Page 1

THE P RT AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2020

PUBLISHED BY THE CARIBBEAN FISHERIES TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE

CFTDI

MODERNISING THE FISHERIES MANAGEMENT LEGISLATIVE FRAMEWORK IN TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO FOOD SAFETY AND CORONAVIRUS

DROGHERS ACT: HOW OUTMODED LEGISLATION CAN STIFLE EFFECTIVE TRADE AND INVESTMENT CFTDI COLLABORATES WITH AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT BANK AND TOBAGO HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY


CONTENTS

2|

04

CFTDI RESPONSE TO COVID-19

18

FOOD SAFETY AND CORONAVIRUS

08

MODERNISING THE FISHERIES MANAGEMENT LEGISLATIVE FRAMEWORK IN T&T

22

DROGHERS ACT: HOW OUTMODED LEGISLATION CAN STIFLE EFFECTIVE TRADE AND INVESTMENT

12

MEET THE TEAM: MS. MURIEL QUAMINA

24

14

REGISTRATION AND STUDENT SERVICES HAS A NEW LOCATION

CORNER: 26 REGIONAL GRENADIAN

16

THE GALLEY SCOOP: FISH CHOWDER

FISHING 30 CARENAGE CENTRE

16

CFTDI COLLABORATES WITH AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT BANK AND TOBAGO HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY

STUDENTS CELEBRATE

CARIBBEAN FISHERIES TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE

5


CAPTAIN’S BULLETIN

Welcome to the first edition of The Port, a digital bi-monthly newsletter published by the Caribbean Fisheries Training and Development Institute (CFTDI).

30

18

This publication will serve as a portal to the maritime and fisheries activities happening locally and regionally, as well as our training programmes, issues, achievements and progress made. We at CFTDI are committed to creating an environment for nurturing innovation, creativity, and excellence in all our endeavours, especially in support of our students and maritime and fisheries stakeholders. We provide students with rich experiences that enable them to reach their full potential to face the challenges of intensifying competition confidently and competently. We impart a high-quality technical education coupled with appropriate and robust practical training elements that emphasize transversal skills in all our modules and programmes. We have assembled a group of young and enthusiastic professionals with a wide range of skillsets and practical experience that have taken up the challenge to produce a quality digital newsletter, with relevant and timely information for all our stakeholders. We have also partnered with our industry and government stakeholders to provide insights and articles on different aspects of the industry. Best wishes for the success and bright future of The Port. Paul Gabbadon

THE PORT NEWSLETTER | 3


CFTDI’S RESPONSE TO COVID-19

Kerri Griffith

Training Assistant Curriculum Development and Training Department

O

n March 11, 2020 the Novel Coronavirus (COV I D -1 9) was declared a global pandemic and has been ingrained in the minds of the world and has altered our way of living ever since. COVID - 19 is a virus belonging to the family of Coronaviruses that is spread typically between animals such as cats, bats, camels and cattle. Although rare it can sometimes be transmitted to humans. When contracted it typically spreads from person to person through close contact, usually within six feet. The virus is transmitted via respiratory droplets mainly from coughing or sneezing. Symptoms include fever, coughing, shortness of breath, sore throat, tiredness and in some cases diarrhea. Symptoms may appear within 2 to

4|

14 days after exposure. Young persons, the elderly and immunocompromised persons are at higher risk. Globally, confirmed positive cases have exceeded 13 million and the death toll is more than 0.5 million with these numbers increasing daily. As a result of this pandemic, CFTDI has implemented a recovery and adaptation plan as a means of minimising the risk of contracting and spreading COVID-19 amongst our staff, students and external visitors. Our ‘Reopening Protocols Post COVID19 Plan’ listed rules, guidelines and restrictions to help in adjusting to ‘the new normal’. Some of the information included were the proper use of Personal Protective Equipment (P.P.E), procedures to address sick persons, social distancing and personal hygiene. Structural updates were also made to our facilities such as the installation of hand wash stations at strategic locations and appropriate signage displaying rules for wearing masks and hand wash practices. Our visitors and staff are also required to fill out a questionnaire upon entering the compound detailing any recent symptoms or exposure to persons who have COVID-19. Lastly, routine cleaning is also conducted on all high-touch surfaces.

