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2011 Summer Reading Program


Table of Contents Why Read Throughout the Summer?........................................................................1 Lower School Instructions.............................................................................................2 Reading Record...........................................................................................3 Directions for Locating Leveled Book Lists.............................................4 Favorite Series.............................................................................................5 Favorite Authors...........................................................................................6 Multicultural Authors of Children’s & Young Adult Literature...............................................................................6 Middle School Instructions & Required Reading...............................................................7 Award Winning Books................................................................................8 Upper School Instructions........................................................................................9 Required Reading List..............................................................................10 Optional but Recommended List............................................................11 Theatre Optional but Recommended List.............................................11 These books can be found at the public library, Borders, Barnes and Noble, Amazon and other book stores. For questions, please contact Media Center Director Mrs. Marcia Craig at (704) 366-5657, ext. 6601. Variations from this list must be approved by Mrs. Craig.


Why Read Throughout the Summer? Researchers have confirmed what you may have observed as a parent - that children differ widely in how much they read. Some children are voracious readers who keep a flashlight by the bed while other children believe that reading is a painful experience devised by adults who just don’t understand all that life has to offer. Researchers have also shown that students who read consistently and widely develop fluency, a rich and useful vocabulary, expand their knowledge of God’s world, other people, historical events, and culture. Most significantly, reading is a fundamental skill that positively correlates with academic achievement. Simple reading is important but is not enough. Chall, Jacobs, and Baldwin (1990) emphasize that challenging but comprehensible reading materials need to be the primary portion of students’ reading diets. Reading easy, entertaining, enjoyable books or an “old favorite” is appropriate but should be considered an occasional treat. We encourage students, with parent help and direction, to choose books to read that appeal to their interests. Students are encouraged to read with purpose—to learn or for pleasure. We also advocate designating some reading time each day throughout the summer and school year. The quantity of thought-provoking supplementary books that are beneficial for students preparing themselves for college grows every year. Students can use the summer months to their advantage by reading a wide variety of books. Upper school students may be able to include their thoughts and reflections about books that have impressed them as part of college essays. All choices for summer reading are personal for students in kindergarten through eighth grade. Students in grades 6 - 12 have required and/or optional reading selections. Expectations are explained on the following pages. Thank you for encouraging your children to read. Chall, J., B.Jacobs, and L. Baldwin. “The Reading Crisis.” Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1990.

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Lower School Instructions

Theme:

“Bee A Reader”

Purpose:

For lower school students, reading consistently throughout the summer months allows them to learn new vocabulary and broaden their perspectives while maintaining reading gains made throughout the school year. We encourage every student to read at least three books that appeal to his/her interests.

Incentives: To encourage reading, the media center will offer incentives to readers. To earn these incentives, please follow these directions: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

To earn an incentive, students must read at least three books. Record ALL the books you read this summer. A reading record is on the website and the next page. Parents, please sign the reading record beside the book title. Please bring your summer reading record to school on the first day of school in August 2011. You may turn your reading record in to your classroom teacher. Teachers will submit the reading records to the media center. READING RECORDS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED LATER THAN FRIDAY, SEPT. 2, 2011.

Students who read at least three books will earn a sticker. Additional and/or different incentives will be provided for students who read 10 or more; 20 or more; and 40 or more books. So “Bee A Reader” this summer.

Family values vary widely in a diverse faith community. We recommend that families read together so that family values can be reiterated when reading and discussing characters and their attitudes and behaviors. Reading as a family benefits students in several ways. Students retain information better when they have an opportunity to discuss (retell) what they have learned or experienced by reading. Students can ask questions about unfamiliar concepts or vocabulary. Explanations will foster additional learning that becomes new background knowledge. This new background knowledge can be used for making connections to even more new learning in the future 2


Name:_________________________________________________ Date: __________________

Book Title: _______________________________________________________________

Parent’s Signature: _________________________________________________________

2.

Book Title: _______________________________________________________________

Parent’s Signature: _________________________________________________________

3.

