Page 1

ISSUE 7

SEPTEMBER 2017

#FINEDININGINDIAN FACE OF FINEST NEW INDIAN CUISINE

WOMAN PRIDE

ANJULA DEVI

FEATURED CHEF MANJUNATH MURAL

FOOD TASTING TEMPER RESTAURANT

STREET FOOD

SPICE OF THE MONTH

KOCHIN

CINNAMON


CONTENTS • FINEDININGINDIAN

September 2017 Issue 7

Table of Contents

04

Chef Manjunath Mural One Michelin star - First Indian chef in South east Asia

07

Cinnamon Cinnamon is an evergreen laurel tree

09 13

Tempercity, London New Restaurant with Inspired Indian menu

17 23

Cochin - Street Food Queen of Arabian Sea

Ms.Anjula Devi A true Masterchef in her own rights

Seasonal Selected Fine dining Indian Recipe

WWW.FINEDININGINDIAN.COM • @FINEDININGINDIA

04

13

17

07


#FINEDININGINDIAN

EDITOR

PAGE 3

Editor's Letter

New editor SUPRIYA PREMA RAJ

We are so grateful and happy that Fine dining Indian is Recognised Worldwide for its Vision, Our readers are increasing day by day.

we are incredibly thankful for Chef Srijith Manjunath mural, Ms Anjula Devi sharing her life success with Finediningindian.

I would personally like to thank My wife Supriya premaraj, and all the esteemed personalities contributed to the magazine.

We urge all Indian chefs around the globe to provide your recipes

our Mentor

and articles for our future issues. We are also looking for promoters,

CHEF SURESH PILLAI

through product placement advertisement.

From September 1st onwadsMs. Supriya Premaraj will be looking after the Magazine and its editorial side.

Please write to chef@finediningindian.com

With Gratitude, Founder Bobby Retnakumar Geetha

#finediningindian

Our Vision: " To be the world's best  fine dining Indian cuisine website and magazine"     We strive to achieve this by providing a platform for all Indian food lovers around the globe.


#FINEDININGINDIAN

FEATURED CHEF

Chef Manjunath Mural On e M ic h e lin star In dian c h e f fir st In dian c h e f to gain On e M ic h e lin for 2016 & 2017 in south e ast asia

Awards and recognition: Achieved One Michelin Star in 2016 the song of India Singapore

culinary background: 3year Hotel Management From IHMCT &AN

Family background was Doctors but I never wanted to become doctor

Early career wanted to become a room service manager got attracted to the suit.

Turning point my mother's death made me a serious person and winning the 2nd place in Chef competition in my IHMCT & AN by her blessings

Mentors Chef Reynold Fernandes, Chef Milind Sovani, Chef Sanjeev Kapoor and Chef Prakash Danmear  

Motivation motivated by the cuisine of Singapore, never giving up attitude and just do it what u believe in.

what should be Indian chefs approach in making Indian cuisine best in The World? Make it more eye appealing, more refine, use high-end ingredients, never compromise with the quality of ingredients, French like presentation, Make it Indian but should not look like Indian.

PAGE 4


what you want to be known for and what legacy you want to leave behind?

Being an Indian Head chef, what difference it made in your life.

Known

guest happy, but passion does not allow me to keep quiet, so we try

Who

to

tried

Cuisine world, Chef and

be to

in

a

his

younger

that

its

his

in

I have learned a lesson all these years. It's not possible to make every

as much possible make everyone happy if not very happy accept the bad reviews, but I work hard to make other guests happy, and let's be

cuisine

positive and carry on.

knowledge

chefs

journey

promoting

Indian

passionate

with

carry

and

loved

shared

Chef

promote

Asia

And

who

humble

Challenges in retaining good reviews?

and

so

of

Indian

cuisine

in

what was your exposure and training in modernist cuisine? Since I am in Asia, for last 11 years, my food is becoming modern in a

on. way with an influence of Asian twist, taste and presentation.