Screen protectors in staffing areas

Social distancing practised in classrooms - Fish Processing room

CARIBBEAN FISHERIES TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE


To prevent or reduce the spread of the COVID-19 virus the following methods have been advised: 1. Wash hands with soap and water or sanitize with an alcohol-based sanitizer if soap and water are not available 2. Cover mouth and nose with tissue when sneezing or coughing and dispose of tissue immediately. If no tissue is on hand, cough or sneeze into the crook of your elbow 3. Clean and disinfect surfaces frequently 4. Practice social distancing by avoiding close contact with anyone, stay at least 6 feet apart 5. Avoid touching your face 6. Wear a facemask 7. Avoid sharing utensils and other household items with persons who are sick 8. Stay at home if you are ill 9. Contact your doctor if you are experiencing any of the symptoms of the virus

THE PORT NEWSLETTER | 5


STUDENTS IN ACTION Students participating in a basic survival course at CFTDI practising principles and techniques to use a life raft and what to do in an emergency. This course is a component of the Basic Safety Training.

a.

b.

d.

6|

c.

CARIBBEAN FISHERIES TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE


a. Student in the water with a floation device b. Students safe in a life craft c. Student turning over the life raft d. Student preparing to jump into the water e.Students huddling together to keep each other warm f. Student on a radio device Scan and visit course information

g. Students igniting a flare

e.

f.

THE PORT NEWSLETTER | 7

g.


MODERNISING THE FISHERIES MANAGEMENT LEGISLATIVE FRAMEWORK IN TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO Elizabeth Mohammed, Senior Fisheries Officer Louanna Martin, Fisheries Officer Sarika Maharaj, Interim Coordinator - Fisheries Inspectorate Nerissa Lucky, Director of Fisheries (Ag.) Fisheries Division, Ministry of Agriculture, Land and Fisheries

T

The Fisheries Management Bill was introduced in Parliament in June 2020 after almost three decades of development. This Bill is intended to revolutionise and modernise fisheries management in Trinidad and Tobago by creating a robust legal basis for regulation of the fishing industry and management of the common property fisheries resources that belong to the people of the country.

term sustainability of fisheries resources and the ecosystem and precautionary approaches to fisheries management are also e mbodie d in the Bill’s principles for decision-making.

Consistent with international best practices in fisheries management and e mbodie d in the Bill’s principles for decision-making is a participatory approach. The Bill makes provision for stakeholder involvement in the governance and decision-making process and for collaboration of government agencies with responsibilities impacting fisheries. These include trade, health, customs, finance, national security, maritime services, foreign affairs and the environment, with the Fisheries Division. Long-

(b) fulfillment of the country‘s international coastal, flag, port and market State obligations

8|

The Bill expands the scope of the regulatory framework to include all fishing (artisanal, non-artisanal, commercial, recreational, national and foreign) and fishing-related activities (e.g. landing, processing, transshipment, in transit movement, trade) within the

In addition to these overarching principles the Bill facilitates: (a) protection of current fish trade markets and penetration of potential m a r ke t s

(c) security of access by nationals to fisheries resources in areas beyond national jurisdiction (d) strengthened control of fisheries crimes including illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing (e) strengthened control of crimes associated with fishing.

CARIBBEAN FISHERIES TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE


waters under national jurisdiction (Archipelagic Waters, Territorial Sea and Exclusive Economic Zone) and by national fishing vessels in areas beyond national jurisdiction; mindful that the current Fisheries Act of 1916 regulates only fishing by the national fleet up to the Territorial Sea, while the Archipelagic Waters and Exclusive Economic Zone Act regulates foreign fishing in the full extent of Trinidad and Tobago’s jurisdiction. Some of the

key m ea s ur e s Bill provide for:

1. An administrative framework for harmonisation of the fisheries management programs in Trinidad and in Tobago and establishment of fisheries inspectorates in both islands 2. D e v e l o p m e n t and implementation of fisheries management plans

3. Establishment of a Fisheries Management Fund to be managed by a Fisheries Financial Board 4. Mandatory registration of fishers and fish workers 5. Mandatory record-keeping by the Fisheries Division (e.g. records of fishing vessels and fish vendors)

authorised officers and observers, logbook and vessel monitoring systems, increase in the type and form of admissible evidence, a penalty system to deter non-compliance with penalties in addition to fines and imprisonment, e.g. forfeiture, banning order 8. Expanded regulation-making powers of the Minister taking into consideration the changing national, regional and international circumstances and obligations. (Continued on page 10...)

