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VOL 23 ISSUE 23 • JANUARY 8, 2020 • charlestoncitypaper.com

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Plastic Problems

Hard-fought plastic bans roll out across Charleston area BY SKYLER BALDWIN

CHARLESTON CITY PAPER 01.08.2020

In the wake of smaller-scale ordinances throughout the area, Charleston County began talks of a ban on single-use plastics in late 2018. To mitigate the ecological damage of plastic pollution and consolidate the laws across local areas, the ordinance was adopted in March 2019 and set to take effect with the new year.

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When communities like Isle of Palms started looking into small-scale plastic bans and ordinances, Caroline Bradner, the land, water, and wildlife project manager for the Coastal Conservation League (CCL), says the group stepped in to help the proposals along. “We feel that it’s just incredibly important that, from the beginning, all of those who will be affected are engaged especially to make it successful and make the difference that we all want to see — a shift in the mindset of our residents here and visitors alike,” she says. But in order to get to that point, there first has to be a shift in behavior, in this case one enforced by law. Business and restaurant owners especially are undertaking a considerable change, as the ordinance explicitly targets plastic grocery bags, styrofoam food containers and cups, and plastic straws in favor of recyclable alternatives. Members of communities across the county are no strangers to these changes. According to the CCL, Isle of Palms passed the first single-use plastic bag ban in our state in 2015. Their ban was community-led and blazed a trail for future plastics ordinances in Mt. Pleasant and Folly Beach. The Charleston County’s single-use plastic ban took effect on Jan. 1, and some remain concerned that outlawing specific uses for plastic bags and containers won’t make a big enough difference in the environment for the inconvenience claimed by some in the community. “I was in the industry when environmentalists were hell-bent on stopping the use of paper bags,” says Lisa Bowen, owner of Burbage’s Self Service Grocery on Broad Street. “Save the spotted owl — it was all about the spotted owl 35 years ago, and now it’s about the sea turtle. I do get frustrated that a small group of people are impacting these big decisions that do really affect people. It affects the elderly. It affects poor people. It’s a real thing. And what gets me is how unreal of an impact this is going to have.” Those in favor of the ordinances point to growing piles of plastic in the harbor and

other waterways. In Charleston specifically, many see that alone as a powerful argument. “So many people are depending on the water,” Bradner says. “You have oystermen and women who are wanting to make sure the oysters are clean, and now that means microplastics.” Microplastics, tiny pieces of plastic less than 5 mm in size, break down from larger pieces or smaller materials and items used in everyday life. Microplastics can be small enough to passively enter the water’s food cycles, and in turn, our bodies. A 2014 Citadel study found microfibers from synthetic clothing in oysters and other man-made pollutants in local wildlife. “Microplastics are getting into our oceans and into our dolphins and our oysters, and that’s getting into us,” Bradner says. “That makes it clear that we need to be thinking about how we can target plastic pollution across the board … “It’s certainly not a silver bullet for pollution,” Bradner says. “But it takes a lot of the pressure off of our collective effort to come up with creative solutions for the things that are much harder, like fishing gear and plastic water bottles.” Bradner says that this ordinance only targets easy items that the community can shift away from. Many times, the ordinances go hand in hand with education and outreach — helping people not just understand why, but other ways they can be helping accomplish the underlying goal. As things stand now, Bowen says she’s concerned that the community is lacking this knowledge. “You have to educate people,” she says. “Back in the day, we were being educated about litter and keeping the space around us clean. It was a big deal for us. I grew up in the ’60s, ’70s, ’80s, and now, I’ve never seen this city dirtier.” But the biggest reason for Bowen’s opposition to the ban seems much less nuanced. “I don’t like bans,” she says. “I don’t think bans are a part of a free society. Society is pretty good at not dictating, but reinforcing the positive. People were already using reusable bags.

Ruta Smith

BEFORE CHARLESTON’S BAN TOOK EFFECT, BURBAGE’S GROCERY ON BROAD STREET ENCOURAGED CUSTOMERS TO CARRY THEIR REUSABLE BAGS WITH LITTLE SUCCESS

People were already not asking for plastic.” Bowen believes it goes back to personal accountability and waste management at higher levels. “When’s the last time you’ve driven down the interstate?” she asks. “Did you notice the trash? When’s the last time you looked at a Target parking lot? Nobody is noticing the litter. Companies aren’t being accountable for the trash around their buildings. The city isn’t being accountable for the trash on the streets. That’s how it gets in our waterways.” Bradner admits that it’s a big change, especially for business owners, but supports the goals of the ordinance in targeting unnecessary convenience items or those the community already has alternatives for. “That styrofoam that you’re eating out of is leaching toxins the whole time you’re doing that, especially if the food is hot,” Bradner warns. “There are a lot of reasons to switch away from that, but it’s much harder to find a replacement that works for you. It also tends

to be more expensive to switch away from those styrofoam containers.” To Bowen, the ban doesn’t seem like it’s targeting items with good alternatives, it looks like it’s taking the easy way out. Not only that, but fear of what’s next looms when the first step seemed so simple and easy. After all, she says, after one ban, more will follow. Bowen says she agrees with the ideals behind the new law, but has seen little buy-in from her customers who don’t seem to care. After handing out 400 free reusable bags to shoppers during the city’s initial talks of the ordinance, Bowen says just three ever brought them back. Bradner is hopeful that over time, those numbers will begin to change. “These little changes that we can make, and the way we think about things,” she says. “The hope is that we do it all together and, ultimately, we end up in a position where we can’t imagine ever going back.”


JANUARY 9-19, 2020

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Three Questions With Presidential Candidate …

“I think in some ways [legislators] have gotten numb to it and just sort of expect to have to battle these bans every year.” —Ann Warner, leader of the Womens’ Rights and Empowerment Network, says people should contact their lawmakers to voice opinions on anticipated abortion bans in the legislature, which may not have as much support to make progress in an election year. Source: Statehouse Report

Courtesy Brackish Solutions

CHARLESTON CITY PAPER 01.08.2020

S.C. AG COMMISSIONER PETITIONS FEDS TO REVISE HEMP RULE TO HELP THE STATE’S FARMERS

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In a letter sent on Dec. 20, 2019, South Carolina Commissioner of Agriculture Hugh Weathers asked U.S. Sec. of Agriculture Sonny Purdue to revise its regulatory framework for hemp to help out S.C. farmers. As it stands, the USDA’s latest interim rule on hemp (published on Oct. 31, 2019), has testing requirements that do not take into consideration the arbitrary weather conditions farmers face on a daily basis. The federal rule mandates that hemp fields be sampled by SCDAdesignated staff and tested by a DEA-registered laboratory within 15 days prior to harvest. SCDA feels this window is too narrow, referencing both poor weather conditions and back-ups at labs. The issues Weathers brings up echo concerns shared by farmers who spoke to the City Paper in September as we examined whether the industry could keep pace with growth. More than 100 farmers in the state are growing hemp, but the lack of regulations and funding have left some in bureaucratic purgatory. In his letter, Weathers wrote, “We believe that several provisions in the interim final rule lack the flexibility necessary for our farmers to be profitable and for SCDA to be able to implement a successful hemp program.”

Weathers, who predicts that about 300 farmers will participate in South Carolina’s 2020 hemp farming program, recommended that the USDA implement new guidelines including:

• Providing states with funding through

cooperative agreements to carry out the testing and sampling requirement set forth in the interim final rule • Revising the interim final rule to allow for random and risk-based sampling of hemp farmers • Adjusting 15-day window to 30 days, as in other hemp-cultivating states • Increasing the limit of THC to 1 percent instead of 0.5 percent. According to the SCDA, “The majority of the noncompliant results that SCDA sees are below 1 percent and we have no reason to believe that farmers with non-compliant samples below 1 percent are intending to grow a controlled substance” The interim final rule is effective through Nov. 1, 2021. According to the USDA, comments received before Dec. 30, 2019 will be considered prior to issuance of a final rule. —Connelly Hardaway

$3.5 million

The amount raised in Q4 2019 by Jaime Harrison, the former state Democratic leader challenging U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham for his seat in 2020. Source: The State

Tom Steyer Until the S.C. Democratic Party primary on Sat. Feb. 29, we will publish candidate responses to three questions on issues facing local voters along with a brief analysis of each from two CofC professors. For more, visit charlestoncitypaper.com/threequestions 1. What would you do now and in the future to address climate change’s impact, particularly for poor and rural residents of coastal communities? Climate change is impacting the poor and natural disasters are sinking vulnerable communities further into poverty. Under my Administration on day one, I will declare climate a national emergency and address the effects of climate change on the poor. I will direct every part of the executive branch to align their rules and decisions with the country’s global and domestic science-backed climate goals. I will also challenge Congress to pass vital legislaSTEYER tion to enact a Green New Deal and provide additional funding to protect the country against climate and weather-related natural disasters. 2. How would you deal with enduring, stark racial inequalities in places like South Carolina? In this country, there has been over 400 years of legalized discrimination and unfairness that has provided the deepest injustice to communities of color across this nation. The wealth gap is widening, not a result of individual or family choices but rather the result of structural racism in public policy. The primary roots of wealth inequality is the richest Americans get to live by a different set of rules than everyone else. Within the first 100 days of my presidency, I will start a formal commission on race relations to address systemic racism and poverty and develop solutions to best deal with and undo the injustices. 3. Why should South Carolina voters support you Feb. 29? I will invest in the American people. My administration will promote a new Democratic narrative of how our nation can prosper and thrive. I will break the corporate stranglehold over our democracy and economy. Progress in this country will heavily depend upon the enactment of policies that provide all Americans with five fundamental human rights. My administration will provide all the right to a fair vote, clean air & water, quality education, and healthcare for all. My administration will address the inequities that divide us. I will promise to restore honor, build a more prosperous America, and provide justice to all.

According to the experts …

If you watch television, listen to the radio, or surf the internet, you’ve probably heard of Tom Steyer. Steyer is the self-funded billionaire presidential candidate who has dominated the airwaves over the past few months. Steyer has improved his position in South Carolina, where he is currently fifth, based on the Real Clear Politics Poll Average. Steyer’s rivals criticize him for outspending his competitors and buying votes. However, in our recent book on the South Carolina primary, we find that campaign spending is not a strong predictor of candidate success in the state’s primary. Consider the 2016 Republican contest. In that race, Jeb Bush far outspent his Republican competitors, including Donald Trump, yet finished fourth with less than 8 percent of the vote. Steyer’s opponents also criticize his lack of political experience. Fortunately for Steyer, our book also shows that political newcomers have just as good of a chance to win the South Carolina primary as more experienced candidates. Once again, 2016 is a good example given Donald Trump’s lack of prior political experience. Steyer is more than an inexperienced billionaire, however, and has made some smart campaign decisions. He has held over 25 events and has nearly 50 paid staffers in the Palmetto State, more than many of his political rivals. Steyer also speaks about several issues that appeal to African Americans: the state’s largest Democratic constituency. As one example, Steyer has proposed investing over $125 billion as president in historically black colleges and universities. Steyer still faces an uphill battle to win the South Carolina primary. He has struggled to secure key state endorsements — another important factor in our book. Further, he has a reputation as a fairly liberal candidate in a state where Democratic voters are more moderate than Democrats nationwide. Jordan Ragusa and Gibbs Knotts are political science professors at the College of Charleston. They recently published First in the South: Why South Carolina’s Presidential Primary Matters (USC Press, 2019).


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BLOTTER O’ THE WEEK

While a man was stopped at a red light, an unknown woman approached his vehicle, jumped belly-first onto the hood, and grabbed his windshield wipers, breaking off the driver side one. The woman ran away before the driver could get out and yell at her, but she left her phone and wallet behind. The Blotter is taken from Charleston Police Department reports. We’ve added a cartoon and a little commentary. We’ve added a little humor, too. No one has been found guilty. This is not a court of law. On Christmas Eve, a police report noted that a Daniel Island man received a text from his daughter saying “mom’s acting crazy, again,” which is the family code for “mom’s been drinking.” The woman assaulted the husband soon after, police say. Thankfully, there were no bruises and EMS was not requested — it’s a Christmas miracle. “A gaggle of subjects” were observed loitering outside of a downtown church daycare. One offender was smoking, one offender was sleeping, and one was holding a cup of urine. According to police, he “had to be reminded to take his cup of urine with him.” Going out on a limb here, but he was probably trying to leave it because it’s a cup of pee. Roughly $2,699.93 worth of Ancestry DNA kits (17 in total) were shoplifted from a downtown convenience store by a white male. Apparently, they needed to find out 17 different times that they’re 98 percent English, 1.9 percent French, and 0.1 percent Polish.

At a downtown bar last week, a dish full of buffalo dip was thrown. One man was struck in the back of the head and several patrons were splattered with dip. The man that threw the dish was arrested and charged with assault and battery third degree because wing sauce was never meant to be weaponized. A man entered a downtown hotel during the week of Christmas and damaged a piece of “gingerbread artwork.” We’re assuming the offender was either a harsh food critic, a rude art critic, or just hungry. At a Daniel Island hotel on the week of New Year’s Day, a woman attempted to convince police to let her go by referencing the Hilton family, the president, a bunch of body bags, and her psychiatrist. The therapist was contacted and an involuntary committal order was quickly signed by a judge. We can’t think of a better way to end the 2010s than a rant about politicians, the rich, and your psychiatrist. In a West Ashley parking lot, a man informed officers that he “does not answer questions,” when they asked if there was marijuana in his vehicle. Of course he doesn’t answer questions; he’s a rebel that might have weed in his car.

A juvenile was shot in the arm downtown last week during an aggravated assault with a firearm. On the peninsula, a man’s revolver was stolen from his vehicle. He did not know the serial number and the gun was fully loaded. He didn’t lock the car, but the gun was bought from a licensed dealer, so everything’s on the up and up. A West Ashley officer noticed a woman heating up a liquid in a measuring cup in her car. She was pretty upfront, telling the cops that it was heroin. Upon a search, they found two cartons of cigarettes with a white powder in them. The offender told police that neither were hers, and that one probably belonged to her mother and one probably belonged to her daughter. Holidays and families, am I right? A young man, described as “19-20 years old,” ran out of a West Ashley convenience store with two packs of JUULs. This incident occurred just two days after the age to purchase nicotine was raised, so he must have been going through withdrawals.

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County Council not doing Charleston any favors

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CHARLESTON CITY PAPER 01.08.2020

he term “awe-inspiring” is certainly not used to describe Charleston County Council. Better words: dysfunctional, opaque, non-strategic, lethargic, deaf, insular, and irresponsible. Just look at one recent shining moment: agreeing to sell the long-vacant Naval Hospital for likely $10 million to $12 million — we still don’t know the real figure — to a group of developers in what seemed to be a no-bid sweetheart deal that may allow them to build a new social services building nearby. But again, there are no real details on that deal, either. The whole Naval Hospital imbroglio follows a shady series of transactions through the years that saw North Charleston purchase the hospital from the federal government for $2 million and turn it around to sell it to a different developer for $5 million, which went bankrupt and led to the county buying it for $33 million. Advantage: Developers. Losers? Taxpayers, who funded the buyout. So now comes the latest deal cloaked in secrecy. Taxpayers may recoup some of the brain-addled deal reached earlier. But so far, we don’t know details. And that’s the point — county council members are elected to do the people’s business in public, not in private. Instead of masking what they’re doing to build personal power bases and feed big egos, members need to be inspiring, socially responsible public servants committed to good stewardship of public dollars. Council, however, remains challenged to do the public’s work in an above-board manner, as highlighted by three continuing headaches:

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Interstate 526: Regardless of whether you are for or against lengthening this connector, council members flail around arguing with everyone and their sister, but making little headway. If you’re looking for a textbook example of a public body that lacks leadership, council’s continued mishandling of this project — and long-term fixes for congestion — is mind-numbing. Recycling: At one point, it looked like the county was going to build a new recycling center near the Bees Ferry landfill. Then insider, political deal-making moved it to another location that has been rife with problems. As the project moved forward, tons of recycling material was shipped to Horry County for processing, but then stopped when the price went sky high. Now? A lot of what you put in the blue bins is piling up ... at Bees Ferry. Einstein would be mortified. Half-cent sales tax: When council was looking for a way to figure out how to pay its share of lengthening I-526, it decided to try to tap $300 million from a second half-cent sales tax originally targeted in 2016 for other road projects, green space, and more. The result: A lawsuit that’s still working its way through the courts. No more turf battles. No more broken promises. No more back-room politicking and smoke-and-mirrors deals. No more secrecy. Charleston County Council needs to buck up and start working in a more transparent way. If members can’t figure it out, we can find a way to pay for them to take a leadership training refresher class that won’t cost taxpayers a dime.

Andy Brack

EDITORIAL

Editor: Sam Spence Staff: Skyler Baldwin, Heath Ellison, Connelly Hardaway, Mary Scott Hardaway, Lauren Hurlock, Lindsay Street Cartoonist: Steve Stegelin Photographer: Rūta Smith Contributors: Gabriella Capestany, Vincent Harris, Melissa Hayes, Stephanie Hunt, D.R.E. James, Stratton Lawrence, Parker Milner, Robert Moss, Alex Peeples, Kyle Peterson, Michael Pham, Chase Quinn, Jeremy Rutledge, Michael Smallwood, Rex Stickel, Rouzy Vafaie, Dustin Waters, Kevin Wilson, Vanessa Wolf, Kevin Young

Published by City Paper Publishing, LLC Members: J. Edward Bell | Andrew C. Brack

Views expressed in Charleston City Paper cover the spectrum and do not necessarily reflect the views of the publisher. Charleston City Paper takes no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts. © 2020. All content is copyrighted and the property of City Paper Publishing, LLC. Material may not be reproduced without permission. Proud member of the Association of Alternative Newsmedia and the South Carolina Press Association.

