The Port Newsletter - January/February 2021

from CFTDI

Scroll for more

Page 1

THE P RT JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021

PUBLISHED BY THE CARIBBEAN FISHERIES TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE

CFTDI

WOMEN IN SCIENCE: MY LIFE AS A MARINE BIOLOGIST MARACAS BAY FISHING VILLAGE GLOBAL RECYCLING DAY: WE CAN BE HEROES! OUTREACH ACTIVITIES AT THE CARENAGE FISHING CENTRE WORLD ORAL HEALTH DAY: BE PROUD OF YOUR MOUTH


CONTENTS 04 05

WOMEN IN SCIENCE: MY LIFE AS A MARINE BIOLOGIST MARACAS BAY FISHING VILLAGE

RECYCLING DAY: 06 GLOBAL WE CAN BE HEROES! MEET THE TEAM: 10 DANIELLE SARGEANT

2 |

06

11

OUTREACH ACTIVITIES AT THE CARENAGE FISHING CENTRE

12

STUDENT’S CORNER: • MEDICAL FIRST AID: FIRST CLASS OF 2021

14

WHERE ARE THEY NOW?: • ATIBA CAMBELL, MARINE ENGINEER

16

THE GALLEY SCOOP: GRILLED KING FISH

18 20

WORLD ORAL HEALTH DAY: BE PROUD OF YOUR MOUTH WORKPLACE WELLNESS IN COLLABORATION WITH THE MINISTRY OF HEALTH

05

CARIBBEAN FISHERIES TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE


CAPTAIN’S BULLETIN

Welcome back to the third edition of The Port a digital bi-monthly newsletter published by the Caribbean Fisheries Training and Development Institute.

17

19

We thank you for your continued support as we continue to highlight the maritime and fisheries activities occurring regionally, locally and here at our Institute. At CFTDI, we are committed to providing top tier training and producing skilled and certified students in a variety of maritime and seafood technology courses. We have been able to maintain our training standards even in these uncertain times created by the COVID-19 pandemic by transitioning to a blended learning approach and strict sanitization and social distancing protocols that have allowed us to keep our staff and students safe while at the Institute. We must also commend the dedicated staff of CFTDI as they remain steadfast as we continue to build and expand the Institute to meet our goals and objectives. We would also like to thank our guest authors who willingly provided articles. We do hope that you continue on this journey with us as we continue to explore the diverse maritime and fisheries sectors while simultaneously showcasing some of the services and value CFTDI brings to the industry. Best wishes and please be safe.

THE PORT NEWSLETTER | 3


WOMEN IN SCIENCE: MY LIFE AS A MARINE BIOLOGIST

Dr. Reia Guppy

Assistant Professor UTT Marine Scientist Department

INTERNATIONAL DAY OF WOMEN AND GIRLS IN SCIENCE WAS CELEBRATED ON THURSDAY 11TH FEBRUARY, 2021.

I

was 11 years old when I knew that I wanted to become a marine biologist. I can’t remember a time when I didn’t love the ocean or had a fascination of what lay beneath the surface. However, there was no real opportunities to study marine biology in Trinidad. So I went to study abroad, and did both a Bachelors and a Masters in Marine Biology in the USA, and later on a PhD and postdoctoral in the UK. As a young marine biologist, I focused on coral reef ecology. I was lucky to get my first real start with a Guinness Scholarship in 1996 to participate in the Earthwatch Programme, where I was chosen to go to San Salvador, Bahamas to work on a coral reef health project. My first real job was as a junior Marine Ecologist at the Institute of Marine Affairs (IMA). I accredit the IMA for providing a wide range of practical experiences in not just marine biology, but in environmental impact assessments and interdisciplinary conservation and management projects.