6. Institution of a system of regulated access to the fisheries resources to be implemented through a range of authorisations, licences and permits with requisite fees; this is a distinct change from the existing practice of open access to the fisheries resources 7. E n h a n c e d fisheries monitor ing , cont rol , surveillance and enforcement systems including extensive duties and powers of

National Public Consultation - Tobago -June 2018

Consultations with State Agencies - June 2018

National Public Consultation - Trinidad -June 2018

THE PORT NEWSLETTER | 9


Given the magnitude of the administrative, social and economi

it becomes law and the associated industry trade-offs (See Box 1.

and implementation of a change management-stakeholder aw

The Bill was forwarded to a Joint Select Committee for review and repo

was dissolved on 3 July in advance of national general elections on 1

BOX 1. Indust COSTS • Financial costs (application fees, certification, outfitting compliant gear, support observers, penalties); • Requirement for registration, recording and associated certification; • Regulated access to fisheries resources; • Increased and more stringent administrative procedures and monitoring; • Requirement to use specific designated landing sites or identified ports; • Requirement to provide fisheries data; and • Organisational strengthening to effectively participate in decision-making.

10 |

CARIBBEAN FISHERIES TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE


ic changes required for effective implementation of the Bill once

.), the restructuring of the fisheries administrations in both islands

wareness programme are critical elements in moving forward.

orting back to Parliament by 31 August 2020. Subsequently, Parliament

10 August 2020.

try Trade Offs BENEFITS • Social and economic benefits as a consequence of well-managed fisheries; • Legitimate and equitable access to fisheries resources; • Improved safety at sea and search and rescue; • Secured international trade markets; • Well-equipped and managed fishing facilities; • A formal role in fisheries management decision-making; • Protection from theft or interference of fishing gear/equipment and fishing contained in such gear; • Confidentiality of economically sensitive and personal information; • Comparative advantage of those who demonstrate historical compliance.

Castara Bay Fishermen, Tobago. Photo by Pedro Lastra

THE PORT NEWSLETTER | 11


MEET THE TEAM MS. MURIEL QUAMINA, COMMUNITY AND OUTREACH MANAGER

M

uriel’s career at CFTDI spans thirty-two years in the field of seafood technology. She is a graduate of The University of the West Indies with a Bachelor of Science degree in Human Ecology (Nutrition and Dietetics) and a Masters in the Adult and Continuing Education programme (MACE). Ms. Quamina served an adjunct role in channeling the department into the widely accepted seafood education programme for industry and community education. Her current focus is community and outreach programmes in fishing communities.

Ms. Muriel Quamina

Picture of Ms. Quamina and students

12 |

Ms. Quamina briefing visitors to the institute

CARIBBEAN FISHERIES TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE

Ms. Quamina receiving a token from student

Students brining fish in the fish processing lab


COURSE DETAILS The course will consider the handling fish aboard the vessel, and the control of factors that lead to deterioration of the catch thereby maintaining a high quality catch. The training will reflect on an understanding of how time, temperature, and the presence of microorganisms affect spoilage thus, important considerations for the maintenance of vessel sanitation will be included. The course will also cover the rudiments of finfish identification.

P.O Box 1150 Western Main Road, Chaguaramas, Port of Spain, Telephone: (868) 6344276/1635, www.cftdi.edu.tt , facebook: @caribbeanfisheries,THE instagram: @cftdi PORT NEWSLETTER | 13


REGISTRATION AND STUDENT SERVICES HAS A NEW LOCATION

T

o our valued customers, we we lcome you to CFTDI’s new and improved Registration and Student Services office. Our objective is to enhance the Institute’s customer service experience, by providing registration and student services that encourage a hospitable customer experience. To achieve this objective, the Registration and Student Services office was relocated to a more centralised and accommodating location. As customers enter the main administrative compound, the Registration and Student Services office is within clear view for ease of access. The Registrar is also located at this new office to ensure that customer enquiries

14 |

will be facilitated at one location. We have also upgraded the department to facilitate your technological needs. Applicants may go online and download the medical forms for courses, view course schedules and make enquiries. On your visit to the Registration and Student Services office you will be greeted by our warm and friendly staff members that are excited to assist you with your training needs. The staff members in the registration unit were increased, so that the waiting time for customer service will be minimised.

