate the percentage of underserved youth who comprised  their audiences.  “Under‐served” was defined as families under the poverty threshold as set by the U.S.  Department of Health and Human Services (see http://aspe.hhs.gov/poverty/08Poverty.shtml.)  Although nearly  a quarter (24%) of the children and nature initiatives do not know the number of underserved  youth who were  reached in the last year, the majority estimated their activities reached audiences comprised of between 1‐25%  underserved youth.  Table 15 displays the numbers and percentages of grassroots initiatives and the estimated  percentage of underserved youth reached.    Table 15.  Underserved Youth Reached in the Last Year  Percentage 

Number of Initiatives

0%  1‐10%  11‐25%  26%‐50%  51%‐75%  Over 75%  Don't know  Total number of  initiatives 

2 21 11 11 10 4 19 78

31  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 

Percent of Total  Respondents  3% 27% 14% 14% 13% 5% 24% Total number of  initiatives responding 

Percent with Known  Underserved Youth Data  3%  36%  19%  19%  17%  7%    59 


Distribution of Children and Nature Network Tools (Question 23)  More than a quarter of the grassroots initiatives used or distributed thirteen of the nineteen C&NN Tools listed  on the questionnaire.  Chart 14 displays the numbers and percentages of grassroots initiatives and their use of  C&NN tools.  Of particular note is that nearly two‐thirds of the initiatives used or distributed the research and  studies available through C&NN.  Nearly half of the grassroots initiatives reported using the C&NN electronic  newsletters and Facebook.  A third or more of the initiatives used the Nature Clubs for Families Toolkit, C&NN  Community Action Guide, Let’s G.O.! (Get Outside) Toolkit, C&NN Report on the Movement to Re‐Connect  Children with the Natural World and blogs.    Other tools listed as used and comments given include the following:  • • • • • • • •

Natural Teachers information;  Our website links to Children and Nature website;  Professional Toolkit we produced;  Quotes from Rich or his book;  radio and news media, Mother Nature's Child film, network member;  Rich Louv's Field Notes;  RSS feeds; and  School presentations based on children's book.   

  Chart 14. Children & Nature Network Tools Used Research and Studies

49,63%

C&NN electronic newsletters

38,49%

Facebook

35,45%

Nature Clubs for Families Toolkit

34,44%

C&NN Community Action Guide

33,42%

Let’s G.O.! (Get Outside) Toolkit

31,40%

C&NN Report: Movement to Re‐Connect Children…

29,37%

Blogs

28,36%

Web site news summaries

25,32%

NING C&NN Community Site—C&NN Connect

24,31%

Book list on web site

21,27%

Power Point Presentations

20,26%

Video links on web site

19,24%

Natural Leaders Network Toolkit

15,19%

YouTube

11,14%

Twitter

10,13%

Where Nature Meets Story

8,10%

Natural Service Network Toolkit

5,6%

Leadership Writing Series

4,5% 0

32  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 

20 40 Number (Percent) of Initiatives 

60  


On the 2011 questionnaire, twelve additional response options were given for this item.   Comparisons of the  seven categories that appear on both the 2009 and 2011 questionnaires appear in Table 16.   The number of  grassroots initiatives increased slightly using three tools (Power Point presentations, Nature Clubs for Families  Toolkit, C&NN electronic newsletters) and decreased slightly using two tools (Research and Studies, C&NN  Community Action Guide) between the two administrations of the questionnaires.  Eight to ten fewer initiatives  used two tools (Report on the Movement to Re‐Connect Children with the Natural World, Website news  summaries) between the 2009 and 2011 questionnaires.   Table 16. Comparisons of 2009 and 2011 C&NN Tools Used by Grassroots Initiatives in the Last Year  Children & Nature Network   Tools Used in the Last Year 

Comparison  2009 to 2011 

Power Point presentations  Nature Clubs for Families Toolkit  C&NN electronic newsletters  Research and Studies  C&NN Community Action Guide  Report on the Movement to Re‐Connect  Children with the Natural World  Website news summaries 

 

2009 Grassroots  Initiatives  (#,%)  Total number of  initiatives = 72  16, 22% 31, 43% 36, 50%

2011 Grassroots  Initiatives  (#,%)  Total number of  initiatives = 78  20, 26% 34, 44%

50, 69% 35, 49%

49, 63% 33, 42%

37, 51% 

29, 37% 

35, 49%

25, 32%

38, 49% 

    New Nature and Place‐based Efforts (Questions 24 and 25)  Half or more of the grassroots initiatives reported that school gardens or habitat projects, natural play areas,  trails or trail projects, and community gardens had been established since they started their activities.  More  than a quarter of the grassroots initiatives started nature clubs for families and neighborhood parks. These  nature and place‐based opportunities are displayed in Table 17 with the number and percentage of initiatives.    These findings indicate that between 1,000 and 3,000 new nature and place‐based opportunities for children  have been established in the areas served by these grassroots initiatives.  The 2011 Questionnaire added  neighborhood parks and trails or trail projects as response options.  The 2009 results indicated at least 500 new  nature clubs for families, school gardens, natural play areas, and community gardens for children had been  established.  The grassroots initiatives reported that those four efforts added between 725 and 2000 new nature  and place‐based opportunities, indicating growth of at least another 225 new opportunities in the last two  years.     Table 17.  New Nature and Place‐based Efforts Started by Children and Nature Initiatives 

None  10 or less  11 — 20  21 or more  Don't know 

 

Table 17a.  Community Gardens Response Options Number of Initiatives  20 29 6 5 18

  33  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 

Percent 26% 37% 8%  6%  23%


Table 17b.  Natural Play Areas None  10 or less  11 — 20  21 or more  Don't know 

15 45 1 4 13

19% 58% 1%  5%  17%

21 29 2 1 25

27% 37% 3%  1%  32%

Table 17c.  Nature Clubs for Families None  10 or less  11 — 20  21 or more  Don't know  Table 17d.  Neighborhood Parks None  10 or less  11 — 20  21 or more  Don't know 

36 15 3 3 21 Table 17e.  School Gardens or Habitat Projects Response options Number of Initiatives  None  15 10 or less  30 11 — 20  6 21 or more  11 Don't know  16 Table 17f.  Trails or Trail Projects None  19 10 or less  29 11 — 20  5 21 or more  5 Don't know  20 Total number of initiatives  78

46% 19% 4%  4%  27% Percent 19% 38% 8%  14% 21% 24% 37% 6%  6%  26%   

  Respondents listed they had initiated the following other new children and nature activities.    • • • • • • • •