What makes you proud of all your achievement? A

good

team

team

which

success My

and

Team

for

leader

is I

and

behind am

all

the

my

proud

of

the

How you conceive a dish, improvise traditional dish in international style? Presentation, using the international elements, trends present, customise according to local the taste and overall experience of the

achievements.

meal.

one of your worst food critic or comment you? Touch

wood

once.

But

about

few

taste.

 

no

got

worst

even

complaints;

times

related

to

How you train your team with an international mix? I put Trainee in the all departments, make him learn sop and standard operating recipes, then get him to work on quality, consistency and presentation. And make an expert in set menu preparation.

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FEATURED CHEF

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Three daily rituals you do as a chef and why it’s important? Briefing Being on the counter & tasting the food Talking to my team in a personal way checking everything is ok. Trying to meet guest as much as possible. 

If you would have given a chance to pick the dream team with Famous Indian chef whom you pick? Include yourself in any position to run a kitchen for a day.

Chef Atul K, Chef Sanjeev my mentor (heading the kitchen), Chef Reynold, Chef Manish, Chef Mural (commis)

How you keep up to date, which web sites or books you refer when compiling new menu and your approach to designing a menu? I believe in my ideas and India is a vast country every region inspires me to take a modern dish, e.g., I made Srikhand Mango molecular Bubble with mini puri, Tamarind Froth Pani puri, I like to original. I believe no other cuisine can beat the taste of Indian cuisine.it's delicious.

what guidance do you like to provide for Indian chefs; to follow a successful career like yours? Believe in your self what you doing, set a principle what kind of cuisine you want to introduce, Make Indian food healthy with out compromising taste and work on presentation make more eye appealing it does not look like an Indian dish, Make interesting set menus. Create some interesting Chef oriented drinks.

pick one dish that represents you and why it’s your favourite, thought behind its creation? Sambhal Infused Norwegian Tandoori Salmon With Masala Caviar  It defines my style of cuisine Asian influence but cooking with the tradition while adding a little bit twist Asian spice elements. 

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FEATURED CHEF

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C

SPICE OF THE MONTH

PAGE  7

innamon

ARTICLE

BY

SUPRIYA

PREMA

RAJ

Cinnamon is an evergreen tree of the laurel family, characterised by oval-shaped leaves, thick bark, and a berry fruit. When harvesting the spice, the bark and leaves are the primary parts of the plant used. Sri Lanka is the largest producer and cinnamon from Sri Lanka and Seychelles is considered the best in the world.

Cinnamon is cultivated by growing the tree for two years, then cutting the stems at ground level. The following year, about a dozen new shoots form from the roots, replacing those that were cut. The trees grow to 10m. The dried inner bark of the cinnamon tree is the spice used in cooking. The longest, unblemished pieces of bark are rolled by hand to form compact curls and then dried.

The spice has a pleasant flavour and warm smell which has made it popular in cooking. The flavour of cinnamon is due to an aromatic essential oil. This essential oil is prepared by roughly pounding the bark, and keep it in water with salt or sea water to softening it, and then quickly distilling the whole. It is of a golden-yellow colour. Cinnamon is commonly available as quills, quillings or ground into fine powder. Cinnamon buds are also used as a spice.  Cinnamon has the unique ability to imitate the activity of insulin in the body. For those who are unfamiliar with the process of glucose metabolism, insulin is the chemical that helps your body regulate its levels of blood sugar (glucose). The spice can alter the metabolism of not only sugar but of carbohydrates as well. Some research shows that cinnamon can help lower LDL (bad) cholesterol, which is great for your heart health. The consumption of cinnamon is said to impact abdominal fat more so than fat found in other parts of your body. Cinnamon oil cures gastric debility and commonly used as an inhalation for colds and sinusitis. 