CARIBBEAN FISHERIES TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE

Nigel Wint

Registrar Curriculum Development and Training Department


Registration and Student Services building

Registration and Student Services office

THE PORT NEWSLETTER | 15


THE GALLEY SCOOP FISH CHOWDER Active Time Total Time Yield 30 MIN

40 MIN

Serves : 6 to 8

HOW TO MAKE IT 1. Heat oil in a large pan over medium heat; add cumin (geera) seeds and oregano. Add onion, pimento pepper, sweet potato, chillies and garlic and cook, stirring constantly for 1 minute. Add the fish stock. 2. Reduce heat and cover, leaving to cook for 10minutes, or until potatoes begin to soften. 3. Cut the fillets into chunks. 4. Place fish in a bowl and season with salt, pepper and chadon beni. 5. Add the fish, peas, corn. Uncover pan and cook over low heat for 7 -10 minutes, until fish is just cooked. Stir in the cream and remove from heat. 6. Garnish with parsley. 7. Serve at once. 8. Minerally white wines, like those from northern Italy’s cool Alto Adige region, are terrific paired with smoked fish.

Source: Seafood Industry Development Company Limited

16 |

CARIBBEAN FISHERIES TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE


Ingredients

Caribbean Seafood Extravaganza, Seafood Industry Development Company Limited

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

454 g (1 lb) of small Snapper fillets, skinned 45 ml (3 tbsp) vegetable oil 5 g (1 tsp) oregano or dried thyme 1 onion, diced ½ green pimento pepper, seeded and diced 225 g (½ lb) sweet potatoes, peeled and diced 2 - 3 fresh chili pepper, seeded and finely chopped 1 clove of garlic, minced 1 litre (4 cups) fish stock (optional) 50 g (¼ cup) whole kernel corn 125 ml (½ cup) cream 5 g (1 tsp) salt 1.25 g (¼ tsp) black pepper 30 ml (2 tbsp) chadon beni, minced 45 g (3 tbsp) fresh parsley, chopped (to garnish)

Photo By Chelsea Kyle, Prop Styling And Food By Ali Nardi

THE PORT NEWSLETTER | 17


FOOD SAFETY AND CORONAVIRUS

A

ccording to the World Health Organisation (WHO), Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses which may cause illness in animals or humans. In humans, several coronaviruses are known to cause respiratory infections ranging from the common cold to more severe diseases such as Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS). The most recently discovered coronavirus causes coronavirus disease COVID-19. On March 12, 2020, Trinidad and Tobago confirmed its first Covid19 Case. With the realisation that the country had recorded its first Covid-19 case, panic buying ensued and citizens stocked up on large quantities of several commodities such as toilet paper and disinfectant sprays, with the sudden fear of a forthcoming shortage or an increase in prices. Supermarket shelves, locally, regionally and internationally struggled to remain stocked on commodities, as long lines presented themselves at these establishments. Consumers also rushed to the country’s Farmers Markets and Municipal Markets, to

18 |

purchase fresh produce and meat. Little is known or understood about the effect of COVID-19 and food and food safety and the following Questions and Answers serve as a guide to consumers. 1. How is COVID-19 Spread? COVID-19 is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person. This includes between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet), and through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs. It may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes.

Carla Marcelle-Boyce Deputy Chairman National Food Safety Coordinating Committee

Vibrant, open-air market, local fresh fruits a

CURRENTLY THERE IS NO EVIDENCE OF FOOD OR FOOD PACKAGING BEING ASSOCIATED WITH TRANSMISSION OF COVID-19

CARIBBEAN FISHERIES TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE


2. Are the agricultural produce at the markets safe? Currently there is no evidence of food or food packaging being associated with transmission of COVID-19. Unlike foodborne gastrointestinal (GI) viruses like Norovirus and Hepatitis A that often make people ill through contaminated food, SARS-CoV-2, which causes COVID-19, is a virus that causes respiratory illness. Foodborne exposure to this virus is not known to be a route of transmission. However, it’s always critical to follow the 4 key steps of food safety—clean, separate, cook, and chill – to prevent foodborne illness. 3. How do I ensure that agricultural produce remain safe for consumption? • Firstly, choose produce that are not bruised or damaged. • At home, wash your hands for 20 seconds with water and soap before and after preparing fresh produce.

and vegetables

© Dr. Michael Neafsey

• •

For produce that require peeling, rinse BEFORE you peel it, so dirt and bacteria aren’t transferred from the knife onto the fruit or vegetable. Gently rub produce while holding under plain running water. For firm produce such as watermelon and cucumbers, use a clean vegetable brush or sponge to remove dirt on the outer surface. For leafy green vegetables such as lettuce and cabbage, remove the outermost leaves and agitate under running water to loosen surface dirt. Finally, dry produce with a clean cloth or paper towel to further reduce bacteria that may be present.