Send us a letter We love hearing from readers. Share your opinions (up to 200 words) in an old-fashioned letter (1316 Rutledge Ave., Charleston, SC 29403) or by email to editor@charlestoncitypaper.com. We reserve the right to edit for length and clarity. Please include your name and contact information for verificaiton.


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THE SPENCE REPORT | BY SAM SPENCE

Getting By SC’s war against poor residents shows total disconnect with working people

CHARLESTON CITY PAPER 01.08.2020

South Carolina is a poor state. Past the “Great Day” greetings and glossy magazine rankings, in a slew of economic metrics, many South Carolina residents rank among the poorest in the nation. The war waged against poor people in South Carolina is cynical political theater with deadly consequences for thousands just scraping by as backslapping politicians do little to seriously address the problem. Many times, leaders have opted for policies that go out of their way to punish poor people for being poor. Two weeks before Christmas, Gov. Henry McMaster announced that the state received a waiver for a new Medicaid “community engagement initiative.” The waiver would require some of the state’s poorest residents receiving health insurance through Medicaid to work at least 80 hours per month to remain insured. Those most affected would be low-income parents, according to a report from the Georgetown University and S.C. Appleseed Legal Justice Center. Of the adults who rely on Medicaid and are targeted, 86 percent are mothers and 51 percent are African American — the state’s nonelderly population is just 28 percent African American, according to the report. Rural areas would be especially hard hit.

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Faced with the new requirements, the groups conclude that many poor in South Carolina could very well lose their coverage because of red tape and administrative issues, expenses like child care, or could end up earning too much to be covered by Medicaid but unable to afford private insurance. By their own estimates, state analysts say about 3,000 residents could lose coverage over five years. Appleseed and Georgetown worry that number is “undoubtedly an underestimation,” putting it at 5,000-14,000. This is just the latest example of ideology driving politics that stoke socio-economic division and shame people for being poor. In 2017, S.C. Attorney General Alan Wilson trotted out $275,000 in SNAP fraud that his office prosecuted, a whopping 0.02 percent of the $1.2 billion S.C. received for food stamps in 2016. The proposed work requirements amount to a one-two punch when coupled with the past two governors’ decisions to decline Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act — a move which has cost “several hundred” lives, one former state Medicaid leader has said. South Carolina is the only state to turn down Medicaid expansion and require work reporting from enrollees. Besides being morally reprehensible, the state’s fight

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against the best interests of its residents who live at or near poverty shows a true disconnect between South Carolina leaders and low-income working people. Announcing the proposal last month, federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services leader Seema Verma claimed that the move “will lift South Carolinians out of poverty by encouraging as many as possible to participate in the booming Trump economy.” Unemployment is indeed low and the markets are high. People have made money, but it likely isn’t the single mom in Allendale County, where almost a quarter of adults are on Medicaid and 37 percent live in poverty. To boast a “booming Trump economy” for South Carolina families is at best a political stretch, at worst untrue, and in any case, is a twisted jab at the thousands of residents who struggle to get by. “Without meaningful work, life loses its joy and meaning,” McMaster said at the rollout, according to the Greenville News. In a state where its leaders have repeatedly failed and even worked against its most vulnerable residents, the governor will surely understand if Palmetto State citizens don’t share in his joy.

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Vincent van Gogh, Dutch, 1853–1890. Self-Portrait (detail), 1887. Oil on canvas. Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art, Hartford, CT. Gift of Philip L. Goodwin in memory of his mother, Josephine S. Goodwin, 1954.189. Allen Phillips/Wadsworth Atheneum.

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ANERGY (ABOVE) RECEIVED HONEST CRITICISM FROM EXTRA CHILL, CHRIS HUBER’S (LEFT) WEBSITE

Artists and writers agree that it’s time for more music criticism in the local scene

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CHARLESTON CITY PAPER 01.08.2020

BY HEATH ELLISON

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harleston has blossomed into a popular music hub in the last 10 years. Sure, there have always been interesting tunes and artists coming out of the Lowcountry, but the scene is heading into the new decade with heightened momentum and clout, thanks to popular recording studios, venues, and artists. But, one thing seems to be missing from the formula many successful music scenes have established: honest and thoughtful criticism. The music community is a tight-knit group with more friends working in tandem than enemies competing for attention. Behind closed doors, opinions are exchanged between artists in the hopes of making the best music possible; the omitted ingredient, though, is the outside perspective found in written critical analysis. It may hurt to read something nega-

tive about a local album or song, but many artists and writers for several South Carolina publications tend to think that it’s time for the scene to embrace criticism to better develop Holy City music.

Think Critically Most news sources in the city cater to food, theater, and film reviews with varying degrees of controversy, but honest evaluations of the local music scene are scarce. But, that’s not always for lack of trying. Kalyn Oyer, editor of Charleston Scene with The Post and Courier, wrote reviews for her publication through 2018, but discontinued them after her coverage expanded to visual arts, theater, and events. Despite this, she admits that criticism is good for the music scene’s development. “I believe we need more critics,” Oyer says. “Without criticism, it’s hard for a music or arts scene

to grow. With criticism comes the opportunity for improvement and a chance for truly outstanding art to be put in the spotlight.” The Charleston City Paper finds itself in a similar situation. In the past, our publication has printed album reviews, but they were often far from the critical analysis required “Without criticism, it’s to push an artist to a new height. The long-running “In the Jukebox” series hard for a music or featured brief song descriptions, with arts scene to grow. little criticism. City Paper editor Sam Spence says With criticism comes that resources have been one of the the opportunity for biggest hurdles to clear for music criticism. “There’s so much creative energy improvement and around Charleston that many weeks a chance for truly we can’t even preview all the shows we outstanding art to be put want to, which unfortunately means that criticism falls by the wayside,” in the spotlight.” —Kalyn Oyer he says. “We’re certainly not afraid of ruffling feathers. Charleston City Paper has had award-winning writers tackling local restaurants and stage reviews for years, not to mention the opinion columns that run in every single issue.” During his tenure as the music editor at Free Times in Columbia, Jordan Lawrence was known in


Photos by Ruta Smith

Soda City for not pulling any punches in his music reviews; #BlameJordan began trending on Twitter, sometimes as a joke, among Columbia artists for a reason. But, Lawrence believes that backlash can be a sign that a publication is doing something right. “I think it can be hard for an artist to see all the spots where they can grow or the new ideas they can introduce if they’re only being told what they want to hear about their work,” he says. “That’s one of the important roles in which criticism comes in: It shows an honest opinion that’s not their perspective on their work and those kinds of things give them another view on what they’re doing.” Free Times has made a conscious attempt to “be more critical” since Lawrence became the managing editor in August 2019, he says. “A good honest critic will say things that an artist’s friends won’t, an artist’s peers won’t. Without good artist criticism, I think a lot of times what a musician or any artist will get into is a feedback loop in terms of the responses they’re getting and the opinions that are offered on their work.”

Being honest Ruta Smith

Extra Chill is possibly the most popular music outlet in Charleston that posts the occasional negative

review. Founder and editor Chris Huber says that while he’s cautious about articles that are too glowing or harsh, reviews have become some of the most popular content on his website. Their reviews are occasionally critical but rarely ruthless, usually written by local music fans who are quick to provide constructive criticism instead of brutal takedowns fit for Pitchfork. “A good Huber also believes that tasteful criticism is beneficial to artists, cithonest critic ing his October review of Whitehall’s will say things recent single, “Learning to Dance.” In that an artist’s the article, he comments that Whitehall without their saxophonist, Pat Magwood, friends won’t, “is a little bit disappointing.” an artist’s “It’s not that they don’t sound good without the sax, but the sax did make peers won’t.” their sound much more unique,” he adds —Jordan Lawrence in the review. Vocalist and guitarist Paddy McKiernan says that, while they don’t agree with the critique, they were happy to have the changing lineup acknowledged, and reached out to Huber to say that there were no hard feelings. “They actually texted me and thanked me for being continued on page 14

Provided

charlestoncitypaper.com

MATT KEADY (CENTER) WROTE AN INFAMOUSLY CRITICAL REVIEW OF JD MOON’S (ABOVE) DEBUT LP

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Critical

saying that bands of differing statures should be critically evaluated differently. continued from page 13 “There’s no point in saying X local act you haven’t heard of has their first album and honest,” Huber recalls. “Stuff like that I here’s why it’s not good. That does nobody guess just makes an artist think about what any favors,” he says. “But, if the Restoration they’re making and if it can be better, instead comes out with an album that has probof assuming that what they’re making is the lems, we’re going to talk about what those best thing they could possibly make.” problems are because they’ve risen to that The first somewhat critical article that level. In a weird way, you have to earn the Extra Chill posted was DJ Edwards’ review right to be negatively criticized.” of punk band Anergy’s debut EP, Anergy Whether that principle applies to Drink. The album received some moderate Andrew Halley is debatable. Halley, previpraise, some tepid song descriptions, and ously the bassist and vocalist for popular one critical segment where Edwards calls local rock band SonderBlue, released his the EP’s final song a “disappointment.” debut solo album Time Ghosts under the The release garnered a three out of five, to moniker JD Moon in October. Weeks which Anergy drummer Gabe Segarra says later, the LP received arguably the harshest he was happy someone took the time to review a Charleston artist has seen from listen to his music. the local press in years. “Time Ghosts lacks insufficient [sic] evidence proving “It definitely can be hard to take the any sort of proof that he could criticism,” he says, “but at the same time, ‘front his own band,’” reviewer and former City Paper intern if you want to be a successful artist, you Keady wrote for Extra have to learn to take that criticism.” —Gabe Segarra Matt Chill in November. Huber recalls being appre“That is something that a lot of people hensive about the review, but posted it don’t do,” he adds. “I could tell he actually anyway. “That kind of blew up in my face,” listened to it because a lot of that stuff he he says. Several members of the Charleston said — it was spot on.” music community approached him afterward “If he criticizes one song, that’s OK to tell him that the review was too hard on because it just means the compliments that Halley and was too personal. he gives the other four are that much more Halley was initially “a little depressed” meaningful to me,” says Segarra. “I’ve seen after reading the review, but says that there’s a lot of reviews of things where people don’t a lot of positivity that stemmed from it. “The really seem like they’re trying to have any amount of people that hit me up and said, criticism. But, that one felt genuine to me. At ‘Hey, I love you, I love your music, you’ve least I know he’s being honest when he said helped me through a lot of hard times,’ stuff he liked the other ones.” When asked if criticism can help “You can trash a SUSTO album or bands grow a music scene, Segarra believes that are already established, but when that it can, “for the most part.” you have a lower-level band, you’ve “It definitely can be hard to take the criticism,” he says, “but at the got to keep in mind the context of the same time, if you want to be a scene that you’re writing for.” —Chris Huber successful artist, you have to learn to take that criticism. If you ever get to a higher level than just local music, like that — it was really beautiful to see people are going to criticize you. It’s just that,” he recalls. Halley says that he’s got the way it is and you have to learn to roll about 14 songs written and ready to go for with the punches.” another album. Keady tells the City Paper that, while he stands by the majority of the album review, Toughen up he has reevaluated sections of it. “What There isn’t a field guide to review writing I took away from this the most is to be a because, oddly enough, it’s an artform by good guy who has high expectations for itself. Composing a good review takes pracmusic, and not go for [an artist’s] neck,” he tice, thought, and care. says. “There were some parts that I feel like Oyer believes that readers shouldn’t always I definitely could have taken out or some take a review at face value. “When done parts that I could have said in a much more properly, a review serves as a guide to the realistic way.” album, noting peak moments and impressive Despite the review, Halley believes that techniques, and also places that might not there should be more critical analysis in the have shined as brightly. In the end, it’s all an local music scene. “Why not? It’s cool,” he opinion,” she says. says. “I think everyone’s entitled to their Huber calls for nuance when writing a opinion. I think that any publicity is good review. “If you trash Hootie & the Blowfish, publicity.” it’s not going to ruin their career,” Huber If Halley can handle that, it’s a good sign notes. “You can trash a SUSTO album or that other artists can take some well-meanbands that are already established, but when ing constructive criticism. you have a lower-level band, you’ve got to keep in mind the context of the scene that If you are interested in writing thoughtyou’re writing for.” provoking reviews of local music, send your Lawrence’s opinion parallels Huber’s, ideas to heath@charlestoncitypaper.com.


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THE SECR ET S BAND

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CITY PICKS

S AT U R D AY

Charleston Marathon

Get ready to watch snowboarders fly through the air at Mex 1’s annual Snowboard Rail Jam. Back for the fourth year, Mex 1 is packing in 20,000 pounds of snow at its West Ashley location. This epic event will feature flips and tricks from regional and national amateur snowboarders showcasing their skills as they catch air on a 20-foot rail jump. With the event commemorating the surf cantina’s seventh anniversary, there will be plenty of fun for all including live music from Strawberry Squad, an outdoor bar, and drink specials. Sat. Jan. 11, 5-11 p.m. $20/door, $15/adv. Mex 1 Coastal Cantina, 817 St. Andrews Blvd. West Ashley. mex1coastalcantina.com

The O2 Fitness Charleston Marathon returns for its 10th year this weekend. Runners of all stripes are invited to hit the pavement in either a marathon, half-marathon, 5K, or youth marathon. A portion of proceeds from the race benefits Engaging Creative Minds, a local nonprofit that seeks to spark creativity and curiosity in students through innovative learning experiences. Sat. Jan. 11 at 7:15 a.m. Prices and locations vary. charlestonmarathon.com

S U N D AY

S AT U R D AY

East Cooper Meals on Wheels Oyster Roast

GRIT BOX Grand Opening

S AT U R D AY

CHARLESTON CITY PAPER 01.08.2020

Snowboard Rail Jam

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The East Cooper Meals on Wheels seventh annual oyster roast is a familyfriendly event with food, oysters (of course), beverages, live music, a bounce house, and other fun activities for the family. Guests will enjoy live music from The Shakin’ Martinis Band while shucking oysters. Hot dogs, beer, wine, and soft drinks are also included in the ticket price. Sun. Jan. 12, 1-4 p.m. $20+. Palmetto Islands County Park, 444 Needlerush Pkwy. Mt. Pleasant. ecmow.org

S U N D AY S AT U R D AY

Oyster Roast for Sea Turtles Coastal Expeditions hosts an oyster roast fundraiser for sea turtles featuring all-you-can-eat oysters, beer and wine, and oyster cruises. A portion of proceeds benefit the Sea Turtle Program in Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge. Sat. Jan. 11, 1-5 p.m. $40+. Coastal Expeditions, 514 Mill St. Mt. Pleasant

Wagener Terrace Oyster Roast and BBQ The Wagener Terrace neighborhood association hosts their always popular neighborhood oyster roast at Lowndes Grove this Sunday. Enjoy oysters, barbecue, live music, and more. Sun. Jan. 12, 12-4 p.m. $25/adult, $13/children. Lowndes Grove Plantation, 266 Margaret St. Downtown

Accomplish some of those new year goals at Grit Box Fitness, a boxing and boot camp gym opening at 2 Carlson Court. The space, the former location of art gallery The Southern, joins a sort of upper Meeting Street wellness hub, next to sweat studio The Works and across the street from soon-to-open F45 Training. Enjoy an open house and free classes, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. on Saturday and celebrate with a grand opening party, 7-10 p.m. Sat. Jan. 11, 8 a.m.-10 p.m. Free to attend. GRIT BOX Charleston, 2 Carlson Court. Downtown. gritboxfitness.com


2020 17

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Taste of Folly: S U N D AY S AT U R D AY

Jokes at Two Blokes Enjoy an evening of stand-up comedy at Two Blokes Brewing this Saturday. Hosted by Keith “Big Daddy” Dee, the evening sees performances from DS Sanders, Josh Bates, and Paul Baeza. You may have seen Sanders on Comedy Central or BET’s ComicView; he turns everyday truths into side-splitting comedy routines. Bates is the host of local comedy shows, Is This Art? and The Wine Down. Baeza comes from Charlotte, bringing with him both a quick wit and a dark sense of humor. Sat. Jan. 11, 9-11 p.m. $10. Two Blokes Brewing, 547 Long Point Road Suite 101, Mt. Pleasant

Charleston Wedding Festivals The Charleston Area Convention Center hosts a wedding festival this weekend chock full of all the latest wedding trends and ideas for your big day. There will be wedding workshops held throughout the day featuring advice from experts in the biz. Check out large displays with the most current wedding supplies and services, experience a mock wedding and reception display, and enter to win a variety of prizes. Sun. Jan. 12, 12-4 p.m. $8/general, $45/VIB (b for bride). Charleston Area Convention Center, 5001 Coliseum Drive. North Charleston

Cocktail Competition Hosted by Blue Chair Rum

FRIDAY, JANUARY 17 | 7pm-10pm | Tides Hotel Taste craft cocktails made by the Folly Restaurants & Bars, then vote for your favorite! Tickets are $20 in advance/$25 at the door and include free samples of all cocktails. Must be 21 or over.

Taste of Folly:

Street Festival

SATURDAY, JANUARY 18 | 10am-4pm | Center Street Join us as we showcase everything Folly with a special emphasis on our eclectic culinary scene! Enjoy...

- Cooking Demonstrations - Bert’s Hot Dog Eating Contest - Chili Cook Off

- Oyster Shucking Contest - Server Olympics - Live Music and a Kids Area

Tickets are $5, purchase advanced tickets for expedited entry. Folly residents and kids 12 and under are free. Separate registration fee for the Chili Cook Off.