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SPICE OF THE MONTH

PAGE Â 8

Cinnamon is used to flavouring rice, curries, desserts and meats, and also used in beverages, pickles, chutneys and ketchup. In baking, it is utilised for both colouring and flavouring. In Western cuisine, it is mainly used in sweet dishes, while in eastern cuisine it is primarily used in savoury dishes. In Indian foods, it is widely used in curries and also an essential part of garam masala which includes cardamom, cloves and peppercorns. Masala chai is tea with milk and sugar, which is liberally laced with cinnamon. It is used in the preparation of chocolate, especially in Mexico.


Temper Restaurant City one more London restaurant Jumps in to Inspired Indian cuisine Rush

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RECIPES

PAGE  9


MUTTON ROLL Slow smoked and roasted mutton shoulder meat breaded and deep fried. Served with a green herb chutney. Lamb lacks flavour taste more similar to confit lamb, but waitress ensured its only smoked. Smoked flavour was not coming through. When eating together with the sauce, the dish is balanced.

SQUID AND SAMPHIRE PAKORA Crispy fried Pakora we believe that used tempura flour to make it lighter. Squid is crispy yet tender. Samphire is almost dried as when it's fired for long it loses its moistness and remains the skin part. Onions are crispy and moist. Use of fresh mint and sliced red chilly is well-thought combo enhances the whole experience. One of the best pakora in London.

FISH HEAD THALI Thought the dish comes as the whole fish head. Chef Neil confirmed they don't serve the whole head instead they slow braise and pull the meat. Make curry from stock with okra. The Thali plate is beautiful believe the make is Utopia . But the garnishes on thali doesn't add any value other than to bulk up the plate. Bread Paratha which is cooked on the griddle is very nice. The dish has powerful dry fish smell which is bit off putting

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RECIPES

PAGE  10


SMOKED DUCK MASALA

The smoked duck which is served slightly less than medium yet not medium rare. Which is very much perfect to enjoy the meat. They don't brine the which is confirmed by the kitchen. The skin is soggy and chewy. You can't take out all the meat as most stuck to the bone. The sauce is very refreshing with real ginger flavour coming through. The yoghurt on top balanced the dish a different approach

BANANA RAMA DRAMA The dish is a bit confusing. There is banana jelly, Banana fritters banana cake, Banana ice cream, banoffee sauce. Couldn't understand why it's named after a gods Name RAMA to it. The whole dish doesn't live up to expectation

CHOCOLATE AND TURMERIC TORTE WITH PISTACHIO ICECREAM Again the desert seems a bit let down when compared to the Savory world.The use of Turmeric for dusting give an eye appeal and its different approach.But the dish needs to be tasted as turmeric is so high it over powers the whole dish and gives a light bitter like after taste.Not sure they use peanut butter as it had similar taste.

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RECIPES

PAGE  11


Temper City opened in July 2017, serving BBQ meats and poultry alongside curry, tandoor roasted meats and home-made roti breads.Temper restaurants are unique BBQ and open fire pit restaurants with a focus on New World wine and with an innovative cocktail selection, created in house.

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RECIPES

PAGE  12


#FINEDININGINDIAN

WOMEN IN INDIAN CUISINE

ANJULA DEVI

PAGE 13

indian chef and author. ownS Indian catering company, FOOD CONSULTANT My core inspiration is pure and simple - my love of authentic and traditional Indian food. I want to destroy the myth that Indian food is complicated. It was this love of cooking which propelled me to open my own cookery school. However, I knew that on its own my passion and love of Indian food wasn't enough to start up a business. I did a lot of research initially and could see there was a gap in the market for showcasing traditional Indian food in my local and surrounding area. Every business builds in its own unique way over time, and mine has subsequently been driven by word of mouth.   I am now an author and I have worked with a range of retailers, food manufacturers and leading publications. After launching a range of Indian cooking products and a ‘How to’ book on Indian cooking with Lakeland UK, I launched my cookery book ‘Spice for Life’, in April 2017. I am also Brand Ambassador for the world’s largest Indian food company,TRS Foods, and have created my own brand – ‘Route 207’ 

What was the motivation behind starting your website? My inspiration came from my Dad at a very early age. He taught me to cook when I was 10 years old. By the age of 12, I was his ‘right hand man/girl’ when we catered for large Indian weddings. I could see the joy Dad brought to people's faces and the genuine praise he received from strangers wanting to meet him and find out more about his food.  I wanted to bring joy to friends, family and people I had never met before, by the simple act of cooking great food. The laughter rings around my house when we

O U R

F E A T U R E D

entertain great company with great food. My Dad used to say "Anjula it's the humblest of ingredients

I N D I A N

W O M E N

P R I D E

that make the tastiest of dishes”. This eventually led to me starting my own business and launching my website.


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WOMEN IN INDIAN CUISINE

What was your initial Investment and work behind starting the website? The initial investment in setting up my business was probably only 

£ 1000. I

did a lot

of searching for bargains, but I knew that good quality products like knives and pans were essential. I also realised that I needed a good website to be the core of my marketing efforts. The website was basic initially, but enough to attract people to it.  When it came to shaping the content of my website, to reflect my initial business proposition, I relied on my judgement and instincts. I knew that I had to tell my personal story, have images that intrigued people and the overall content had to meet my potential customers’ needs. I decided to have a link on my home page to an independent testimonial website where my customers provided feedback on my business and I supplemented the website by building a strong social media platform.

How did you overcome the setbacks that you faced?   I have never been one for following the crowd, which has led people on occasion to behave negatively towards me. However, it also means that I tend to do things in a unique way, and I think that this is what has made my food and my business attractive propositions over time. Even when people have been critical, I am now able to see this as a compliment and it usually spurs me on.  I always draw strength from the many things that my Dad, who was a culinary genius, told me. Whatever setbacks I have faced, I always try to believe in my own ability, skills and knowledge. My Dad used to say "Anjula, talent will see the light of day". 

PAGE 14


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WOMEN IN INDIAN CUISINE

PAGE Â 15


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WOMEN IN INDIAN CUISINE

PAGE 16

Who or what was your support system in the beginning? My number one supporter has always been my husband, closely followed by my two sons and my sister, Shanti. Running your own business, with all that this entails, can be a considerable responsibility and I could not have achieved what I have without them.    Whilst my main supporters are my family, I'm extremely lucky that they also have some good experience in running a company, marketing and budgeting. It's very important to mention this, as sometimes whilst your family can offer you lots of support it's also important you have some sound business perspectives. I have been lucky that my family are able to do both. 

What are the innovations you are taking on in Indian cuisine and how you research, develop new recipes? I am so lucky that my passion is my work. I love food, and start every day wondering what I can make for a tasty breakfast. I have a natural fascination in all of the food that I see. I often see something in another dish that inspires me to try to make my own adaptation of it. Mostly though, I just decide to give something a go. It may have never been made exactly that way before, but I have always loved the pure joy of creating something new. I have been working on something for over a year and am about to launch this exciting innovation, so I can't say too much just yet. I really hope that this could help to change the way that people perceive Indian food. 


Cochin also was known as Kochi is a major port city on the south-west coast of India by the Arabian Sea and the Laccadive Sea. Kochi is also known as the Queen of the Arabian Sea. It is part of the district of Ernakulam in the

QUEEN OF ARABIAN SEA

Kochin

state of Kerala and often referred to as Ernakulam. Cochin is the commercial and industrial capital of Kerala and is the second largest city on the west coast of India. Cochin is proud of its world-class port and an international airport that link it to many major cities

words by Supriya premaraj

worldwide. Kochi has a very long and illustrious history. Some historians believe that the origin of the name Kochi is a modified form of the word 'Cochazhi' which in Malayalam means 'small sea'. Others are of the opinion that 'Kochi' was named so by the Chinese. It looked like China when the Chinese came to the region during the 14th century and installed Chinese nets. Another theory is that name Kochi derived from the word Kaci, meaning "harbour". 

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STREET FOOD

PAGE   17

NOMADIC

|

24


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STREET FOOD

PAGE   18


Kochi was the centre of Indian spice trade for many centuries. Kochi started to grow and soon developed into a major trading point dealing in pepper, cardamom, cinnamon, cloves, etc., which were and still are famous for their quality. The Arabs, British, Chinese, Dutch, Italians and Portuguese helped Kochi emerge as a bustling centre of commercial activity, connecting the mainland to the rest of the world.

Jewish Synagogue also is known as the Paradesi Synagogue located in Jew Town in Mattancherry is one of the famous tourist's spots. Cochin Jews were also called Malabar Jews. They are the oldest group of Jews in India and also known as the original Indian Jewish. They built synagogues in Kerala at the beginning of the 12th and 13th centuries. They are known to have developed Judeo-Malayalam, a dialect of Malayalam language.

There were three different types of Jews: the Black, White and some meshuchrarim. The Malabari Jews were called Black Jews although their skin colour was brown. They built seven synagogues in Cochin, reflecting the size of their population. The Paradesi Jews also known as White Jews built one Synagogue and it is called the Paradesi Synagogue. While comparing with Black Jews, this group was small. Both groups practised endogamous marriage, maintaining their distinctions. Both communities claimed special privileges and the greater status over each other. It is claimed that the White Jews had brought with them from Iberia a few score meshuchrarim (former slaves, some of the mixed African-European descent).

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STREET FOOD

PAGE   19


Kochi features a tropical monsoon climate. It is a moderately hot and humid place round the year. Annual temperatures range between 23 and 31 °C. From June to September; the southwest monsoon brings in heavy rains. The northeast monsoon brings light rainfall during October-December.

As the city is widely known as the commercial or economic capital of the state of Kerala, and thus good transport infrastructure is critical for the city's economy. Kochi has the National highways which include NH 47, NH 66, the seventh longest highway in India, connects Kochi with Mumbai, via Kozhikode and Mangalore on the western coast of India. For transport within the city, buses and taxis are available throughout the day. The city has a high-speed and efficient bus transportation system, mainly dominated by private operators, known as RedBuses. The state public transport company, KSRTC started city services due to frequent complaints against red buses.

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STREET FOOD

PAGE   20


Being one of the safest harbours in the Arabian Sea, Kochi ranks among India's major seaports. Queen Mary 2, was the largest passenger cruiser to call at Kochi. The Kochi International Marina is a marina in the city of Kochi. It is located on the eastern coast of the Bolgatty Island in the premises of the Bolgatty Palace, a 'heritage hotel'. Apart from international cruises, domestic ferry and cruises operate in Kochi. The Kochi Marina is the only marina in India.

Kochi

has an international

airport, known as the Cochin International Airport. It currently is the fourth busiest International airport in India. There are two major railway stations – Ernakulam Junction and Ernakulam Town which is locally known as the South and North terminals. Kochi Metro rail, a rapid transit system started operation. The Kochi metro project is the first metro in the country which connects rail, road and water transport facilities.  

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STREET FOOD

PAGE   21


Kochi has the perfect blend of south Indian delicacies and western country delicacies. It is a typical South Indian state, so the food which is available is mostly authentic South Indian dishes. But still, Kochi offers various kinds of food from all parts of Indian and international too. For enjoying the sea food Kochi is a perfect place.  Some of the sea food speciality that we get in Kochi is Malabari Prawn curry, king fish steak, karimeen pollichathu etc. If a taste of local seafood is what you are looking for in Kochi, you should try it from toddy ( the alcohol made from fermented coconut water )  shops. The beef fry, kappa (tapioca), Thala curry (fish head curry) and podimeen (fish cut into small pieces and fried) are some of the unique varieties of food available in a toddy shop.  In Kochi, the mix of sweet and savoury snacks are available in different restaurants. The must-try dishes are Malabari mutton biryani, which is served with papad, onions, dates chutney and chicken fry. Chappati and chicken fry with lime juice sprinkled on it. When you are in Kochi, you must try the Kerala parotta and dishes include a beef roast, thattu dosa and egg dosa. There are pure vegetarian restaurants that serve Idly, different varieties of Dosa, Idiyappam (string hoppers), Appam (hoppers), Puttu and Kadala curry (chick pea curry) and also you get some of the North Indian dishes like Tandoori chicken, roti and dal makhani. 

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STREET FOOD

PAGE   22


Spice for Life by Anjula Devi is published by Clearview Books. Photography by Dan Jones. Priced at £25 and available all good bookshops. ISBN: 978-1908337-375 

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RECIPES

PAGE   23


RECIPES

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PAGE  24

PREPARATION TIME 30 MINUTES. COOKING TIME 4 HOURS AND 40 MINUTES. MARINATE OVERNIGHT. SERVES 4

INGREDIENTS

1.5

kg

boneless

butterflied this,

and

(ask

to

shoulder your

score

it

Wet Ingredients

lamb,

butcher

to

too)

do

2

large

250

ml

onions, white

sliced

wine

vinegar

 

2

tbs

Worcestershire

Key Spices

2

tbs

dark

2

tbs

grated

jaggery

4

tsp

pulped

garlic

2

tsp

pulped

ginger

4

fresh

1

tsp

turmeric

2

tsp

red

2

Indian

2

1

2

tsp

inch

powder

chilli bay

leaves

pieces

cumin

flakes

of

cassia

bark

seeds

1

tbs

coriander

1

tsp

black

1

tsp

brown

1

tbs

paprika

(you

seeds

peppercorns mustard

seeds

150

mild

can

seeds g

if

large

4

tbs

remove you

ripe

raw

tenderiser

8

green

cardamoms

4

2

black

cardamoms

2

cloves

1 2

tsp tbs

fennel

seeds

fenugreek

leaves

Other Spices tbs

mango

membrane

a

milder

tomato

tomatoes,

for

skin

out the

groundnut

minced

as

and

version)

paste chopped (try it’s

not

finely

to

miss

the

lamb)

oil

or

vegetable

oil

Garnish 1

small

bunch

of

coriander,

1

small

bunch

of

mint,

Zest

2

the

papaya

Warming Spices

sugar

chillies

prefer

ingredient

tbs

soft

green

sundried

4

this

brown

sauce

powder

and

juice

of

one

chopped

chopped lime


RECIPES

#FINEDININGINDIAN

METHOD You are going to love this recipe Take a large frying pan set on a low heat, add all the key spices to the pan and gently warm through for 1 minute. Remove from the heat, place in a pestle and mortar, grind to a fine powder and add to a large mixing bowl. This is the best bit - take all of the wet ingredients and the mango powder and add to the bowl. Mix really well, add the lamb and coat it with all the other ingredients.

Cover the bowl and place in the fridge overnight. Remove from the fridge and bring to room temperature for at least 30 minutes. Pre-heat the oven to 140 C, 280 F or gas mark 1, then place the lamb including all the marinade in an oven proof dish.

Cover with foil and cook for 4 hours. In the meantime take a small dry frying pan and warm through the warming spices for 1 minute. Remove from the heat, bash the green cardamoms and black cardamoms in a pestle and mortar, remove their husks and place the seeds back into the pestle and mortar. Grind to a fine powder along with the cloves, fennel and fenugreek Set aside. Remove the foil, add the ground warming spices to the lamb. Cook for a further 30 minutes without the foil on, or until the meat just pulls away with a fork. Remove from the oven, add the coriander, mint, lime juice and zest. Serve with fresh chapattis and fiery mint chutney. Â

PAGEÂ 25


Method

Galawati Kebab Recipe by Chef Manjunath Mural

Thoroughly lamb

Yield: 2 portion Prep Time: 30 min Total Time: 35 min

boneless

pieces. of

In

paste,

raw

powder,

pan,

the

and

Put

the

the

processor

fats

Cut

add

it

roasted

to

into

small

lentil

very

pieces

garlic

garam

mixture

make

the

small

paste,

paste,

lamb

from

the

ginger

papaya

salt

well.

food

add

all

chunk.

food

lambs,

mix

clean

masala

flour into

fine

and

a

paste

form.

Method For

smoking,

Lamb leg boneless chunk - 300 grams

paste,

Ginger paste - 3tbs

pour

Garlic paste - 3 tbs

to

Red chilli powder - 3 tsp

and

Garam masala powder - 3 tsp

mixture

Raw papaya paste - 50 grams

of

Salt - to taste

mixture).

Roasted lentil flour - 75 grams

drops

Ghee - 1 tbs Burned charcoal - 2pcs

light

put

the

come

1

20

tbs

it

grams On

flat a

add

burned

ghee. Put

15

mix

ghee,

golden

of

for

bowl

of

now.

and

of

a

2pcs

out

keep

in

a

lid

non pan

brown.

on

Take

Make

shape

will top

out

sear

pan, the

Serve

it

lamb and

start of

it

the

small

patties

stick

fine

charcoal

Smoke

mins.

well.

the

pieces

(gilawat

pour

a

few

patty

till

while

its

warm.

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RECIPES

PAGE  26


Venison is the generic term for meat from deer and there are six species of deer in this country, all producing venison with distinctive eating qualities. There is very little fat on wild meat, particularly venison

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RECIPES

PAGE  27


Recipe by Bobby.R.G

Scottish highlands Venison sheek kebab, Black fig and ginger chutney Concept of Conceiving this dish mainly to use in game season. In britain venison is Available Farmed all year round. Wild roe deer can be found all year round. Wild red and fallow deer is in season from 21 October to 15 February. In Uk the majority of Venison comes from Scotland. The meat should have a deep colour, with a dense texture. There shouldn't be too much fat, but what there is should look white and firm avoid any that is yellow and greasy. Choose your cut according to what you want to do with it. For roasting, choose whole fillet; saddle (bone in); loin (boneless saddle); haunch (back leg, either on the bone or boned and rolled); or shoulder (boned and rolled). There are four species of wild deer established in Scotland; roe deer, red deer, sika and fallow deer. Roe deer and red deer are native species; they colonised Scotland naturally after the end of the last glaciation around 10,000 years ago, and wild populations have survived in Scotland since then. Sika and fallow deer have both become established following introduction.

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RECIPES

PAGE  28


Yield : 2 portion Prep Time : 20 min Total Time : 35 min Ingredients Black fig chutney 200g Venison minced 20g Grated smoked cheddar

100g Dry black fig

20g Ginger garlic paste

20g Fresh ginger grated

20g crispy fried onion

3g Dry ginger powder

8 g MDH degi mirch powder

3g red chilli powder

10 g coriander powder

10g distilled vinegar

5g cumin powder

3g onion seed

5 g garam masala powder

5g mustard oil

2 g chopped mint leaf

200g water

20g fine chopped mix peppers 30g Mint chutney

Method Ensure you choose best quality Venison. In a mixing bowl add venison, grated cheese, chopped mint leaf, ginger garlic paste, chopped fried onion and all powdered spices. hence venison is lean compared to lamb cheese will add moistness and will keep it from getting dry. keep it refrigerator till you want to use it. Mold venison mix around a thick skewer press chopped mix peppers around the minced venison. Cook in a preheated tandoor. Sprinkle chat masala and brush with clarified butter. Serve with Mint chutney and Fig chutney.

For Fig chutney Boil all ingredients except onion seed till the fig is very soft. Blend fig mixture to a smooth paste and pass through a fine sieve. Temper chutney with onion seed with and mustard oil. You can transfer to a piping bag and use when plating as shown in picture

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RECIPES

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Fine dining indian food magazine september 2017 issue No. 7  

We are so grateful and happy that Fine dining Indian is Recognised Worldwide for its Vision, Our readers are increasing day by day. we are...