4 |

Since then, I have been involved in marine research throughout the region and in countries as far as Apia (American Samoa), Thailand and Australia. I have since expanded my interests to include marine biodiversity, population connectivity, ecotoxicology, and environmental health, whilst using a variety of genetic tools to help answer ecological questions. Over the years, I have also contributed towards capacity building of ocean acidification, biodiversity and conservation of natural resources through participation in initiatives such as the advancement of the Nagoya Protocol in the Caribbean region, and the National Sea Turtle Task Force, to name a few. I have also completed a Masters in Science in Forensic Sciences in 2019, in an effort to better focus and understand environmental health. Altogether, this will allow me to forge a path in the field of environmental forensics in Trinidad and Tobago and the Caribbean. In this way, I feel I can

make a contribution towards the prevention of illegal trade of wildlife within the region. Most of my time however is spent as an Assistant Professor in the Marine Sciences Department at The University of Trinidad and Tobago. I’ve been there now over 11 years, and I feel that life has come full circle. I’m proud to say that I am part of a team that brought Marine Sciences degrees (Bachelors, Masters and PhD) to Trinidad. I am a professional Marine Biologist and so much more. I am a conservator, a consultant, an educator, an influencer and I’m a successful woman in Science!

Dr. Reia Guppy holding a sea turtle

CARIBBEAN FISHERIES TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE


MARACAS BAY: FISHING VILLAGE Kerri Griffith

Training Assistant Curriculum Development and Training Department

Maracas Bay is one of the major tourist attractions located in the Northern Range of Trinidad and Tobago. As tourists both domestic and international visit the area to gain access to the sun, sand and sea that is surrounded by lush and undulating mountains. At first glance, anyone visiting the area would be attracted to mainly the expansive bay. However, Maracas Bay is home to five villages namely Maracas Bay Old Road, Grand Fond Road, Tyrico Bay, Damien Bay and The Fishing Village. The Fishing Village is located on the western end of Maracas Bay and the settlement begins near the beachfront and gradually filters into the hillside where a plethora of homes and small businesses can be seen. The street begins with the Maracas Bay Hotel and there are a variety of small businesses such as bars, parlours and a clothes shop along the stretch. The Fishing Village is one of the most prominent fish landing and retail sites on the north coast of Trinidad. At this location fishermen offload

others noted that fluctuations in sales is a common trend in the industry. However, despite the challenges of the fishing industry the residents all possessed a resounding love for Maracas Bay and the art of fishing.

Maracus Bay Fish Market

their catch of King Fish, Cavalli, Shark, Marlin, Jashwa, Mahi Mahi and Snapper before sale. These fishermen sometimes sell their catch directly out of their coolers or proceed to sell at the Marcas Bay Fish Market or any of the other vending stalls lining the Maracas Fishing Village Road. According to residents, the Maracas Bay Fish Market has been in existence for over 50 years and it is in need of some repairs. When asked about the impact of COVID-19 on sales, the responses varied as some fishermen stated that their sales were greatly impacted while

Maracus Bay Fish Market

Maracus Bay Fishing Village

THE PORT NEWSLETTER | 5


GLOBAL RECYCLING DAY: WE CAN BE HEROES! Global Recycling Day is held annually on March 18th and aims to promote the significance of recycling across the world. This year’s theme, Recycling Heroes, recognizes the people, places and activities that showcase the important role recycling plays in contributing to an environmentally stable planet and a greener future which will benefit all (globalrecyclingday. com). March 18th, is a day for action; putting the planet first, changing the

mind-set of governments, businesses, communities and individuals around the world, to see recyclables as a resource. For us users of the earth, we have the cognitive and institutional ability to reprocess our discarded materials into new useful products. As a resource, our recyclable waste economically speaking has the potential to create wealth and give satisfaction, which is

Sian Cuffy-Young Founder and CEO Siel Environmental Services Limited

why it is truly important (now more than ever) to think about waste as an opportunity for economic growth, and cultural enhancement and not simply an environmentally-political problem which needs saving. When we think recycling, the traditional approach is to educate with the illustrious Mobius loop and the three-chasing-arrows reminding consumers to “reduce, reuse, recycle”.