To purchase your tickets and for more information, please go to

Commonhouse Aleworks Anniversary F R I D AY

Annual Open Mic The Poetry Society of South Carolina hosts their annual open mic night at the Charleston Library Society this Friday. Hosted by Jim Lundy, this event is open to anyone with a poem to read, or anyone who just wants to hear an entertaining collection of poems from others. Fri. Jan. 10, 7-9 p.m. Free to attend. Charleston Library Society, 164 King St. Downtown. poetrysocietysc.org

To celebrate two years of great beer on O’Hear Avenue, Commonhouse Aleworks is throwing a big party with the help of Vive Le Rock Productions. Attendees can enjoy axe throwing, brewery tours, hula hooping, face painting, a tattoo competition, and live music. A portion of proceeds benefit Metanoia Community Development, which helps build leaders, establish quality housing, and generate economic development. Sat. Jan. 11, 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Free to attend. Commonhouse Aleworks, 4831 O’Hear Ave. North Charleston

visitfolly. com

or download the free Visit Folly app on your smart phone.

CALENDAR | charlestoncitypaper.com

S AT U R D AY

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A ARTS

artifacts MITCHELL HILL OPENS IN NEW KING STREET LOCATION

Mitchell Hill has officially moved down the block. The Charleston-based “design house” celebrates a decade in the city with this recent expansion, moving from their former spot at 438 King St. to 414 King St. (former location of Chase furniture). The new Mitchell Hill space is 12,000 square feet and features both a design center — carrying the latest in furnishings, paint, flooring, and original works of art — and an event space. In a press release earlier this year owners of Mitchell Hill, Michael Mitchell and Tyler Hill, said: “Mitchell Hill aims to serve as a resource for both design connoisseurs and to-the-trade industry professionals.” Mitchell continued, “We’ve seen Charleston grow into a design hub, and with the influx of interior designers, furniture makers, and design aficionados, we saw a hole in the market. The same way many of the designers gravitate toward High Point Market, Atlanta, and New York, we want to be seen as a design resource in your backyard.” Learn more about Mitchell Hill and check out info for upcoming events online at mitchellhillinc.com. —Connelly Hardaway

Dear Sugar PURE Theatre’s production of Tiny Beautiful Things shares a universal message

THE LION KING BROKE BOX OFFICE RECORDS AT NORTH CHARLESTON PAC

Last month Disney’s The Lion King celebrated a record breaking two-week premiere engagement at the North Charleston Performing Arts Center (NCPAC). The performance grossed more than $2.4 million at the box office and entertained over 32,000 theatergoers. The 16 performances, held Dec. 4Dec. 15, broke the box office record for the highest gross and most attended show ever in NCPAC’s history. In a press release, the NCPAC estimates that the city of North Charleston also benefited immensely from The Lion King, generating an economic benefit of over $7.7 million to the city from travel, hotels, restaurants, parking, and patronization of other businesses. Touring Broadway shows are big business in North America; in 2018-2019 season attendance across North America reached 18.5 million with the season grossing over $1.6 billion. According to the Broadway League, touring Broadway shows contribute a cumulative $3.8 billion to the metropolitan areas that host them. Check out all of the Performing Arts Center’s upcoming performances at northcharlestoncoliseumpac.com. —CH

BY VINCENT HARRIS Tiny Beautiful Things

CHARLESTON CITY PAPER 01.08.2020

Jan. 9-Feb. 1 $22-$35 PURE Theatre 134 Cannon St. Downtown puretheatre.org

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In 2012, a writer named Cheryl Strayed published a book called Tiny Beautiful Things: Advice on Love and Life from Dear Sugar. The book was a compilation of letters and responses from Strayed’s time as an anonymous advice columnist, “Dear Sugar,” for the online literary magazine The Rumpus from 2010-12. Strayed received thousands of letters asking for advice, and she used many of them in her book. People reached out to her, or more accurately, to Sugar, pouring out their fears, feelings of loss, stories of abuse, confessions of lust, and all manner of visceral emotions, and Strayed responded with unflinching honesty, humor, compassion, and acceptance. It’s the kind of story that seems tailormade for a dramatic retelling, and that’s what My Big Fat Greek Wedding writer and star Nia Vardalos did in 2017, adapting the book with Thomas Kail and Marshall Heyman and starring as Cheryl/Sugar. In the play, Cheryl moves around her home, reading and reacting to the letters

Sugar receives, as a small group of actors follow her from kitchen to living room, essentially all around her home embodying the letter-writers and awaiting her responses, which often involve stories from her own life. Their stories become entwined with Cheryl’s own as the play progresses, perhaps leading to a greater understanding of human nature for everyone involved. That search for understanding is what drew PURE Theatre director Sharon Graci to the play in the first place, and made her want to helm it. “There’s a quote from Variety that (the play) is like a theatrical hug in turbulent times,” Graci says. “And I think that that is an absolutely appropriate description of what the experience of Tiny Beautiful Things is. It is wonderfully human, and it amplifies our feeling of being part of a collective as opposed to being individuals suffering alone.” PURE’s production of Tiny Beautiful Things, which opens this Thursday, stars Cristy Landis as Cheryl and R.W. Smith, Douglas Scott Streater, and Sullivan Hamilton as the letter writers. Graci says that when casting Landis as Cheryl, there was one quality she was looking for. “Honesty,” she says. “The fact is that continued on page 21

Photos by David Mandel

SHARON GRACI SAYS THAT THIS PRODUCTION IS FOR ANYONE WHO DOESN’T WANT TO FEEL ISOLATED OR AT ODDS WITH THE WORLD

For daily updates from Charleston’s art world, check out the Arts+Movies section at charlestoncitypaper.com.


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DAVID SCHIRDUAN’S RPG IS INFUSED WITH LOWCOUNTRY LORE

Know Your Role New local role-playing game takes you on a Lowcountry adventure

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BY MICHAEL PHAM can result in lots of arguing) to advance the story and develop each others’ characters. It’s possible to play an RPG from scratch, but if you need some inspiration, a book of ideas (often called an “Adventure”) is always beneficial. Inspired by games like Dungeons & Dragons (D&D) and Pathfinder, Lowcountry Crawl is a historical fiction RPG adventure book, rooted in 19th century Southern United States history, created by David Schirduan and John Gregory. Both were born and raised in the South; they grew up tromping around the marshes and listening to local legends around Saint Helena. Lowcountry Crawl is compatible with D&D-style games, but reflects old-school first edition D&D in tone. Standard D&D and RPG mechanics like the 20-sided die, armor class, HP, etc. are used. Unfortunately, Lowcountry Crawl isn’t for first time RPG players; it’s meant to be content and inspiration for an existing D&D group. For newbies, Schirduan published Bone Marshes in June 2018. It’s a complete RPG, recommended for first-time players, containing rules and an adventure for players to become familiar with RPG basics. And shortly after publishing, Schirduan and Gregory met and with their shared interests in games and the South, made their own uniquely southern adventure. “I was still in a ‘magical marshes’ kind of mood after publishing Bone Marshes,” Schirduan says. “Around mid-August I met John on an online forum and decided that continued on page 21

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ARTS | charlestoncitypaper.com

What’s an RPG? It’s simple: it’s you and a group of friends sitting around a table and yelling at each other all night. Kidding, of course (sort of). RPGs, role-playing games, are fueled by imagination. It’s a game that you and your friends make together. At its core, RPGs are a way to tell stories with your friends and go on crazy adventures together, fighting the bad guys (or being the bad guys), finding treasure, overcoming obstacles, and solving puzzles or mysteries together. Using the characters you’ve created, you and your friends make decisions together (which

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BYE SOCIAL LIFE, HELLO MOVIES | BY KEVIN H A N YOUNG

Litter Box Cats is a pretty bad movie, even if you’re a cat My roommate Kevin and I rarely get out to the cinema to see movies ... but I finally snuck myself into the Terrace to see the film adaptation of the Andrew Lloyd Webber musical Cats. How I got in, I’ll never tail. Anyway, so I was sitting in a theater filled with young families, an older couple, and a few snarky jackasses like my roommate. By the way, last I wrote an article, I unfairly ripped into and stereotyped furries in my heated catpile on the film’s trailer. My apologies on that one. The movie starts and we hear this magical twinkly music that always reminds me of dear old Crookshanks. So far, so good. Granted that was only 40 seconds in ... Immediately, we see a faceless asshole woman toss a bag that has what I’m assuming is a cat and, voila, it is our main character, Victoria (Francesca Hayward). She is being watched and approached by a bunch of other curious cats. Up until that very moment, I had not seen these “cats” on a big screen. On my roommate’s laptop it looked possibly horrific and funny. I can say the moment I saw the head catman, Munkustrap (Robbie Fairchild), on the big screen skulking around on his arms and legs, I was in a catatonic state. I’m not trying for a kickass pun here. I was genuinely disturbed. From there, we meet a cat. Said cat sings about himself and his radness while the other cats do these sultry Bob Fosse walks. After that we meet another cat. This one also sings about herself and her radness while the other cats do those sultry Bob Fosse walks. Then we meet another cat ... Do you see a pattern? It’s wash, rinse, repeat with slight moments of action like a cat being kidnapped or possibly Thanosed out of existence by Idris Elba. We also find out that these cats are magical “jellicle” cats but never find out anything past that. We find out one will be chosen for a really great reward that essentially sounds like death. Then we’re treated to Rebel Wilson eating roaches

Images courtesy Universal Pictures

WHY AREN’T THEIR, UM, “PAWS” FURRY, TOO?

that have human faces and mice with baby faces singing. And then Dame Judi Dench pops up looking like Bert Lahr’s cowardly lion wearing a ring. Jason Derulo shakes his CG-edited crotch while Taylor Swift shakes her CG bosom. Cats get horny. Not an hour in and I already found myself wishing I could bolt out of there and duck into Paddock & Whisky next door. It’s just too much. I’m all for external stimuli and even absurd shit, but this transcended that. At this point in the viewing my eyes looked through the screen and thought of something more pleasant — that GIF of Jerry Seinfeld leaving the theater. How I envied GIF Jerry. I have so many questions. But I’ll try to keep it to a few. Why do some cats wear clothes but others don’t? With all the technology at their disposal, why didn’t the studio just do animated cats for the film version? Even if it looked clunky, it would have been way less off-putting for sure. Why did Grizabella (Jennifer Hudson) during her big “Memories” number have a bit of wet stuff on her

“A hilarious family comedy.” - BackStage Magazine

nose? I kept getting scary flashbacks to Messy Tessie from The Garbage Pail Kids Movie. Why are y’all sexualizing us? Why?! Why?! That’s so weird! I mean yeah I’ve gotten my share of pussycat in my time but I, and all the other felines I know, never walked around in unison making horny noises and shaking our tails that way. Also, don’t pretend to get us. It’s OK, filthy humans, you don’t need to get us. We definitely don’t get you, and we’re fine with that. In the end, I feel like a sour puss for being so down on this movie. Part of me feels bad for everyone top to bottom because this project had been in gestation since Spielberg himself expressed a fleeting interest in it during the musical’s heyday. I think, for a money-grubbing movie studio, they likely had the best intentions. You know, this reminded me of another bewildering movie adaptation that bombed during the Christmas season, David Lynch’s Dune. That too relied on the source material’s fans to come along for the overstuffed, mildly disturbing, trippy journey. This, like Dune, will garner a cult following from idiots like my roommate. If anything it made me appreciate T.S. Eliot’s Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats a little more. And as much as I’m unnerved by this whole thing, I’m still going to see the musical when it comes to the North Charleston Performing Arts Center. If anything, so I can see how this stacks up against the source material. Besides, at least there it makes sense seeing humans in catsuits because getting us actual cats to be in Cats would be like herding ... Cats. Cats — Rated PG. Directed by Tom Hooper. Starring James Corden, Judi Dench, Jason Derulo, Idris Elba, Francesca Hayward, Jennifer Hudson, Ian McKellen, Taylor Swift, and Rebel Wilson. ~RIP Lil’ Bub

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continued from page 18 Cheryl is a seeker. She is giving advice, yes, but she herself is discovering her own truth as she encourages everyone else to find their own truth through their own experiences.” Through Cheryl’s experiences with those seeking advice, she finds more than just tragedy; Graci says the play touches on many different facets of humanity and stresses a theme of universality, something she says we sorely need in today’s contentious times. “Cheryl is responding to readers seeking help and seeking guidance, and she’s at home in her life participating in this,” she says. “It’s funny and quirky and incredibly heartfelt and deeply moving. I think that it’s for everyone not wanting to be isolated, or not wanting to be continuously at odds, or not wanting to experience the division. And that really drove the desire to produce this play now for this audience in this time.” Interestingly enough, Graci says she avoided watching Vardalos’ version of the play, or any of the other versions that have popped up since its 2017 debut. “I think each production is unique to the aggregate parts that make up the collective ensemble that is working on a piece of theater,” she says, “No two performances could ever be the same. Every variable that comes into play in making art has exponential

ripple effects that are beyond definition.” What does define Tiny Beautiful Things, though, is its intimacy. A story like this requires a stripped-down presentation, and Graci says her experience working with small-scale productions helped her direct PURE’s version effectively. “I think that one of the greatest strengths that I bring to my work as a director is that I came up through very, very small venues with limited resources,” she says. “So it forced me to always concentrate on the essence of character and storytelling. And that will absolutely be the background of this production as well.” Graci adds, though, that she wouldn’t have been quite as comfortable with a minimal approach earlier in her career. “When I was younger, it was harder for me to get out of my own way,” she says, “until I realized that getting out of my own way wasn’t running from the deficits. It was actually walking into perceived deficits and limitations and allowing complications and lack of resources to not be impediments, but to actually be the opportunities for the greatest creative solutions. It was remaining open to all possibilities within the process.” Whatever the presentation, Graci says she hopes the audience walks away from Tiny Beautiful Things feeling a little less isolated. “The idea is that each person’s path will continue to unfold,” she says, “but you do not walk alone.”

RPG continued from page 19 his incredible work deserved to be in a nicelooking book, so I pitched him the idea of making a little zine.” Instead of the high fantasy Tolkieninspired or sci-fi Lovecraftian-style RPGs, Lowcountry Crawl revolves around Gullah legend and stories of the South. “Growing up in the Lowcountry, I found myself surrounded by nearly 300 years of history,” Gregory says. “It’s easy to get caught up in the ‘romance’ of the South, but the real history is far less rosy and far more complex.” With the help of Akelah Adams of Salt and Sage Books, Lowcountry Crawl brings light to an under-explored piece of 19th century history, bringing life to some of its more outrageous elements and tales. In the first issue of Lowcountry Crawl, players can explore over a dozen locations on four barrier islands, and encounter creatures with special Omens, ghost pirate ships, and a mad scientist. It also includes tools to create your own islands and environments for players to explore. A standard session might start in St. Erasmus, where players will learn about the ghost hauntings in the Chapel of Ease, or speak with the mad scientist in the lighthouse on Folly Point, or check out the pirate cove of Blackwater Bay. Lowcountry Crawl is a very free-form

Provided

SCHIRDUAN AND HIS CO-CREATOR, JOHN GREGORY, ENLISTED LOCAL ARTISTS TO HELP ILLUSTRATE THE ZINE

RPG adventure book, and players aren’t restricted to what’s confined in the zine. Anything can happen. The zine is available online for $5 for a PDF, or $10 for both a PDF and print copy. Twenty percent of proceeds made from Lowcountry Crawl will go to the Penn Center, an African-American cultural and educational center on Saint Helena Island. “We’re hoping that this zine attracts the attention of those who share a heritage with the residents of this period and place in history,” Schirduan says. “RPGs are an opportunity to hang out with friends more frequently and a great way to share ideas and have fun. Hopefully more people will be open to play RPGs and enjoy them as much as I do.”