For extra measure, produce can be rinsed in a simple sanitising solution comprised of 5 tablespoon bleach per gallon of water. Only potable water should be used for washing of hands and produce. 4. Are there any risk from interacting with animals or consuming animal products? General hygiene measures should be applied when handling animals and animal products. These include regular hand washing with soap and potable water after touching animals and animal products, as well as avoiding touching eyes, nose or mouth, and avoiding contact with sick animals or spoiled animal products. Always remember, you should not handle, slaughter, dress, sell, prepare or consume meat that originates from wild animals or livestock that are sick or that have died from unknown causes. Raw wild meat or uncooked dishes based on the blood of wild animals should not be consumed. These practices place people at high risk of contracting any number of infections. As per general good food safety practices, raw meat, milk or animal organs should be handled with care, to avoid potential cross-contamination with uncooked foods. When consuming animal products, ensure meat from healthy animals is cooked thoroughly and remains safe to eat. Cooking food to a temperature of 70°C can help ensure that it is safe for consumption.

THE PORT NEWSLETTER | 19


5. Are there any risks from touching food packaging? According to the World Health Organisation, the risk of catching the virus that causes Covid-19 from a package that has been moved, travelled, and exposed to different conditions and temperatures is also very low. To date, there is no evidence of human or animal food or food packaging being associated with transmission of the coronavirus that causes Covid-19. Source: •

GENTLY RUB PRODUCE WHILE HOLDING UNDER PLAIN RUNNING WATER.

Pan American Health Organization/ World Health Organisation (PAHO/WHO)

Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO

United States Food and Drug Administration (USFDA)

Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

World Organization For Animal Health (OIE)

20 |

FINALLY, DRY PRODUCE WITH A CLEAN CLOTH OR PAPER TOWEL TO FURTHER REDUCE BACTERIA..

CARIBBEAN FISHERIES TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE


THE PORT NEWSLETTER | 21


DROGHERS ACT: OUTM LEGISLATION CAN STI EFFECTIVE TRADE AND INVESTMENT Shipping Association of Trinidad and Tobago

T

rinidad and Tobago is a twin island state and movement of cargo by sea between ports within each island and between both islands should be a no-brainer. Instead, the process can be so inefficient and burdensome that international carriers opt to call at only one port, and cargo that can effectively be moved by sea instead has to be moved by road and by heavily subsidised ferry, in the case of Tobago. The single piece of legislation responsible for this is the Droghers Act (DROGHERS ACT. CHAPTER 50:07. LAWS OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO. Act. 41 of 1914). The Droghers Act was first passed into law in 1914 and has been amended in 1921 and in 1964. On a basic level, the Act was designed to regulate the movement of vessels coastwise, as a means of regulating trade within ports in Trinidad and Tobago. This piece of legislation is also mirrored in the Customs Act as “Coastwise Trading”. As far as facilitating regulation goes, the Droghers – as it is more commonly known, has long outlived its usefulness, and now acts only as an obstacle and a deterrent to efficient transporting of cargo between Ports within Trinidad and Tobago, and even between

22 |

Trinidad and Tobago; which are treated as two separate states under this Act. Genesis of the Droghers From an historical perspective, at the time that the Droghers Act was first passed, Trinidad & Tobago, like many of its neighbours, was a British colony. The British, in an attempt to control their borders – specifically from an influx of foreign goods from Venezuela at the time, designed legislation that prevented Spanish cigarettes and alcohol from finding their way into the colonies and into what the British considered their territory. They achieved this by ensuring that any vessel in Trinidad moving by sea from one port to another was required to be registered as a drogher. The Act was therefore meant to regulate, control and at the same time derive some revenues from any such movement along ports on its coast. To be fair, somewhat similar “protectionist” legislation exists in other countries even today. In the United States, the Merchant Marine Act of 1920, also known as the Jones Act, is a United States federal statute that provides for the promotion and maintenance of the American merchant marine. Among other purposes, the law regulates maritime commerce in

US waters and between US ports, and requires that all goods transported by water between US ports be carried on US-flagged ships, constructed in the United States, owned by US citizens, and crewed by US citizens and US permanent residents. This law would ensure, for example, that any Japanese fishing vessel fishing just outside US territorial waters would be restricted in plying its trade at ports along the US coast.