Siel Environmental Services Limited outreach activities facilitated by Ms. Sian Cuffy-Young

6 |

CARIBBEAN FISHERIES TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE


Bas Emmen for Unsplash.com

Baled paper for recycling

We often forget the most efficient and effective practices of the other R’s – Reduce, Reuse, Repair, Refill and Repurpose, which should all be done before we even get to Recycling. The goal of sustainable waste management is to reduce the quantity of natural resources consumed, to reuse as much as possible so that we create less waste. With that being said, the roles of all stakeholders namely government, civil society, the business community (including manufacturers) and individuals cannot be underscored as we all have a critical role to play. Recyling is indeed possible when the right legislation is developed and enforced, products are made which have a high probability of being recycled and the citizenry does it part by engaging in the right actions. Recycling saves energy and conserves resources.

When we engage in recycling, we divert waste away from our landfills, reduce harmful emissions and can even create employment. Sometimes what we don’t know ultimately harms us which is why global waste is expected to triple by 2050 unless urgent action is taken. In the Caribbean, we do have some positive examples of organizations making a difference in the recycling sphere. Carib Glassworks, a glass manufacturer in Trinidad and Tobago recycles both food grade and beverage glass containers. They have strategically placed collection bins throughout the island inviting individuals, communities, businesses etc. to participate in glass collection initiatives. Sustainable Barbados Recycling Centre’s purpose is to divert waste from the sanitary landfill located in Barbados. Their operational benefit is to extended

landfill life and reprocesses material. The importance of education and awareness must be given priority so the work of Siel Environmental Services Limited is critical. We make it our business to transform the way you think and act towards waste utilizing through every available platform so as to reach and impact all levels. Our advocacy and outreach from the bottom up signify the importance of cultivating an informed and educated public. To be truly sustainable, we must meet our needs using the resources presently available without compromising the needs of future generations. This is why it is important to have #recyclingheroes of all scales consciously active, onboard and committed to solving the wicked problem of waste management. You are that HERO!

THE PORT NEWSLETTER | 7


8 |

CARIBBEAN FISHERIES TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE


THE PORT NEWSLETTER | 9


MEET THE TEAM DANIELLE SARGEANT COOK I Danielle is a longstanding member of the CFTDI family having been a part of the Institute since January 2010. She began her stint as a Cook I in the Catering Department however, she has transitioned into conducting lectures and practical training as part of the Fish Utilization Programme for Home Economic Teachers within the Seafood Technology and Fisheries Training Department. She also assists with Product Development and outreach initiatives within the Department. Danielle has her Associate Degree in Culinary Management from Trinidad and Tobago Hospitality and Tourism Institute and she is certified by CFTDI in Chilled and Frozen Fish Handling and Processing, Salt Curing, Drying and Smoking. With these qualifications, Danielle has been instrumental in the development of a variety of products for outreach activities such as Fish Pizza Roles, Smoked Fish Accra and Fish Chowder to name a few. Presently she is a part of a dedicated team geared towards revitalizing CFTDI’s Seafood Technology and Fisheries Training Programme through the production of Fish Sausages, Fish Burgers and a variety of other value added seafood products.

Mrs. Danielle Sargeant showcasing smoked fish sandwiches

Grilled Tuna fish atop herb vegetable pasta

10 |

CARIBBEAN FISHERIES TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE

Spicy fish balls in a marinara sauce

Beet root wraps with marinated fish presented at Fiery Foods Festival


OUTREACH ACTIVITIES AT THE CARENAGE FISHING CENTRE We at Caribbean Fisheries Training and Development Institute (CFTDI) would like to highlight some of the training and outreach activites that have have been taking place at the Carenage Fishing Centre (CFC). Some of the training options offered and samples produced are showcased to highlight how creativity and adding value to an idea, a product, a service and to yourself can benefit you, now and for the future.

Marcus Goring

Manager Facilities and Operations Department

Aside from the feeling of wellbeing that is gained from learning something new, our training courses provide an opportunity to create a stream of revenue, whether as a primary or additional source of income to support individuals and families. The skills on display, include Fin Fish Handling and Preparation, Outboard Engine Maintenance and Repair and Safety at Sea also known as Personal Survival Techniques. Visitors to CFC showed interest in the various displays and courses.