ARTS | charlestoncitypaper.com

Sugar

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C CUISINE

a la carte ROSALIE’S PIZZA TRUCK SET TO HIT CHARLESTON STREETS IN EARLY 2020

Ruta Smith

ESTADIO’S SEAFOOD PAELLA COMES IN A BROAD PAN FILLED WITH TENDER RICE, TOPPED WITH SHRIMP, SQUID, AND CLAMS IN THE SHELL

REVIEW

Pass the Porron Estadio brings bold, well-executed tapas to Spring Street BY ROBERT F. MOSS Estadio

CHARLESTON CITY PAPER 01.08.2020

Tapas Entrees: (tapas style) $2.50-$28 Serving: Dinner (daily) & Weekend Brunch 122 Spring St. Downtown

22

I hereby declare 2020 to be the year of beets and kale. No, it’s not an “eat healthy” New Year’s resolution thing. I am simultaneously declaring 2020 to be the year of sherry cocktails, and maybe “gin tonics,” too. And all because of Estadio. That’s the new Spanish-style bar and restaurant that opened on Spring Street back in October. There is plenty of sherry, which you can drink by itself in a glass or shaken into an oloroso old fashioned ($12) or a refreshing Manzanilla gimlet ($11). There are also Basque ciders, frozen wine “slushitos,” and all sort of other things, many punctuated by exclamation points —”¡Vermut! On Tap,” “¡We Have Porróns!” If you’re considering the seafood paella

($28) — and you should — learn from my error and put in that order along with your drinks, before you get lost in the pintxos and tapas. We’ll get to the paella later. First there are things on skewers, like a quartet of royal red shrimp ($12) stretched straight, grilled brown and crisp around the edges, and basted with salsa verde. The traditional pintxo gilda ($2.50) is deceptively simple: a single green olive, a folded anchovy, and a thin hot green pepper speared on a toothpick, a bite that builds from tart to briny to heat. I always order patatas bravas at tapas places because a) the name is fun to say and b) done right, they are delicious. But they are also really easy to screw up, resulting in sad bowls of soggy spuds in limpid tomato sauce. Not at Estadio. Their patatas are brown and crisp, with fat squiggles of pale yellow aioli criss-crossing the peppery red sauce. The potatoes stay crisp, too, so you keep coming back to them as you graze your way through the rest of the tapas, making

the last forkful as good as the first. A single meatball arrives in a round white plate amid a pool of thick tomato sauce, and it sparked some debate at our table. Some felt it too mild and plain — especially at $10 a pop — but others (that is, me) found it pleasingly savory with a subtle dose of spicy heat. I was underwhelmed by the croquetas, though. There are three options — jamon ($11), rock shrimp ($12), and boletus ($11) — but regardless of which you choose you get three, fried light-golden brown. Beneath the pleasantly crisp crust is a gooey gob of mild bechamel, really more fried cream balls than anything. Blindfolded, I might not be able to pick out which was the jamon and which the shrimp. Admittedly, my judgment here may be slanted because those innocuous, creamy mouthfuls were sampled amid so many other bites that absolutely explode with flavor. Estadio’s “seven minute” eggs ($3) have a continued on page 24

Industry veterans Leah Highfield and Jeremy Williams are originally from “up north” — Boston and New York respectively — so pizza has always been a part of their lives. These days, Highfield works at Indaco and Williams is part of the crew at the Royal American. “We’ve always liked cooking together,” says Highfield. After years — yes, years — of R&D, the couple is finally ready to launch their own pizza truck, Rosalie’s, named after Williams’ nonna. “It started as a hobby,” says Highfield, “then the more we started doing it we were nerding out on pizza stuff.” Highfield and Williams estimate they’ve collectively worked in the industry for upwards of 20 years, both front and back of house. Highfield was even able to get her hands dough-y in the kitchen at Indaco. “To be on the line and make pizza after pizza, that feeling of crunch time and knowing I can handle it, it’s actually really fun,” says Highfield. Rosalie’s will make three different kinds of pies: classic round pies, grandma pies, and Detroit style. All will be available by the slice, and each is made with premium, organic flour from Central Milling, which operates a farm out of Utah. “We started R&D two years ago,” says Williams. “I’d go back home to New York, and we’d hit up all the pizza places in Boston, Philly.” Pizza devotees are known to squabble over labels — the couple says their thin crust/classic round pie will be naturally leavened with all-natural starter, reminiscent of a “New York-style, old-school slice place.” The grandma pie is “basically a thin square baked in a pan with oil at the bottom,” says Highfield. And their Detroit pie is a “version of Sicilian but thick and fluffy, we let the dough sit out and get really airy.” The couple has been operating out of the shared space KTCHeN on Rivers Avenue, and hope to park their truck in the Royal American parking lot for an early 2020 pizza pop-up. The 20-foot trailer was “completely gutted” and now boasts a shiny new paint job, two deck ovens, and a “magical” hood that they’re hoping will keep them cool come springtime. Highfield and Williams have already hosted friends — like the Royal American’s owner John Kenney, who they say has been begging them to get up and running — and they’re feeling pretty confident about the final menu, which will also include gelato, ices, and salads in addition to the pies. “We always had this idea that it would be fun to have a business together,” says Highfield. Keep up to date with Rosalie’s first popup by following them on Instagram. —Mary Scott Hardaway Be the first to know. Read the Food+Drink section at charlestoncitypaper.com.


5Church The sister restaurant to 5Church Charlotte, 5Church Charleston is run by exec chef Adam Hodgson and Bravo Top Chef alum Jamie Lynch. While the menu veers pretty standard high-end, approachable, “modern American” fare — think salmon, raw bar items, flatbread — the Market Street spot has made a point to go the extra mile by sourcing ingredients from Lynch’s new six-acre farm located 30 minutes from Charlotte. —Mary Scott Hardaway (Dish, Summer 2019) Lunch, Dinner, & Sun. Brunch. $$$. Dinner. 32 N. Market St. (843) 937-8666. The Alley Fun bowling alley with games, lanes, great drinks, and good food. Lunch (Thurs.-Sun.), Dinner, Late Night (daily). $$. Lunch, Dinner, Late Night, Live Music, Non-Smoking, Burger Week. 131 Columbus St. (843) 818-4080. Boxcar Betty’s Somewhat hidden away on Savannah Highway is Boxcar Betty’s, a simple enough place that means to take a stand on the lack of good fried chicken sandwiches. Because owners Ian MacBryde and Roth Scott, formerly of Magnolias, staked their claim as a niche kind of joint, the menu confidently boasts only a few items. Boxcar Betty’s now has four area locations. Lunch, Dinner (daily). Lunch, Dinner. 1922 Savannah Hwy. 843-225-7470 114 Holiday Drive. 7800 Rivers Ave.

Ms. Rose’s Modern American diner food with classics like meatloaf and fried chicken and newer favorites like kale, polenta, and brussels sprouts. Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner (daily), Weekend Brunch. $$. Outdoor Dining, Sunday Brunch, Lunch, 3, Dinner, Parking. 1090 Sam Rittenberg Blvd. (843) 766-0223. Philly’s Cheesesteaks They say don’t be fooled by imitators. We say this is definitely the real deal when it comes to cheesesteaks, whether you take ‘em ‘wi’d or ‘widout.’ Lunch & Dinner, Closed Sun. $$. Lunch, Dinner, Best of Charleston winner. 4650 Ladson Road. (843) 873-0776. The Rarebit A 50s-style cocktail bar with a full menu of diner favorites like chicken noodle soup, patty melts, and triple stack burgers. Breakfast is served all day, every day. Lunch, Dinner, & Late Night. (Tues.-Sun.) Kitchen open until 1 a.m. $$$. Sunday Brunch, Lunch, 3, Dinner, Breakfast, Late Night, Wifi, Burger Week. 474 King St. (843) 974-5483.

MEET AT FLEET THIS HOLIDAY SEASON!

Burtons Grill Classic New England fare, from clam chowder to shrimp scampi with big entrees like barbecue ribs and rib-eyes, plus a local catch. Lunch & Dinner. $$$$. Lunch, Dinner. 1875 Hwy. 17 N. (843) 606-2590. Early Bird Diner Biscuits and eggs for breakfast. Patty melts and open faced sandwiches for lunch. Blue plate specials for dinner featuring meat and sides of your choice. Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner (Mon.-Sat.),. Late Night (Fri. & Sat.), & Sun. Brunch. $$. Sunday Brunch, Lunch, Dinner, Breakfast, Late Night, Parking, Non-Smoking. 1644 Savannah Hwy. (843) 277-2353. Eli’s Table Benedicts for breakfast, soup and sandwiches for lunch, and crowd-pleasing entrees for dinner like pork chops, lemon chicken, and seafood fra diavolo. Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, & Weekend Brunch. $$$$. Sunday Brunch, Lunch, 3, Dinner, Breakfast. 129 Meeting St. (843) 405-5115. Florie’s at Commonhouse Aleworks Outdoor Dining, Sunday Brunch, Lunch, Dinner. 4831 O’Hear Ave. Harold’s Cabin This Bill Murray-owned restaurant serves fresh eats and coffees from its two-story location in the Westside neighborhood. Mon.-Fri. 4-10 p.m. Sat. & Sun. 9 a.m.-10p.m. Brunch & dinner. Lunch, Dinner, Breakfast. 247 Congress St. (843) 793-4440. Hen and The Goat This fast/casual spot offers sandwiches, breakfast, and snacks in a family friendly atmosphere. Lunch (daily). Lunch. 869 Folly Rd. Jack’s Cafe A greasy spoon that’s operated on the edge of the college campus forever, serving up burgers, breakfast, and more. Breakfast & Lunch, weekdays. $$. Lunch, Breakfast, Non-Smoking, Wifi. 41 George St. (843) 723-5237. Kickin’ Chicken 27 varieties of wings, plus great sandwiches, huge salads, and burgers too. Lunch, Dinner, Late Night (Daily). $$. Lunch, Dinner, Late Night, Delivery, Best of Charleston winner. 337 King St. (843) 805-5020 1175 Folly Road. (843) 225-6996 349 W Coleman Blvd. (843) 881-8734 800 N. Main St. (843) 875-6998 1179 Sam Rittenberg Blvd. (843) 766-5292. KinFolk A stone’s throw from Kiawah, KinFolk occupies the tiny space once inhabited by Crave Smokehouse. With snug seating for two dozen, it’s something of a shack in its own right. Served on a slice of white sandwich bread and accompanied by three lightly brined bread-and-butter pickles, the chicken itself is at once crisp and juicy. Arguably, it’s at the hot level that the dish achieves true Nashville distinction. The melange of black pepper, smoked paprika, and sweet sugar hit first, followed by a slow burn at the back of the throat. The chicken’s inherent blandness helps to temper any real intensity, and the heat lingers for just a few seconds. In other words, order it this way if you can. Lunch, Dinner. 4430 Betsy Kerrison Pkwy. Krazy Owls Steampunk sports bar and restaurant. L, D, daily. 3157 Maybank Hwy. (843) 640-3844. Mainland Container Co. Kitchen & Bar Mainland Container Co. is comprised of a rustic, beachy restaurant, a ground-level bar set in a shipping container, and

& equals

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Rutledge Cab Co. An all-day menu of burgers, salads, sandwiches and finer fare. Lunch & Dinner. $$$. Outdoor Dining, Lunch, Dinner, Parking, Burger Week. 1300 Rutledge Ave. (843) 720-1440. The Shelter Kitchen + Bar Burgers, brunch fare, beer, and a sprawling bar and patio make for a comfortable place to hang and enjoy yourself. Lunch, Dinner, (Daily) & Weekend Brunch. $$$. Outdoor Dining, Sunday Brunch, Lunch, 3, Dinner, Late Night, Burger Week. 202 Coleman Blvd. (843) 388-3625. Stack’s Coastal Kitchen A small menu focuses on fresh seafood with duck, steak, and pork entree options too. Lunch & Dinner. $$$$. Lunch, Dinner. 1440 Ben Sawyer Blvd. (843) 388-6968. Toast of Charleston Housemade soups, sandwiches, and desserts “to die for,” according to USA Today. Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, & Sun. Brunch. $$$. Sunday Brunch, Lunch, Dinner, Breakfast, Delivery, Live Music. 155 Meeting St. (843) 534-0043 2026 Savannah Hwy. (843) 556-0006 717 Old Trolley Rd. Unit 10. Uptown Social There are adult slushies with names like High Noon grapefruit frose and Day Rager, plus signature cocktails like the Grape-full Dead and Burning Sensation. The bar food fares well. The sloppy joe sliders are billed as “cafeteria style, but better.” Although not a very high bar, they’ve succeeded. The Armitage pizza makes a case for what Uptown Social does best — bake fresh dough. Lunch, Dinner (Daily). Weekend Brunch. Outdoor Dining, Sunday Brunch, Lunch, 3, Dinner. 587 King St. (843)793-1837. Vickery’s Bar and Grill Great setting for creative American food with Cuban flair and some of the best bloodys in town. Voted Best Outdoor Patio and Best Happy Hour by CP readers. Lunch, Dinner, (Daily) & Sun. Brunch. $$. Outdoor Dining, Lunch, Dinner, Waterfront, Best of Charleston winner, Parking. 1313 Shrimp Boat Lane. (843) 884-4440. Warehouse As of early 2019 Warehouse is now serving “noodle bowls for the soul,” offering a ramen-focused menu, small plates, and their neighborhood favorite Sunday brunch. Lunch (Fri.), Dinner (Daily), & Sun. Brunch. $$. Sunday Brunch, Lunch, 3, Dinner, Late Night, Wifi. 45 1/2 Spring St. (843) 202-0712.

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n SOUL FOOD Bertha’s Kitchen Classic soul food like you wish your mama made. Okra soup, mac & cheese, collars, and more. Lunch & Dinner, weekdays. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. $$. Lunch, Dinner, Top 50. 2332 Meeting Street Rd. (843) 554-6519.

continued on page 25

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CUISINE | charlestoncitypaper.com

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ample umbrella-covered seating. Bar food offerings range from wings; hushpuppies that are basically savory donuts drizzled with honey, and served with hot pepper jelly and pimento cheese; and a beer cheese-covered tater tot extravaganza called The Full Container. Dinner (Mon-Sat.), Weekend Brunch. Sunday Brunch, 3, Dinner. 1528 Ben Sawyer Blvd. (843) 284-8174.

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dining guide

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Porron continued from page 22

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perfectly jammy center, and they’re sliced in half and topped with shredded, herb-flecked tuna and orange roe. The oily richness of redrimmed mackerel crudo ($11) is balanced by the sparkle of sliced citrus and the crunch of crushed hazelnuts. Equally brilliant is the “mackerel con potato chip” ($3). A dollop of creme fraiche laced with bits of mackerel rests atop a paper-thin slice of fried potato, with a spicy pepper ring atop — a great crisp bite followed by a big punch of heat. And go figure this: Among such a swirl of beguiling flavors, what really stand out are the beets and kale. You read that correctly. A tiny hollow cylinder is carved from a roasted red beet ($2) and filled with a tart green puree of parsley and feta, giving an acidic pop against the earthiness of the edible container. The vividly green sopa de kale ($7) is a creamy, vegetal blend of kale and potato that sparkles with lemon and floral herbs. If you find me sitting in my office, fingers poised motionless over my keyboard, staring blankly out the window at the gray January sky, odds are I’m daydreaming about those parsley-stuffed beets and that creamy kale soup. And we haven’t even gotten to the paella. Estadio’s Spanish-focused wine list is impressive, with 14 tempranillos from Rioja and Ribera del Duero alone and many more bottles from around the Iberian Peninsula. If that’s not enough, there’s an entire “gin tonic” program with rare gins collected from around Spain — a passion project for owner Max Kuller and his bar director Adam Bernbach (as they explained to cuisine editor Mary Scott Hardaway last year). Waiting for that paella gives one plenty of time to survey the room. The place is organized around an open kitchen wrapped by a big L-shaped bar. A single row of roughhewn tables line the two exterior walls, which are accented by stylish red trim and red and gold Moorish-patterned tile. It’s a tight space, especially as aspiring diners crush up to the bar (Estadio doesn’t take reservations) and servers in pale blue T-shirts weave their way around to deposit small plates on the tables. But it’s a pleasant kind of crowded, buzzing with energy. This is not the kind of place to sip a contemplative cocktail but rather to order a porrón of red wine — a lamp-like glass pitcher with a long spout protruding from the side — and pass it around so everyone in your crowd can pour half of a stream directly into their mouths and the rest down their shirt. (I’m pretty sure that’s how it would have gone down had my party been brave enough to try it.) Floor-to-ceiling windows fill the room with light before sundown and offer a fine view of Spring Street afterwards, which to an old timer seems surprisingly bustling at 8 p.m. at night. But the newly built building that houses Estadio has eight Airbnb rentals above, and more stretch down what was once Sanctuary Alley and dot each side of Spring: a hotel district without any visible hotels.

Ruta Smith

THE VIVIDLY GREEN SOPA DE KALE IS A CREAMY BLEND OF KALE AND POTATO

And then that damned paella finally arrives, a broad pan filled with tender rice topped with shrimp, squid, and clams in the shell and crisscrossed with yellow aioli. The savory rice is laced with sofrito and saffron — spicy but just slightly so. The texture is splendid, but when you start scraping away the crispy socarrat, rice charred to the flat metal pan . . . well, it’s simply out of this world, and absolutely worth the wait. We should note that the Charleston Estadio is not the first; it’s an outpost of a D.C. restaurant that opened in 2010 to much acclaim. Over the years, I’ve been less than impressed with most attempts to import successful “concepts” from somewhere else. What wows the crowds in other cities rarely clicks here. Notably, though, Estadio isn’t a lift-andshift of the same restaurant from our nation’s capital. “We aren’t going to take a salad from here and recreate it in Charleston,” Kuller told Eater DC last year. The interior design, the slushitos, the porróns — those are all pretty much the same. But Kuller teamed up with talented local chef, Alex Lira, who proved himself first at The Lot and then at Bar Normandy. They traveled through Spain for fresh inspiration, and within the tapas format, Lira has pretty free rein. The Charleston menu bears only a passing resemblance to the original, not just with different dishes, but completely different headings and ingredients. The seafood in the paella is all local, as is the fish in the crudo, which might be flounder, beeliner snapper, or king mackerel depending on the week. There’s an aged South Carolina gouda, and those grilled royal reds are what Mark Marhefka of Abundant Seafood brings up from Florida waters when local shrimp aren’t in season. The tapas mode and aesthetic is well suited to Charleston, and the format allows Lira to highlight local flavors without resorting to tired Southern-fusion tropes. There’s no pimento cheese on the patatas bravas. Nothing is perched upon a fried green tomato. Instead there are bold but balanced flavors, with fresh local ingredients prepared in unexpected ways. I’ve been wondering what Charleston dining in the Airbnb era might look like. It doesn’t have to be all brunches and burgers. Maybe it looks like Estadio?


