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THE P RT OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020

PUBLISHED BY THE CARIBBEAN FISHERIES TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE

CFTDI

HURRICANE PREPAREDNESS

SUSTAINABLE SHIPPING FOR A SUSTAINABLE PLANET

MENTAL HEALTH FOR ALL: GREATER INVESTMENT GREATER ACCESS


CONTENTS 04

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SUSTAINABLE SHIPPING FOR A SUSTAINABLE PLANET

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MEET THE TEAM: DEREK ARCHER

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STUDENTS IN ACTION

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MENTAL HEALTH FOR ALL: GREATER INVESTMENTGREATER ACCESS

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DELBERT MAHON PERRY FISHMONGER

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THE GALLEY SCOOP: BONITO PELAU

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HURRICANE PREPAREDNESS

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LOCAL FOOD HERO’S WHYFARM

20 MOON PHASES 21 FISH FACTS - BONITO

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CARIBBEAN FISHERIES TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE

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SUSTAINABLE SHIPPING FOR A SUSTAINABLE PLANET

T

he theme for World Maritime Day 2020 is “Sustainable Shipping for a Sustainable Planet”. The focus for a sustainable planet was initiated in 2012 with the United Nations (UN) Conference, Rio+20 to address the issues of Green House Gases (GHGs) from exhaust emissions of the various modes of transport. Though shipping accounts for 3% of global emissions of GHGs, the adverse effects to climate control prompted the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) to mandate countries and ship owners to further reduce exhaust emissions from their ships initially 10% by 2020 and a further reduction of 50% by 2050. Focus on sustainable shipping became prevalent due to the challenges countries and ship owners faced with the measures adopted. The definition of sustainable development was proffered in the

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Captain Kirton Huggins Curriculum Development and Training Manager Curriculum Development and Training Department

Brundtland Report of the World Commission on Environment and Development in 1987 as, ‘Sustainable development meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.’ The guidelines for this broad objective were developed under three pillars in compliance with those developed by the UN for a sustainable planet. The three pillars pertain to Economic / Social / Environmental factors (loosely termed “profit, people and planet”) that embodies sustainability for everyone. Regarding sustainable shipping, the following summarises the pillars:

Social Pillar Concurrent with the development of the Economic Pillar is the enhancement in the quality of life for seafarers. Already the adoption of the Maritime Labour Convention (MLC) addresses these factors together with gender diversity in making a seafaring career a viable and attractive one.

Economic Pillar Focuses on the utilization of diverse energy sources to ensure resources are used more efficiently and reduce the emission of GHGs. Developments towards these objectives are already a reality.

It is to be noted that these Pillars are applicable to all facets of human existence that culminates into a sustainable development approach that embodies the concepts of Blue and Green Economies. There are

Environmental Pillar This pillar addresses the protection of the marine environment as specified under the MARPOL Convention with Regulations adopted for ballast water, pollution from ship generated waste inclusive of exhaust emissions, garbage and sewerage.

CARIBBEAN FISHERIES TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE


however inherent cost effective challenges to be faced with these developments. The proliferation of conventions, instruments, regulations and annexes adopted with tight timelines, by IMO together with legislative measures by individual countries, increases the operational costs. Ship owners are however expected to maintain affordable fees for shipping to be viable to the consumer. Mitigating the challenges are grave concerns. The incentives visualized are deemed to be in the long term. The new measures towards decarbonisation and eradication

of the use of fossil fuels, is expected to reduce operational costs through greater efficiency of machinery and energy resources inclusive of additional cargo carrying space. Profit margins are therefore expected to increase. It is noteworthy to mention that developments in accordance with the above are progressing at a rapid rate. Currently there are vessels in service being propelled by electricity similar to vehicles ashore as battery banks replaces fuel tanks. It is estimated that new built ships after 2030 will not be using fossil fuels.

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT MEETS THE NEEDS OF THE PRESENT WITHOUT COMPROMISING

THE

ABILITY

OF

FUTURE GENERATIONS TO MEET THEIR OWN NEEDS

Yara Birkeland – Battery Powered Container Vessel Photo courtesy Yara

THE PORT NEWSLETTER | 5


MEET THE TEAM DEREK ARCHER SAFETY OFFICER

D

erek has been a part of the CFTDI family for over seven years and he functions as both a Lecturer and Health and Safety Officer. He has a plethora of qualifications ranging from a Diploma in Security Administration to Certificates in Health, Safety, Security and Environmental, Advanced Risk Assessment and Accident / Incident Investigation. Mr Archer lecturers in the Maritime field specifically in courses such as Personal Survival Techniques, Personal Safety and Social Responsibility, Basic First Aid and Security Awareness. In addition to his previously mentioned qualifications he is a Physical Trainer and Coach in the field of Athletics. Mr. Archer has also represented Trinidad and Tobago in the 1984 Olympic Games as a sprinter in the men’s 4 x 400 metre relay.