Customer tasting of a sample of our Croaker Fish Sausage

THE PORT NEWSLETTER | 11 Pan Fried Croaker Fish Sausage

Customer requesting information about our training courses


STUDENT CORNER: MEDICAL FIRST AID FIRST CLASS OF 2021 Students participating in a Medical First Aid course at CFTDI. They are practising various life saving techniques as well as how to treat several types of injuries.

12 |

a.

CARIBBEAN FISHERIES TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE

b.


a. Checking for circulation (pulse) b. Applying an AED (Automative External Defibrillator) c. Applying a compression bandage d. Sling and Binder e. Two person CPR (Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation) Scan and visit course information

c.

d.

THE PORT NEWSLETTER | 13

e.


WHERE ARE THEY NOW? ATIBA CAMPBELL, MARINE ENGINEER

Kerri Griffith

Training Assistant Curriculum Development and Training Department

Atiba Campbell, a Marine Engineer, is a past student of Caribbean Fisheries Training and Development Institute where he successfully completed Proficiency in Survival Craft, Advanced Fire Fighting and Ratings Forming Part of an Engineering Watch. These have helped him progress to his position of Engineer Officer of Watch - EOOW 3/1 also known as Third Engineer. Atiba has 17 years experience in the Maritime Industry and currently works on Drillships and Anchor Handling Tug Supply Vessels. A Drillship is drills for oil and gas in various parts of the world. Anchor Handling Tug Supply Vessels are for rigs that do not have self propulsion, therefore, these vessels are responsible for towing rigs and transporting supplies to and from the rig. Mr Campbell has worked for companies such as Marine Utilities Services Limited, Gulf Mark, Petro Saudi and Oldendorff. Atiba started his career as an Oiler Class 4 where he was responsible for engine room maintenance via cleaning and assisting the engineering officer. After two years offshore sea time (equivalent to one year in international waters) he upgraded to Class 3 an Experienced Oiler. After 18 months seatime, he was permitted to upgrade to Category 2 known as Motorman who ensures machinery Atiba Campbell - Engine control room of vessel, keeping watch at shift

14 |

CARIBBEAN FISHERIES TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE


such as pumps and generators are serviced, lubricated, fully operational and that any anomalies are to be reported to the Engineers. After 24 months of seatime as a Category 2 he then progressed to Category 1 also known as Fourth Engineer. Fourth Engineer also known as a Junior Engineer is assigned a team and these persons are responsible for undertaking specific tasks. After 18 months as a Fourth Engineer he then progressed to Third Engineer 3/1 As a Third Engineer he is currently responsible for overseeing the Night Shift on the Vessel. Atiba typically runs 12hr shifts, however this is extended depending upon the work being undertaken or in the event of emergencies. In this role, he and his team are responsible for all machinery including the sewage plant and also the pumping and receiving of cement, mud and barite. He and his team also keep logs such as generator temperatures and frequencies to ensure that the vessel does not suffer a blackout or shut down. Atiba’s next steps are Second Engineer 2/1 followed by Chief Engineer.

Atiba Campbell - Fabricating in the Engine Room

HE HAS WORKED FOR COMPANIES SUCH AS MARINE UTILITIES SERVICES LIMITED, GULF MARK, PETRO SAUDI AND OLDENDORFF.