The major distinction between the Jones Act and the Droghers Act however is utility and applicability. The name Droghers is indicative of the datedness of this legislation as a drogher is defined as “A small craft used in the West India Islands to take off sugars, rum, etc., to the merchantmen; also, a vessel for transporting lumber, cotton, etc., coastwise”. Operating the Droghers in the 21st Century Even if the Droghers Act as it stands was relevant today, the administration of it would now be done in a vastly different world from the world that existed then. Now, a vessel that is licensed to move coastwise, in addition to getting the Droghers Certificate, also acquires a Droghers Book. Everytime such a vessel enters a port to work, the Book on board must be taken ashore to the Customs and Excise area on the port to be

CARIBBEAN FISHERIES TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE


MODED IFLE D Executive Council 2020-2021 of Shipping Association of

stamped. The same process must be Trinidad and Tobago repeated when the vessel leaves the port and the entire process is then of the day. This old Act could quite seeking to bunker here. This additional repeated on entering another port. easily be taken off the books since cost may only succeed in making the the whole philosophy of trade with cost of bunkers uncompetitive in the In practical terms, if a vessel arrives at Trinidad has changed so drastically region and has the effect of possibly a “finger� berth, the seaman with the and/or has been replaced with some pushing the customer to another less Book can simply hop off the vessel modern version. Given the slow pace expensive port. The cost of bunkers and proceed to Customs. However, involved in legislative changes in this (fuel) is the single largest recurring on many occasions if the berth country, an alternative could be a cost on any vessel, and buyers are does not allow this or if the vessel change to at a minimum improve the particularly good at finding ports is conducting its business at the administrative processes. Guyana for with the least expensive cost for fuel. anchorage or is even if she is waiting example, had such an Act, possible at the anchorage before business since their location presented the The Government of Trinidad and can be conducted, the vessel has no same problems with the Spanish main. Tobago has commissioned a choice but to hire a launch to take However, they have taken it off the team to investigate the Maritime the seaman from the vessel to the books decades ago. For simplicity, if Sector with a view to improving its shore and vice versa. The cost of such the powers that be could amend the competitiveness and growing the a hire stands at US$250 for one-way. process so that this physical Droghers sector. The maritime community This means that the average cost to a stamp can simply be an electronic is waiting with expectation for the vessel, just to transport the seaman approval, this expensive taxi fare impact of the Committee, and while to and from the port is a whopping could be avoided, and the process the announcement was made nearly a US$500 to enter the port and immediately rendered more efficient. year ago, no one seems to know who another US$500 to leave the port. the principals are, and what their plan Customs will not allow the Book to The actual cost of the stamp to a is to achieve what is broadly termed travel on land with greatly reduced customer with a 7625 DWT vessel is growth and development goals, and cost but insist that it is done like it less than TT$50.00 for each stamp. It what progress has been made so far. has always been done. Now bear seems barely worth the effort. Customs in mind this cost is imposed just to of course will gain about TT$225 on the Nevertheless, given that our Maritime administer the Droghers Book and is same transaction. The entity bearing sector is largely a service oriented one not revenue to the Government but the cost of this is the international vessel – with a significant export-oriented rather a third-party intermediary. doing business here. This is just one of component, we recommend that the unnecessary costs to be borne by legislative reform be given high and Persons in the sector have been an organisation that wants to set up urgent priority. The importance of trade trying without success to effect business here and needs to navigate facilitating legislation and regulation change in the Droghers Act and often coastwise. If one were to examine the cannot be ove rstate d. A trade recommendations require extensive case of a bunker operator in Trinidad, facilitating environment is essential lobbying with no results at the end this cost must be passed on the vessels for attracting foreign investment. THE PORT NEWSLETTER | 23


CFTDI COLLABORATES WITH AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT BANK AND TOBAGO HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY

Group photo of Tobago Outreach Team, with members from

Agriculture Development Bank (ADB), Caribbean Fisheries Training

and Development Institute (CFTDI) and Department of Marine

Resources and Fisheries (DMRF) and members of Trinidad and Tobago Police Service (TTPS)

24 |

O

n February 12, 2020 the Department of Marine Resources and Fisheries (DMRF) under the purview of the Tobago House of Assembly collaborated with the Agricultural Development Bank (ADB) proudly hosted the official launch of the

Gabriel Wales

Project Coordinator Community and Outreach Department

new ‘Fisheries Extension Outreach Office Programme’. The event took the form of a street fair which was held at the Charlotteville Fishing Facility and featured display booths by the Tobago Emergency Management Agency (TEMA), Marine Safety Training and Consultants

CARIBBEAN FISHERIES TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE


Employees of CFTDI, Mr. Derek Archer (right) and Mr. Marvin Youk See (left) responding to public inquires.