A local business that deals with alternative energy sources noticed our efforts of a community garden. This spring,  2011, they came and built some new benches and added to our landscaping efforts. We would have liked to have  more involvement with our nature group but they did not want children working with the tools they had.  'Bringing Nature to Life' Workshop series has grown organically with people and organizations across North  America paying to attend.  Community outreach events reaching diverse audiences with conservation messages and activities.  Exploration & increased utilization of existing local parks & nature preserves, interest from local daycares & schools  on how to integrate nature into curriculum more.  Family Discovery Walks led by naturalists.  Family habitat projects.   Forest Kindergartens ‐ 8 pilot projects. Supported various freelancers set up, the development of two charitable  trusts and a Community Interest Company.  Gateway CNC has been slow to achieve establishment of specific facilities, projects, family activity groups due to  lack of funding and active members. Our member organizations (in our collaborative) have achieved many of the  above goals individually, however ‐ though they do not all report these things to Gateway CNC. Gateway CNC has  34  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 


• • • •

• • • •

• • • • • •

accomplished two events ‐ at Earth Day 2010 and 2011 in Forest Park in the City of St. Louis where we "connected"  children with small mammal pelts and skulls to increase their nature "awareness".   Get Outdoors Florida is collaborating closely with the Florida Youth Conservation Center Network sponsored by the  Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, some of their sites are also included.  Get to Know Unconference participation.  Library developing a "nature literacy" garden and teachers committing to bringing kids outside.  Pediatric medical community wearing "Has Your Child Played Outside Today?" buttons; Ohio Children's Outdoor Bill  of Rights; Environmental Literacy Plan draft; The Report on Ohio's Initiative to Reconnect Children with Nature;  Public Awareness Campaign; Helping grow statewide collaboration, organization and capacity of other Ohio  grassroots initiatives.  Permanent mud wallow established in existing communitypark.  Professional development‐ especially in training child care center evaluators to award points for centers with built  environments and activities that promote outdoor play in nature.  Quest Discovery programming (self‐guided environmental scavenger hunts throughout the state for families).  Rain gardens have been planted (with community involvement) at Antioch University New England, Keene  Recreation Center (planted with help from all 4th grade classes over the course of a day last spring), a local  elementary school and in front of the Keene Police station. Vision 2020 efforts to make Keene the healthiest  community by 2020 has a big push for healthy eating/active living among youth and adults. We're working to  create a related program to engage youth, particularly youth with mental and physical challenges.  Schoolyard habitats; outdoor education lessons.  Service learning projects have been established at parks throughout Rutland County, Vermont.   Service Learning Projects to include recycling programs; Nature Scene Investigator program; compost bins; fire  restoration projects; outdoor STEM learning; bird box construction; family service teams; MLK and Earth Day Day of  Service (trail maintenance, invasive plant removal, etc.).  Teachers taking their students outside regularly...as well as their own children.  The organization has received the endorsement of Governor Sam Brownback for the Kansans for Children in Nature  Plan, and is now determining next steps for implementing the Plan.  Two Green Lots, one Kids Corridor initiative, one paid Green Jobs initiative, one unpaid Green Jobs initiative. 

  Other comments included:  •

Without surveying the entire state there is no way for us to know of our impact. We do not have the coalition  capacity to track this. 

Audiences Reached by New Efforts (Question 26 and 27)  The item that asked respondents to estimate the total audience numbers reached by new initiatives was  changed on the 2011 questionnaire. The largest response option in 2009, more than 100,001, was expanded to  three response options on the 2011 questionnaire: 100,001–250,000, 250,001–500,000, and more than 500,001.   This change is partially responsible for the increase in estimated audience numbers; it also increases the  accuracy of the estimates that appear in this section.  Although nearly a fifth (19%) of the respondents are unsure of the size of the audiences reached by the six new  activities, 63 grassroots initiatives (81%) reported the total audience numbers participating in new community  gardens, natural play areas, nature clubs for families, neighborhood parks, school gardens or habitat projects,  and trails or trail projects.  One‐third of the initiatives that knew their participant numbers in 2011 reported  reaching between 101 and 1,000 participants with their new children and nature activities and opportunities;  another third reached between 1,000 and 10,000 participants. Estimated number of 2011 participants appears  in Chart 15 and Table 18; estimated number of participants reported for 2009 appears in Table 19.      35  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 


Chart 15. Participant Numbers Reached by New Children and Nature Activities and Opportunities, 2011  More than 500,001 250,001 –500,000 100,001 – 250,000 50,001‐100,000 20,001‐50,000 10,001‐20,000 5,001‐10,000 1,001‐5,000 101‐1,000 Less than 100 0

5

10

15

20

25

Number of Children & Nature Initiatives

    Table 18. Participant Numbers Reached by 6 New Children and Nature Activities and Opportunities  including Community Gardens, Natural Play Areas, Nature Clubs for Families, Neighborhood Parks, School  Gardens or Habitat Projects, Trails or Trail Projects, 2011  Response Options 

Number of Initiatives 

Percent of Total Respondents 

Less than 100  101‐1,000  1,001‐5,000  5,001‐10,000  10,001‐20,000  20,001‐50,000  50,001‐100,000  100,001–250,000  250,001–500,000  More than 500,001  Unknown  Total number of initiatives  

2  21  11  10  5  5  2  3  1  3  15  78 

3% 27% 14% 13% 6% 6% 3% 4% 1% 4% 19% Number of initiatives responding

Percent with Known  Participant Numbers  3% 33% 17% 16% 8% 8% 3% 5% 2% 5% 63

The total number participating in six new activities in 2011 is at least two million and may be as large as five  million.  These numbers are considerably larger than the 2009 questionnaire with estimates between 305,000  and half a million for total audience numbers reached in four new activities.   36  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 


Table 19. Participant Numbers Reached by 4 New Children and Nature Activities and Opportunities  including Nature Clubs for Families, School Gardens, Natural Play Areas, and Community Gardens, 2009  Response Options 

Number of Initiatives 

Percent of Total Respondents 

Less than 100  101‐1,000  1,001‐5,000  5,001‐10,000  10,001‐20,000  20,001‐50,000  50,001‐100,000  More than 100,001  Unknown  Total number of initiatives  