Atiba Campbell - Machining a new shaft for a cargo water pump

Jack up rig and a Tow ship

THE PORT NEWSLETTER | 15


THE GALLEY SCOOP GRILLED KING FISH Active Time Total Time Yield 30 MIN

HOW TO MAKE IT

40 MIN

Serves : 10

Source: Seafood Industry Development Company Limited

1. Wash the steaks then season with salt and pepper for taste. 2. Combine the celery, chive, garlic and vinegar. Add the seasoned steaks and allow to marinate for half and hour 3. Hold until ready to grill 4. Heat grill until hot then reduce to medium heat 5. Ladle oil on the grill 6. Grill fish steaks for 3 minutes (1 ½ minutes on either side) basting occasionally with the marinade 7. Serve immediately 8. Place on a bed of cabbage and garnish with parsley and pimentos. Serve with steak fries and green salad or side dish of your choosing. 16 |

CARIBBEAN FISHERIES TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE


Ingredients • 2,250 g (5lb) of Kingfish steaks • 1 whole lemon • 300ml (1 ¼ cup) oil • Salt, to taste • 15g (1tbsp) celery • 15g (1tbsp) chive • 15g (1tbsp) garlic Caribbean Seafood Extravaganza, Seafood Industry Development Company Limited 2008

• 50 ml (¼ cup) vinegar

THE PORT NEWSLETTER | 17


WORLD ORAL HEALTH DAY: BE PROUD OF YOUR MOUTH

Dr Gabrielle Ward, Doctor of Dental Surgery

Tongue discolouration and enlargement aslo known as Covid-19 tongue

Every year on 20 March, World Oral Health Day is celebrated globally. Instituted by the World Dental Federation (FDI Fédération Dentaire Internationale), the campaign’s purpose is always one to unite and educate the world’s population on good oral habits. For the next three (3) years (2021-2023) the chosen theme – Be Proud of Your Mouth – is your only task to help achieve oneness and edification. Are you proud of your mouth? What does it mean to be proud of your mouth? Let us explore the possibilities. Good oral health goes hand in hand with good general health. The mouth does not exist on its own; it is integral to our overall health status, effectively connecting the outside

18 |

world to our internal systems. Let us consider four (4) such instances. 1. There are some conditions that affect the body that your dentist will be able to spot perhaps before you do. For example, painful ulcers on the inner surfaces of the lips, cheeks and on the tongue can be a sign of vitamin B-12 deficiency, and interestingly, a recent study suggests that, although rare, one of the first signs of COVID-19 can be physical changes in the tongue (swollen, patchy [as seen in the pictures]), as well as a burning sensation and loss of taste.

CARIBBEAN FISHERIES TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE


2. We also need our mouths for nutrition. If there are decayed or broken teeth that are causing discomfort, our ability to consume the ideal amount of nutrients can be significantly reduced leading to a host of other issues. 3. Poor oral health can cause some of us to feel unhappy while socializing thereby lowering our self-esteem. 4. Lastly, there are some illnesses that are so intertwined with the rest of our bodies that there can be no separation from our oral health where treatment is concerned. One such condition is diabetes mellitus, which if uncontrolled, can cause quicker progression of gum disease (bleeding gums). The other side of that coin is that good oral hygiene can improve one’s blood sugar levels steadily over time. We have also seen where the hormonal changes experienced during pregnancy can cause some swelling and bleeding of the gums.

If you find that you are affected by some of what has been mentioned, do not be wary. There is hope. As a guide for optimum teeth and gums your oral health checklist should include: 1. Brushing teeth in the morning and at night before bed, for two (2) minutes using a fluoride toothpaste. 2. Flossing all teeth at least once daily. 3. Using an alcohol-free, fluoride mouthwash. 4. Visiting your dentist regularly for routine cleanings and check-ups, and carrying your child for their first check-up once their first tooth appears. The relationship between your overall health and your oral health cannot be overstated. If you follow the guidelines above, you would have done your due diligence to confidently Be Proud of Your Mouth.

VISITING YOUR DENTIST REGULARLY FOR ROUTINE CLEANINGS AND CHECK-UPS, AND CARRYING YOUR CHILD FOR THEIR FIRST CHECK-UP ONCE THEIR FIRST TOOTH APPEARS.

