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ISSUE 9

DECEMBERÂ 2018

#FINEDININGINDIAN WORLDS FINEST INDIAN FOOD MAGAZINE

CHEF

Thomas Zacharias CHEF

Varun Inamdar

FIRST INDIAN WOMEN CHEF TO BE AWARDED WITH A MICHELIN STAR

CHEF

Satbir Bakshi STREET FOOD

Kozhikode INGREDIENT

Avocado

WOMAN PRIDE

Garima Arora


CONTENTS • FINEDININGINDIAN

DECEMBER 2018 Issue 9

Table of Contents

04

GARIMA ARORA First One michelin star Indian women Chef

09 12

VARUN INAMDAR TV personality , chef and master chocolatier THOMAS ZACHARIAS CIA Graduate , Three Michelin trained Indian chef based In Mumbai

15 18

KOZHIKODE - CALICUT Indian Street Food

18

AVOCADO Ingredient To Know and use

23

Selected Fine dining Indian Recipe

SATBIR BAKSHI Executive Chef Oberoi Mumbai

WWW.FINEDININGINDIAN.COM • @FINEDININGINDIA

04 09 15

12


#FINEDININGINDIAN

FOUNDERS COLUMN

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Gratitude Letter Dear Readers,

Editor Ms.Supriya Premaraj

we are happy to present our Last Quarter Issue for 2018

Special Correspondent Sana Qureshi

Sincere Gratitude for all chefs who been featured in this Issue by providing timely articles, Interview,

Featured Chefs

Images and Recipes.

Garima Arora Thomas Zacharias

Its an Immense proud and achievement for Chef

Varun Inamdar

Garima Arora. Her inspiring story we could feature in

Satbir Bakshi

our Women Pride Column. We want to feature More women Achievers in our future Issues. Do let us know 

Courtesy All Images to their respective

We are so grateful and happy that Fine dining Indian

chefs and providers

is Recognised Worldwide for its Vision, Our readers are increasing day by day.

For Varun Inamdar Food styling: Varun Inamdar

We urge all Indian chefs around the globe to provide

Photography: Piyush Singh

your recipes and articles for our future issues. We are

Recipes: Mindful Eating by

also looking for promoters, through product placement

Varun Inamdar

advertisement.

We strive to push forward in achieving our vision "To be the face of Finest Indian cuisine In the world "

Please write to chef@finediningindian.com

With Gratitude, Founder Bobby Retnakumar Geetha

Write to us Chef@finediningindian.com or send message through Instagram

#finediningindian

Our Vision: " Being the world's best  fine dining Indian cuisine website and magazine"     We strive to achieve this by providing a platform for all Indian food lovers around the globe.


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INDIAN WOMEN PRIDE

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Garima Arora

The women who just wrote History. First Indian women Michelin chef  Garima Arora's culinary journey all began in her family's humble kitchen in Mumbai, India. She was mesmerized by her father’s joy as she watched him recreating dishes from his frequent travel. From that point on, she knew that she would one day open her own restaurant and it was only a matter of time. Despite her love of food, it took her some time to return to the kitchen. She first enrolled at Jai Hind College where she graduated with a degree in Mass Media. Garima worked briefly as a journalist before returning to her culinary roots. She left Mumbai for Paris to study at Le Cordon Bleu and since then never looked back. For the last decade, Garima has worked alongside many worldrenowned chefs such as Gordon Ramsay in 2011 and René Redzepi from 2013 to 2015. In the fall of 2015, she packed her bags once again and relocated to Bangkok to join the Gaggan restaurant group. As she explored the jungle and tribal markets of Thailand, she grew more and more inspired by its abundance of produce and incredibly rich flavors. At 30 years old, guided by her desire to serve contemporary and culturally relevant food, Garima opened her restaurant, Restaurant Gaa, in Bangkok. Her mission is to discover novel ways to transform locally harvested and seasonal ingredients into personal culinary experiences.


RESTAURANT GAA THE RESTAURANT IS SITUATED IN AN EYECATCHING YELLOW CONVERTED SHOP HOUSE SURROUNDED BY LARGE TREES ON LANG SUAN ROAD. * Career timeline: 2010: Graduated from Le Cordon Bleu, Paris 2010: Quartier du Pain 2011: Verre by Gordon Ramsay / Table 9 Kitchen 2013: Noma 2016: Gaggan 2017: Opened Restaurant Gaa in April

About Restaurant Gaa Led by Noma-trained, ex Gaggan sous chef, Garima Arora and an international team of chefs, officially opened its door in April 2017 in Bangkok. Gaa was born out of Chef Garima’s determination to synergize the connection between India, her native country, and Thailand. When Chef Garima arrived in Bangkok, she instantly fell in love with both the similarities and differences this country has to offer. Gaa is her journey of rediscovering her roots and discovering the new territory. Chef Garima taps into techniques from around the world and applies them to locally sourced ingredients to create something uniquely theirs – an approach that is best described as “Modern Eclectic Cuisine.” Everything that is served to the guests is freshly prepared in-house with immense thought and care.