4  18  18  3  2  0  1  2  21  69 

6% 26% 26% 4% 3% 0% 1% 3% 30% Number of initiatives responding

Percent with Known  Participant Numbers  8% 38% 38% 6% 4% 0% 2% 4% 48

  In Table 20, the six new children and nature activities and opportunities are broken down by the estimates of  total audience reached.  Although approximately a fifth of the respondents are unsure of the size of the  audiences reached by their new activities, a range of participants can be calculated for those grassroots  initiatives that knew their audience numbers.   Table 20. Cross Tabulations of 6 New Activities and Opportunities with Estimates of Total Audience Reached  Since your initiative began, approximately how many nature clubs, school gardens, natural play areas and community  gardens have been established in your region, either directly or indirectly, as a result of your efforts?   Table 17a. Community Gardens    None  10 or  less 

11 —  20  21 or  more  Don't  know 

Number of  Community  Gardens 

What do you estimate as the total audience reached by these new initiatives? (check one) 

20 

Less than 100 2 1 

21 10 

1,001 – 5,000 11 3 

28 

19 

10 

101 – 1,000

10 2 

10,001 – 20,000 5 0 

20,001 – 50,000 4 1 

50,001 – 100,000 2 0 

100,001 – 250,000 3 0 

250,001 – 500,000 1 0 

More than 500,001 3 0 

5,00110,000

Unknown 16 3 

Table 17b. Natural Play Areas    None  10 or  less 

11 —  20  21 or  more  Don't  know 

Number of  Natural Play  Areas 

What do you estimate��as the total audience reached by these new initiatives? (check one) 

15 

Less than 100 1 

1,001 – 5,000 3 

44 

12 

14 

101 – 1,000

10,001 – 20,000 0 

20,001 – 50,000 0 

50,001 – 100,000 0 

100,001 – 250,000 0 

250,001 – 500,000 0 

More than 500,001 0 

5,00110,000

37  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 

Unknown 3 


Table 17c. Nature Clubs for Families    None  10 or  less 

11 —  20  21 or  more  Don't  know 

Number of  Nature Clubs  for Families 

What do you estimate as the total audience reached by these new initiatives? (check one) 

21 

Less than 100 0 

1,001 – 5,000 6 

29 

13 

25 

11 

101 – 1,000

10,001 – 20,000 1 

20,001 – 50,000 2 

50,001 – 100,000 1 

100,001 – 250,000 1 

250,001 – 500,000 0 

More than 500,001 1 

5,00110,000

Unknown 1 

Table 17d.  Neighborhood Parks    None  10 or  less 

11 —  20  21 or  more  Don't  know 

Number of  Neighborhood  Parks 

What do you estimate as the total audience reached by these new initiatives? (check one) 

36 

Less than 100 1 

17 

1,001 – 5,000 5 

15 

21 

10 

101 – 1,000

10,001 – 20,000 0 

20,001 – 50,000 3 

50,001 – 100,000 1 

100,001 – 250,000 0 

250,001 – 500,000 0 

More than 500,001 0 

5,00110,000

Unknown 5 

Table 17e.  School Gardens or Habitat Projects    None  10 or  less 

11 —  20  21 or  more  Don't  know 

Number of  School Gardens  Less than or Habitat  100 Projects 

What do you estimate as the total audience reached by these new initiatives? (check one)  101 – 1,000

1,001 – 5,000

5,00110,000

10,001 – 20,000

20,001 – 50,000

50,001 – 100,000

100,001 – 250,000

250,001 – 500,000

More than 500,001

Unknown

15 

29 

11 

17 

10 

Table 17f.  Trails or Trail Projects    None  10 or  less 

11 —  20  21 or  more  Don't  know 

Number of  Trails or Trail  Projects 

What do you estimate as the total audience reached by these new initiatives? (check one) 

19 

Less than 100 1 

1,001 – 5,000 4 

29 

20 

10 

101 – 1,000

10,001 – 20,000 0 

20,001 – 50,000 0 

50,001 – 100,000 1 

100,001 – 250,000 0 

250,001 – 500,000 0 

More than 500,001 0 

5,00110,000

38  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 

Unknown 2 


Table 21 displays estimates of the range of audience numbers reached by the six new children and nature  activities and opportunities in 2011 as well as the estimated numbers for the four new activities and  opportunities for which data were gathered in 2009.  The audience estimates for two opportunities added to the  2011 questionnaire are by far the largest, with participants at neighborhood parks estimated at 2.3 million to 4.7  million and participants on trails or trail projects at 2.2 to 4.7 million.  School gardens or habitat projects  received the next highest audience numbers; the total audience reached through these school‐based activities is  at least 2.2 million and may be as large as 4.6 million or more.  Community gardens, natural play areas and  nature clubs for families had at least a million participants each in 2011.  The smallest estimate of the number of  participants was in nature clubs for families, still impressive with an upper range that may be as large as two  million or more.    Each of the four activities and opportunities for which data were gathered twice show huge increases in  audience numbers in 2011 compared with 2009.  The order of audience size was slightly different for the  activities and opportunities in 2009: school gardens or habitat projects followed by natural play areas,  community gardens and nature clubs for families.  Table 21.  Comparison of 2009 and 2011 Estimates of Audience Numbers Reached by  Children and Nature Activities and Opportunities  2011 

2009 

Neighborhood Parks  Lower Range  Upper Range  2.3 million  4.7 million  Trails or Trail Projects  Lower Range  Upper Range  2.2 million  4.7 million  School Gardens or Habitat Projects  Lower Range  Upper Range  2.2 million  4.6 million  Community Gardens  Lower Range  Upper Range  1.5 million  3.5 million  Natural Play Areas  Lower Range  Upper Range  1.3 million  2.9 million  Nature Clubs for Families  Lower Range  Upper Range  1.0 million  2.0 million 

Neighborhood Parks  Data not gathered in 2009  Trails or Trail Projects  Data not gathered in 2009  School Gardens or Habitat Projects  Lower Range  Upper Range  293,000  530,000  Community Gardens  Lower Range  Upper Range  180,000  360,000  Natural Play Areas  Lower Range  Upper Range  248,000  500,000  Nature Clubs for Families  Lower Range  Upper Range  172,000  320,000 

The percentage of underserved youth who participated in these new activities and opportunities ranges from  none to 75%.  Numbers and percentages of underserved youth reached in 2011 and 2009 are presented in  Tables 22 and 23 respectively.  Although more than 36% (28) of the grassroots initiatives in 2011 are unsure of  the percentage of underserved youth reached by their new initiatives, 64% (50) reported data about  39  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 


underserved youth.  Of those grassroots initiatives that knew the number of underserved youth, more than a  quarter (26%) reached audiences comprised of between 1‐10% underserved youth.  Nearly a quarter of the  initiatives reached participants that included between 11‐25% underserved youth, the same number reaching  participants that included between 26‐50% underserved youth.  New children and nature activities and  opportunities offered by another 16% reached audiences that included between 51 to 75% underserved youth.   In at least four initiatives, at least 75% of the audiences were underserved youth.    Table 22.  Underserved Youth Reached by 6 New Children and Nature Activities and Opportunities  including Community Gardens, Natural Play Areas, Nature Clubs for Families, Neighborhood Parks,  School Gardens or Habitat Projects, Trails or Trail Projects, 2011  Percentage   0%  1‐10%  11‐25%  26%‐50%  51%‐75%  Over 75%  Don't know  Total number of initiatives responding 

Number of  Initiatives  1 13 12 12 8 4 28

Percent of Total  Respondents  1% 17% 15% 15% 10% 5% 36%

Percent with Known  Underserved Youth Data  2%  26%  24%  24%  16%  8%    50 

  Comparison of the 2009 and 2011 data indicate considerable increases in the number and percentage of  reporting initiatives that included underserved youth in their children and nature activities and opportunities.   Twenty‐eight initiatives did not report underserved youth data in either years.  In 2011, however, only one  initiative reported no underserved youth in their children and nature activities and opportunities, compared  with six in 2009.  The three intervals between 11% and 75% show substantial increases from 2009 in the number  of initiatives reaching underserved youth.  Table 23.  Underserved Youth Reached by 4 New Children and Nature Activities and Opportunities  including Nature Clubs for Families, School Gardens, Natural Play Areas, and Community Gardens, 2009  Percentage  0%  1‐10%  11‐25%  26%‐50%  51%‐75%  Over 75%  Don't know  Total number of initiatives responding 

Number of  Initiatives  6 14 9 6 2 4 28

Percent of Total  Respondents  9% 20% 13% 9% 3% 6% 41%

Percent with Known  Underserved Youth Data   15%  34%  22%  15%  5%  10%    41 

  The estimates of underserved youth reached by the six new children and nature activities and opportunities in  2011 are reported in Table 24, which also displays the estimates for 2009.  The new activities and opportunities  are ordered by the 2011 upper range estimates of underserved youth.  The order is slightly different from those  displayed for total audience numbers in Table 21; still, the largest numbers of underserved youth are reached  40  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 


through the same activities and opportunities: school gardens or habitat projects, neighborhood parks and trails  or trail projects.  The 2011 estimates for underserved youth in four new children and natures activities and  opportunities are all considerably larger than those from 2009.  In two years, the estimates are at least 2.5 times  larger for underserved youth using natural play areas.  The number of underserved youth participating in nature  clubs for families at least tripled.  The numbers quadrupled for underserved youth involved in school gardens  and habitat projects and are at least six times larger for underserved youth with access to community gardens.  Since respondents could check all that apply in the question about these options, their reported audience  numbers and underserved youth may have been counted for more than one of these activities.  Thus it would  not be appropriate to total the numbers reported in Table 24.   

Table 24.  Comparison of 2009 and 2011 Estimates of Number of Underserved Youth  Reached by New Children and Nature Activities and Opportunities  2011 

2009 

School Gardens or Habitat Projects  Lower Range  Upper Range  451,000  1,639,000  Neighborhood Parks  Lower Range  Upper Range  484,000  1,574,000  Trails or Trail Projects  Lower Range  Upper Range  454,000  1,546,000  Community Gardens  Lower Range  Upper Range  360,000  1,180,000  Natural Play Areas  Lower Range  Upper Range  216,000  856,000  Nature Clubs for Families  Lower Range  Upper Range  94,000  371,000 

School Gardens or Habitat Projects  Lower Range  Upper Range  89,000  401,500  Neighborhood Parks  Data not gathered in 2009  Trails or Trail Projects  Data not gathered in 2009  Community Gardens  Lower Range  Upper Range  45,250  176,600  Natural Play Areas  Lower Range  Upper Range  87,500  316,100  Nature Clubs for Families  Lower Range  Upper Range  20,750  110,750 

    Participating Audiences and Organizations (Question 29)  Respondents selected among twenty‐eight audiences and organizations that participated in their children and  nature initiatives.  The percentage and number of initiatives and their selections appear in Chart 16.  Three‐ fourths of the initiatives named these participants: educators (79%); nature centers (76%) and local non‐profit  organizations (74%).  Approximately two‐thirds reported participants from colleges or universities, parks, public  school teachers, and natural resource professionals.  Half or more listed these participants:  state agencies,  childcare providers, scouts, community organizers, grandparents and businesses.  41  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 


Chart 16. Audiences and Organizations Participating in Children & Nature Initiatives  Educators Nature centers Local non‐profit organizations Colleges or universities Parks Public school teachers Natural resource professionals State agencies Childcare providers Scouts Community organizers Grandparents Businesses Private school teachers Home schoolers Health care providers Federal agencies Camp staff and counselors Landscape designers Faith‐based organizations Children’s museums Boys and Girls Clubs Libraries 4‐H Zoos and aquaria YMCA or YWCA Planners Parent teacher organizations

79%(62) 76%(59) 74%(58) 67%(52) 64%(50) 63%(49) 62%(48) 54%(42) 54%(42) 53%(41) 53%(41) 50%(39) 50%(39) 45%(35) 45%(35) 45%(35) 42%(33) 41%(32) 40%(31) 38%(30) 33%(26) 33%(26) 32%(25) 31%(24) 29%(23) 27%(21) 26%(20) 24%(19) 0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

Number of Initiatives 

  Other audiences and organizations identified as participants in the responding initiatives were: arboreta,  botanic, public and wildflower gardens (5); museums (3); apiary (1); military (1); parents (1); and researchers (1).   This item was new on the 2011 questionnaire. 

  Programs and Activities  Items 30 through 31 examine the timing and reported attendance of programs and activities offered by children  and nature initiatives by season, week, day and time of day.  These items are new to the 2011 Questionnaire.   Tables 25 through 31 present these data.  The findings indicate that initiatives most frequently offered activities  weekly (45%), on weekends (77%) and year‐round (78%).  The best attended programs or activities were offered  monthly (26%), in the afternoon (22%), and occurred on Saturdays (44%) in spring (26%).   

42  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 


Table 25. Programs and Activities by Hour and Day  (Question 30a)  Weekends  60  77%  Weekdays  47  60%  Afternoon  40  51%  Morning  39  50%  After‐school  33  42%  Evening  30  38%  Other, please specify  19  24%    Many of the comments in the Other categories for questions 30‐31 indicated that respondents do not know or  do not provide programs or activities.  Rather partners or existing agencies provide programming for their  children and nature initiatives.  They also commented:  • • • • • • • •

All of the above, but our efforts are collaborative with partner organizations who provide the programming;   Holidays;   Nature Play Club is on weekends (The website is updated 3‐4 times throughout the week);  Our work has been focused on supporting professionals within agencies (work week);  Overnight eco‐programs, multiday programs;  Overnight youth summit (3 days);  Weekdays during summer, weekends year‐round and  We provide design consultations and educator workshops in diverse settings at diverse times.   

Table 26. Programs and Activities by Week   (Question 30b)  Weekly  35  45%  Monthly  33  42%  Quarterly  22  28%  Annually  18  23%  Other, please specify  24  31%    Respondents listed these comments in the Other column:  • • • • • • • • • •

A partner is a camp facility; their programs promote outdoors and run weekly;   Most weekends throughout the year, some weekday programming;   Our activities vary ‐ not regular in nature, except for one project that met with teachers on a monthly basis;  Seasonal  camps;  Some times of the year daily, other times very sporadic;  Sporadically ‐ a lot early in year (more than monthly) and then quiet summer and then picking back up ‐ averages  to bi‐monthly;  Sporadically throughout the year, associated with local, annual events, C&NN initiatives, national initiatives, or as  opportunities unfold;  We gather as a Steering Committee monthly and host two professional education sessions annually;  We involved our summer reading program children during the summer months and  Weekly in summer, monthly year‐round.  43  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 


Table 27.  Programs and Activities by Season   (Question 30c)  Year‐round  61  78%  Spring  25  32%  Fall  23  29%  Summer  21  27%  Winter  17  22%   

Table 28. Best Attended Programs and Activities by Hour   (Question 31a)  Afternoon  17  22%  Morning  16  21%  After‐school  9  12%  Evening  7  9%  Other, please specify  29  37%    In the Other column, respondents commented:  • • • • • •

Activities vary in nature (children and adults) and it's not possible to give one answer;   Day‐long, during the school day, morning and afternoon, work week hours, all day 8am‐4pm (5);  Depends on the program & the group participating (i.e. Scout, school, day camp);  It really varies depending upon the initiative and demographic of the target audience;  Weekend afternoons for actual "real‐life" nature club. First thing in the morning and last thing at night is when  moms are online reading the website and my social media and  Weekends (4). 

Table 29. Best Attended Programs and Activities by Day  (Question 31b)  Mondays  1  1%  Tuesdays  2  3%  Wednesdays  2  3%  Thursdays  2  3%  Fridays  4  5%  Saturdays  34  44%  Sundays  5  6%  Other, please specify  28  36%    Respondents specified these comments in the Other column:  • • • • •

As a science center we offer programming daily ‐ in July and August we have participants every day b/c they are our  highest visitation months;   Depends on the age ‐ Mondays being the least favorite during the school year;  During the school week;  It really varies depending upon the initiative and demographic of the target audience;  It varies‐‐Monday‐Friday represented;  44  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 


• • • • • • • •

Professional development sessions have varied;  Saturdays for Nature Play Club. Tuesday through Thursday for interactions on web and social media;  School programs = weekdays;  Family/community programs = weekends;  Summer weeklong intensive institute with teachers (87 hours);  Teacher planning days;  We have several scheduled dates which vary by season and  Weekdays ‐‐ no significant difference between days.   

Table 30. Best Attended Programs and Activities by Week   (Question 31c)  Monthly  20  26%  Weekly  15  19%  Quarterly  9  12%  Annually  7  9%  Other, please specify  27  35%    Respondents added:  • • •

Depends on type of programming & time of year;   July and August ‐ highest visitation months and  Schools participate annually; community program participants quarterly.   

Table 31. Best Attended Programs and Activities by Season  (Question 31d)  Spring  20  26%  Year‐round  14  18%  Summer  13  17%  Fall  10  13%  Winter  2  3%    Respondents also listed these options:  • • • •

Our initiative follows the school year;   Some partner groups do well year round, others summer only;  Spring and Fall and  Spring, Summer, Fall.  

  Outcomes Observed Changes (Question 28)  In response to the question about which of twenty changes have been observed since their children and nature  initiatives started, all of the questionnaire respondents saw at least one.   Most grassroots initiatives reported  increased awareness of the importance of nature for children’s healthy development (81%), followed by 67%  who reported media attention and educational benefits to participants, and 65% who reported community  45  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 


ssupport.  Nearly two‐thirdss observed de evelopment o or enhancemeent of places to play and learn outdoorrs in  n nature, partne erships with n new allies, co ommunity imp provements tto provide acccess to nature‐based expeeriences  aand increased d engagementt of non‐form mal educators.  More than  half the grasssroots initiatiives reported d  increased enggagement of fformal educators, increase ed engagemeent of early ch hildhood proffessionals and d  ccaregivers and d repeat participation by cchildren and yyouth in natuure‐based eveents and proggrams.  Changges,  n numbers and percentages appear in Chart 17.    R Respondents also listed these other obsserved changges:  • • • • •

Increa ased collaborattion among ageencies;  Increa ased corporate social responssibility efforts; Increa ased interest in creating nature play areas ffrom outside orrganizations; Naturee initiatives in child care centters and  Parent networking. 

  Chart 17. Ch hanges as a R Result of Child dren & Naturre Initiatives 

  O On the 2009 q questionnaire e only eight outcomes werre listed as re sponse optio ons.  Then eighty‐five perceent of the  q questionnaire e respondentss saw at leastt one of eight changes sincce their childrren and naturre initiatives sstarted  vversus one hu undred percen nt seeing at le east one chan nge to reportt in 2011.  Chaanges on thosse eight items  b between 2009 9 and 2011 arre displayed in Table 30.   Four outcom es showed an n increase in the number o of  ggrassroots inittiatives; four showed decrreases.  Of no ote are the faiirly large num mber of initiattives reportin ng  46  © 2012 Childre © en & Nature N Network 

 


changes in:  awareness of the importance of nature for children’s healthy development (up 12 initiatives),  number of children playing outdoors (up 9 initiatives), engagement of pediatricians and others in the medical  community (up 6 initiatives), funding for the children and nature initiative (down 6 initiatives), and partnerships  with new allies (down 12 initiatives.)    Table 32. Comparisons of 2009 and 2011 Changes as a Result of Children & Nature Initiatives  2009 Grassroots  Initiatives  (#,%)  Total number of  initiatives = 72 