THE PORT NEWSLETTER | 19


WORKPLACE WELLNESS IN COLLABORATION WITH THE MINISTRY OF HEALTH Kerri Griffith

Training Assistant Curriculum Development and Training Department

Lindy-Ann Mendoza

Clerk Stenographer I Human Resource Department

Voluntary Counselling and Testing On December 08, 2020 the Caribbean Fisheries Training and Development Institute (CFTDI) hosted a Health Fair for its members of staff. The initiative was spearheaded by Ms. Lindy Ann Mendoza, who is the Clerk Stenographer I of he Human Resource Department along with assistance from Ms. Michelle Smith - Foreman, who assisted with the preparation and ensuring all COVID-19 protocols were observed. The event was supported by CFTDI to promote general health and wellbeing especially in light of the COVID 19 pandemic which has affected the lifestyle of persons. The health services offered were provided by the North West Regional Health Authority (N.W.R.H.A) and was facilitated by Ms. Anastacia Ramroop Health Promotion Officer (Ag). The services provided include Basic Health Screening for Blood Glucose and Blood Pressure, Body Mass Index (BMI) and Nutrition Counselling, Prostate Specific Antigen Screening and Voluntary Counselling and Testing (VCT).

20 |

These activities were well received by members of staff with a turn out of thirty (30) persons. This Health Fair is part of a wider initiative of the Institute to ensure that the mental, physical, emotional and developmental needs of employees are met.

Prostate Specific Antigen Screening

CFTDI staff participating in health fair

Ms. Lindy Ann Mendoza, Clerk Stenographer I, Human Resource Department

THIS HEALTH FAIR IS PART OF A WIDER INITIATIVE OF THE INSTITUTE TO ENSURE THAT THE MENTAL, PHYSICAL, EMOTIONAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEEDS OF MEMBERS OF STAFF ARE MET.

CARIBBEAN FISHERIES TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE


COURSES OFFERED • • • • • • •

BASIC TRAINING SECURITY AWARENESS ADVANCED FIRE FIGHTING MEDICAL FIRST AID RATINGS FORMING PART OF A NAVIGATIONAL WATCH OUTBOARD ENGINE MAINTENANCE & REPAIRS PROFICIENCY IN SURVIVAL CRAFT P.O Box 1150 Western Main Road, Chaguaramas, Port of Spain, Telephone: (868) 634-4276/1635 THE PORT NEWSLETTER | 21


MOON PHASES MARCH

APRIL

Full Harvest Moon: 28th March 2021

Full Moon: 27th April 2021

Last Quarter Moon: 6th March 2021

Last Quarter: 4th April 2021

New Moon: 13th March 2021

New Moon: 12th April 2021

First Quarter: 21st March 2021

First Quarter: 20th April 2021

Best Fishing Days:- 13th March - 28th March

Best Fishing Days:- 11th April - 26th April

22 |

CARIBBEAN FISHERIES TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE


FISH FACT

KING FISH Scomberomorus cavalla

image taken from NOAA FishWatch

King Fish commonly known as King mackerel is typically found in the Western Atlantic in Massachusetts, North Carolina, Brazil and the Caribbean and it has a preference for warm coastal waters. It has a streamlined (torpedo shape) with an iridescent blue-green colour on the back before it fades into silver and white along the sides. It is covered in a combination of white and silver scales. King Fish are voracious, opportunistic, carnivores that feed on fish, shrimp, squid and various crustaceans.

King Fish is highly sought after due to its excellent culinary properties as it possesses a high fat and protein content along with a moderately firm texture. The King Fish is very versatile as it is excellent for baking, frying, barbequing and broiling. Adapted from Caribbean Seafood Extravaganza by Seafood Industry Development Company 2008

THE PORT NEWSLETTER | 23


THE PORT NEWSLETTER P.O Box 1150 Western Main Road, Chaguaramas, Port of Spain, Telephone: (868) 634-4276/1635,

NEWSLETTER TEAM Paul Gabbadon, Colene Hoyte, Fazeel Mohammed, Emile Jobity, Kerri Griffith, Jeremy Williams, Zozrina Edghill. Front Cover: Paul Gabbadon Back Cover: Paul Gabbadon Caribbean Fisheries Training and Development Institute an Agency of

Ministry of Agriculture, Land and Fisheries