The 9th Annual charleston Mary Scott Hardaway

Bok Choy Boy at Spanglish Mon. Jan. 13 5 p.m. A la carte Spanglish Cocina + Bar 652 St. Andrews Blvd. West Ashley

FOODIE EVENT | Good neighbors Bok Choy Boy Asian Fusion will be taking over the kitchen at Spanglish in West Ashley — this will be the first of several takeovers in 2020. Chef Setrini Sison will be taking over the menu with returning dishes, as well as some new eats like a fried rice dish and an Ube Whoopie Pie dessert. With their newly acquired liquor license, Spanglish will keep the drinks flowing. —Mary Scott Hardaway MONDAY

T r d uck o o F

cuisine calendar Thankful Thursdays — One dollar from every pint sold on Thankful Thursdays is donated to a local charity. While sales throughout the day count, the official happy hour is from 5-8 p.m., when the charity will be in the brewery to discuss the good work they do. Learn more on Tradesman’s Facebook page. Each Thurs. 5-8 p.m. Free to attend. Tradesman Brewing Co., 1647 King St. Ext. 843 410-1315. facebook.com/ Tradesmanbrew/ Weekly Beer and Wine Tastings at Edmund’s Oast Exchange — Edmund’s Oast Exchange offers weekly wine tastings on Thursdays entitled Sarah’s Selections from 5:30-7:30 p.m. For $5, enjoy a special beer tasting selected by Certified Sommelier Sarah O’Kelley. All proceeds benefit a selected charity each quarter. Each Thurs. 5:30-7:30 p.m. $5. Edmund’s Oast Exchange, 1081 Morrison Dr. 843-990-9449. edmundsoast.com/exchange Open Mic — acoustic Each Sat. 4-7 p.m. Freehouse Brewery, 2895 Pringle St, Ste B. freehousebeer.com/ Suds and Savasana — Start your Saturday right with Suds and Savasana, a weekly all-

levels yoga class held in Low Tide Brewing. After the yoga class, led by Darcy Mahan, enjoy a craft beer. Each Sat. 11 a.m. $15/yoga and beer, $10/ yoga. Low Tide Brewing, 2863 Maybank Hwy. (843) 501-7570. lowtidebrewing.com/ Bendy Brewski Sunday Brunch — 45 minutes of all levels yoga followed by a flight of beer! and brunch offered by Suelto at Holy City Brewing. Mats avail to borrow Each Sun. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $15. Holy City Brewing, 4155-C Dorchester Road. 843-437-0846. holycitybrewing.com

n FOODIE EVENTS Charleston Place Launches World-Class Champagne Tastings — Sip and savor a variety of legendary Champagnes from top Louis Vuitton Moet Hennessy (LVMH) brands including Veuve Clicquot, Krug, and Ruinart. Charleston Grill’s advanced sommelier and wine director Rick Rubel has cultivated two different Champagne flights, served daily at the Thoroughbred Club and Charleston Grill. Ongoing, 11 a.m. $49-$75. Charleston Place, 130 Market St. (843) 722-4900. Common Hour — Every Wed. and Thurs. evening at Wild

dining guide continued from page 23

Dave’s Carry-Out Up in Elliotborough on the humble corner of Morris Street, they serve a splendid array of breaded items from both surf and turf. Lunch (Tues.Fri.), Dinner (Tues.-Sat.). Closed Sun. and Mon. $$. Lunch, Dinner, Late Night, Top 50. 42-C Morris St. (843) 577-7943. Hannibal’s Kitchen Sautéed crab, fried whiting, or shrimp over grits for breakfast. Plus sandwiches, chicken wings, and more. No frills. True soul. Breakfast, Lunch, & Dinner (Mon.-Sat.) 7 a.m.-close. Closed Sun. $$. Lunch, Dinner, Breakfast. 16 Blake Street. (843) 722-2256. Martha Lou’s Soul food — fried chicken, chitlins, lima beans. Lunch, Early Dinner Lunch (Mon.-Sat.). $$. Lunch, Dinner, Top 50, Parking. 1068 Morrison Drive. (843) 577-9583 2000-Q McMillan Ave.

Common enjoy Common Hour with $8 white, red, and rosé wines and $5 Chef’s Selection of ‘bites’ from 5-6:30 p.m. Each Wed. Thurs. 5 p.m. A la carte. Wild Common, 103 Spring St. cannongreencharleston.com Undiscovered Charleston Food Tour — Chef Forrest Parker, the city’s only Palmetto Guild Certified chef guide, leads guests on a three hour experience unlike any other. You’ll begin with a 90 minute walking tour, exploring the complicated history of the Holy City and the culinary influences that shaped Charleston into one of the world’s top food destinations. The tour concludes at the cozy Bistro A Vin where you’ll relax while Chef Forrest teaches you how to cook three dishes from recipes he wrote interpreting definitive Lowcountry classics, and prepared using techniques he mastered over two decades. He’ll serve those recipes for lunch while you enjoy a carefully curated wine pairing (or cool, delicious sweet tea if you’d prefer). You’ll go home with Chef Forrest’s recipes as his gift to you. Each Mon. Wed.-Sun. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. $125. Riley Waterfront Park, 1 Vendue Range. undiscoveredcharleston.com

Nana’s Seafood and Soul The restaurant’s Instagram is updated daily — sometimes multiple times a day often with an image of Eugene H. Krabs from Spongebob Squarepants shouting “Ay yall boy! Nana’s got dem garlic crabs.” And you should follow Mr. Krabs’ advice. With pork chops, fried whiting, cornbread, and bread pudding, this is real deal comfort food. Check in often to see the full menu of must-try specialties. —Kinsey Gidick Lunch, Dinner, Top 50. 176 Line St. (843) 937-0002. Workmen’s Cafe Miss Angie will comfort you with her food. We recommend the lima beans and rice plate. Smoky, meaty, and delicious. Breakfast (Sat.) & Lunch (Tues.-Fri.). $$. Lunch, Breakfast. 1837-A Grimball Road. (843) 225-0884.

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NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to the Master’s Report and Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale in the Court of Common Pleas in the case of Pinnacle Bank, Plaintiff vs. Wren Metts, Dwight D. Stone, Thomas L. White, Jr. and Parsonage Point Condominium Owners Association, Inc., Defendants, Civil Action No. 2019-CP-10-04434, the undersigned will sell at public auction at the County Council Chamber, 2nd Floor of the Lonnie Hamilton, III Public Services Building, 4045 Bridge View Drive, North Charleston, South Carolina, to-wit: 11:00 a.m., on the 4th day of February, 2020, to the highest bidder the following described property: ALL that certain Condominium Unit known and designated as UNIT 8E, PARSONAGE POINT HORIZONTAL PROPERTY REGIME, a Horizontal property regime established pursuant to the South Carolina Property Regime Act, §27-31-10, et. seq., South Carolina Code of Laws, 1976, as amended and submitted by Master Deed dated July 9, 2007 and duly recorded in the Office of the RMC for Charleston County, South Carolina on July 11, 2007, in Book B-632 at Page 811. CONVEYED TOGETHER WITH: (1) An undivided percentage in the common elements, restricted common areas, and facilities of the property described in said Master Deed (“Common Elements”) attributable to the said Unit; (2) An easement for the continuance of all encroachments by the Dwelling Unit on any adjoining unit or common elements existing as a result of construction of the Condominium Unit(s) or which may come into existence hereafter as a result of settling or shifting of the dwelling unit(s) or of the other condominium unit(s), after damage or destruction by fire or other casualty, or after taking in condemnation or eminent domain percentages, or by reason of alteration or repair to the common elements made by or with the consent of the Board of Administration; (3) An Easement in common with the owners of other condominium units to use any pipes wires, ducts, flues, cables, conduits, public utility lines and other common elements located in any other rights and easements in common with the other condominium unit owners, all a described in the Master Deed, Bylaws and any and all Amendment thereto as recorded in the office of the RMC for Charleston County, South Carolina. SAID DWELLING unit is conveyed together with an undivided percentage in the common elements, limited common areas and facilities of the property described in the Master Deed. THIS BEING the identical property conveyed to Wren Metts by Deed of Parsonage Point Development, LLC, dated October 26, 2017, and recorded on November 15, 2017, in the Office of the Register of Deeds for Charleston County, South Carolina, in Book 0679 at Page 689. TMS NO. 355-07-00-060 PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2362 Parsonage Road, #8-E Charleston, SC 29414 As deficiency judgment has been demanded, the bidding will remain open for thirty (30) days following the date of the sale. Notwithstanding the fact that deficiency judgment is demanded, Plaintiff reserves the right to waive deficiency judgment up to seven (7) days prior to the date of the sale of the mortgaged premises in which case bidding will be closed on the date of the sale. Notice is further given that the successful bidder at the sale, other than the Plaintiff, shall be required to immediately, pursu-

ant to the Court’s instructions at the sale, deposit with the undersigned as earnest money and as evidence of its good faith an amount equal to five (5%) per cent of its bid in cash, certified check or cashier’s check to be applied to the costs allowed and the debts found to be due with the balance to be remitted prior to the expiration of thirty (30) days from the date that the bidding is closed, which date is thirty (30) days from the date of sale. Interest on the bid shall be paid to the date of compliance at the rate of 4.125% per annum. The purchaser shall pay for the preparation of all papers and for all recording fees. The sale will be made subject to all outstanding property taxes, if any. Should the successful bidder fail to make such deposit at the time of the acceptance of the bid, with time being of the essence, or should a representative of the Plaintiff or Plaintiff’s attorney not be present at the sale, or should the property for any reason whatsoever not be sold on the sales date above, the undersigned shall sell said property at the next sales date, and this process shall continue until the property is sold. NOTICE: The foreclosure deed is not a warranty deed. Interested bidders should satisfy themselves as to the quality of title to be conveyed by obtaining an independent title search prior to the foreclosure sale date. In addition, the successful bidder shall take the property subject to any superior liens or interests. s/Douglas M. Zayicek Douglas M. Zayicek, Esquire (S.C. Bar No. 11304) Holly M. Lusk, Esquire (S.C. Bar No. 102307) Attorneys for Plaintiff BELLAMY, RUTENBERG, COPELAND, EPPS, GRAVELY & BOWERS, P.A. 1000 29th Avenue North (29577) P.O. Box 357 Myrtle Beach, SC 29578-0357 (843) 448-2400 (843) 448-3022 (Facsimile) dzayicek@bellamylaw.com hlusk@bellamylaw.com STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF CHARLESTON IN THE FAMILY COURT NINTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DOCKET NO. 2019-DR-10-3180 Lakresha Pressley Jeffcoat Plaintiff, vs. Tawanna Michelle Jeffcoat Defendant. SUMMONS FOR DIVORCE (One-Year Continuous Separation) To the DEFENDANT AboveNamed: YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that you have been sued by the Plaintiff for DIVORCE in the Court indicated above. You must respond in writing to the attached Complaint for Divorce and serve a copy of your Answer on the Plaintiff at the address below within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons upon you, not counting the day of service, or thirty-five (35) days if you were served by certified mail, restricted delivery, return receipt requested. If you wish to retain an attorney to represent you in this matter, it is advisable to do so before submitting your Answer to the Plaintiff. If you do not answer the Complaint within the required thirty (30) days, the Court may grant a DIVORCE and grant the Plaintiff the relief requested in the Complaint. Lakresha Pressley Jeffcoat CHARLESTON, SC 12/18/2019

STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF CHARLESTON IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS FOR THE NINTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT CASE NO. 2019-CP-10-3949 JAMES MOULTRIE, Plaintiff, vs. BESSIE LEWIS, ROSE MARIE MOULTRIE, ANTHONY MOULTRIE, KENDRICK MOULTRIE, TAMEKA PATERSON, GEORGE G. MOULTRIE, JR., MICHAEL MOULTRIE, STANLEY MOULTRIE, JR., STEFAN MOULTRIE, SHERARD MOULTRIE, BENJAMIN WILLIAMS, CONSTANCE LONEY, GEORGE WILLIAMS, JOHN DOE, adults, and RICHARD ROE, infants, insane persons, incompetents and persons in the military service of The United States of America, being fictitious names designating as a class any unknown person or persons or legal entity of any kind, who may be an heir, distributee, devisee, legatee, widower, widow, assign, administrator, executor, creditor, successor, personal representative, issue or alienee of PATRICIA WILLIAMS, deceased, and any and all other persons or legal entities, known and unknown, claiming any right, title, interest or estate in or lien upon the two parcels of real estate described in the Lis Pendens and Complaint filed herein, Defendants. SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF FILING TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVENAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your Answer upon the subscribers at their office located at 858 Lowcountry Blvd., Suite 101, Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina, 29464, within thirty (30) days after service hereof, exclusive of the date of such service; and if you fail to answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. YOU WILL PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the Civil Action Cover Sheet, Certificate of Exemption, Summons, Lis Pendens, Notice and Complaint in the above entitled action were filed in the office of the Clerk of Court for Charleston County on July 25, 2019. CISA & DODDS, LLP By: s/John J. Dodds, III 858 Lowcountry Blvd., Suite 101 Mt. Pleasant, SC 29464 (P) (843) 881-6530 (F) (843) 881-5433 SC Bar No.: 1707 john@cisadodds.com ATTORNEYS FOR PLAINTIFF December 26, 2019. Mount Pleasant, SC (Filed November 7, 2019 with the Berkeley County Clerk of Court) STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS COUNTY OF BERKELEY NINTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT CASE NO. 2017-CP-08-02019 Daniel Island Marina Village Property Owners Association, Inc. , Plaintiff, v. Charleston Glass & Mirror Company, Inc. d/b/a Charleston Glass Company a/k/a Charleston Glass Co., et al., Defendants.

Charleston Glass & Mirror Company, Inc. d/b/a Charleston Glass Company a/k/a Charleston Glass Co., Third-Party Plaintiff, v. Corcoran Caulking & Waterproofing, Third-Party Defendant. THIRD-PARTY SUMMONS TO THIRD-PARTY DEFENDANT CORCORAN CAULKING & WATERPROOFING: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer Defendant/Third-Party Plaintiff, Charleston Glass & Mirror Company, Inc.’s Amended Answer to Plaintiff’s Second Amended Complaint and Third-Party Complaint against Corcoran Caulking & Waterproofing in this action, and to serve a copy of your Answer to the said Defendant’s Third-Party Complaint on the subscribers at their offices, 50 Immigration Street, Suite 200, Charleston, South Carolina 29403 within thirty (30) days after the service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the Third-Party Summons and Complaint. LUZURIAGA MIMS, LLP By: s/Kevin W. Mims, Esquire 50 Immigration Street, Suite 200 Charleston, SC 29403 (843) 410-4713 Attorneys for the Defendant/ Third-Party Plaintiff Charleston Glass & Mirror Company, Inc. Charleston, South Carolina Dated: December 19, 2019 STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF CHARLESTON IN THE FAMILY COURT NINTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT CASE#: 19-DR-10-3668 JAMES S, HERNDON. ANGELIA M,M, HERNDON. Plaintiffs, -vsKHLOE, a Minor Under the Age of Nine Years, CHASE, a Minor Under the Age of Five Years, KELLY PETERS, JOSHUA GEORGE, and S.C. DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICES, Defendants. SUMMONS TO THE DEFENDANT KELLY PETERS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Plaintiffs’ Complaint in this action (the object and prayer of which is to adopt the above minor children and to obtain other relief as set fourth in the said Complaint), the original of which has been filed in the office of the Clerk of the Family Court of Charleston County, S.C. (100 Broad Street, Suite 143, Charleston, SC 29483) on October 23, 2019, and a copy of which will be delivered to you upon request being made to the Plaintiffs’ undersigned attorney; and you must serve a copy of your Answer to the said Complaint on the undersigned attorney for the Plaintiff, Claude Tackett, Esq, at his office at the address below, within thirty (30) days following the date of last publication, exclusive of the date of such publication. YOU ARE HEREBY GIVEN NOTICE FURTHER that if you fail to appear and defend and fail to answer the Complaint as required by this Summons within thirty (30) days after service hereof as stated above, exclusive of the day of such service, judgment by default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Mount Pleasant, South Carolina Claude Tackett Claude Tackett Law Firm, LLC Attorney for the Plaintiff P.O. Box 429 Mount Pleasant, South Carolina 29465 (843) 800-1126 November 25,2019


Edward Cummings, Petitioner, v. Katherine Hanberry, in her capacity as Trustee of the Cummings Family Trust, Respondent. SUMMONS TO THE RESPONDENT NAMED ABOVE: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to Answer the Petition in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your Answer upon the Petitioner listed above at the following address: Jonathan S. Altman, Esq. Derfner & Altman, LLC 575 King Street, Suite B Charleston, SC 29403 Your Answer must be served on the Petitioner at the above address within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Petition upon you, exclusive of the day of such service; and if you fail to answer the Petition within that time, judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Petition. August __, 2019 Jonathan S. Altman, Esq. Derfner & Altman, LLC 575 King Street Suite B Charleston, SC 29403 Attorney for Petitioner (843) 723-9804 rsavini@derfneraltman.com

STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT CASE NO: 2019-CP-07-01534 COUNTY OF BEAUFORT SUMMONS And NOTICE OF FILING OF COMPLAINT (Non-Jury trial demanded) SOLICITOR’S OFFICE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT PLAINTIFF VS. Kevin Hilton ($1,199.85) Steven Thornall ($568.00) Defendant: TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: A LAWSUIT HAS BEEN FILED AGAINST YOU, WITHIN THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER SERVICE OF THEI SUMMONS ON YOU (NOT COUNTING THE DAY OF RECEIVING IT) YOU MUST SERVE ON THE PLAINTIFF AND ANSWER TO THE ATTACHED COMPLAINT OR MOTION UNDER RULE 12 OF THE SOUTH CAROLINA RULES OF CIVIL PROCEDURE A COPY OF YOUR ANSWER OR MOTION MUST BE SERVED ON THE PLAINTIFF’S ATTORNEY, ASSISTANT SOLICITOR FRANCINE NORZ: WHOSE ADDRESS IS: OFFICE OF THE SOLICITOR P.O. BOX 1880 BLUFFTON, SOUTH CAROLINA 29910. IF YOU FAIL TO DO SO JUDGEMENT BY DEFAULT WILL BE ENTERED AGAINST YOU FOR RELIEF DEMANDED IN THE COMPLAINT. YOU MUST ALSO ANSWER OR MOTION WITH THE CLERK OF COURT OF BEAUFORT COUNTY. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT THE ORIGINAL COMPLAIN IN THE ABOVE ENTITLED ACTION WAS FILED IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF COURT FOR BEAUFORT COUNTY ON July 02, 2019. ASSISTANT SOLICITOR FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT P.O. BOX 1880 BLUFFTON, SC 29910 ATTORNY FOR THE PLAINTIFF Email FNorz@scsolicitor14.org Phone: 843-474-4814 PLACE: BLUFFTON, S.C.

STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF DORCHESTER IN THE FAMILY COURT FOR THE FIRST JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DOCKET NO: 2019-DR-18-1403

STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF CHARLESTON IN THE FAMILY COURT FOR THE NINTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DOCKET NO. 2019-DR-10-3666

STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF CHARLESTON IN THE FAMILY COURT FOR THE NINTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DOCKET NO. 2019-DR-10-1285

SOUTH CAROLINA DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICES VERSES Melissa Slade, Robert Cook, James Snyder, Charles Slade

SOUTH CAROLINA DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICES VERSUS Amber Lowder-Bridges

SOUTH CAROLINA DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICES VERSUS Cierra Williams

NOTICE TO ALL INTERESTED PARTIES:

NOTICE

NOTICE

You are hereby summoned and required to answer the Complaint in this action filed with the Clerk of Court for Dorchester County on October 3, 2019. Upon proof of interest, a copy of the Complaint will be delivered to you upon request from the Clerk of Court in Dorchester, and you must serve a copy of your Answer to the Complaint on the Plaintiff, the Dorchester County Department of Social Services, at the office of their Attorney, The Legal Department of the Dorchester County Department of Social Service, 216 Orangeburg Road, Summerville, South Carolina 29483, within thirty days of this publication. If you fail to answer within the time set forth above, the Plaintiff will proceed to seek relief from the Court.

TO ALL INTERESTED PARTIES: You are hereby summoned and required to answer the Complaint in this action filed with the Clerk of Court for Charleston County on October 23, 2019. Upon proof of interest, a copy of the Complaint will be delivered to you upon request from the Clerk of Court in Charleston, and you must serve a copy of your Answer to the Complaint on the Plaintiff, the Charleston County Department of Social Services, at the office of their Attorney, The Legal Department of the Charleston County Department of Social Services, 3366 Rivers Ave., N. Charleston, South Carolina 29405-5714, within thirty days of this publication. If you fail to answer within the time set forth above, the Plaintiff will proceed to seek relief from the Court.

TO ALL INTERESTED PARTIES: You are hereby summoned and required to answer the Complaint in this action filed with the Clerk of Court for Charleston County on April 11, 2019. Upon proof of interest, a copy of the Complaint will be delivered to you upon request from the Clerk of Court in Charleston, and you must serve a copy of your Answer to the Complaint on the Plaintiff, the Charleston County Department of Social Services, at the office of their Attorney, The Legal Department of the Charleston County Department of Social Services, 3366 Rivers Ave., N. Charleston, South Carolina 29405-5714, within thirty days of this publication. If you fail to answer within the time set forth above, the Plaintiff will proceed to seek relief from the Court.

STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF CHARLESTON IN THE FAMILY COURT FOR THE NINTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DOCKET NO. 2019-DR-10-3493 SOUTH CAROLINA DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICES VERSUS Terone Lawson and Shavona Green, et al. NOTICE TO ALL INTERESTED PARTIES: You are hereby summoned and required to answer the Complaint in this action filed with the Clerk of Court for Charleston County on October 11, 2019. Upon proof of interest, a copy of the Complaint will be delivered to you upon request from the Clerk of Court in Charleston, and you must serve a copy of your Answer to the Complaint on the Plaintiff, the Charleston County Department of Social Services, at the office of their Attorney, The Legal Department of the Charleston County Department of Social Services, 3366 Rivers Ave., N. Charleston, South Carolina 29405-5714, within thirty days of this publication. If you fail to answer within the time set forth above, the Plaintiff will proceed to seek relief from the Court. STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF CHARLESTON IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS 2019-CP-10-2617 ROBERT CHILDS, PLAINTIFF, v. MORILLO CONSTRUCTION, LLC, JORDAN STUCCO, LLC, BLACKWATER CONSTRUCTION SERVICES, LLC, TORO IRONWORKS, C&C MECHANICAL, LLC, DEFENDANTS.

Attorney of Record: Kyra McMillan, SCDSS, 3366 Rivers Avenue, North Charleston, SC 29405, Telephone: 843-953-9286 STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF CHARLESTON IN THE FAMILY COURT FOR THE NINTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DOCKET NO. 2018-DR-10-1411

Attorney of Record: Kyra McMillan, SCDSS, 3366 Rivers Avenue, North Charleston, SC 29405, Telephone: 843-953-9286 STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF CHARLESTON IN THE FAMILY COURT FOR THE NINTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DOCKET NO. 2019-DR-10-0960

SOUTH CAROLINA DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICES

SOUTH CAROLINA DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICES VERSUS Brandon Lesston

VERSUS

NOTICE

Cierra King, Derrick Harrison, and Darnell Pierce

TO ALL INTERESTED PARTIES: You are hereby summoned and required to answer the Complaint in this action filed with the Clerk of Court for Charleston County on March 18, 2019. Upon proof of interest, a copy of the Complaint will be delivered to you upon request from the Clerk of Court in Charleston, and you must serve a copy of your Answer to the Complaint on the Plaintiff, the Charleston County Department of Social Services, at the office of their Attorney, The Legal Department of the Charleston County Department of Social Services, 3366 Rivers Ave., N. Charleston, South Carolina 29405-5714, within thirty days of this publication. If you fail to answer within the time set forth above, the Plaintiff will proceed to seek relief from the Court.

NOTICE TO Derrick Harrison: You are hereby summoned and required to answer the Complaint in this action filed with the Clerk of Court for Charleston County on May 1, 2018. Upon proof of interest, a copy of the Complaint will be delivered to you upon request from the Clerk of Court in Charleston, and you must serve a copy of your Answer to the Complaint on the Plaintiff, the Charleston County Department of Social Services, at the office of their Attorney, Newton Howle, at the Legal Department of the Charleston County Department of Social Services, 3366 Rivers Ave., N. Charleston, South Carolina 29405-5714, within thirty days of this publication. If you fail to answer within the time set forth above, the Plaintiff will proceed to seek relief from the Court.

Attorney of Record: Kyra McMillan, SCDSS, 3366 Rivers Avenue, North Charleston, SC 29405, Telephone: 843953-9286

SUMMONS YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and are required to answer the Amended Complaint in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your Answer upon the subscribers, at 234 Seven Farms Drive, Suite 111-A, South Carolina, 29492, within thirty (30) days after the service thereof, exclusive of the day of such service, and if you fail to answer the Amended Complaint within the time aforesaid, judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Amended Complaint. BLUNDY LAW FIRM, LLC Amanda M. Blundy, Esq. Bar No. 73069 234 Seven Farms Dr. Ste. 111-A Charleston, SC 29492 ablundy@blundylawfirm.com 843.867.6050

HAVE YOU BEEN SERVED? Search the State Database for legal notices: HTTP://SCPUBLICNOTICES.COM

Free Will Astrology ARIES (March 21-April 19): When comedian John Cleese was 61, his mother died. She was 101. Cleese testifies, “Just towards the end, as she began to run out of energy, she did actually stop trying to tell me what to do most of the time.” I bet you’ll experience a similar phenomenon in 2020 — only bigger and better. Fewer people will try to tell you what to do than at any previous time of your life. As a result, you’ll be freer to be yourself exactly as you want to be. You’ll have unprecedented power to express your uniqueness. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Renowned Taurus philosopher Bertrand Russell was sent to jail in 1918 because of his pacifism and anti-war activism. He liked being there. “I found prison in many ways quite agreeable,” he said. “I had no engagements, no difficult decisions to make, no fear of callers, no interruptions to my work. I read enormously; I wrote a book.” The book he produced, Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy, is today regarded as a classic. In 2020, I would love to see you Tauruses cave out an equally luxurious sabbatical without having to go through the inconvenience of being incarcerated. I’m confident you can do this. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): It’s common to feel attracted to people because of the way they look and dress and carry themselves. But here’s the problem: If you pursue an actual connection with someone whose appearance you like, there’s no guarantee it will turn out to be interesting and meaningful. That’s because the most important factor in becoming close to someone is not their cute face or body or style, but rather their ability to converse with you in ways you find interesting. And that’s a relatively rare phenomenon. As philosopher Mortimer Adler observed, “Love without conversation is impossible.” I bring these thoughts to your attention, Gemini, because I believe that in 2020 you could have some of the best conversations you’ve ever had — and as a result experience the richest intimacy. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Mystic poet Rumi told us the kind of person he was attracted to. “I want a trouble-maker for a lover,” he wrote. “Blood spiller, blood drinker, a heart of flame, who quarrels with the sky and fights with fate, who burns like fire on the rushing sea.” In response to that testimony, I say, “Boo! Ugh! Yuck!” I say “To hell with being in an intimate relationship with a trouble-maker who fights with fate and quarrels with the sky.” I can’t imagine any bond that would be more unpleasant and serve me worse. What about you, Cancerian? Do you find Rumi’s definition glamorous and romantic? I hope not. If you do, I advise you to consider changing your mind. 2020 will be an excellent time to be precise in articulating the kinds of alliances that are healthy for you. They shouldn’t resemble Rumi’s description. (Rumi translation by Zara Houshmand.) LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The 18th-century comic novel Tristram Shandy is still being translated, adapted, and published today. Its popularity persists. Likewise, the 18th-century novel Moll Flanders, which features a rowdy, eccentric heroine who was unusual for her era, has had modern incarnations in TV, film, and radio. Then there’s the 19thcentury satirical novel Vanity Fair. It’s considered a classic even now, and appears on lists of best-loved books. The authors of these three books had one thing in common: They had to pay to have their books published. No authority in the book business had any faith in them. You may have similar challenges in 2020, Leo — and rise to the occasion with equally good results. Believe in yourself! VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): I’ll present two possible scenarios that could unfold for you in 2020. Which scenario actually occurs will depend on how willing you are to transform yourself. Scenario #1. Love is awake, and you’re asleep. Love is ready for you but you’re not ready for love. Love is hard to recognize because you think it still looks like it did in the past. Love changed its name, and you didn’t notice. Scenario #2. Love is awake and you’re waking up. Love is ready for you and you’re making yourself ready for love. Love is older and wiser now, and you recognize its new guise. Love changed its name,

By Rob Brezsny

and you found out. (Thanks to Sarah and Phil Kaye for the inspiration for this horoscope.) LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Renowned Greek sculptor Praxiteles created some famous and beloved statues in the fourth century B.C. One of his pieces, showing the gods Hermes and Dionysus, was displayed inside the Temple of Hera in Olympia. But a few centuries later an earthquake demolished the Temple and buried the statue. There it remained until 1877, when archaeologists dug it out of the rubble. I foresee a metaphorically equivalent recovery in your life, Libra — especially if you’re willing to excavate an old mess or investigate a debris field or explore a faded ruin. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Over a period of 74 years, the Scorpio philosopher and author Voltaire (1694–1778) wrote so many letters to so many people that they were eventually published in a series of 98 books, plus nine additional volumes of appendixes and indexes. I would love to see you communicate that abundantly and meticulously in 2020, Scorpio. The cosmic rhythms will tend to bring you good fortune if you do. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Picasso was one of the most influential artists of the twentieth century. He was also the richest. At the end of his life, experts estimate his worth was as much as $250 million, equivalent to $1.3 billion today. But in his earlier adulthood, while Picasso was turning himself into a genius and creating his early masterpieces, he lived and worked in a small, seedy, unheated room with no running water and a toilet he shared with twenty people. If there will be ever in your life be a semblance of Picasso’s financial transformation, Sagittarius, I’m guessing it would begin this year. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Let’s get 2020 started with a proper send-off. According to my reading of the astrological omens, the coming months will bring you opportunities to achieve a host of liberations. Among the things from which you could be at least partially emancipated: stale old suffering; shrunken expectations; people who don’t appreciate you for who you really are; and beliefs and theories that don’t serve you any more. (There may be others!) Here’s an inspirational maxim, courtesy of poet Mary Oliver: “Said the river: imagine everything you can imagine, then keep on going.” AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In a poem titled “The Mess-iah,” spiritual teacher Jeff Foster counsels us, “Fall in love with the mess of your life . . . the wild, uncontrollable, unplanned, unexpected moments of existence. Dignify the mess with your loving attention, your gratitude. Because if you love the mess enough, you will become a Mess-iah.” I bring this to your attention, Aquarius, because I suspect you’ll have a better chance to ascend to the role of Mess-iah in the coming weeks and months than you have had in many years. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Comedian John Cleese believes that “sometimes we hang onto people or relationships long after they’ve ceased to be of any use to either of you.” That’s why he has chosen to live in such a way that his web of alliances is constantly evolving. “I’m always meeting new people,” he says, “and my list of friends seems to change quite a bit.” According to my analysis of the astrological omens, Pisces, 2020 will be a propitious year for you to experiment with Cleese’s approach. You’ll have the chance to meet a greater number of interesting new people in the coming months than you have in a long time. (And don’t be afraid to phase out connections that have become a drain.) Homework: Figure out how you might transform yourself in order for the world to give you what you yearn for. FreeWillAstrology.com

CLASSIFIEDS | charlestoncitypaper.com

STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA IN THE PROBATE COURT NINTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT COUNTY OF CHARLESTON CASE NO.: 2019-GC-10-00131

29


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Down 1 Beer ingredient 2 Symphony orchestra woodwind 3 “Who Framed Roger Rabbit?” character 4 Onomatopoetic name for motorized rickshaws 5 First N.L. player to hit 500 home runs 6 “Hold up!” 7 Company’s bottom line 8 When doubled, a guitar effect 9 Job opening fillers 10 Only state name starting with two vowels 11 Head the cast 12 Reports

14 Feature of a font 17 Assist 18 Sched. guess 23 Tropical fruit with pink flesh 25 Baby Yoda, eventually (one presumes) 26 Prime minister between Major and Brown 27 “Head Like ___” (Nine Inch Nails song) 28 They may be recorded for quality and training purposes 29 “Hello, ___ Be Going!” (Phil Collins album) 31 Barbera’s animation partner 32 Diminished 33 Do a haunted house job 36 Catches 40 Raw silk shade 41 Annoying ones 46 “Two-bite” bakery item, maybe 48 Actor Gibson of “2 Fast 2 Furious” 50 “The Daily Show” correspondent Chieng 51 Neighbor of Nev. 53 Rafter’s need 55 Disney movie about computers 56 Lifesaver, maybe 57 Subway fixture 59 “I know” 61 Wriggly tankful 62 “Dallas Buyers Club” Oscar winner Jared 63 Sandy golf hazard 65 Hotel offering 66 “Give ___ go!”

Last Week's Solution

CHARLESTON CITY PAPER 01.08.2020

Gary A. Ling, Attorney

Across 1 Coat of arms inscription 6 Dir. from NYC to Seattle 9 Sibilant sound 13 In the vicinity of 14 “The Beatles at ___ Stadium” (music documentary) 15 Minimal amount 16 ?keep a kaenS 19 Collapsible shelter 20 Paleozoic and Cenozoic, e.g. 21 What baby shampoo avoids 22 Hybrid citrus from Jamaica 24 Propped open 26 ?loot s’tsirucinaM 30 “___ a Rainbow” (Rolling Stones tune) 34 ___ apso (dog breed) 35 Prescriptions, briefly 37 “Mixed-ish” network 38 “You’ve Got Mail” ISP 39 With 49-Across, ?retsis s’anereS 42 Blazers’ org. 43 Unhealthy 44 High or low cards 45 “Li’l” guy in the comics 47 Take five 49 See 39-Across 52 “___ be surprised” 54 “... ___ it seems” 55 Birch of “Ghost World” 58 “Flashdance” director Adrian 60 Paintball mark 64 ?rekrowoc s’rotcudnoC 67 Precious metal sources 68 “Eat, ___, Love” 69 ___-Whirl (amusement park ride) 70 Second to ___ 71 Wood used to make baseball bats 72 Fabled tale-teller


M MUSIC

pulse 16 -YEAR- OLD CALEB BORICK AMONG NATIONAL YOUNGARTS FINALISTS FOR CLASSICAL MUSIC

Grace Potter’s first album in four years covers new ground BY VINCENT HARRIS Grace Potter w/ Devon Gilfillian Wed. Jan. 8 8 p.m. Show is sold out Charleston Music Hall 37 John St. charlestonmusichall.com

Once upon a time, there was a rock star named Grace Potter. She was a swaggering, cowboy boot-wearing badass who fronted a band, the Nocturnals, through four albums of strutting, ’70s-style hard rock with a dash of soul. Potter’s soaring voice mixed with her band’s musical muscle was a potent combination. For about a decade or so, Potter and the Nocturnals rode a wave of upward momentum, signing with Hollywood Records, sending albums like 2007’s This Is Somewhere, 2010’s Grace Potter and the Nocturnals, and 2012’s The Lion the Beast the Beat further and further up the charts. In addition to selling hundreds of thousands of albums, Potter was packing bigger and bigger houses with the Nocturnals. Behind the scenes, though, there was a growing problem. The 20-something wild child who’d grown up idolizing characters like Sharon Stone’s tough cowgirl in The Quick and the Dead was outgrowing her role. “I think that I branded myself too soon as ‘The cool girl in the cowboy boots,’ ” Potter says. “For me, my armor was pretending I was one of the guys. And that played really well early on, but as I was creating music over that period of time, I realized that as a songwriter, I was trying to communicate some really deep emotions through the filter of being this badass rock star. But I’m really not that.” After The Lion the Beast the Beat came out, Potter decided it was time to make a change, and she recorded the 2015 album Midnight as a solo artist — though most of the Nocturnals appeared on the album. And, boy, was it a change; the album is full of pounding, programmed beats, frothy dance-pop, and miles-deep funk. It was such a stunning departure from her typical work that it seemed like Potter was recharged as an artist, having a clean slate to make whatever kind of music she wanted. Yet, four years still passed before she released her second solo album, Daylight. This LP is many things, but it ain’t bouncy pop music. There are a couple of old-school rockin’ moments on Daylight, namely the hard-charging “On My Way” and a near-X-rated ode to pure lust called “Desire,” but other than that, Potter is as introspective and stripped-down

Pamela Neal

POTTER NEVER THOUGHT SHE WOULD RELEASE AN ALBUM AS “REVEALING AND ALMOST DISTURBING” AS HER LATEST, DAYLIGHT

as she’s ever been, trading her swagger and bombast for a more intimate performance. And that’s because over the four years between Midnight and Daylight, Potter has been through a lifetime’s worth of experiences. She officially ended the Nocturnals, got divorced, fell in love again, and became a mother. That tends to change a person, and Potter says that if Midnight was a big party, Daylight is “what we look like in the morning after we’ve been at the bar all night long.” The opening lines of the title track, a barbed-wire ballad with plenty of wide-open space for Potter’s skyscraping vocals, sum up the turmoil of the last four years of her life. “Oh, Lord, it’s been a long, long time,” she sings as the song rises and falls. “I’ve been lost and found and lost again so many times/ I can’t remember if I ever knew my way at all/ But this is a dark matter, love is a sharp, sharp dagger/ Even the slightest touch could cut you down, down, down.” The album’s songs about love, loss, and healing were so personal for Potter that she initially wasn’t sure she was going to let anyone else hear them. “There was nothing to hide behind,” she says. “That’s what was so terrifying about putting an album out. It’s so weird; this album is so reflective and so honest, and it goes to so many dark places that it seemed like you should go to in private. I never thought I’d put

out an album like this. It’s far too revealing and almost disturbing in some ways. Keeping it to myself was my therapy; it’s as close to hanging out my dirty laundry as I’ve ever done.” Since the album was released last October, though, a remarkable thing has happened: People have responded emotionally to Potter’s new songs, sharing their own stories with her. “Since it’s come out, I can’t tell you how many people have shared these really vulnerable parts of their lives with me,” she says. “People are opening up these really wide, beautiful canyons of their lives that they’ve never felt comfortable to share and sharing them with me. And I wouldn’t have known that if I’d kept these songs to myself. Now I’m so glad that I’m not missing it. The stories I’ve heard, the emotions from people; I’m so glad I’m experiencing this narrative on people’s lives.” Given the personal nature of her new material, one might think that Potter doesn’t feel as attached to the old-school rock ’n’ soul songs she did with the Nocturnals. But, she’s actually gained a new perspective on her older songs that makes her love them more than ever. “People used to describe me back then as wiser than my years,” she says. “It’s been really cool to dig back through the catalog and find out where the truth had been. It’s almost like fortune telling; it’s like messages in bottles from myself, then to now.”

The National YoungArts Foundation recently announced their list of finalists for their National Arts Competition and local 16-year-old high school senior Caleb Borick made the cut. The home-schooled student is being recognized for his abilities as a classical pianist. He is one of 686 students across the nation to be honored for their accomplishments in the visual, literary, and performing arts. “It is a tremendous honor to be named a National YoungArts finalist,” Borick said in a statement. “Music has been one of the central parts of my life from my earliest memory, and this ranks as one of my highest achievements.” Borick’s victory will allow him to participate in National YoungArts Week, a weeklong program that offers master classes, mentorships, and workshops in creative fields in Miami. Because of the honor, Borick is also eligible for nomination to be a U.S. Presidential Scholar in the Arts. The teenage pianist has proven himself to be a prodigy in the Lowcountry several times. In 2013, he performed at TEDxCharleston alongside violinist Benjamin Halford. Borick won the top prize in the Philadelphia International Music Festival Concerto Competition in 2014, when he was 11 years old. Three years later, he competed in the Music Teachers National Association (MTNA) National Competition in Baltimore. —Heath Ellison

JAEE BRYANT IS TOO SERIOUS FOR TELEVISION ON NEW SINGLE, “PROSPER”

Rapper Jaee Bryant is kicking off the decade with a new track, “Prosper.” The song is the first single from his upcoming album, Too Serious for Television, planned for release on Valentine’s Day. “I feel like the single is more about self care and motivation,” he says. “The past years, when I started music, I was going through a lot mental illness situations, but this year I was able to focus on my business, clothing brand, music, etc., and I am beyond happy with life and enjoying the music I am making. So this track just reflects on the past years, the growth, and the achievements.” Bryant is preparing for a big year after quietly working on his clothing brand, Never Say Ruin, for the majority of 2019. Too Serious for Television will be the first of two LPs the rapper plans to release in 2020. His second album of the year will be titled To Live & Die in Charleston. The last time Bryant was this active musically was in 2018, when he released Evil Lurks and The TrifectAAA. —HE

MUSIC | charlestoncitypaper.com

Seeing Daylight

31


M

The Bluest of Blue Sufferin’ Moses exits the opera house, enters the juke joint on King of all the Sad Things BY KEVIN WILSON

SATURDAY evening series

JANUARY 11 7-9

ing Lavish r u t a Fe ng

i Fe atur

Sounds

tickets $13 @ citypapertickets.com/$16 DOOR

THURSDAYS Lady & The Brass          WEDNESDAYS

CHARLESTON CITY PAPER 01.08.2020

FRIDAYS

32

SATURDAYS

Funktastics FutureFunk SUNDAYS

Honky Tonk 504 meeting thecommodorechs.com

Sufferin’ Moses w/ Josh Roberts and the Hinges Fri. Jan. 10 9:15 p.m. $10 Pour House

It should come as no surprise that Sufferin’ Moses frontman Zach Quillen has always been a big blues fan. “In fact,� he tells the City Paper, “the first albums I ever bought as a kid were by B.B. King, Chuck Berry, and Elvis Presley. I spent several years listening to nothing but those. Eventually I branched out into all kinds of other stuff, but that was my starting point.� It wasn’t until college, however, that Quillen first embraced the idea of making music as a lifelong vocation. “I initially went to school to focus on math and physics, but then I decided I wanted to study something with a little more life in it. That’s when I switched over to music and studied voice, mainly, which is how I met the other original members of the band in, believe it or not, the opera program at Ohio University.� This, apparently, was less of a stretch than it might seem on the surface. “When you think about it,� Quillen says, “most blues singers have powerful voices that really project, so it makes sense in a way that this shared endeavor led us back to the blues.� Amazingly, the like-minded crew of opera scholars quickly discovered that they really did have the chops to pull off an authenticsounding electric blues set night after night, as they were gigging at juke joints all over southeastern Ohio. Then life began to get busy for each of the founding members. “People started having babies, moving away, or simply found other reasons for bowing out,� Quillen recalls. After earning a master’s degree at OU, Quillen himself took leave of the area and made his way down to the Lowcountry, cultivating a distinctive presence within the Charleston music scene ever since. Alongside Quillen on vocals and guitar, Sufferin’ Moses’ current lineup features Arnold Gottlieb on bass and Sean Harshaw on drums. “I guess you could say that I pick my band members like I would pick little league baseball players. You know, for it to work, it has to be a team of talented guys, who are also the nicest boys to be around.� After nine years of building a solid repertoire and a decent-sized following, Quillen and company decided it was about time to lay down some tracks in the studio. Many months of hard work will culminate in an extraordinary locally-produced LP called King of all the Sad Things.

Paul Chelmis

QUILLEN SAYS THAT KING OF ALL THE SAD THINGS IS A REPRESENTATION OF EVERYTHING THE BAND LIKES TO DO

For this project, the trio “was basically tracked live down at Fairweather Studios, over by Folly Beach,� Quillen says. “Omar [Colon]’s place is kind of like the old Motown set-up with one big room where everyone works in close proximity. And that is exactly the kind of sound I was going for, so it turned out real well for us.� The resulting 12 tunes, according to Quillen, are representative of everything they like to do as a band, with some of the songs going all the way back to the beginning. “Ultimately, I’m just glad to get a quality product out there. Where this will lead is anyone’s guess,� he adds. “We’ll definitely be shopping it to labels and sending it to radio stations all over the country. And at some point we plan to head out on tour. For now, it’s nice to have something substantial to share with our hometown fans.� Quillen is also adamant about pointing out that the upcoming show at the Pour House will involve more than just the songs that comprise the new release. “While we primarily play originals, we also aim to please the audience by pulling out the best B-sides that they didn’t know they wanted to hear, including electric blues, old country, R&B, and material from some of the more obscure singer-songwriters. If we are doing our job, you won’t ever hear too much of what you already know at a Sufferin’ Moses show.�


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MUSIC | charlestoncitypaper.com

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MUSICBOARD

n WEDNESDAY, 8

BURNS ALLEY Karaoke Chris CHARLESTON GRILL Duda Lucena, Latin

jazz, 6:30 p.m.

CHARLESTON MUSIC HALL Grace Potter w/ Devon Gilfillian, rock, pop, 8 p.m. THE COMMODORE Lady & The Brass,

funk, soul, 9:30 p.m.

THE DEWBERRY Joe Clarke Big Band,

jazz, 7 p.m.

HOOKED SEAFOOD Chris Boone,

Americana, folk, 5 p.m.

JOHNKING GRILL + BAR Graham Whorley & Friends, blues, roots, rock,

7 p.m.

LOGGERHEAD’S Eric Penrod, jams,

6 p.m.

PLANET FOLLYWOOD Michael Martin Band, Americana, 9 p.m. POUR HOUSE On the Deck for Dead Wednesday: Reckoning, Grateful Dead

covers, 6:30 p.m.

THE PUB ON 61 The Associates, jams RITA’S SEASIDE GRILLE Bender Funk,

THE PUB ON 61 Karaoke, 8 p.m. THE REFUGE Todd Beals Trio, jazz,

9:30 p.m.

songwriter, 6 p.m. 6:30 p.m.

songs instead of numbers, 7-9 p.m. TASTY FUSION Ben Somewhere, singersongwriter THE WASHOUT Gracious Day, acoustic, country, jams, 7 p.m.

KARAOKE

LOCAL 616 Karaoke Chris R PUB Karaoke with Aaron SHOOTER’S Karaoke with Rick, karaoke

at 8 p.m.

OPEN MIC

jams, 7 p.m.

KARAOKE

CONTAINER BAR Whitney Hanna & Fancy Kool-Aid, singer/songwriter,

SMOKEY’S PLACE Karaoke with Jason,

karaoke, 9 p.m.

OPEN MIC

ART’S Singer-Songwriter Night, rotating

singer-songwriters

ELLIOTBOROUGH MINI BAR Open Mic,

7 p.m.

n THURSDAY, 9 ANDELL INN The Joy Project Jazz Quartet, jazz, 6 p.m. BAR MASH Red Cedar Review, blue-

grass, 7:30 p.m.

BARSA TAPAS LOUNGE & BAR Steve Simon and the Kings of Jazz, jazz,

7 p.m.

soul, 9:30 p.m. 10 p.m.

THE DEWBERRY Joe Clarke Big Band, jazz, 7 p.m. Joe Clarke Trio, jazz, 8 p.m. THE DINGHY TAPROOM AND KITCHEN Dave Landeo, rock and sol, 7 p.m. DOCKERY’S Ben Whitney, singer-song-

writer, 6:30 p.m.

DUDLEY’S ON ANN Stream DJ, dance

music

HIGH COTTON James Slater Trio, sax

jazz, 6 p.m.

LOGGERHEAD’S High Five Duo, covers,

party band, 6 p.m.

MOE’S CROSSTOWN TAVERN Whitney Hanna & Friends, rock, 10 p.m. MONSTER MUSIC Listening Party and Happy Hour, Get a free slice of pizza

CHARLESTON GRILL Richard White Trio,

and enjoy a different storewide sale each week. 5-8 p.m.

CHARLESTON LIBRARY SOCIETY Bachanalia: the Intimate Bach, classi-

PALMETTO BREWING CO. Benefit of the Doubt, rock, 7 p.m. POUR HOUSE Sufferin’ Moses w/ Josh Roberts & the Hinges, blues, rock,

jazz, 6:30 p.m.

cal, Bach, 7 p.m.

COASTAL COFFEE ROASTERS Acoustic Night, open jam THE COMMODORE The Majestics, funk,

rock, jams, 8:30 p.m.

KARAOKE

BAR MASH Jeff Wilson, jazz, 9:30 p.m. CHARLESTON GRILL Ron Wiltrout Jazz Quartet, jazz, 7-11 p.m. THE COMMODORE Funktastics, funk,

WILD WING—NC Matt & Dan, jams

THE WASHOUT Eddie Bush, acoustic,

SOUTHERN ROOTS SMOKEHOUSE Sound Check: Musical Bingo, bingo, but with

roots, 9 p.m.

n FRIDAY, 10

THE WASHOUT Brady & Dale, bluegrass,

TRAYCE’S TOO Straight Jacket, covers,

WINDJAMMER The Yacht Club, soft

7:30 p.m. 4 p.m.

8:30 p.m.

THE SOUTHERN BAR AND GRILL Guilt Ridden Troubadour, Americana, rock,

MAINLAND CONTAINER CO. KITCHEN & BAR Open Mic Night, 7-10 p.m.

THE TIN ROOF Spaced Out Tiki Happy Hour, David Bowie covers, Elvis covers,

9:15 p.m.

THE PUB ON 61 Morpheus, funk, rock,

n SATURDAY, 11 CHARLESTON GRILL Asa Holgate Quartet, jazz, 7:30 p.m. CHARLESTON MUSIC HALL Love & Southern D!scomfort, 7:30 p.m. CHUCKTOWN BAR AND GRILL Back in the Day Saturday, hits from the ’80s, THE COMMODORE Lavish Sounds,

Motown, covers, dance music, 7 p.m. Futurefunk, funk, 9:30 p.m.

THE DEWBERRY Joe Clarke Big Band,

jazz, 7 p.m.

THE DINGHY TAPROOM AND KITCHEN Tar & Feather, bluegrass, country, 7 p.m. HIGH COTTON Frank Duvall Trio, piano

jazz, 7 p.m.

LOCAL 616 DJ D-EZ, old and new-school

tunes, 10 p.m.

NORTH CHARLESTON PERFORMING ARTS CENTER Keith Sweat w/ Freddie Jackson, soul, R&B, 7 p.m. NV DJ Y-Not, dance and party music PALMETTO BREWING CO. Pentley Holmes, singer-songwriter, 6 p.m. POUR HOUSE Zach Deputy w/ Of Good Nature, funk, soul, 9 p.m. PROHIBITION New South Jazzmen, THE PUB ON 61 Jon Hanks Band, singer-

songwriter

THE ROYAL AMERICAN Madam Adam w/ Lost Cosmonauts, White Walls,

rock, 9 p.m.

SAND DOLLAR HeadRush, rock, covers,

10 p.m.

SURF BAR Wallace Brown & the Peacematters, roots, rock, 10 p.m. SUSHI BLUE Salsa Night , DJ Luigi, salsa TOMMY CONDON’S Bograts, folk,

9:30 p.m.

THE DINGHY TAPROOM AND KITCHEN Donnie Polk, jams, 7 p.m. THE DROP IN Stratton Moore & Friends,

Maya Gold, 8 p.m.

THE WASHOUT Louie D Project, funk,

THE ROYAL AMERICAN The Mobros w/ Orange Doors, Pierce Alexander, rock,

8 p.m.

WINDJAMMER Spunjwurthi, rock, 9 p.m.

SAND DOLLAR HeadRush, rock, covers,

KARAOKE

jazz, 6 p.m.

JUANITA GREENBERG’S—MP Graham Whorley, acoustic soul/rock and jams,

6:30 p.m.

K.C. MULLIGAN’S Token Mary, pop,

jams, 10 p.m.

LOCAL 616 DJs: The Selectas, party

tunes

PINK CACTUS Hector Salazar & Gregory Guay, latin, 6 p.m. PLANET FOLLYWOOD Karaoke w/

10 p.m.

SURF BAR Louie D Project, funk, 10 p.m.

SUBMISSIONS Please have listings for the following week submitted no later than noon Friday to ensure publication both in print and online. Contact us at musicboard@ charlestoncitypaper.com.

Provided

jazz, 7 p.m.

TRAYCE’S TOO Free Ride, party band,

HALLS Larry Ford, Abe White, and Chris Williams, jams, 6 p.m. HIGH COTTON Frank Duvall Trio, piano

Charleston’s own Shut Up & Color exists to make music that is loud and fun. And that infectious ethos is what this week’s show in Park Circle is seemingly built around. For this particular occasion, the local band will be holding court at the Sparrow along with two other groups that are guaranteed to deliver an electrifying evening. Here’s the breakdown: Shut Up & Color will hit hard with its highenergy antics and stellar song selection. Then, Marytree will be bringing their minor key mayhem to the party. Their 2017 album, Chipper, recalls big hard rock hits from the 2000s and grunge tunes that toppled the charts in the ‘90s. Songs like “That Much is Certain” bring back thoughts of the last big push for rock on the radio. Finally, Pluff Mud Queen can be counted on to double down on the blues. Their songs, like “Ball of Confusion” and “More Than Love,” are dance-y, energetic foot-tappers and head-bangers. The setting for such an outrageous outing couldn’t get any better than the Sparrow, the area’s hallowed hall of noise. —Kevin Wilson SATURDAY

’90s, and 2000s, 9 p.m.

jazz, 7 p.m.

9 p.m.

VARIETY | 9 to 5 Mag Release Party

DJS + DANCE Dudley’s After Dark DJ Matterhorn, 8 p.m.

8:30 p.m.

acoustic rock and jamgrass, 10:30 p.m. ELI’S TABLE Gino Castillo, jazz, 7 p.m.

w/ Semkari, Bad Vessel, Maya Gold Fri. Jan. 10 8 p.m. $7 Purple Buffalo

CRAZY D’S Karaoke HARBOR BREEZE Karaoke LOGGERHEAD’S Karaoke, 10 p.m.-1 a.m. MANHATTAN’S Karaoke, 9 p.m. TRU BLUES Karaoke Night, 9 p.m.

THE PURPLE BUFFALO 9 To 5 Magazine release party, Semkari, Bad Vessel,

THE DEWBERRY Joe Clarke Big Band,

ROCK | Shut Up & Color

rock, 9 p.m.

blues

R&B, 9:30 p.m.

CHARLESTON CITY PAPER 01.08.2020

TOMMY CONDON’S Bograts, folk,

rock, Americana, 6 p.m.

SEANACHAI Monthly Celtic Jam, Irish,

34

DJ Richburg, 9:30 p.m. POUR HOUSE Joey Harkum, singer-

Provided

w/ Marytree, Pluff Mud Queen Sat. Jan. 11 8:30 p.m. The Sparrow

LOGGERHEAD’S Karaoke, 10 p.m.-1 a.m. R PUB Karaoke with Aaron SMOKEY’S PLACE Karaoke with Jason,

karaoke, 9 p.m.

OPEN MIC

FREEHOUSE Freehouse Acoustic Open Mic, local acoustic

n SUNDAY, 12 CHARLESTON GRILL Bob Williams Duo,

jazz/classical (guitar and violin), 7 p.m. COAST Graham Whorley, acoustic duo: rock, jazz, and grooves, 7-10 p.m.

THE COMMODORE Honky Tonk Sunday,

jams, 9 p.m.

THE DINGHY TAPROOM AND KITCHEN Josh Hughett, singer/songwriter, 7 p.m. GATHERING CAFÉ Jazz Brunch, jazz HALLS The Plantation Singers, gospel,

12:30-3:30 p.m.

Quarterly music and arts publication 9 to 5 magazine is celebrating their second year and eighth issue with a release party at the Purple Buffalo and three sets from South Carolina artists. Synth-heavy rock project Bad Vessel will perform their electronic and fun indie tracks, like their 2019 single “Shiny,” at the event. Semkari, a featured artist in the upcoming issue of 9 to 5 magazine, is also set to play. The rapper’s known for a bold mixture of video game references and a heartfelt delivery that gives his music more substance than the Smash Bros. and Darth Vader samples initially let on. Since dropping his 2018 EP, Sempathy, Semkari has released a series of singles, such as 2019’s “Mustang” and “Sapphire // Ruby,” both featuring Scene Jesus. Americana singer Maya Gold will round out the rundown. Her first single, “Broken Frame,” was released in December. The track mashes rhythmic acoustics, an electric guitar that carries the melody, and some descriptive lyrics that paint an image of the song’s main character. The night’s lineup is eclectic and showcases the next crop of potentially great artists in the South Carolina scene — just like 9 to 5 does every few months. —Heath Ellison FRIDAY

that Rapper, hip-hop, 9 p.m. SNAPPER JACK’S SEAFOOD & RAW BAR Foggy Sunday w/ The Fogg, rock cov-

ers, 3:30 p.m.

ST JAMES GATE Ed “Porkchop” Meyer,

singer-songwriter, 12 p.m.

SURF BAR Midnight Revel, jam band,

HIGH COTTON The Bluestone Ramblers,

10 p.m.

PINK CACTUS Hector Salazar & Grace McNally, Latin, 6 p.m. POUR HOUSE Jazz is Phish, jazz, Phish covers, 9 p.m. On the Deck: Kanika Moore and the Motown Throwdown,

songwriter, 7 p.m.

bluegrass brunch

gospel, soul, funk, 1 p.m.

THE ROYAL AMERICAN Anfernee w/ Clayton James, Dr. Mambo, Abstract

n MONDAY, 13 BAR MASH Live Funk/ Mo-town music with Mike Quinn and friends, funk, soul,

9:30 p.m.-1 a.m.

CONTAINER BAR Whitney Hanna, acous-

tic rock, 6 p.m.

HENRY’S HOUSE Jaykob Kendrick,

TOMMY CONDON’S Kevin Church, singer-

Southern rock, acoustic, 10 p.m. K.C. MULLIGAN’S Amanda, jams, 10 p.m.

THE WASHOUT Donnie Polk, acoustic,

POUR HOUSE On the Deck: Holy City Heaters, jam-grass, Americana, roots,

4 p.m.

KARAOKE

THE TIN ROOF Karaoke, 9 p.m.

6 p.m.

THE TIN ROOF Emerald Empire, jams,

8 p.m.

continued on page 36


1/15

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w/ Of Good Nature Sat. Jan. 11 9 p.m. $15/adv, $18/dos Pour House

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w/ Orange Doors + Pierce Alexander DOORS: 9PM / $10 COVER

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w/ Anfernee. + Dr. Mambo + Abstract “That Rapper” DOORS: 9PM / $8 COVER

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WED, JAN 8

EVENT CALENDAR

w/ Slark Moan + Hannah O (of Honna) DOORS: 9PM / $5 COVER

Tuesday Night Dance Party Series w/ Persona La Ave + DJ Lazercat

GROOVE-JAM | Zach Deputy In 2019, singer and multi-instrumentalist Zach Deputy released an EP called Red Moon. Actually, it was less individual songs and more of a mini-suite of what Deputy does best: reggae-inflected, headnodding grooves, electronic percussion rubbing up against Deputy’s sweet-and-sour vocals, and general blissed-out chillaxing all around. It doesn’t necessarily sound all that different from what Deputy has done in the past, but why should it? He’s been carving out a singular niche for more than a decade now, creating a hybrid of the musical styles he loves, picking and choosing elements from jam-rock, electronic pop, and straight-ahead reggae, making them his own. Onstage, Deputy’s typical set is even more continuously connected than his new EP. Much like Keller Williams, Deputy loves looping technology, setting up an easygoing groove piece by piece. The singer then sits back to ride the wave, adding his croon or a few choice guitar leads while the set becomes something bigger than a setlist. Much like a top-notch jam band, Deputy’s set changes every night because it can. There’s one guy driving, so he can do whatever he likes with the loops and leads, building a song in response to the crowd or taking it in another direction because he feels like it. Whether on album or onstage, Deputy makes exploratory kind of music that isn’t as demanding as jam, or prog-rock, for that matter. It’s more about finding a sweet spot in the pocket and settling in. —Vincent Harris SATURDAY

DOORS: 9PM / NO COVER

TheRoyalAmerican.com 970 Morrison Drive Charleston, SC (843)817.6925

ALL DATES AND SHOWTIMES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE

SUFFERIN’ MOSES + JOSH ROBERTS AND THE HINGES ALBUM RELEASE PARTY

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SAT, JAN 11

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Badjon

SUN, JAN 12

ZACH DEPUTY “RED MOON TOUR” W/ OF GOOD NATURE

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36

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ALTERNATIVE ROCK | Madam Adam Over the summer, local rock band Madam Adam hit the city with two singles, “Wherewithal” and “Rest of Your Life.” It’s been almost five years since their last LP, Rite of Passage, and the band hasn’t changed too much. There’s a little more pop, especially in the gigantic chorus of “Wherewithal,” but the band is still doing what they do best: making melodic alternative rock music for the modern age. “Rest of Your Life” has a new-wave electronic focus hiding behind the delayed guitar. The verse, which reflects longingly on the future, is romantic and contemplative toward the idea of forever. Madam Adam certainly has learned a thing or two about dynamics in the last few years. The band lets the music build and swell more than ever, instead of going fast with hardhitting and loud-as-hell rock tunes. Currently, there’s no word on what Madam Adam’s new music is leading up to, and there haven’t been any new songs since the summer, but fans of the band’s approachable and fun alternative tracks are surely eager to see what’s around the corner. —Heath Ellison SATURDAY

musicboard continued from page 34

TOMMY CONDON’S Open Mic Night,

open mic, 7 p.m. TSUNAMI—MP Derek Cribb, coustic reg-

OPEN MIC TOMMY CONDON’S Open Mic: Songwriter Night, open mic, 7 p.m.

HOME TEAM BBQ Holy City Confessional, singer-songwriter show-

ART’S Saluda Shoals, country, rock,

HUNLEY’S TAVERN Ted McKee, acoustic

Americana, 9 p.m. CHARLESTON GAILLARD CENTER Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, classical,

KARAOKE

7:30 p.m.

mic, 9:30 p.m. O’BRION’S—JI Karaoke w/ Blaze, kara-

oke during Margarita Mondays

jazz, 6 p.m.

n TUESDAY, 14

gae/rock, 10:30 p.m. BIG GUN BURGER SHOP Karaoke, open

Night with Heather Rice, jazz, 6:30 p.m. HIGH COTTON James Slater Trio, sax

CHARLESTON GRILL Kevin Hamilton and Friends, jazz, 6:30 p.m. THE DINGHY TAPROOM AND KITCHEN Jeff Bateman and Josh Hughett, covers,

jams, 7 p.m. FILL RESTAURANT AND PIANO BAR Jazz

case, 7 p.m.

Americana and folk-rock

K.C. MULLIGAN’S DJ Random, DJ, jams,

10 p.m.

OCEAN COWBOYS Poppa DuPree and JoJo, jams PROHIBITION Salsa Night w/ Gino Castillo Cuban Jazz Quartet, Cuban,

salsa

continued on page 38


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Sun. Jan 12

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1/2 PRICE BURGERS 12-6PM FREE POOL 12-6PM

37


Jonathan Boncek file photo

w/ Clayton James, Dr. Mambo, Abstract that Rapper Sun. Jan. 12 9 p.m. $8 The Royal American

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FOR MORE INFO & VIP CALL (843) 737-5648 OPEN MON-SAT 2PM-2AM • SUN 8PM-2AM

HIP-HOP | Anfernee. Four prominent Charleston hip-hop acts are taking over the Royal American to give 2020 a proper welcome. Rappers Clayton James, Anfernee., and Abstract will each play their own set along with a performance from masked jazz/trip-hop group Dr. Mambo. The instrumental trio recently played at O-Ku on King Street with Abstract on Dec. 28, but this will be the first live show in quite a while for both James and Anfernee. James previously indicated on social media that he was taking a break from live performances for a period of time while working on new music but a show at one of Charleston’s most recognized venues with a bill of three other major players in local hip-hop is a pretty bold way to return to the scene. New music has not been indicated or teased by the other artists on the bill but the new year usually brings announcements and hype. If nothing else, all of the performers are remarkable showmen, thanks to Anfernee. and Abstract’s unrelenting energy and the costumed ghostliness of Dr. Mambo. It’s a celebration of a new year and new promises with some of Charleston’s most loyal hip-hop figures. —Alex Peeples SUNDAY

Visit charlestoncitypaper.com for the latest live music, karaoke, and open mic events

musicboard continued from page 36

THE WASHOUT The Ol’ 55s, bluegrass,

7 p.m.

OPEN MIC

BURNS ALLEY Molly Durnin, open mic,

9 p.m.

LOCAL 616 Sessions at 616, open mic,

9 p.m.

MYNT Locals Open Mic Night, 10 p.m. THE PUB ON 61 Open Mic, open mic SMOKEY’S PLACE Open Mic, w/ Rock

Pile, 8 p.m.

ANDELL INN The Joy Project Jazz Quartet, jazz, 6 p.m. BAR MASH Red Cedar Review, blue-

THE DEWBERRY Joe Clarke Big Band,

jazz, 7 p.m.

HOOKED SEAFOOD Chris Boone,

Americana, folk, 5 p.m.

JOHNKING GRILL + BAR Graham Whorley & Friends, blues, roots, rock,

7 p.m.

LOGGERHEAD’S Eric Penrod, jams,

6 p.m.

PLANET FOLLYWOOD Michael Martin Band, Americana, 9 p.m. POUR HOUSE On the Deck for Dead Wednesday: Reckoning, Grateful Dead

covers, 6:30 p.m.

THE PUB ON 61 The Associates, jams RITA’S SEASIDE GRILLE Bender Funk,

rock, Americana, 6 p.m.

THE WASHOUT Brady & Dale, bluegrass,

jams, 7 p.m.

WILD WING—NC Matt & Dan, jams

CHARLESTON GRILL Richard White Trio,

jazz, 6:30 p.m.

9 p.m.

COASTAL COFFEE ROASTERS Acoustic Night, open jam THE COMMODORE The Majestics, funk,

R&B, 9:30 p.m.

CHARLESTON GRILL Ron Wiltrout Jazz Quartet, jazz, 7-11 p.m. THE COMMODORE Funktastics, funk,

soul, 9:30 p.m.

jazz, 7 p.m.

acoustic rock and jamgrass, 10:30 p.m. ELI’S TABLE Gino Castillo, jazz, 7 p.m.

HALLS Larry Ford, Abe White, and Chris Williams, jams, 6 p.m. HIGH COTTON Frank Duvall Trio, piano

jazz, 6 p.m.

JUANITA GREENBERG’S—MP Graham Whorley, acoustic soul/rock and jams,

10 p.m. THE DEWBERRY Joe Clarke Big Band, jazz, 7 p.m. Joe Clarke Trio, jazz, 8 p.m. THE DINGHY TAPROOM AND KITCHEN Fowl Play, party band, 7 p.m. DUDLEY’S ON ANN Stream DJ, dance

music HIGH COTTON James Slater Trio, sax

jazz, 6 p.m. LOGGERHEAD’S Me and Mr. Jones, cov-

jams, 10 p.m.

MOE’S CROSSTOWN TAVERN Whitney Hanna & Friends, rock, 10 p.m. MONSTER MUSIC Listening Party and Happy Hour, Get a free slice of pizza

K.C. MULLIGAN’S Token Mary, pop, LOCAL 616 DJs: The Selectas, party

tunes

PINK CACTUS Hector Salazar & Gregory Guay, latin, 6 p.m. PLANET FOLLYWOOD Karaoke w/ DJ Richburg, 9:30 p.m. THE PUB ON 61 Karaoke, 8 p.m. THE REFUGE Todd Beals Trio, jazz,

6:30 p.m.

THE SOUTHERN BAR AND GRILL Guilt Ridden Troubadour, Americana, rock,

roots, 9 p.m.

SOUTHERN ROOTS SMOKEHOUSE Sound Check: Musical Bingo, bingo, but with

KARAOKE

singer-songwriters

CONTAINER BAR Whitney Hanna & Fancy Kool-Aid, singer/songwriter,

6:30 p.m.

OPEN MIC

ART’S Singer-Songwriter Night, rotating

MAINLAND CONTAINER CO. KITCHEN & BAR Open Mic Night, 7-10 p.m.

BAR MASH Jeff Wilson, jazz, 9:30 p.m. BIG GUN BURGER SHOP Never Better w/ Rex Darling, Celine Dijon, Emo,

karaoke, 9 p.m.

SMOKEY’S PLACE Karaoke with Jason,

OPEN MIC

7 p.m.

songs instead of numbers, 7-9 p.m. TASTY FUSION Ben Somewhere, singersongwriter THE WASHOUT Gracious Day, acoustic, country, jams, 7 p.m.

KARAOKE

at 8 p.m.

n FRIDAY, 17

BARSA TAPAS LOUNGE & BAR Steve Simon and the Kings of Jazz, jazz,

n WEDNESDAY, 15

funk, soul, 9:30 p.m.

SHOOTER’S Karaoke with Rick, karaoke

grass, 7:30 p.m.

THE DINGHY TAPROOM AND KITCHEN Donnie Polk, jams, 7 p.m. THE DROP IN Stratton Moore & Friends,

THE COMMODORE Lady & The Brass,

CHARLESTON CITY PAPER 01.08.2020

n THURSDAY, 16

THE DEWBERRY Joe Clarke Big Band,

jazz, 6:30 p.m.

38

7 p.m.

STONO CAFE Open Mic, 6:30 p.m.

BURNS ALLEY Karaoke Chris CHARLESTON GRILL Duda Lucena, Latin

2028 PITTSBURGH AVE.

ELLIOTBOROUGH MINI BAR Open Mic,

LOCAL 616 Karaoke Chris R PUB Karaoke with Aaron

ers, R&B, soul, 6 p.m.

and enjoy a different storewide sale each week. 5-8 p.m. MUSIC FARM Badfish w/ Tropidelic, Little Stranger, Sublime covers, 8 p.m. POUR HOUSE Mr. Holland’s Oats,

Hall & Oates covers, 9 p.m. SALTY MIKE’S Thomas Champagne,

pop, rock, reggae, 5 p.m. THE TIN ROOF Curly Blue w/ Super Runaway, Anergy, punk, rock, 8 p.m. TOMMY CONDON’S Bograts, folk,

8:30 p.m. TRAYCE’S TOO Strum Dogs, covers,

9:30 p.m. THE WASHOUT Eddie Bush, acoustic,

rock, jams, 8:30 p.m. WINDJAMMER Lauren Hall Band, coun-

try, singer-songwriter, 9 p.m.


Monday is the last day!

NOMINATIONS? NOMINATIONS DEADLINE EXTENDED UNTIL JANUARY 13!

MUSICBOARD | charlestoncitypaper.com

HAVE YOU MADE YOUR

39


Profile for CharlestonCityPaper

Charleston City Paper Vol 23 Issue 23  

Founded in 1997, the locally owned and operated Charleston City Paper is Charleston’s only weekly alternative newspaper and the second-large...

Charleston City Paper Vol 23 Issue 23  

Founded in 1997, the locally owned and operated Charleston City Paper is Charleston’s only weekly alternative newspaper and the second-large...