2011 Grassroots  Initiatives  (#,%)  Total number of  initiatives = 78 

51, 71% 

63, 81% 

24, 33%

33, 42%

24, 33% 

30, 38% 

Media attention 

51, 71%

52, 67% 

Increased community support  Increased number of people participating in  events and programs  Increased funding for the children and nature  initiative  Partnerships with new allies 

53, 74%

51, 65%

 

39, 54% 

36, 46% 

 

26, 36% 

20, 26% 

61, 85%

49, 63%

Changes as a Result of Initiatives 

Increased awareness of the importance of  nature for children’s healthy development  Increased number of children playing outdoors Increased engagement of pediatricians and  others in the medical community 

Comparison  2009 to 2011 

 

Key Findings of Statistical Analyses  Relationships or correlations between characteristics of the grassroots children and nature initiatives and  several questionnaire items were analyzed using nonparametric inferential statistical analyses including  Kendall’s tau, Spearman’s rho and regression.  Statistically significant degrees of association (p<.05) emerged in  comparisons of these sets of data.  These results do not mean that one characteristic caused the other; merely  that a strong relationship exists between the two sets of characteristics.   Year grassroots initiatives formed (question 5) compared grassroots activities (question 20).  This finding  indicates the earlier the grassroots initiatives formed, the more grassroots activities an initiative is likely to have  engaged in during the past 12 months.  Conversely, the later a grassroots initiative formed, the fewer activities it  is likely to have engaged in during the last 12 months.  Said another way, grassroots initiatives that engaged in  few activities during the last 12 months are more likely to have been formed in the last year or two.    Year grassroots initiatives formed (question 5) compared to total audience in the last 12 months (question  21).  This association indicates the earlier the grassroots initiative formed, the larger the estimate of the total  audience reached in the past 12 months is likely to be.  In contrast, grassroots initiatives that reported smaller  total audience numbers during the last 12 months are more likely to have been formed in the last year or two. 

47  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 


Grassroots activities (question 20) compared to use of social networking tools (question 18).  The correlation  indicates that the larger the number of grassroots activities engaged in during the last 12 months, the greater  the likelihood is that an initiative uses social networking tools such as Facebook and twitter.   Alternatively, if  social networking tools are not used, the number of grassroots activities is likely to be smaller over the last 12  months.    Grassroots activities (question 20) compared to use of C&NN tools (question 23).  The finding points to the  conclusion that the larger the number of grassroots activities engaged in during the last 12 months, the larger  the number of C&NN tools used or distributed is likely to be.   This strong relationship also indicates that the  fewer the number of C&NN tools used or distributed, the smaller the number of grassroots activities likely to  have been engaged in during the last 12 months.  In other words, as number of activities increases so too does  the number of C&NN tools used; and vice versa, when more tools are used initiatives engage in more activities.  Grassroots activities (question 20) compared to changes seen (question 28).  The relationship indicates that as  activities increase so do the number of impacts; the larger the number of grassroots activities engaged in during  the last 12 months, the greater the number of changes likely to be seen since the start of the children and  nature initiative.   Conversely, the smaller the number of grassroots activities engaged in during the last 12  months, the fewer changes are likely to be seen as a direct or indirect result since the start of the children and  nature initiative.       

 

48  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 


Appendix Grassroots Leadership 2011 Survey © Children & Nature Network. All rights reserved. Please contact Cheryl Charles, Ph.D., President and CEO, Children & Nature Network, Cheryl@childrenandnature.org, for permission to use this survey. Support for development of this survey, analysis and reporting was provided by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. Grassroots Leadership 2011 Survey

 

Page 1 - Heading

The Grassroots Leadership survey is multiple choice and should only take a few minutes of your time to complete. Either "check one," "check all that apply," or fill in the blanks. If you do not complete this survey in one sitting, remember to SAVE YOUR ANSWERS by selecting the "Submit" button at the bottom of the page.

Page 1 - Question 1 - Open Ended - One Line

[Mandatory]

Name of your grassroots children and nature initiative: (fill in the blank)

Page 1 - Question 2 - Choice - One Answer (Bullets)

What is your organization structure? (check ALL that apply) Single agency or organization sponsor Informal collaborative of organizations, agencies and individuals Formal collaborative of organizations, agencies and individuals Lead agency with cooperating partner organizations Other, please specify

 

49  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 

[Mandatory]


Page 1 - Question 3 - Choice - One Answer (Bullets) Approximately what percentage of your initiative’s financial support for the organizational structure you selected in Question 2 comes from the following? (Total should be approximately 100%.)

  0

 

%

1- 20%

21 - 40%

41 - 60%

61 - 80%

> 8 0 %

Don't Know

B u s i n e s s e s  Federal agencies F o u n d a t i o n s I n d i v i d u a l s Local public agencies S t a t e a g e n c i e s Other, please specify

    Question 4 - Choice - One Answer (Bullets) per column [Mandatory]

What do you estimate are the total resources committed to your initiative in the past 12 months? Note: Respond to this question based on the resources of the organizational structure you selected in question 2, e.g., the budget, in-kind products or services and volunteers hours of your informal or formal children and nature collaborative. (check one per column) Financial Support, Budget Less than $100 $101 - $1,000 $1,001 - $5,000 $5,001 - $10,000 $10,001 to $20,000 $20,001 to $50,000 $50,001 to $100,000 $100,001 to $250,000 $250,001 to $500,000 More than $500,001 None Unknown

In-kind products or services Less than $100 $101 - $1,000 $1,001 - $5,000 $5,001 - $10,000 $10,001 to $20,000 $20,001 to $50,000 $50,001 to $100,000 $100,001 to $250,000 $250,001 to $500,000 More than $500,001 None Unknown

 

 

50  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 

Volunteer Hours Less than 100 hours 101 – 1,000 1,001 – 5,000 5,001 - 10,000 10,001 to 20,000 20,001 to 50,000 50,001 to 100,000 100,001 to 250,000 250,001 to 500,000 More than 500,001 hours None Unknown


Page 1 - Question 5 - Choice - One Answer (Bullets)

[Mandatory]

When was your children and nature initiative formed? (check one) 2005 or earlier 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Page 1 – Question 6 - Choice - Multiple Answers (Bullets)

[Mandatory]

What best describes the geographic area you serve? (check ALL that apply) Neighborhoods Suburban Area Rural Area City Metropolitan Area County/Parish Multi-county State Province Multi State/Multi Province Nation Tribal Nation Other, please specify

Page 2 - Heading

Page 2 of 5 If you do not complete this survey in one sitting, remember to SAVE YOUR ANSWERS by selecting the "Submit" button at the bottom of the page.