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INDIAN WOMEN PRIDE

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INDIAN WOMEN PRIDE

Philosophy Restaurant Gaa stands by the belief that food should reflect the richness and variety of its land and the moment in time. Here the food captures the vibrancy of Bangkok and its amalgamation of cultural influences. The team makes it their mission to explore interesting ways to transform local, seasonal humble ingredients into something that’s unheard of and completely new.

Craftsmanship At Restaurant Gaa, it is all about the transformation of ingredients. In an in-house room dedicated to fermentation, this is where the team uses the combination of craft and science to explore local ingredients in order to create new flavor palettes. All of the condiments used in the food were born here, start to finish, from the cultured butter to fish sauce, with no fillers or MSG. The food tastes different and more complex because of the different path taken to achieve the flavors.

Menu Restaurant Gaa offers 2 menus: 10- and 14-course meal at 2,400 and 2,900 baht respectively. The restaurant offers wine selections from respected trailblazing producers from around the world, most of which promote natural, biodynamic and organic practices. To compliment the food, they also offer juice pairings with light and refreshing juices and kombucha that are made fresh daily. Restaurant Gaa also offers signature cocktails made with ingredients that are fermented and pickled on-premise.

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INDIAN WOMEN PRIDE

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I knew all along that I wanted to be a cook. It was after 6 months working as a journalist that I decided to do it then. Cooking is a young person’s game as it is very demanding especially physically. I wanted to do it while I can give 100%.

for young chefs ; Keep your head down and

Receiving our first Michelin star is definitely one of the

work hard. There is no substitute for hard work.

most memorable moments in my professional life. The

Ever.

way I see it is that this achievement is much bigger than me. I hope this recognition paves way for the future

Cooking, to me, is a cerebral exercise so I

generation of chefs and everyone across all industries

would say intellectual. Every time we cook, we

and gives them the confidence to pursue their passion.

ask the questions like “why are we doing this?” or “does it make sense?”.

At Gaa, taste comes first. Everything that we put on the plate has to make sense to the flavor of the dish. That’s

When I hire new staff, I make sure they each

my take on it. We'd never add something just for the sake

bring different skill sets to the table, preferably

of it.

ones that I do not have. This way we make a cohesive well-functioning team. My current

One time my father called out that my risotto was not al

team and I are extremely diverse. At this point

dente. If you know me, you know my father is the most

we have 7 nationalities, I believe. They're like

influential figure in my life, especially in terms of food. So

family to me. 90% of my team is the same

that really hit me as a young cook, but that moment

people since opening night last year, so they

taught me to be able to take criticism and believe that it

have quite a clear understanding of what I

will push you to be better.

expect from them.


INDIAN WOMEN PRIDE

#FINEDININGINDIAN

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PAGE  8


Chef Varun Inamdar Varun Inamdar is regarded as one of the TOP 10 celebrity chefs in India with 16 years of work experience as a trained chef, chocolatier, food stylist, author and an ex-top rank executive at Oberoi Hotels and Resorts, India. He has served Barack Obama, Nicholas Sarkozy, Vladimir Putin, Angela Merkel, Richard Branson in the West; Ambanis, Tendulkars, Khans, Bachchans and Kapoors in India along with Queen Rania of Jordan, The Royal family of Al Sabah, Al Khalifa and Al Saud in the Arabian Gulf,  amongst many others. He has been gifted a rosary by The Bishop of Rome, Pope Francis for his contribution to Indian culture through a culinary book by Bloomsbury USA.  

Awards: Recipient of the National Award for The Best Chocolatier of the year at the hands of Mr. Nilesh Gabral, Chairman of Goa Tourism and Development Corporation in August 2017. Chef recently won an award for 'The Best Cookery Show on the Web' Guinness World Record 2018 holder for 'The World's largest Chocolate Mud Pie' weighing 1346 kgs.