VISITORS COMMENDED CFTDI STAFF FOR THEIR PROFESSIONAL AND ATTENTIVE SERVICE

wider Caribbean. This latest Fisheries Extension Outreach initiative was designed to take various services offered by the Department directly to the relevant communities across the island, thereby streamlining processes for fisherfolk with very demanding schedules. These services include, but are not limited to: registration of fishers, boats and engines, transfer of boats and engines, and application for tax exemptions.

Mr. Derek Archer and Mr. Marvin Youk See represented the CFTDI on the day. Based on feedback collected, the event was very well received by stakeholders. Visitors commended CFTDI staff members for their professional and attentive service. The DMRF welcomed the outreach collaboration to network with CFTDI as a training facilitator to the sector of fisherfolk.

Limited (MSTCL), the Environmental Research Institute Charlotteville (ERIC) and the Caribbean Fisheries Training and Development Institute (CFTDI) as key stakeholders in the fishing industry. The ADB featured and introduced the ‘Sea to Shore’ loan facility to the Tobago fisher folk. All stakeholders were also engaged in networking on site to address questions and concerns from attendees. Championing the rollout on the day was the Fisheries and Aquaculture Unit of the DMRF. This unit also shoulders an essential responsibility to assist with the training of fishers, processors, vendors, and other key stakeholders in the Tobago fishing industry, and by extension the

Mr. Marvin Youk See (right) responding to public inquires.

THE PORT NEWSLETTER | 25


REGIONAL CORNER GRENADIAN STUDENTS CELEBRATE AT CFDTI Kerri Griffith

Training Assistant Curriculum Development and Training Department

O

n Saturday 7th March 2020, 25 students from Grenada, Carriacou and Petite Martinique arrived at Caribbean Fisheries Training and Development Institute to commence their Basic Safety Training Course. This training was sponsored by The Ministry of Youth Development, Sports, Culture and the Arts of Grenada and was facilitated by Mr. Norman Gilbert (Permanent Secretary specifically responsible for Youth Development).

Grenadian students of the Basic Training course with Instructor Mr. Archer.

26 |

The course and its contents are in accordance with Section A-V1/1 Paragraph 2 of the STCW Code and the Convention on STCW, 1978, as amended. The aim of this course is to provide the basic qualifications for individuals

CARIBBEAN FISHERIES TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE


Grenadian students of the Fire Fighting course with Instructor Mr. Bull.

who are interested in becoming a professional seafarer. The training provided is applicable to any capacity sea-going vessel, offshore rig, or platform. This is a mandatory course for those who intend to pursue a career at sea or offshore. The course consists of both theory and practical sessions. The 25 students participated in an eight (8) day training schedule which commenced with Basic First Aid followed by Personal Safety and Social Responsibility, Basic Fire Fighting and Fire Prevention, Security Awareness and Personal Survival Techniques. After completing the training schedule the students were issued Basic Safety Training and Security Awareness Certificates. They departed the CFTDI on March 17, 2020 as certified seafarers who are now equipped to apply their knowledge to their trade.

Grenadian students celebrate their course completion.

THE PORT NEWSLETTER | 27


CARENAGE FISHING CENTRE THE FUTURE OF FISH VENDING IN

Keegan Slinger

Product Development Manager Product Development Department

TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO A PREMIER DISTRIBUTION CENTRE FOR FRESH FISH DAILY

The Carenage Fishing Centre - State of the art fishing facility

28 |

CARIBBEAN FISHERIES TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE


T

he Carenage Fishing Centre (CFC) opened its doors to the general public on November 09, 2018. Its modern design and seamless operations confirm an advancement in domestic fish marketing and an uplifting experience for Trinidad and Tobago. At the CFC, fresh fish offered for sale by vendors are displayed on crushed ice in stainless steel units. Purchased fish is gutted, cleaned and sliced according to customer’s preference. Vendors adhere to strict seafood safety guidelines including wearing appropriate attire i.e. personal protective gear such as white steel-toed rubber boots, white leather aprons and hair nets.