Page 2 - Heading

What can you tell us about the demographics of your region? [We know that this may take a little research on your part, but the information would be very helpful to us! Wikipedia is a good source of demographic information - search for your geographic region and use “demographics” as a key word.] http://en.wikipedia.org/

 

51  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 


Page 2 - Question 7 - Choice - One Answer (Bullets)

[Mandatory]

Approximately what is the population of the geographic area you serve with your children and nature initiative? (check one) 10,000 or less 10,001 to 25,000 25,001 to 50,000 50,001 to 100,000 100,001 – 500,000 500,001 – 1,000,000 1,000,001 – 5,000,000 5,000,001 to 10,000,000 10,000,001 or more Page 2 - Question 8 - Rating Scale - Matrix

[Mandatory]

Percent of Population by Race/Ethnicity (Please check one in each row below) 0

 

%

1- 20%

21 - 40%

41 - 60%

61 - 80%

> 8 0 %

Don't Know

W h i t e   ( n o t   H i s p a n i c   o r   L a t i n o )  Black or African American (not Hispanic or Latino)  Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander (not Hispanic or Latino)   H i s p a n i c   o r   L a t i n o  A s i a n   ( n o t   H i s p a n i c   o r   L a t i n o )  American  Indian or Alaska Native (not Hispanic or Latino)  T w o   o r   m o r e   r a c e s 

Page 2 - Question 9 - Rating Scale - Matrix

[Mandatory]

Percent of Population by Income Level (Please check one in each row below)

 

0

$24,000 or less per year per family  $24,001 to $45,000 per year per family   $45,001 to $90,000 per year per family   $90,001 to $150,000 per year per family   $150,001 or more per year per family     52  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 

%

1- 20%

21 - 40%

41 - 60%

61 - 80%

> 8 0 %

Don't Know


Page 2 - Question 10 - Rating Scale - Matrix

[Mandatory]

Percent of Population by Age Group (Please check one in each row below)

 

0

%

1- 20%

21 - 40%

41 - 60%

61 - 80%

> 8 0 %

Don't Know

B i r t h   t o   u n d e r   f i v e   y e a r s  F i v e   t o   n i n e   y e a r s  T e n   t o   1 4   y e a r s  1 5   t o   1 9   y e a r s 

Page 2 - Heading

Page 2 of 5 If you do not complete this survey in one sitting, remember to SAVE YOUR ANSWERS by selecting the "Submit" button at the bottom of the page.

Page 3 - Heading

Page 3 of 5

If you do not complete this survey in one sitting, remember to SAVE YOUR ANSWERS by selecting the "SUBMIT" button at the bottom of the page.

Page 3 - Question 11 - Choice - One Answer (Bullets)

Does your children and nature initiative have a Web site? (check one) Yes No Page 3 - Question 12- Open Ended - One Line

If yes, what is the URL? (fill in the blank)

 

53  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 

[Mandatory]


Page 3 - Question 13 - Choice - One Answer (Bullets)

If "Yes," how many “unique visitors” (a statistic used to count each individual who visits a Web site during a specific time period) did you have in the past month? (check one) Note: if you do not currently have a tool to measure this, you may want to use Google Analytics, a free tool that measures the effectiveness of your website. Less than 500 501-1,000 1,001-2,500 2,501-5,000 5,001 to 10,000 10,001 to 20,000 20,001 to 50,000 50,001 to 100,000 100,001 to 200,000 More than 200,001 Unknown Page 3 - Question 14 - Choice - One Answer (Bullets)

[Mandatory]

Do you have an electronic newsletter or listserv? (check one) Yes No Page 3 - Question 15 - Choice - One Answer (Bullets)

If yes, how many people are on your distribution list? (check one) Less than 500 501-1,000 1,001-2,500 2,501-5,000 5,001 to 10,000 10,001 to 20,000 20,001 to 50,000 50,001 to 100,000 100,001- 200,000 More than 200,001 Unknown Page 3 - Question 16 - Choice - One Answer (Bullets)

Do you have a print newsletter? (check one) Yes No

 

54  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 

[Mandatory]


Page 3 - Question 17 - Choice - One Answer (Bullets)

If yes, how many people are on your distribution list? (check one) Less than 500 501-1,000 1,001-2,500 2,501-5,000 5,001 to 10,000 10,001 to 20,000 20,001 to 50,000 50,001 to 100,000 100,001to 200,000 More than 200,001 Unknown Page 3 - Question 18 - Choice - One Answer (Bullets)

[Mandatory]

Are you using other social networking tools such as facebook and twitter? Yes No Other, please specify

Page 3 - Question 19 - Choice - One Answer (Bullets)

If yes, how many facebook fans do you have or followers on twitter or other social media sites? (check one) Less than 50 51-100 101-250 251-500 501 – 1,000 1,001 – 2,500 2,501 – 5,000 5,001 – 10,000 10,001 to 20,000 20,001 to 50,000 More than 50,001 Unknown Page 3 - Heading

Page 3 of 5 If you do not complete this survey in one sitting, remember to SAVE YOUR ANSWERS by selecting the "Submit" button at the bottom of the page.

55  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 


Page 4 - Heading

Page 4 of 5 If you do not complete this survey in one sitting, remember to SAVE YOUR ANSWERS by selecting the "SUBMIT" button at the bottom of the page.

Page 4 - Question 20 - Choice - Multiple Answers (Bullets)

[Mandatory]

In the past twelve months, in which of the following activities has your grassroots initiative engaged. (check all that apply) Briefings for elected officials Capacity building Children’s outdoor programs/events Convening annual conference or summit Development of collateral material such as brochures, publications or educational products Development of related research Exhibits/booths Family events Fundraising Let’s G.O.! (Get Outside) campaign in April 2011 Media interviews Nature Clubs for Families Natural Leaders Natural Service Network Natural Teachers Network Networking meetings Organizational development Professional workshops Public lectures Other, please specify Page 4 - Question 21 - Choice - One Answer (Bullets)

What do you estimate as the total audience reached by your activities in the past 12 months? (check one) Less than 100 101 – 1,000 1,001 – 5,000 5,001 - 10,000 10,001 to 20,000 20,001 to 50,000 50,001 to 100,000 100,001 to 250,000 250,001 to 500,000 More than 500,001 Unknown

56  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 

[Mandatory]


Page 4 - Question 22 - Choice - One Answer (Bullets)

[Mandatory]

Of the children and youth served in the previous question, approximately what percentage is under-served? (check one) Note: For purposes of this survey, “under-served” is defined as families under the poverty threshold as set by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. http://aspe.hhs.gov/poverty/08Poverty.shtml 0% 1 - 10% 11 - 25% 26 - 50% 51 - 75% over 75% Don't Know Page 4 - Question 23- Choice - Multiple Answers (Bullets)

Which of the following Children & Nature Network Tools have you used or distributed? (check all that apply) Blogs Book list on web site C&NN Community Action Guide C&NN electronic newsletters C&NN Report on the Movement to Re-Connect Children with the Natural World Facebook Leadership Writing Series Let’s G.O.! (Get Outside) Toolkit Power Point Presentations Nature Clubs for Families Toolkit Natural Leaders Network Toolkit Natural Service Network Toolkit NING C&NN Community Site—C&NN Connect Research and Studies Twitter Video links on web site Web site news summaries Where Nature Meets Story YouTube Other, please specify

 

57  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 

[Mandatory]


Page 4 - Question 24 - Rating Scale - Matrix

[Mandatory]

Since your children and nature initiative began, approximately how many of each of the following has been established in your region, either directly or indirectly, as a result of your efforts? (please provide an answer in each row) N

 

o

n

e

10 or less

1 1

-

2 0

21 or more

Don't know

C o m m u n i t y   G a r d e n s  Healing gardens, e.g., at hospitals   N a t u r a l   p l a y   A r e a s  N a t u r e   c l u b s   f o r   f a m i l i e s  N e i g h b o r h o o d   p a r k s  School gardens or habitat projects  T r a i l s   o r   t r a i l   p r o j e c t s  O t h e r   ( p l e a s e   s p e c i f y   b e l o w ) 

Page 4 - Question 25 - Open Ended - Comments Box

Describe other efforts:

Page 4 - Question 26 - Choice - One Answer (Bullets)

What do you estimate as the total audience reached by these new initiatives? (check one) Less than 100 101 - 1,000 1,001 - 5,000 5,001 - 10,000 10,001 - 20,000 20,001 - 50,000 50,001 - 100,000 100,001 to 250,000 250,001 to 500,000 More than 500,001 Unknown

58  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 

[Mandatory]


Page 4 - Question 27 - Choice - One Answer (Bullets)

[Mandatory]

What percentage of the children and youth participating in these new initiatives is under-served? (check one) Note: For purposes of this survey, “under-served” is defined as families under the poverty threshold as set by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. http://aspe.hhs.gov/poverty/08Poverty.shtml 0% 1 - 10% 11 - 25% 26 - 50% 51 - 75% Over 75% Don't Know Page 4 - Question 28 - Choice - Multiple Answers (Bullets)

Since your children and nature initiative began, which of the following changes have you seen as a direct or indirect result? (check all that apply) Behavioral indicators that children are happier, more creative, confident and/or collaborative Community improvements to provide access to nature-based experiences Development or enhancement of places to play and learn outdoors in nature Educational benefits to participants Enhanced family bonding Health benefits to participants Increased awareness of the importance of nature for children’s healthy development Increased community support Increased engagement of early childhood professionals and caregivers Increased engagement of formal educators Increased engagement of non-formal educators Increased engagement of pediatricians and others in the medical community Increased frequency of children playing outdoors in nature Increased funding for the children and nature initiative Increased interest and participation in nature-based service projects Increased number of children playing outdoors in nature Increased number of people participating in nature-based events and programs Media attention Partnerships with new allies Repeat participation by children and youth in nature-based events and programs None Other, please specify

 

59  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 

[Mandatory]


Question 29—Choice—Multiple Answers Which of the following audiences and organizations are participating in your children and nature initiative? (check all that apply) 4-H Boys and Girls Clubs Businesses Camp staff and counselors Childcare providers Children’s museums Colleges or universities Community organizers Educators Faith-based organizations Federal agencies Grandparents Health care providers Home schoolers Landscape designers Libraries Local non-profit organizations Natural resource professionals Nature centers Parent teacher organizations Parks Planners Private school teachers Public school teachers Scouts State agencies YMCA or YWCA Zoos and aquaria Other, please specify

 

60  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 


Question 30 —Choice—Multiple Answers

In the last year, when has your children and nature initiative provided programs and activities?  Check all that apply. 

a. By Hour and Day Check all that apply. Morning Afternoon After-school Evening Weekdays Weekends Other, please specify

b. By Week Check all that apply. Weekly Monthly Quarterly Annually Other, please specify

c. By Season Check all that apply. Winter Spring Summer Fall Year-round Other, please specify

 

61  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 


Question 31 —Choice—One Answer Per Section In the last year, when have your best attended children and nature initiative programs and activities occurred? Check one per section. a. By Hour Check one. Morning Afternoon After-school Evening Other, please specify b. By Day Check one. Mondays Tuesdays Wednesdays Thursdays Fridays Saturdays Sundays Other, please specify c. By Week Check one. Weekly Monthly Quarterly Annually Other, please specify d. By Season Check one. Winter Spring Summer Fall Year-round Other, please specify

 

62  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 


Page 4 - Heading

Page 4 of 5 If you do not complete this survey in one sitting, remember to SAVE YOUR ANSWERS by selecting the "Submit" button at the bottom of the page.

Page 5 - Heading

Page 5 of 5 If you do not complete this survey in one sitting, remember to SAVE YOUR ANSWERS by selecting the "SUBMIT" button at the bottom of the page.

Page 5 - Heading

Your Name and Organization

Page 5 - Question - Open Ended - One Line

[Mandatory]

Email Address:

Page 5 - Question - Open Ended - One Line

[Mandatory]

First Name:

Page 5 - Question - Open Ended - One Line

[Mandatory]

Last Name:

Page 5 - Question - Open Ended - One Line

[Mandatory]

Organization:

Page 5 - Heading

Page 5 of 5 If you do not complete this survey in one sitting, remember to SAVE YOUR ANSWERS by selecting the "Submit" button at the bottom of the page.

63  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 


Thank You Page

We thank you for taking time to complete this survey. Having this information will help us to track the tangible success of the movement to reconnect children and nature. Your completion of this survey indicates that you agree to have the information you provided be compiled into the report of these survey results. Please print your survey responses for your records. Thank you! Click here to visit our web site: <http://www.childrenandnature.org/>

Screen Out Page

Thank you for your willingness to participate, however, we are looking for survey respondents who fit a different profile.

Over Quota Page

Thank you for your willingness to participate, however, this survey is now closed.

Survey Closed Page

Thank you for your willingness to participate, however, this survey is now closed.

 

64  © 2012 Children & Nature Network 

 


/CNNGrassrootsSurvey2011