Book Title: _______________________________________________________________

Parent’s Signature: _________________________________________________________

4.

Book Title: _______________________________________________________________

Parent’s Signature: _________________________________________________________

5.

Book Title: _______________________________________________________________

Parent’s Signature: _________________________________________________________

6.

Book Title: _______________________________________________________________

Parent’s Signature: _________________________________________________________

7.

Book Title: _______________________________________________________________

Parent’s Signature: _________________________________________________________

8.

Book Title: _______________________________________________________________

Parent’s Signature: _________________________________________________________

9.

Book Title: _______________________________________________________________

Parent’s Signature: _________________________________________________________

10.

Book Title: _______________________________________________________________

Parent’s Signature: _________________________________________________________

Lower School Reading Record

1.

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Directions for Locating Leveled Book Lists

summer reading books that are leveled (JK - grade 1) Please follow the directions carefully because the website has many steps. • Go to http://www2.scholastic.com/browse/home.jsp • Scroll down and look to the right of the screen for Teacher Book Wizard. Click on the words: Teacher Book Wizard. (You do not need to fill in the search box). • At the top right corner in very small gray print you will see, “Your Reading Level System.” Click on Guided Reading. Then click the set button. • Look to the left of the screen and click on, Leveled Search. Then click, Go. • Look at the left margin for Reading Level. Click on the arrow button beside any (a drop down box) to find your child’s level. • You should see letters: A, B, C etc. Select the letter that aligns with your child’s reading level. You may also elect to narrow the search by selecting options. • Then scroll to bottom of the page and click on search. • A list of books will come up with your child’s reading level. Book Selections: Teachers have encouraged students to read to learn and/or to be entertained. Students are becoming more adept at selecting books in their zones of development. So, rather than try to publish comprehensive and perhaps cumbersome lists that attempt to meet the wide array of interests and meet the developmental needs of our student body, we encourage you to use AR Bookfind—http://www.arbookfind.com/. This great tool allows you to locate books that appeal to your child and would be in his/her zone of development. This will give you the flexibility to offer a huge variety of books to your readers.

http://www2.scholastic.com/browse/home.jsp 4


Series Author A to Z Mysteries Ron Roy Adventure Odyssey Alex Rider Anthony Horowitz Amelia Bedelia Peggy Parrish American Girls Various Andrew Lost J.C. Greenberg Animal Ark Ben M. Baglio Angelina Katharine Holabird/Helen Craig Arthur Marc Brown Boxcar Mysteries Gertrude Chandler Warren Cam Jansen David Adler Curious George H.A. & Margaret Rey Dear America Various Eloise Kay Thompson Encyclopedia Brown Donald J. Sobol FaithGirlz Kristi Holl FaithGirlz – Girls of 622 Harbor View FaithGirlz – Lucy Nancy Rue Faith Girlz – Sophie Nancy Rue Franklin Sharon Jennings/Paulette Bourgeois Geronimo Stilton Geronimo Stilton Great Brain John Dennis Fitzgerald Grandma’s Attic Arleta Richardson Hank the Cowdog John R. Erickson Hardy Boys Frankin W. Dixon High Hurdles Lauraine Snelling Hyperlinkz Robert Elner If You Give A Mouse Lauren Numeroff Judy Moody Megan McDonald Junie B. Jones Barbara Park Katie Kazoo Switcheroo Nancy Krulik Lady Grace Mysteries Lady Grace Cavendish Landmark Book Series Left Behind Jerry Jenkins/Tim LaHaye Little House on the Prairie Laura Ingalls Wilder Madeline Ludwig Bemelmans Magic Tree House Mary Pope Osborne Matt Christopher Sports Matt Christopher My America Various My Name Is America Various Nancy Drew Carolyn Keene Narnia C.S. Lewis Nate the Great Marjorie Sharmat Ramona & Henry Beverly Cleary Red Rock Mysteries Jerry Jenkins/Chris Fabry Redwall Brian Jacques RPM Chris Fabry Sarah Plain & Tall Patricia MacLachlan Series of Unfortunate Events Lemony Snicket 39 Clues Various Young Believer on Tour Stephen Arterburn

Favorite Series

Ages 9-12 6-12 8-12 4-8 8-10 7-10 8-12 4-8 8 & up 7-12 8-12 4-8 9-12 4-8 9-12 9-12 9-12 9-12 9-12 4-8 7-10 8-12 8-12 9-12 12 and up 9 and up 8-12 4-8 6-10 4-8 7-12 8-12 9-12 9-12 9-12 4-8 4-8 4-12 7-10 9-12 9-12 9-12 6-9 7-12 8-12 9-12 9-12 8-10 10 and up 8-12 12 and up

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Favorite Authors Multicultural Authors 6

Adler, David A. Allard, Harry Allen, Judy Arnold, Tedd Arnosky, Jim Avi Aylesworth, Jim Baglio, Ben M. Barrett, Judi Berenstain, Stan/Jan Bodecker, N. M. Bourgeois, Paulettte Bratton/Kennedy Brenner, Martha Brett, Jan Bridwell, Norman Broekel, Ray Brown, Marc Bulla, Clyde Robert Burningham, John Byars, Betsy Carle, Eric Carlstrom, Nancy Whtie Carrick, Carol Cooney, Barbara Coughlan, Cheryl Dahl, Michael Dalgliesh, Alice De Paola, Tomie Echlert, Lois Eckert, Edana Fleming, Denise Foley, Cate Fowler, Allan Fox, Mem

Fradin, Dennis B Fraustino, Lisa Rowe Freeman, Don Freeman, Marcia S. Friskey, Margaret Frost, Helen Ganeri, Anita Garcia, Eulalia George, Jean Craighead Gerrard, Roy Gibbons, Gail Giff, Patricia Reilly Gipson, Fred Greene, Carol Hall, Lynn Hayward, Linda Henkes, Kevin Herriot, James Heyman, Anita Hoban, Russell Hoff, Syd Holabird, Katharine Holm, Jennifer L. Hornblow, Leonora Hurwitz, Johanna Jacobs, Marian B. Kalbacken/Lepthien Karon, Jan Kellogg, Steven Keene, Carolyn Kessler, Leonard Kimmel, Eric A. Kirpatrick, Rob Knox, Barbara Kramer, S. A.

Kraus, Robert Krensky, Stephen Krumgold, Joseph Kuskin, Karla Lasky, Kathryn Leppard, Lois Gladys Lester, Helen Levine, Ellen Lewis, Beverly Lewis, Marjorie Lobel, Arnold Lonenecker, Theresa Lord, John Vernon Lowry, Lois Lunn, Carolyn MacLachlan, Patricia Marshall, Edward Marshall, James Mattern, Catherine Maurer, Tracy M. McCall/Keller McCloskey, Robert McDermott, Gerald McKissack, Patricia C. Mills, Lauren Minarik, Else Holmelund Moore, Eva Murphy, Elspeth Campbell Murphy, Patricia J. Myers, Bill Noble, Trinka Hakes Numberoff, Laura Oke, Janette Olien, Becky Osborne, Mary Pope

Parrish, Peggy Pascoe, Elaine Pattern, Barbara J. Peet, Bill Pfister, Marcus Polacco, Patricia Potter, Beatrix Rey, H.A. Richardson, Adele D. Rope, Peter/Connie Rylant, Cynthia Saunders-Smith, Gail Say, Allen Schaefer, Lola M. Scheer, Julian Seuss, Dr. Sharmat, Marjorie Weinman Sharmat, Mitchell Shaw, Nancy Slate, Joseph Snelling, Lauraine Stamper, Judith Townsend, Emily Rose Trumbauer, Lisa Waber, Bernard Waddell, Martin Warner, Gertrude Chandler Wexler, Jerome Wilder, Laura Ingalls Wise Brown, Margaret Wisniewski, David Wood, Audrey Ziefert, Harriet

Children’s & Young Adult Literature Joseph Bruchac Gwendolyn Books Nikki Giovanni Nikki Grimes Virginia Hamilton Ji Li Jiang

Julius Lester Patricia McKissack Frederick McKissack Patricia Polacco Linda Sue Parks Gloria Jean Pickney

Jerry Pinkney Ethel Footman Smothers Mildred D. Taylor Angela Johnson Jacqueline Woodson Lawerence Yep


Students in grade 7 are required to read two Accelerated Reader™ books of their choice valued at eight or more points. Students will be required to take the corresponding Accelerated Reader™ quiz on each book at the beginning of the 2011-12 school year. Students in grades 6 and 7 are encouraged to read additional books of their choice. Reading a wide variety of books contributes to students’ background knowledge, builds vocabulary and provides topics for conversation and discussion. Students in grade 8 are required to read one AR book of his or her choice valued at 15 - 18 points. Students will be required to take an AR test on the book. Two great books that meet the requirements are The Book Thief by Marcus Zusak and The House of the Scorpion by Nancy Farmer. AR BookFinder, at www.arbookfind.com, is a useful tool for locating books by an array of criteria, parents and students may use the Advanced Search to find books by title, author and or interest level. A sentence or two provides a brief description of books.

Family values vary widely in a diverse faith community. We recommend that families read together so that family values can be reiterated when reading and discussing characters and their attitudes and behaviors. Reading as a family benefits students in several ways. Students retain information better when they have an opportunity to discuss (retell) what they have learned or experienced by reading. Students can ask questions about unfamiliar concepts or vocabulary. Explanations will foster additional learning that becomes new background knowledge. This new background knowledge can be used for making connections to even more new learning in the future

Middle School Instructions & Reading Record

Students in grade 6 are required to read two Accelerated Reader™ books of their choice valued at seven or more points. Students will be required to take the corresponding Accelerated Reader™ quiz on each book.

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In addition to the wonderful classic books on the list of middle school reading choices, students may select from the following Newbery Award, and honor books. 2011 Medal Winner: Not recommended by Charlotte Christian School. 2010 Medal Winner: • When You Reach Me

by Rebecca Stead

Honor Books: • Claudette Colvin: Twice Toward Justice by Phillip Hoose • The Evolution of Calpurnia Tate by Jacqueline Kelly • The Mostly True Adventures of Homer P. Figg by Rodman Philbrick

Award Winning Books

2009 Medal Winner: Not recommended by Charlotte Christian School. 2008 Medal Winner: • Good Masters! Sweet Ladies! Village from a Medieval Village by Laura Amy Schlitz Honor Books: • Elijah of Buxton • The Wednesday Wars • Feathers

2007 Medal Winner: • The Higher Power of Lucky Honor Books: • Penny fron Heaven • Hattie Big Sky • Rules 2006 Medal Winner: • Criss Cross

by Christopher Paul Curtis by Gary D. Schmidt by Jacqueline Woodson by Susan Patron, illustrated by Matt Phelan Simon & Schuster/Richard Jackson)

by Jennifer L. Holm

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Penguin Young Readers Group)

• The Voice that Challenged a Nation: Marian Anderson and the Struggle for Equal Rights by Russell Freedman (Clarion Books/Houghton Mifflin) • Lizzie Bright and the Buckminster Boy by Gary D. Schmidt (Clarion Books/Houghton Mifflin) 2004 Medal Winner: • The Tale of Despereaux: Being the Story of a Mouse, a Princess, Some Soup, and a Spool of Thread by Kate DiCamillo, illustrated by Timothy Basil Ering (Candlewick Press) Honor Books: • Olive’s Ocean by Kevin Henkes (Greenwillow Books) • An American Plague: The True and Terrifying Story of the Yellow Fever Epidemic of 1793 by Jim Murphy (Clarion Books) Other books that may appeal to ms readers: • Granny Torrelli Makes Soup by Sharon Creech • Soldier’s Heart by Gary Paulsen (Male appeal - graphic novel

of Civil War soldier)

(Random House)

by Kirby Larson

• Ghost Canoe • Redwall Series

(Delacorte Press)

by Lynne Rae Perkins

Nonfiction: • The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens by Sean Covey • The Great Fire by Jim Murphy

by Cynthia Lord (Scholastic)

(Greenwillow Books/HarperCollins)

Honor Books: • Whittington by Alan Armstrong, illustrated by S.D. Schindler (Random House) • Hitler Youth: Growing Up in Hitler’s Shadow by Susan Campbell Bartoletti (Scholastic) • Princess Academy by Shannon Hale (Bloomsbury Children’s Books) • Show Way by Jacqueline Woodson, illustrated by Hudson Talbott (G.P. Putnam’s Sons) 2005 Medal Winner: • Kira-Kira

Honor Books: • Al Capone Does My Shirts by Gennifer Choldenko (G.P. Putnam’s Sons/a division of

by Cynthia Kadohata (Atheneum Books for Young Readers/Simon & Schuster)

• The Other Side of Truth • Red Scarf Girl

by Will Hobbs

(Male appeal - action/adventure)

by Brain Jacques (Male appeal)

by Beverly Naidoo by Ji Li Jiang

Authors who write for young adults: • Ann Rinaldi writes historical fiction and these will appeal to girls. • Sharon Creech has titles that will appeal to both guys and girls. • Gary Paulsen and Will Hobbs write action adventure books that are appealing to all. • Avi writes books that will appeal to both genders. • Philip Pullman writes books in the fantasy genre that also deal with good versus evil. • In The Tiger in the Well series, his writing has been compared to Charles Dickens. • Elizabeth George Speare has several books that will appeal to young adults. • Richard Peck also writes quick reads that are appealing to young people.


Every student in every grade in the upper school is required to read at least one book. The book assignments are generally made by grade level. Students in honors and/or Advanced Placement速 classes have additional reading assignments. There are also lists of optional books for those students who want to learn more in a particular area. Teachers have specific units and activities planned that will deal with the content of the required books. Teachers may ask students to read, paying attention to specific concepts, themes, ideas, characterization and so forth, and will directly communicate their expectations to students. Note: AP Foreign Language teachers will send a summer assignments packet to those students taking an AP Foreign Language class. This is required work for those students.

Upper School Instructions

For upper school students, reading consistently throughout the summer months prepares them for the academic courses that they will take in the fall. The quantity of thought-provoking supplementary books that are beneficial to students preparing themselves for college grows every year. Students can use the summer months to their advantage by reading a wide variety of books. Reading prepares students to deal with new ideas and provides a basis for discussion and reflection on a common topic.

Family values vary widely in a diverse faith community. We recommend that families read together so that family values can be reiterated when reading and discussing characters and their attitudes and behaviors. Reading as a family benefits students in several ways. Students retain information better when they have an opportunity to discuss (retell) what they have learned or experienced by reading. Students can ask questions about unfamiliar concepts or vocabulary. Explanations will foster additional learning that becomes new background knowledge. This new background knowledge can be used for making connections to even more new learning in the future 9


Required Reading required reading for RISING GRADE 9:

• The Old Man and the Sea

by Ernest Hemingway

In addition, students taking Honors English are required to read the following book. • Peace Like a River by Leif Enger

Upper School Reading Lists

requiredREADING readingFOR forRISING RISINGGRADE GRADE10: 10: REQUIRED

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• Killer Angels by Michael Shaara In addition, students taking Honors English and/or AP U.S. History are required to read a second book. Students taking AP U.S. History are also required to read this book. An email will be distributed early in the summer giving instructions for guided reading and notetaking on Albion’s Seed. If you are taking AP U.S. History and do not receive this communication by June 2, please contact donn.headley@charchrist.com. • Albion’s Seed by David Hackett Fischer Students taking Honors English but who are NOT taking AP U.S. History, please select ONE: • The Jungle by Upton Sinclair • How Should We Then Live by Francis Schaeffer • Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe • The Crucible by Arthur Miller • The Light and the Glory by Peter Marshall

requiredREADING readingFOR forRISING RISINGGRADE GRADE11: 11: REQUIRED

• Cry, the Beloved Country

by Alan Paton

In addition, students in Honors English, AP Language and AP european History are Required to read a second book. Students taking AP European History are required to select one of the following books. • Those Terrible Middle Ages: Debunking the Myths by Regine Pernoud • The Crusades by Hilaire Belloc • Citadel of God: A Novel of St. Benedict by Louis de Wohl • Joan of Arc by Mark Twain Students taking honors or AP language composition but who are not taking AP european History must select the second required book from any of these lists. Honors English or AP Language and Composition • Barefoot Heart by Elva Trevino Hart • Ake: The Years of Childhood by Wole Soyinka • Siddharatha by Herman Hesse • The House of the Spirits by Isabel Allende • Pavilion of Women by Pearl Buck • The Autobiography of Malcolm X Options ONLY for those in AP Language and Composition • Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance* by Robert Pirsig • I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings* by Maya Angelo Junior Bible (Christian Theology and World Religions) • Jesus Among Other Gods

by Ravi Zacharias

AP U.S. Government & Politics • What’s so Great About America • Common Sense

by Dinesh D. Souza by Thomas Paine

Civil War • Gods and Generals

by Jeff Shaara


Required Reading requiredREADING readingFOR forRISING RISINGGRADE GRADE12: 12: REQUIRED

• The Stranger by Albert Camus (French author) (Themes in this book align with both English and Bible.)

In addition students in GRADE 12 HONORS ENGLISH must read the following book. • Anthem by Ayn Rand In addition students in AP Literature and Composition classes are also required to read the following books. • Anthem by Ayn Rand • Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

These lists provide optional choices for students who want to read additional books.

Students taking AP Enviromental Science are required to read and complete the assignment posted on the website: • A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson

Optional But Recommended List Dr. Headley’s Recommendations: • Death Comes for the Archbishop • Hiroshima • My Antonia • The Oregon Trail • Son of the Morning Star • Two Years Before the Mast

by Willa Cather by John Hersey by Willa Cather by Francis Parkman by Evan Connel by Richard Henry Dana

Mrs. Crawford’s Recommendations (AP Art History): • Vanished Smile: The Mysterious Theft of Mona Lisa by R.A. Scoiti Mr. Nielsen’s Recommendation: • What’s So Great About America by Dinesh D’Souza

Upper School Reading Lists

Students in AP European History are required to read one of the following books. • Those Terrible Middle Ages: Debunking the Myths by Regine Pernoud • The Crusades by Hilaire Belloc • Citadel of God: A Novel of St. Benedict by Louis de Wohl • Joan of Arc by Mark Twain

Theatre Optional But Recommended List • Taming of the Shrew by William Shakespeare • Tartuffe by Moliere • The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde • Hedda Gabler by Henrik Ibsen • The Seagull by Anton Chekhov • Saint Joan by George Bernard Shaw • Mother Courage by Bertolt Brecht

• Our Town by Thorton Wilder • Long Day’s Journey Into Night by Eugene O’Neill • The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams • The Little Foxes by Lillian Hellman • Lost in Yonkers by Neil Simon • Respect for Acting by Uta Hagen • A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry • Fences by August Wilson • Miss Julie by August Strindberg

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Charlotte Christian School is a Christ-centered, college preparatory school, equipping and developing students to effectively integrate Biblical truth and learning into their daily lives and to impact the culture for Christ. 7301 Sardis Road • Charlotte, NC 28270 • (704) 366-5657 • www.charlottechristian.com


Summer Reading Brochure