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FEATURED CHEF

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career achievements • Representing India as a chef is one of the most distinguishing features of my work as a chef. 2018 has seen many highlights in my growth as a chef. Here is the tip of the iceberg: • Visiting Guatemala, Latin America on the invitation on The Indian Embassy as an Indian Chef to host a 12 day long Indian Food festival to packed houses was indeed a proud moment. • Visit to Vietnam as a Chocolatier, representing India and its facets in the world of cocoa has been quiet a responsibility where only 15 best from the cocoa industry were invited as speakers. • Invitation to Abu Dhabi to celebrate India’s Independence with our brethren in The Emirates alongside Actor Shilpa Shetty and Music wizard Kailash Kher was elevating, an experience to re-create Indian food for the Indian diaspora. • Breaking Guinness World Record with a 1346 kgs Chocolate Mud Pie was exhilarating and taking India’s name higher yet again is a proud feeling always. • Being appointed as the ambassador for ‘The Eat Right Movement’ by the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, FSSAI, FDA and AFSTI alongwith Actor Rajkumar Rao is an honour. 

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FEATURED CHEF

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FEATURED CHEF

PAGE  11

Inspiration. The one. The only - Chef Martin Yan who influenced me as a child, even continues to and will do so forever. `My style. I love recreating old classics and simplifying them for my patrons like a recently created Charcoal Butter Quail on the lines of Butter Chicken ( the recipe of which, from my show ‘The Bombay Chef’, by the way, is a rage and amongst the highest viewed in the world at 11 Million + in 2 years) but with blackened quail. I recently did a 5 minute Lucknowi Galaoti Kebab in a naan bowl in Abu Dhabi and you couldn’t guess that it wasn’t made using labour intensive methods. That’s my style and that’s what my people expect from me. More than ingredients I am someone who likes working with flavours. I love an explosion of flavours in my mouth and that’s what I do with food and its flavours. An instant Kalakhatta Granita that I recently made for one of my finale acts of stage was received with a standing ovation amidst crackers, fireworks and smoke on stage.  Sacrifices and pains, well not many apart from not getting the kind of support from my seniors. Not one person from the community stood with me. Considering I was a complete outsider, I needed a lot of handholding and guidance, but very initially I took it in my stride and started carving my own niche. Slowly, media started calling me my own Godfather. Early on I took it with a pinch of salt, but today I understand the gravity of that statement. Yes, after I got married, we missed celebrating a lot of landmark days together like festivals, birthdays and anniversaries, but I wouldn’t say that I went through it because as an industry we all go through it. We are there to make others’ special days extra special. Whatever I am today, I am on my own and I am super proud of that. I am happy no one guided me because that gave me opportunities to weigh the brands, situations, projections and the likes and make my own decisions. I wouldn.t have liked it any other way. 


SAIRAHCAZ SAMOHT #FINEDININGINDIAN

The chef who studied at the famous Culinary Institute of America. worked at three Michelin le Bernardin by chef eric ripert. chef-partner of Bombay canteen who now travels extensively to remote part of india in search of traditional and original recipes, ingredients. read about few questions we put to him full interview featured in our website      FEATURED CHEF

PAGE  12


#FINEDININGINDIAN

FEATURED CHEF

PAGE 13

How you become a chef and why?

What message do you want to give to young

Like many chefs, my love for food and cooking can be

chefs out there?

traced back to my childhood. I was a relatively quiet,

Stay passionate, be resilient, have fun and know

socially awkward kid growing up, timid even. While my

that you need to be constantly learning while you

friends were out kicking balls on the field or playing video

go through this life as a food professional. It's not

games, I dreamt of food. I felt like the odd kid out at the

an easy industry to work through, and there will be

time but in retrospect, I realize I was just different. The

days when it gets so crazy you'd want to give up.

one place where I really felt at home was in the kitchen

But you just need to power through and come back

—my grandmother’s kitchen specifically. It was where I

the next day charged up and willing to take on the

could lose my inhibitions, be myself and create something I

battle with a smile. F or the first few years, focus on

cared about which also tasted delicious. B ut it was not

just learning as much as you can from the best

just about the taste of the food. Here was this marvellous

chefs you can possibly learn from. Do not chase

thing that not only satiates appetites but also brings

higher positions or salary. Rough it out in the

people together unlike anything else. My grandmother’s

beginning, get the right training, and it'll definitely

cooking fascinated me because quite simply, it made

pay off in the end.

people happy. I wanted to be like her, to have that ‘super power’ that gave so many people joy. And here I am, over

What is your memorable achievement in your

two decades later with the opportunity to do exactly that

professional life? Why it was important for you?

every single day. I’ve been lucky enough to get incredible opportunities to shine at various stages of my professional life. Whether it was being a valedictorian at both my colleges (WGSHA, Manipal & The Culinary Institute of America, New York), being Editor-in-chief of the campus newspaper at The Culinary Institute of America (through which I got to meet many incredible chefs like Ferran Adria, Grant Achatz and Jose Andres), getting to work at 3 star Michelin restaurant Le Bernardin in New York City, each of these achievements have shaped me into the chef I am today and the one I’m evolving to become in the years to come.

As a chef, the moments that are truly memorable however are the small ones, like that elderly couple calling me out to their table to tell me how wonderful their meal was and how it reminded them of their childhood. Or when I see an entire kitchen team of happy faces after a smooth service. These small achievements are really what bring me happiness as a chef.


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FEATURED CHEF

PAGE 14

What is your concept of writing a menu for your

How you keep up to date with a constantly

Restaurant and how a new dish makes to the

evolving world's culinary scene?

menu list?

As a chef, it is important to be a student all your

Our menu philosophy at The Bombay Canteen is to

life. The learning can never stop and I try and evolve

showcase regional Indian cuisines and celebrate

constantly in every way I can. Food travel is a very

local, seasonal ingredients in fun and exciting new

powerful way of learning about various cuisines.

ways. We look at introducing new dishes every

Through the internet and social media, I also stay in

season, food with has context to India in some way

tune with what other chefs around the world are

and pays a tribute to our wonderful country. The

doing, but I try not to be influenced by them too

menu needs to have a balance of flavours, colours,

much so that I can retain my own individualistic style

textures, cooking technique and regions of

of cooking.

inspiration. New dishes are usually inspired by recipes I have learn through traveling across

One of your worst food critic or comment you

different parts of India, or by indigenous vegetables

received and how you dealt with it?

and seafood which are at their prime. It is important

One of the earliest feedbacks we got about our

to me that we first recreate those original,

food was that a lot of the dishes had similar flavour

traditional recipes as closely as possible before

profiles and none of them truly stood out. This

innovating upon them. We then look at elevating

could’ve been because we were trying to play it safe

those recipes in various ways but only minimally,

with the flavours so that it would be favourable to

without taking away the integrity of the flavours

many different palates. Having travelled across

they’re inspired from.

various parts of India over the last four years, I have been lucky enough to taste the nuanced variations in

How you develop your team, what

the food in each region, and we have since tried to

responsibilities and freedom you give to your

bring those out in our interpretations of those

juniors?

dishes.

Having a great team of cooks is extremely important to me as a chef, and I spend as much time nurturing

What will be Indian cuisine & Indian chef’s future

them as I do on creating new dishes for the

according to you, what should be Indian chefs

restaurant. We emphasize on some core values in

approach in making Indian cuisine best in The

our kitchen such as respect, equality, teamwork,

World?

consistency and organization, and make sure these

Some of the most talented chefs in India are

are practised on a daily basis. Though initiatives like

currently cooking Western cuisines and working with

our Friday Family Meals and the Indian Ingredient

non-indigenous ingredients. The majority of chefs

Program, the cooks are also given the opportunity to

who are helming high-end Indian restaurants on the

take on leadership roles for smaller tasks and

other hand are simply recreating and innovating

demonstrate creativity of their own so as to prep

upon the popular recipes which have always found a

them to be great culinary leaders in the future.

place on most menus. For Indian cuisine to be truly recognized, we as chefs need to work towards

Name Top Five Indian chefs of all Time

harnessing the richness of cuisines and ingredients

according to you ?

we have in our country and bring them to our

Floyd Cardoz, Manish Mehrotra, Srijith Gopinath,

restaurant tables to represent real Indian cuisine in

Gaggan Anand, Vivek Singh

its different avatars.


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PAGE 15

Chef Satbir and his entire culinary brigade at The Oberoi firmly believe the great importance of local ingredients, lets here his thoughts behind it,

“To explain firstly, the advantages of sourcing locally is to provide our guests the finest of ingredients that are fresh, seasonal and grown locally, for example the all day dining restaurant at The Oberoi, Mumbai –Fenix has explored recipes and delved deep into the complexity of ingredients to develop a pioneering menu of healthy alternatives that do not compromise on portion, size, flavour or cuisine. This comes from the philosophy that nothing gives more flavor to a dish than fresh ingredients. The Eat healthy menu has gone through rigorous trials for each of the dishes. The key focus has been in selecting the right ingredients (mushrooms, broccoli, asparagus, shrimp, salmon, snapper to name a few) and cooking techniques such as stir frying, grilling, sautes and a liberal use of the tandoor. New varieties of superfoods, quinoa, as well as couscous also feature on the Eat Healthy menu at Fenix”

I feels proud to say that the team of talented chefs who are so passionate that they keep trying new

Satbir Bakshi, Executive Chef, has been part of The Oberoi, Mumbai for over 12 years now. He completed his education in New Delhi and Hotel management diploma from IHM, Ahmedabad. He joined hotel Le Meridien, New Delhi and worked there for 2 years. In the year 2003, he joined The Oberoi Mumbai, as sous chef. When The Oberoi, Mumbai re- opened in 2010, he

things every now and then. According to me a team of 70 minds constantly thinking, works better than myself doing the thinking alone. I believe, to stay relevant in this competitive field one has to keep reinventing oneself as today's guests are well travelled and knowledgeable and it is important to draw from the strengths and experience of one’s team members in order to be on top of the game.

returned as an Executive sous chef. In 2011, Satbir took over the responsibility of the kitchen and within 3 years, he became the Executive Chef.

Article by our Special Correspondent Sana Qureshi

The most famous person you have cooked for? Bill Gates & Amitabh Bachchan

An ingredient you hate cooking with? No ingredient is bad enough for a chef to hate it, it depends on what you make out of it.


Our culinary teams today are driven by the

Indian chefs are inspired to curate menus

passion for experimentation and a love of

primarily keeping Indian guests in mind and look

local seasonal ingredients along with a

beyond the usual dishes to create a revolution.

commitment to working closely with Local

For example at Ziya, our modern Indian

Suppliers. We particularly see our guests

restaurant, one can expect a certain rhythm that

enjoy the playful deconstruction of dishes

encapsulates interesting story telling with each

and the classical fine dining approach of

dish features in a tasting menu at Ziya.

fresh ingredients. The dining experience is

The focus is on bringing back the enthusiasm to

unlike any other- as much about food as

our rich culinary treasures and highlighting

immersion into simple, thoughtful use of

regional recipes via structured recipe

Ingredients and their presentation. As the

documentation and uniformity of flavours across.

world comes closer, cuisines are being discovered and re-discovered. The curry, especially, has adapted to whatever environment it has been exposed. And in a way, it has managed to grow beyond India.

We would like to bring back regional Indian food into being a more popular choice for people. It is not enough to say my grandmother makes the best dal. We would like those talents and recipes to come out in the commercial space and cater to a much larger audience. It makes future sense because the returns on investment in this revival journey can be rewarding. Once recipes are retrieved, adjusted for the contemporary palate and standardised, these can be included in menu and pull patrons with their novelty.

Chefs today have refined recipes, created new dishes, paid more keen attention to the

vegetarian restaurant named “Burma Burma’ which is inspired by Burmese home-style food,

quality of ingredients and redefined presentation. One must know that no matter how successful you are in adapting your cuisine to suit foreign palates, all revolutions have to be indigenous.

My memorable meal: At a newly opened a

the fare was flavourful & yet so simple and light. I think I liked it more because I went in with very little expectations, considering it a vegetarian restaurant. But I must say I was shocked in a very positive way.

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NOMADIC

|

24


Kozhikode was once a famous cotton-weaving centre, and

it is remembered as the place of origin of calico, to which

it gave its name Calicut.

Kozhikode, also called Calicut, city,

northern Kerala state, southwestern

India. It is situated on the Malabar Coast.

Calicut is the second largest urban area

in the state. Kozhikode was given the tag

of "City of Sculptures" (Shilpa Nagaram)

CITY OF SCULPTURES

KOZHIKODE

because of the architectural sculptures

around the city.

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STREET FOOD

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Kozhikode was the capital of Malabar during the time of Zamorins, who were ruling before the British Rule in India. It was trading in spices like black pepper and cardamom with the Jews, Arabs, Phoenicians and the Chinese for centuries, and with the Dutch and Portuguese more than 500 years ago. The Portuguese were the first foreigners to find this land, the gateway to Kerala, famous for spices. This city is famous for receiving Vasco da Gama in 1498. He landed on the remote beach of Kappad, which is 18 km away from the Calicut City. Kozhikode has been a multi-ethnic and multi-religious town since the early medieval period. The Hindus forms largest religious group, followed by Muslims and Christians. The Muslims of Kozhikode are known as Mappilas. The multi-cultural mix of Kozhikode ensures that Onam, Christmas, and Id-ul-Fitr (the festivals of the Hindus, Christians, and Muslims) are celebrated with equal pomp. Kozhikode city has a highly humid tropical climate with high temperatures recorded from March to May. The South-west monsoon that sets in the first week of June and continues until September and  the North-East Monsoon that sets in from the second half of October through November. The weather is milder from December/January until March.

Kozhikode Cuisines have a strong Arab influence in their local cuisines which can be evidently felt from the rich meat curries and desserts. Kozhikode is famous for its thick, black, translucent Calicut Halwa. There is different varieties of Halwa in different colours and flavours. Another highlight of the Kozhikode cuisine is the Malabar Moppila Biriyani. Mandhi dishes, which are cooked using chicken, prawns, fish and mutton, are one of the mouth watering specialties. The most popular vegetarian cuisine of Kozhikode includes Sadya. The Sadya cuisine makes for a full fledged feast which comprises of sambhar, pickles, rice along with seven different side dishes. The most popular snacks of Kozhikode include crisp and wafer thin Banana Chips which are cooked in the coconut oil. The city also has a strong mercantile streak to it, with the major vein of commerce being the Mithai Theruvu also called SM street, a long street crammed with shops that sell everything from sarees to cosmetics, and house hotels to sweetmeat shops.

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STREET FOOD

PAGE   18


The avocado or Persea Americana is a fruit that belongs to the family of Lauraceae.

AVOCADO

Avocado refers to the tree's fruit, which is botanically a large berry containing a single large seed. There are dozens of varieties of avocado ranging in size, colour and texture but the most popular of all is the creamy Hass variety. Avocados are commercially valuable and are cultivated in tropical and Mediterranean climates throughout the world. Avocado trees require frequent, deep watering to bear optimally, particularly in spring, summer, and fall. The avocado is a climacteric fruit, which matures on the tree, but ripens off the tree. The flesh softens to a buttery texture that has become extremely popular in everything from toast toppings to desserts.  Avocados are native to Central and South America and did not appear in the UK until the mid-1900s. They are now commercially produced in the US, Caribbean, Mexico, Brazil, Israel and Australia. The climate in UK does not favour Avocado to grow in UK.

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INGREDIENT

PAGE   19


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RECIPES

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At every party and in soups, or with salads, avocado was part of many meals. In North, Central and South America avocado is mainly in savoury dishes. It is also used in the preparation of milkshakes or sweet desserts in places such as Brazil, Philippines, Vietnam, and southern India. They also add avocado to ice cream and other desserts. The avocado is popular in vegetarian cuisine as a substitute for meats in sandwiches and salads because of its high fat content. It is used as the base for the Mexican dip known as guacamole as well as a spread on corn tortillas or toast, served with spices. Avocado is a primary ingredient in avocado soup. Avocado slices are frequently added to hamburgers, tortas, hot dogs, and carne asada. Avocado can be combined with eggs (in scrambled eggs, tortillas, or omelettes), and is a key ingredient in California rolls.

Avocados are considered as a “superfood” and have a special position in the food calorie pyramid. Avocados are rich in various nutrients, vitamins, and minerals. Avocados are an excellent source of monounsaturated fat and vitamin E. Avocados are high in calories due to the high fat content. It's monounsaturated fat, which is a "good" fat that helps lower bad cholesterol. Avocados have more soluble fibre than other fruit and contain a number of useful minerals such as iron, copper and potassium and are a good source of the B vitamin which help you fight off disease and infection. Avocados are low in sugar.


Bhutte ke khees

Recipe by chef Thomas Zacharias of Bombay canteen

PREPARATION TIME 30 MINUTES. COOKING TIME 30 MINUTES. RESTING TIME 6 HOURS SERVES 8 

Corn Fritters | Red Chili-Coconut Chutney | Charred Corn & Moras Salad Corn Fritters: Corn 0.8

on

kg

Whole

the

from fat

2

seeds,

chilies,

Cumin

seeds,

Red Chili-Coconut Chutney

grated

Grated Red

litres

chilli

1

½

teaspoons

Cumin

4-5

Jaggery

teaspoons

Salt

tablespoon

to

Refined

oil

powder 1-2

4 1

¾

cup cup

tablespoons teaspoons

teaspoons

taste

teaspoon

½

teaspoon

Charred Corn & Moras Salad

¼

Roasted

mix

cup

Coating: Starch

Paste

1.5

½

Moras

Corn

coconut

Vegetable

cup

whole

spice

or

corn

chopped

powder

Jeeravan

whole

whole

(asafetida)

Turmeric

shaved

0.8

½

oil

Green

Hing

kg

milk

Vegetable Mustard

cob,

corn

bhaji

kernels

(plucked

1

cup

and

washed)

1

½

cups 4

wheat

#FINEDININGINDIAN

Hing

tbsp

½

-

1

teaspoon

flour

RECIPES

PAGE   21


#FINEDININGINDIAN

RECIPES

PAGE  22

Method Corn Fritters: • Grate the corn on the cob on a coarse grater. • Heat the vegetable oil in a rondeau on medium heat. Add the mustard seeds and wait for it to splutter. Add the cumin seeds, green chillies, hing and turmeric powder. • Add the corn and the milk, season with a little salt and cook on medium heat. • Keep stirring, till the mixture becomes homogenous and thickens. The consistency should be similar to a thick polenta. • Line a shallow hotel pan or sheet tray with butter paper and spread the cooked corn mixture on to it. Make sure it’s even and flat. Allow this tray to chill in the refrigerator for 5-6 hours. • Once the mixture has set, cut into the desired shape. • Make a batter with the coating ingredients Dip the cut pieces of corn mixture into the batter and fry at 180 C till golden brown and crispy. • Drain the excess oil on paper towel and season it with the  jeeravan spice mix.

Red Chili-Coconut Chutney : • To make the red chilli paste, roast dried Kashmiri chillies in an oven and cover in a bowl with hot water. • Strain the water and grind into a smooth paste. • Grind to a smooth paste in a blender. Keep refrigerated

Charred Corn & Moras Salad : • collect all prepared ingredients for salad in a bowl. • Toss salad with hing and a squeeze of lime. 

Plating: • Drizzle the red chilli- coconut chutney on the bottom of the plate. • place the corn fritters and then top it with the charred corn & moras salad.


Yield: 2 portion Prep Time: 30 min Total Time: 30 min

Arbi Tuk Recipe by chef Thomas Zacharias of Bombay canteen

Ingredients 1 kg arbi, peeled and cut into half

Method

8 tbsp tamarind chutney  

1. Fry arbi first at 165 C for about 5-8 minutes till

For the Spiced Yogurt

tender. Drain on paper, allow to cool and then

2 kg. hung curd  3 tsp. red chilli powder To taste  sugar 3 tsp. cumin powder, toasted

smash them to flatten.  2. To make the spiced yoghurt, whisk together the yoghurt with chilli powder, sugar, cumin powder, salt and pepper.

to taste salt to taste chaat masala

3. Fill the tamarind chutney and spiced yoghurt in squeeze bottles and keep refrigerated.

For the Mugri salad

4. On pickup, fry the smashed arbi at 180C till

1 cup mugri/rat tail radish/white radish,

crispy. Drain on a paper towel and season with

chopped

salt, chilli powder and chaat masala.

4 tbsp. diced tomatoes

5. Lay crispy arbi on the bottom of plate. Drizzle

½

tamarind and spiced yoghurt. Sprinkle chaat

tsp. green chillies, finely chopped

2 tbsp. diced pickled onion 1 tbsp. cilantro, finely chopped 1 tsp    cumin powder 2 tsp. pickling liquid

masala and chilli powder and season. Drizzle with tamarind chutney and spicy yoghurt top with the mugri salad. Serve immediately while the arbi is hot and the yoghurt is cold.

to taste salt  

#FINEDININGINDIAN

RECIPES

PAGE  23


Yield: 12 portion Prep Time: 15 min Total Time: 6 hour (freezer) 15 min

Mango Lassi Popsicle Recipe by Varun Inamdar 

Ingredients

Method

• 2 cups thick curd

• Pour all ingredients, minus the pistachios, into a

• 1.5 cups fresh mango pulp

blender.

• 1 no. ripe mango, medium

• Blend until mostly smooth.

sized; peeled and chopped

• Pour into kulfi moulds with candy sticks and place in

• •

½ ¼

cup brown sugar

the freezer till firm.

tsp ground cardamom

• To loosen, place the mould in a bowl of warm water. • Pull the stick out along with the popsicle. • Serve immediately.

#FINEDININGINDIAN

RECIPES

PAGE  24


Yield: 2 portion Prep Time: 30 min Total Time: 30 min

Recipe by Varun Inamdar

Beetroot Hummus

Ingredients: Method For Beetroot hummus: 200 gms beetroot, roasted and

For beetroot hummus

peeled

1. In a grinder, transfer all ingredients for the hummus

1 cup chickpeas, boiled till fork

retaining 1 tbsp olive oil and 1 tbsp chickpeas for

tender

garnish.

8 nos. garlic cloves

2. Grind it all into a smooth and fine paste, without

4 tbsp sesame seeds

using water.

3 tbsp extra virgin olive oil

3. Transfer into bowls and garnish with reserved olive oil

3 tbsp lemon juice

and chickpeas

Salt as required

4. Chill till further use.

½ ½

For crisp whole wheat chapatti

tsp roasted cumin powder tsp chili powder

1. Heat a pan.

For crisp whole wheat chapatti: Whole wheat chapatis

#FINEDININGINDIAN

2. Using a dry cloth, dry roast chapati by pressing them till they turn golden brown and crisp. 3. Serve at room temperature with chilled hummus.

RECIPES

PAGE  25


Fried masala chicken lollipop |seviya | grilled onions |yoghurt chutney Recipe by bobby , Finediningindian's New cookbook

Yield : 4 portion Prep Time : 20 min Total Time : 35 min

for coating

Fot yoghurt chutney

cleaned and trimmed

• 30g tempura flour

• 50g thick yoghurt

• 15g ginger garlic paste

• 10g rice flour

• 10g garlic puree

• 10g Kashmiri chilli powder

• 10g gram flour

• 2g pepper powder

• 30g water

• 3g lemon juice

• 5g lemon juice

• 4g salt

• 2g turmeric powder

• 2g chaat masala

• 5g red chilli powder

• 2g fine chopped mint

Ingredients • 12 no. Chicken wings

• 2g turmeric powder • 3g chopped curry leaf • 3g fennel crushed • 5g lemon juice

• 3g salt • 50g crushed seviya

Plating • 30g grilled button onion flakes

#FINEDININGINDIAN

RECIPES

PAGE  26


Method Chicken wings • Marinate chicken wings with mentioned ingredients keep overnight

For coating

• Make a thick batter with all ingredients except seviya • Dip marinated chicken lollipop , not to dip the bones • coat with crushed seviya on top of batter • drop slowly into hot oil at 180c • drain and keep in a paper towel

For yoghurt chutney

• Mix all mentioned ingredients check consistency and seasoning.

For plating

• Place yoghurt chutney and arrange fried chicken on top • Arrange grilled onion flakes as in picture.

COLONEL SANDERS

I could see it wasn't going to be easy. I couldn't give a franchise to any old greasy spoon. And I knew the chicken had to be cooked the way I told them to cook it if it was going to be as popular as it could be. #FINEDININGINDIAN

RECIPES

PAGE  27


Wild boar sausage Vada |Brioche Paav green chutney Recipe by bobby , Finediningindian's New cookbook Ingredients for Vada mixture: • 20g oil • 3g mustard seed • 1g  hing / asafoetida • 1g curry leaves • 2g  ginger crushed • 4g  clove garlic crushed • 3g green chilli finely chopped

for besan batter: • 150g besan / gram flour • 20g rice flour

Yield : 4 portion Prep Time : 30 min Total Time : 35 min

• 3g turmeric / haldi • 4g kashmiri red chilli powder / lal mirch powder • 2g hing / asafoetida • 3g salt

• 5g coriander finely

• 2g baking soda

chopped

• 50g water

• 3g turmeric / haldi

• oil for deep frying

For finishing : 4 mini brioche pav rolls 4 green chilli

• 100g potato boiled &

30g green chutney 30g tamarind chutney

crushed

30g dry garlic chutney

• 50g wild boar sausage steamed & diced • 5g salt • 3g lemon juice

#FINEDININGINDIAN

RECIPES

PAGE  28


Method Vada Mixture • Heat oil in a pan , add asafoetida , mustard ,curry leaf and ginger garlic . • Saute for a minute add sausage lighty brown , add green chilli, turmeric, potato . • Check seasoning add salt and lemon juice . finish with coriander . • Allow to cool down make a patty with 40g size mixture.

Batter for frying • Make a thick batter with all mentioned ingredients . consistency must be like when you dip finger and lift the drops must be falling slowy ,drops visible . • Dip the patty in batter and fry at a 170c temperature oil . • Lightly sprinkle batter in oil so that you get tiny crisps • Once the patty start coming on top and golden color lift and keep on a paper towel along with the scattered crisps . • Fry green chilli and keep on side

For finishing • cut the brioche warm to keep it soft • Apply green & tamarind chutney in each side, place the fried patty on top sprinkle with tiny crisps and dry garlic chutney • Serve as shown in picture with fried green chilli .

#FINEDININGINDIAN

RECIPES

PAGE  29


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December 2018 Issue 9 - Fine Dining Indian Food Magazine  

Dear Readers, we are happy to present our Last Quarter Issue for 2018 Sincere Gratitude for all chefs who been featured in this Issue by p...

December 2018 Issue 9 - Fine Dining Indian Food Magazine  

Dear Readers, we are happy to present our Last Quarter Issue for 2018 Sincere Gratitude for all chefs who been featured in this Issue by p...

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