Fish prices are competitive and vendors are willing to sell fish steaks to consumers not desirous of purchasing whole-fish. Carite, Redfish, Cro-Cro, Cavalli, Tuna, Mahi-Mahi and lobsters are the top seafood sold at the market. Quality control at the Centre is managed by trained CFTDI staff to ensure that consumers purchase the best and safest products available. All consumers making larger or smaller purchases are urged to walk with coolers or cooler bags, as ice is provided to keep their fish chilled during transport. Caribbean Fisheries Training and Development Institute, through their Seafood Technology and Fisheries Training Programme promotes an ongoing educational component targeting fisherfolk. This aims at

Steak cuts of fresh fish

reducing quality deterioration during fish harvesting and transport. The practice of proper handling and icing of fish on-board and ‘bleeding’ of certain species are encouraged, to provide a higher quality consumer product. The primary objective is the provision of high quality fresh fish to consumers. The facility has a very comprehensive range of services that are offered to both fisherfolk and vendors. These include: berthing, boat repair area, net repair area, engine service room, multipurpose room, lockers, wholesale area, retail area, ice machines, cold storage, internal parking and external parking for customers. The entire compound is secured with security fencing and has 24-hour on-site security. The Carenage Fishing Centre remains a major point of sale for high quality fishery products, with the potential to become one of the most important retail fish markets in the country.

Fish displayed on ice

THE PORT NEWSLETTER | 29


Vendors at the CFC

Clean and advanced vending area

Lobsters on ice

Fish on ice

30 |

CARIBBEAN FISHERIES TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE


Prime Minister Dr the Honourable Keith Rowley hoists a fish during a tour of the Carenage Fishing Centre. The Prime Minister said he was elated that the people of his constituency and the entire nation could finally benefit from the facility.

Operating Hours: Monday – Saturday 7:00am – 5:00pm Sundays and Public Holidays – 7:00am – 2:00pm Parking available

Scan and join our WhatsApp group for fresh fish and prices daily.

THE PORT NEWSLETTER | 31


MOON PHASES AUGUST

SEPTEMBER

Full Moon: 3rd August 2020

Full Moon: 2nd September 2020

Last Quarter: 11th August 2020

Last Quarter: 10th September 2020

New Moon: 19th August 2020

New Moon: 17th September 2020

First Quarter: 25th August 2020

First Quarter: 23rd September 2020

Best Fishing Days:-

Best Fishing Days:-

1st -3rd and 18th -31st August, 2020

1st -2nd and 17th -30th September, 2020

Ronnie . (2020). Lunar August 2020 Calendar Moon Phases. Retrieved from Calendar Work Free Moon Phases For September 2020 Calendar Template�. Free Printable Calendar, Templates And Holidays, 2020 CARIBBEAN FISHERIES TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE 32 |


FISH FACT CARITE

Scomberomorus brasiliensis

Carite is the local name for the Spanish mackerel. Carite are generally restricted to tropical coastal waters. Carite is silvery in colour with several rows of marked, round, yellow bronze spots (in life). Carite is marketed mainly fresh or frozen, also salted, canned and smoked. The maximum size for Carite is 125 cm length with a maximum weight of 6.1 kilograms. THE PORT NEWSLETTER | 33


34 |

CARIBBEAN FISHERIES TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE


THE PORT NEWSLETTER | 35


THE PORT NEWSLETTER P.O Box 1150 Western Main Road, Chaguaramas, Port of Spain, Telephone: (868) 634-4276/1635, www.cftdi.edu.tt, facebook: @caribbeanfisheries, instagram: @cftdi

NEWSLETTER TEAM Paul Gabbadon, Colene Hoyte, Fazeel Mohammed, Emile Jobity, Kerri Griffith, Jeremy Williams, Zozrina Edghill. Front Cover: CFTDI Jetty, by Keegan Slinger

Back Cover: CFTDI Jetty, by Emile Jobity

Caribbean Fisheries Training and Development Institute an Agency of

Ministry of Agriculture, Land and Fisheries

Profile for CFTDI

The Port Newsletter - August/September 2020  

The Port Newsletter - August/September 2020 Published by Caribbean Fisheries Training and Development Institute This issue highlights the I...

The Port Newsletter - August/September 2020  

The Port Newsletter - August/September 2020 Published by Caribbean Fisheries Training and Development Institute This issue highlights the I...

Profile for cftdi
Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded