Page 1

ISSUE 8

SEPTEMBER 2018

#FINEDININGINDIAN FACE OF FINEST NEW INDIAN CUISINE

#keralaflood

CHEF

WOMAN PRIDE

SPICE

GAGGAN ANAND

KANAK KATHURIA

ASAFOETIDA


CONTENTS • FINEDININGINDIAN

September 2018 Issue 8

Table of Contents

04

KERALA Recent Flood and Onam celebration

06

ASAOETIDA Dried latex from the Ferula

08

Ms.Kanak Kathuria Masterchef in contestant , youtuber

10

DHE PUTTU, DUBAI New Restaurant with only steamed puttu

18

BANGALORE Silicon valley of India

23

Seasonal Selected Fine dining Indian Recipe

WWW.FINEDININGINDIAN.COM • @FINEDININGINDIA

04 08 18

10


#FINEDININGINDIAN

EDITOR

Editor's Letter

PAGE 3

finediningindian supports chef suresh's   #cookforkerala 

Dear Readers,

its been a year's Gap we are publishing our magazine again

we are dedicating this issue and all its revenue after expenses goes to the Relief Fund for Kerala government. Kerala my home place badly hit by the recent floods.

We are so grateful and happy that Fine dining Indian is Recognised Worldwide for its Vision, Our readers are increasing day by day.

I would personally like to thank My wife Supriya premaraj, and all the esteemed personalities contributed to the magazine.

We urge all Indian chefs around the globe to provide your recipes and articles for our future issues. We are also looking for promoters, through product placement advertisement.

From September 1st onwads Ms. Supriya Premaraj will be looking after the Magazine and its editorial side.

Please write to chef@finediningindian.com

With Gratitude, Founder Bobby Retnakumar Geetha

Instagram\chefbobbyrg

#finediningindian

Our Vision: " Being the world's best  fine dining Indian cuisine website and magazine"     We strive to achieve this by providing a platform for all Indian food lovers around the globe.


#FINEDININGINDIAN

DEDICATION

PAGE 4

Kerala floods click & please donate directly to chief minister of Kerala

JUST SEEN THE ANGER OF RAIN GODS

Kerala - Gods own country kerala witnessed one of the heaviest and dangerous rainfall over the years. people from all standard of life were affected around 417 people lost the life. positive side people stood together especially young crowd, Fisherman community and armed forces. young generation kept their spirits high and kept a very positive atmosphere in rescue and relief operation 

Kerala received heavy monsoon rainfall on the mid-evening of August 8 resulting in dams filling to capacity; in the first 24 hours of rainfall, the state received 310 mm (12 in) of rain. Almost all dams have been opened since the water level has risen close to overflow level due to heavy rainfall, flooding local low-lying areas. For the first time in the state's history, 35 of its 42 dams have been opened.

Most of the regions affected by this monsoon were classified as ecologically-sensitive zones by the Western Ghats Ecology Expert Panel, the Gadgil Committee. Most of the recommendations and directions by the commitee was either neglected or rejected. Chairman of the committee Madhav Gadgil accused the state government and its irresponsible environmental policy for the recent landslides and floods. He called it a "man-made calamity".


LIFE NEEDS TO MOVE ON TIME TO CELEBRATE TOGETHERNESS IN HOW KERALA FACES THE CALAMITY Onam is a major annual event for Malayali people in and outside Kerala. It is a harvest festival, one of three major annual Hindu celebrations along with Vishu and Thiruvathira, and it is observed with numerous festivities.Onam celebrations include Vallam Kali (boat races), Pulikali (tiger dances), Pookkalam (flower arrangement), Onathappan (worship), Onam Kali, Tug of War, Thumbi Thullal (women's dance), Kummattikali (mask dance), Onathallu (martial arts), Onavillu (music), Kazhchakkula (plantain offerings), Onapottan (costumes), Atthachamayam (folk songs and dance), and other celebrations. It is the New Year day for kerala Hindus.

The Onam sadya (feast) is another very indispensable part of Thiruvonam, and almost every Keralite attempts to either make or attend one. The Onasadya reflects the spirit of the season and is traditionally made with seasonal vegetables such as yam, cucumber, ash gourd and so on. The feast is served on plantain leaves and consists of nine courses, but may include over two dozen dishes.

In hotels and temples, the number of curries and dishes may go up to 30. The importance of the feast to the Kerala's Onam celebration culture is captured in the famous Malayalam proverb "Kaanam Vittum Onam Unnanam" which means "One must have the Onam lunch even selling his property, to have so".The Travancore-style Onasadya is renowned to be the most disciplined and traditionbound.

#FINEDININGINDIAN

DEDICATION

PAGEÂ 5


#FINEDININGINDIAN

SPICE OF THE MONTH

PAGE Â 6

Asafoetida ARTICLE

BY

SUPRIYA

PREMA

RAJ

Asafoetida is the dried latex from the rhizomes of several species of ferula or giant fennel. The species is native to the deserts of Iran and mountains of Afghanistan and is mainly cultivated in nearby India. In India it is cultivated in Kashmir. It is the product of a tall, smelly, perennial herb with strong carrot shaped roots. Asafoetida has a pungent, unpleasant smell quite like that of pickled eggs, but it is added to most Indian savouries. It delivers a smooth flavour reminiscent of leeks. It typically works as a flavour enhancer. Its odour and flavour become much milder and much less pungent upon heating in oil or ghee. Asafoetida is most commonly available boxed as powder or as granules. It is also sold as a hard lump that needs to be crushed. It is best to buy a branded box of powder which is airtight and keeps the sulphurous odour of the spice locked in. having a strong flavour asafoetida keeps well for up to a year.


#FINEDININGINDIAN

SPICE OF THE MONTH

People use asafoetida resin, a gum-like material, as medicine. Asafoetida resin is produced by solidifying juice that comes out of cuts made in the plant’s living roots. Asafoetida is used for breathing problems including ongoing (chronic) bronchitis and asthma. It is also used for digestion problems including intestinal gas, upset stomach, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and irritable colon. Other uses include treatment of whooping cough and hoarse throat. Asafoetida is used mostly in Indian vegetarian cooking and widely used in south India. Its powerful aroma complements lentils, vegetables and pickles. It is sometimes used to harmonize sweet, sour, salty, and spicy components in food. The spice is added to the food at the time of tempering. Sometimes dried and very small amount of ground asafoetida can be mixed with salt and eaten with raw salad.

PAGE 7


INDIAN WOMEN PRIDE

#FINEDININGINDIAN

Kanak Kathuria m aste r c h e f In dia se ason 1  c on te stan t fam ous youtube r  an d in stagr am m e r

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PAGE 8


Who you look up to, who you approach to get

guidance from? o I discuss all issues, recommendations and guidance from my husband. He is my true inspiration and he motivates me a lot. He is the one who inspired me to create this channel and I am grateful for all the support he and my family are providing to me

How you market your profile and get more clients to

help you succeed? o Been active on all social media channels like youtube, twitter, Instagram, facebook, roposo. Haven’t spent too much time in marketing my profile yet. There are some brands who have reached me directly through my email. They found me through youtube or Instagram/ twitter.

What will be Indian cuisines future according to you,

what should be Indian chefs and food enthusiast approach in making Indian cuisine best in the world? o Indian cuisines future is that people across the world, will start consuming more and more healthy, easy to make and delicious Indian food, Indian chefs should try to make delicious, quick and innovative recipes that can bring in a new twist to Indian food across the world.

A Book or an Incident that influenced you and how it

changed your approach to life? o Sandeep Maheshwari’s youtube channel inspires me to share my talent with the world.

Why it’s Important for chefs or food lovers to enter in

competition and How you maintain your focus in winning the competition any suggestions for few Indian chefs planning to entering the competition? o To learn and explore something new, make new contacts in the food industry and to try to create a career using that experience. I maintain my focus by believing in myself that I can win any competition, irrespective of how big my competitors are. My mantra of life “Be passionate about what you are doing and success will surely follow. Share and help others in this world by making it a better place to live”

#FINEDININGINDIAN

INDIAN WOMEN PRIDE

PAGE 9


De Puttu Karama,Dubai Puttu pronounced is a breakfast dish from the Indian subcontinent, eaten in Kerala, some parts of Tamil Nadu, Coorg and Kanara region of Karnataka, and Sri Lanka. Puttu or Pittu means "portioned" in the Malayalam language.

The restaurant is themed and focused on this dish with an ever-changing menu as per the films of actor Dileep from Kerala. puttu is steamed hence its light and healthier than other typical Indian food and its best to have any meal period 

#FINEDININGINDIAN

RESTAURANT

PAGE 10


SULAIMANI TEA An awesome combination of spices infused wit tea. A very traditional drink from north side of kerala . This is free flowing in the restaurant helps in easy digestion of food 

QUAIL EGG PUTTU steam quail egg puttu - quail curry filled inside puttu   topped with quail egg on top

LAMB CURRY WITH SMALL ONIONS slow braised spiced lamb shoulder  cooked with Kerala spices and fried small onions . an excellent combination with puttu .

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RESTAURANT

PAGE  11


PINEAPPLE CHERRY PUTTU Puttu that is best for kids, lightly sweet made with pine apple and glazed cherry

SEA FOOD COMBO PUTTU Designed for seafood lovers. King Prawn masala fried, squid stir-fried with onion, tomato Kerala spices. with a bowl of sweet banana.

CHICKEN ROAST PUTTU an amazing food combo filled with pulled chicken meat , served with fried chicken and coconut based chicken curry

#FINEDININGINDIAN

RESTAURANT

PAGE  12


GAGGAN ANAND re-published

#FINEDININGINDIAN

Asia's best chef & restaurant for the 4th time in a row two Michelin star |  5th best in the world chef owner of gaggan, meaticulous a steak restaurant, a German Sühring restaurant

FEATURED CHEF

PAGE  13


#FINEDININGINDIAN

WOMEN IN INDIAN CUISINE

PAGE 14

Chef Gaggan Anand shows us that anything in the world is achievable when you have a burning desire and passion, and you back this up with hard work and never taking shortcuts.

He keeps the Indian national flag flying high, and we are proud to write about Chef Gaggan.

Q . How did you convince your investor or partner? Was there any groundwork already?

This restaurant is a result of a drunken night. Me and my partner were drunk and I just said: let’s open up a restaurant. And we started working towards it. I quit my job, the one which I had. And we worked on this project. And with all the blessings good we took this decision. And we did it.

Q. How did you get into the radar of the World’s Best Restaurant awards?

You learn a lot when you start working on an international platform. You come in contact with many people who know more than you. You learn from them. And most importantly you say yes to all the opportunities that come your way. Pull it off by hook or by crook. Keep working towards your goal and keep making your food better without doubting your creativity and also assessing the market you are thriving in. All that comes with experience and struggling in various fields and there you are suddenly noticeable while moving towards your goal

G A G G A N

A N A N D


#FINEDININGINDIAN

WOMEN IN INDIAN CUISINE

Q. How did things in El Bulli turn out for you?

I was in Spain, in the lab of El Bulli, for 3 months. The techniques I learned there helped make my roots stronger. You need to have a strong base. From there, you can emerge and move forward. That will take you to places. Adapt the techniques but create your own identity. You can copy once or twice. That will do extremely well for a few months. But if you don't have your own creativity then you will die out very fast. This formula worked for him really well. And it helped him.

Q.What would you have done as a chef if you were not influenced by El Bulli?

I would have found inspiration from somewhere else. You are born with the passion to question how you are growing up, what you are doing and what you want to do. If you don't question your purpose of doing things then you will not push your boundaries. So, that would have got me somewhere else. Or I would have created something entirely on my own. Ha... ha! It's quite possible. Whether it would be as successful or not, that we don’t know. But only a series of failures can describe your success. Only someone who has zero fear of failure can succeed. I have no fear of failure. I learn from it and try again.

PAGE 15


#FINEDININGINDIAN

FEATURED CHEF

PAGE 16

Q. What were the advantages and disadvantages of being an Indian chef outside of India?

It was never about being an Indian chef that was the obstacle. Bringing Indian food to the limelight was the challenge. Indian food all over the world was considered as heavy greasy curry that was usually eaten after heavy drinking with heavy naan bread. Which you do need sometimes, but India is blessed with many cuisines, due to all the different cultures and weather. I saw that and I had the urge for the world to see it.

That was my inspiration - and the challenge was how to present it in a new way, a way in which people who have never tasted those flavours would fall in love with them. And I had to deal with that challenge. I always say "food is the hero". Now we have a very international team who know the flavours very well. So, it’s never about the creator but always the creation.

Q. What are any current or future projects that you have?

We are always coming up with something new. We will keep coming up with them. The more ideas, the more projects. I can't reveal them all or someone with more resources will make that idea happen tomorrow.


Q. Anything you would say to the future generation?

Work hard, stay focussed, believe in yourself and truly love what you do. There is a process and a journey one has to go through. Keep an eye on your goal but at the same time, don't deny the journey. Take everything as a part of growing up. There will be many ups and downs and many failures and some success. Embrace all of them. Running straight after success will leave you with nothing. Go through the grind. To achieve gold, you have to go through the fire. There are no shortcuts in life. Slow and steady wins the race.

Q. With your family, how do you manage your time?

One has to. It’s all about priorities. If you value something, then you will make time for it.

Q. From where do you draw motivation and inspiration?

From everything. You should always have the intention of seeking inspiration. If one has that, you will see inspiration in everything. And you will know what I mean. Nature, colours, seasons, animals, people, pictures, art, music. Everything.

What you read and how you keep updated. How you get new ideas?

Innovation and creation is what contributes to life. Whether you are a chef or from any other profession. IF you stop learning and you think you know it all then that would be the end of it. I read a lot, watches documentary. All kinds coming my way.

#FINEDININGINDIAN

FEATURED CHEF

PAGE   17

NOMADIC

|

24


GARDEN CIY OF INDIA

BANGALORE

#FINEDININGINDIAN

STREET FOOD

PAGE   18


Bangalore officially known as Bengaluru is the capital of the Indian state of Karnataka. It is India's third-largest city. The name "Bangalore" represents an anglicised version of the Kannada language name, "Bengaluru’’. Being the capital of Karnataka, the official language in Bangalore is Kannada.   Bangalore is known as the "Garden City of India" because of its greenery, broad streets and the presence of many public parks, such as Lal Bagh and Cubbon Park. Bangalore is sometimes called as the "Pub Capital of India" and the "Rock/Metal Capital of India" because of its underground music scene and it is one of the premier places to hold international rock concerts. Bangalore is the major center of India's IT industry, popularly known as the Silicon Valley of India. For many years, Bangalore was known throughout India as the greenest, liberal and forward-thinking city. In recent years, these attributes have propelled Bangalore to the forefront of the high-tech industry boom in India, and it currently ranks as India's most developed city and one of the world's fastest growing urban areas.

Bangalore lies in the southeast of the South Indian state of Karnataka. It is in the heart of the Mysore Plateau. The majority of the city of Bangalore lies in the Bangalore Urban district of Karnataka and the surrounding rural areas are a part of the Bangalore Rural district. The Government of Karnataka has carved out the new district of Ramanagara from the old Bangalore Rural district. Bangalore has a tropical savanna climate with distinct wet and dry seasons. Winter season starts from November till January. The coolest month is January. Summer from February to May and the hottest month is April. Bangalore receives rainfall from both the northeast and the southwest monsoons. Monsoon starts from June to October.

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STREET FOOD

PAGE   19


Bangalore is served by Kempegowda International Airport located at Devanahalli, about 40 kilometres from the city centre. It was formerly called Bengaluru International Airport. The airport is third busiest in India after Delhi and Mumbai in terms of passenger traffic and the number of air traffic movements. Buses operated by Bangalore Metropolitan Transport Corporation (BMTC) are an important and reliable means of public transport available in the city. The main bus depots that Karnataka State Road Transport Corporation (KSRTC) maintains are the Kempegowda Bus Station, locally known as "Majestic bus stand".

Bangalore is a divisional headquarters in the South Western Railway zone of the Indian Railways. There are four major railway stations in the city: Krantiveer Sangolli Rayanna Railway Station, Bangalore Cantonment railway station, Yeshwantapur junction and Krishnarajapuram railway station. The Rail Wheel Factory is Asia's second largest manufacturer of wheel and axle for railways and is headquartered in Yelahanka, Bangalore. Namma Metro also known as Bengaluru Metro is a metro system serving the city of Bengaluru, India. It is currently the second longest operational metro network in India after Delhi Metro. The Bangalore Metro Rail Corporation Ltd (BMRCL), a joint venture of the Government of India and the Government of Karnataka, built and operates the Namma Metro.

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STREET FOOD

PAGE   20


Street food in Bangalore is a mix of popular dishes from different Indian states; includes tikki, bhel, vada pav and paranthas, besides vada, dosa , idly etc. Bangalore has a wide and varied mix of restaurant types and cuisines and Bangaloreans deem eating out as an intrinsic part of their culture. Roadside vendors, tea stalls, and South Indian, North Indian, Chinese and Western fast food are all very popular in the city. Udupi restaurants are very popular and serve predominantly vegetarian, regional cuisine.

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STREET FOOD

PAGE   21


Some of the street food that you get in Bangalore are   idly, different varieties of Dosa, Sandwich and Parantha. These are some of the breakfast varieties. Akki Roti is made of rice flour which is mixed with salt and water and kneaded well till the dough gets soft. It is a breakfast item unique to the state of Karnataka.   Paddu or Kuzhi paniyaram is an Indian dish made by steaming batter using a mould. The batter is made of black lentils and rice and is similar in composition to the batter used to make idli and dosa. Kodubale is a crispy snack for tea and they also known as murukku in other states. Rasgulla Chaat is a very interesting chaat recipe made with sweet rasgulla and Indian spices which is perfect for evening snacks Or for special occasion. Vada Pav -  consists of a deep fried potato dumpling placed inside a bread bun (pav) sliced almost in half through the middle.    Mangalore Buns – The Sweet Obsession and is a popular breakfast and tea time snack in the Udupi-Mangalore region belonging to Mangalorean cuisine. Obbattu - is basically a flat bread which is stuffed with sweetened mixture. The stuffing can be bengal gram , tuvar dal , coconut , peanut etc. Kheema samosas, grilled chicken, Idiyappam, sheekh kebabs (chicken, mutton and beef) and the biryanis (chicken and mutton).

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STREET FOOD

PAGE   22


PREPARATION TIME 30 MINUTES. COOKING TIME 4 HOURS AND 40 MINUTES. MARINATE OVERNIGHT. SERVES 4

Apple - kheer , ginger cake, hibiscus jell Recipe by bobby from Indian small sharing plate  cook book For the tart base

For Apple kheer

525g

digestive

Apples

225g

butter

600g

Bramley

biscuits

Milk apple

For the frangipane filling 225g

butter,

softened

225g

caster

sugar

6

free-range

225g 5g

ground

almond

50g

fresh

eggs,

extract

300g 150g 5g

egg

Green

cardamom pink

powder

100g

color

hibiscus

Ultratex sauté)

Lemon

For Tuile 100g

lady

litre 300g

Dry

and

pink

For hibiscus powder and jel

beaten

(puree

no.

Sugar

Edible

almonds

ginger

2

15

flower

250g

50g

juice

Sugar

Apple

juice

20

ml

100g –

1

litre

white

golden plain

almond

caster

For Plating

sugar

flour

20g

extracts

5g

150g

block

100g

flaked

butter,

sugar

lemon

coated

coloured

fennel

balm

melted

almonds

#FINEDININGINDIAN

RECIPES

PAGE   23


#FINEDININGINDIAN

RECIPES

PAGE  24

Method Tart base & frangipane filling, • Preheat the oven to 180C. • Put the biscuits in a large re-sealable freezer bag and bash with a rolling pin into fine crumbs. Melt the butter in a small pan, then add the biscuit crumbs and stir until coated with butter. • Tip into the tart tin and, using the back of a spoon, press over the base and sides of the tin to give an even layer. Chill in the fridge while you make the filling. • Cream together the butter and sugar until light and fluffy. (You can do this in a food processor if you have one. Process for 2-3 minutes.) Mix in the eggs, then add the ground almonds and almond extract and blend until well combined. • Peel the apples, and cut thin slices of apple. (Do this at the last minute to prevent the apple going brown.) Arrange the slices over the biscuit base. Spread the frangipane filling evenly on top. Level the surface and sprinkle with the flaked almonds. • Bake for 20-25 minutes until golden-brown and set. • Remove from the oven and leave to cool for 15 minutes. Remove the sides of the tin. (An easy way to do this is to stand the tin on a can of beans and push down gently on the edges of the tin.) • Transfer the tart, with the tin base attached, to a serving plate. Serve warm with cream, crème fraiche or ice cream.

Tuile 1. Place the egg white in a very clean bowl and whisk until stiff but not dry. 2. Now beat in the sugar bit by bit and continue beating until the mixture forms soft peaks. When that happens, carefully fold in the rest of the ingredients except the almonds. 3. Next drop 4 rounded teaspoons of the mixture evenly spaced out on one of the lined trays, then using a small palette knife spread the mixture thinly and evenly into discs about 10cm across. 4. Don’t worry about a small hole here and there – it doesn’t matter at all. 5. Sprinkle with the flaked almonds, then bake the biscuits near the centre of the oven for 4–5 minutes or until they have turned a nice golden colour with a fine brown fringe.


#FINEDININGINDIAN

RECIPES

PAGE 25

6. While that’s happening prepare the second tray so that you can exchange them. 7. The cooked tuiles need to be quickly and carefully removed, one disc at a time, from the baking sheet, using a metal spatula. Curve each biscuit immediately over a rolling pin, and leave a few minutes until they are cool and crisp. 8. Then remove them to a wire rack and cook the rest, continuing as above until all the mixture has been used up. 9. As soon as the biscuits are cool, store straight away in an airtight tin to keep them crisp.

Apple kheer • Bring milk to a boil in a thick bottom pan and simmer till it thickens. Thickly grate apples without peeling. • Heat a pan, add the grated apples and cook on medium heat. Add sugar and stew till sugar melts and continue to cook till most of the • moisture evaporates. Add some of the reduced milk and cook. • As the mixture thickens add the remaining milk and cook till the kheer thickens some more. Add green cardamom powder, pink colour. continue to cook till the kheer thickens to the desired consistency. • Cool and then chill before serving.

Hibiscus powder and jell • Powder dry hibiscus in a blender to a fine powder, keep 50 g aside for dusting. • Simmer apple juice, sugar and 200 g hibiscus powder bring to down to 250 ml , remove from fire add lemon juice . • Allow to reach room temperature. • Now whisk in ultratex till the liquid gets to a fluid jell consistency

Plating • Use the best available plate, spoon apple kheer on centre, place apple tart on top & touching the side, break a piece of almond tuile place as shown in picture. • Sprinkle few bits of sugar coated coloured fennel seeds. • Top with lemon balm cress, fluid jell on side & dust with hibiscus powder


Scallops, Shrimp, Achar & Peaches Recipe by bobby from Indian small sharing plate  cook book

Yield: 1 portion Prep Time: 30 min Total Time: 35 min Ingredients for Garnish

• 2 No. Scallop (40g Per

Ingredients for Shrimp, Achar

Scallop)

• 50g Small Peeled Shrimp

• 1no. Baby Radish

• 1/2 Lemon Juice

• 15ml Oil

• 1/2 no. Peach

• 2g Ginger Garlic Paste

• 2g Asafetida

• 2g Lemon Juice

• 1g Turmeric Powder

• 3g Mustard Seeds

• 2no. Edible Flower

• 2g Chilli Powder

• 1 Whole Dry Red Chili

• 1g Salt

• 3g Cumin Seeds

• 1g Fresh Curry Leaf

• 10g Chopped Garlic

• 10g Coconut Oil

• 20g Chopped Shallots

Ingredients for Scallop

• 1 No. Tindli or Ivy Gourd

• 2g Turmeric Powder • 6g Chili Powder • 50ml Water • 30ml Plain Vinegar (Distilled) • Salt for Taste

#FINEDININGINDIAN

RECIPES

PAGE  26


Method For Scallop 1.

Make

sure

scallops, 2.

Pan

that

before

fry

the

the

scallops

marinating

scallops

are

with

just

as

all

before

clean

and

provided

plating

dry

as

possible.

ingredients

to

ensure

the

minus

best

Cut

the

oil.

quality

of

finish.

For Shrimp Achar (Pickle) 1.

Heat

the

oil

in

a

seeds.

When

they

garlic.

When

the

mix

with

leaving 2.

Add

start red

turmeric

the

cooked

to

vinegar

mix

and

water,

a

soft and

adding

cracking,

chilies

and

water

more

saucepan,

red

turn

chili

begins

cooking

texture remove

add

asafetida cumin

brown,

to

on

seeds,

add

powder.

powder

the

Sauté

dry

and

red

shrimps

until

the

then

mustard

chillis,

and

accordingly.

shrimp

Then,

starts

curl.

a

low

heat

and

the

water

from

the

heat,

until

has

the

been

allowing

shrimps

fully

it

to

are

adequately

absorbed.

cool

as

Now,

add

needed.

For Garnish 1.

Wash

rounds 2.

both which

Tindli,

1.

as

cut

same

in

for

and

fine half,

baby

as

radish.

possible,

should

peach.

be

Once

Thinly

and

slice

then

tossed

in

up

keep

the

your

them

same

ready,

lightly

cook

middle

of

plate

in

pan

for

a

baby ice you

radish

cold

in

water.

seared

the

minute.

Plating

Using

Place and

tindli

are

now

scallop.do For

the

a

the

pastry seared

edible

2.

Place

in

the

a

brush,

paint

scallop

on

the

top

of

achar,

the

followed

with

by

shrimp

achar.

peach,radish,

tindli

flower. few

pickled

shrimp

on

top

of

the

scallop,

and

around,

as

shown

picture.

Scallop is a common name that is primarily applied to any one of numerous species of saltwater clams or marine bivalve mollusks in the taxonomic family Pectinidae, the scallops.

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RECIPES

PAGE  27


Bay oyster pakora | charred Apricot | tamarind Recipe by bobby from Indian small sharing plate cook book

Ingredients

Garnish

• 1no. Fresh Bay Oyster

• 1/2 Side Fresh Apricot

• 30g Chickpea Flour

• 1 No. Round Baby Radish

• 1g Dry Yeast

• 1no. Tindli or Ivy Gourd

• 1g Sugar • 1g Salt • 0.5g Ajwain Seed

Yield : 1 portion Prep Time : 20 min Total Time : 35 min

• 10g Tamarind Chutney • 1g Edible Flower • 1/4 Slice Lemon for Juice

• 2g Madras Curry Powder • 15g Water • 3g Rice Flour • 200g Oil to Fry

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RECIPES

PAGE  28


Method Bay Oyster 1. Keep the oyster lightly salted for 1hr to help remove any dirt. Lightly steam the oyster for 1 minute, so it opens and the flesh will be in a poached condition. This is mainly to open oyster without any hassle. 2. If you are skilled, and know how to open a fresh oyster with an oyster knife please go ahead. If not, I strongly recommend that you make use of this steam method. Keep The Oyster in Its Juice 1. Begin the creation of a thick batter with chickpea flour, curry powder, ajwain seeds and water. Mix yeast, salt, sugar and 1 tablespoon of lukewarm water and allow it to bloom for 5 minutes in room temperature. 2. Next, mix yeast to the batter and keep in a warm surface until it raises as it should. Be sure it has enough space to raise up without spilling. 3. Remove the oyster from the juice, keeping it in a paper towel. Sprinkle rice & flour, coating evenly. Dip it in yeast batter, frying on a medium heat for the best results. 4. Till its golden and crispy. Remove and keep it in a hot area, or on a paper towel until you need it for plating.

For Garnish 1. Cut apricot in a crisscross fashion to get a grill feel. Then, pan fry on a clean nonstick pan until the flesh side becomes evenly caramelized and soft. 2. Cut baby radish into quarters, keeping the shoots, while slicing the baby cucumber in rounds. You can mix with lemon juice and keep aside to ensure it stays safe for use. 3. Place the apricot in middle of the plate, topping it with fried oyster. 4. Arrange cucumber and radish around as shown in the picture, spoon tamarind chutney in between radish and cucumber. Finish with an edible flower for presentation and to add some notable style to the dish.

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RECIPES

PAGE  29


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Fine dining indian Food Magazine - September 2018 Issue 8  
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