Mr. Derek Archer - Safety Officer

During the COVID-19 pandemic Mr. Archer played a critical role in policy development and implementation to minimise the risk of transmission of the virus. Some of these procedures included the implementation of thermal scanners, visitor/staff questionnaires, social distancing, mask wearing and the designation of a quarantine area for employees. Mr Archer’s current focuses in addition to lecturing is updating the Institute’s policies and procedures such as the Health and Safety Manual along with Emergency Response, Food Safety and Waste Management Procedures. Certificate of completion awarded by Mr. Archer

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CARIBBEAN FISHERIES TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE

Mr. Archer instructing students during a safety formation

Mr. Archer guiding students on safety of a life jacket


COURSES OFFERED • • • • • • •

BASIC TRAINING SECURITY AWARENESS ADVANCED FIRE FIGHTING MEDICAL FIRST AID RATINGS FORMING PART OF A NAVIGATIONAL WATCH OUTBOARD ENGINE MAINTENANCE & REPAIRS PROFICIENCY IN SURVIVAL CRAFT

P.O Box 1150 Western Main Road, Chaguaramas, Port of Spain, Telephone: (868) 634-4276/1635, www.cftdi.edu.tt , facebook: @cftdi, instagram: @caribbeanfisheries THE PORT NEWSLETTER | 7


STUDENTS IN ACTION Students participating in a fire fighting course at CFTDI practising principles and techniques to use a fire extinguisher and what to do in an emergency. This course is a component of the Basic Safety Training.

a.

b.

d.

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c.

CARIBBEAN FISHERIES TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE


a. Students gathering for a quick meeting before drill b. Students putting on breathing apparatus c. Students attempting to enter the fire hut for a routine drill d. Students entering a confined space e. , f. , g. Students extinguishing fires with a fire extinguisher Scan and visit course information

e.

f.

THE PORT NEWSLETTER | 9

g.


MENTAL HEALTH FOR ALL: GREATER INVESTMENT – GREATER ACCESS

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Dr. Hazel Othello Consultant Psychiatrist

CARIBBEAN FISHERIES TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE

Getty Images


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orld Mental Health Day, observed annually on October 10th, is aimed at increasing global awareness of mental health issues. This year’s theme, Mental Health for All, Greater Investment, Greater Access, could not be timelier, in view of the unprecedented events of the past months and their global implications for mental health.

The covid-19 pandemic and public health measures instituted to control its spread have produced many stressors, including social isolation, fear of infection, death of loved ones, job loss and increased demands on front line workers. In addition, the demands of what has now become known as the new normal have revealed novel challenges of digital poverty, homeschooling and working from home.

Getty Images

2020 has shined a spotlight on issues of mental health In 2017 it was estimated that 792 million persons, slightly more than one in ten people globally (10.7%), lived with a mental health disorder. Globally there are approximately three million alcohol related deaths every year and one person is estimated to die by suicide every forty seconds. The many stressful effects of the covid-19 pandemic are expected to worsen mental health outcomes if no preventive steps are taken and some authors have already reported increased levels of anxiety and depression within populations studied. World Mental Health Day 2020 therefore presents an opportunity to alert all sectors of society to the need for greater investment in mental health. Up-scaling investment in mental health and improving access to care require much more than government commitment; they require the involvement of every individual and every sector of society, including the Corporate Sector, Non-Government Organizations and Faith Based Organizations.

It is important to remember that increased investment in mental health can only result in greater access if adequate attention is paid to combating stigma and discrimination, and in so doing, encouraging help seeking behavior, preventing the development of mental health disorders and facilitating early diagnosis and effective treatment. Greater investment in mental health with the goal of producing greater access is therefore everyone’s business and World Mental Health Day 2020 presents an excellent opportunity for everyone to get involved and do their part.

INCREASED INVESTMENT IN MENTAL HEALTH CAN ONLY RESULT IN GREATER ACCESS IF ADEQUATE ATTENTION IS PAID TO COMBATING STIGMA AND DISCRIMINATION

THE PORT NEWSLETTER | 11


DELBERT MAHON PERRY - FISHMONGER

M Kerri Griffith

Training Assistant Curriculum Development and Training Department

r Mahon also known as Perry is a retail vendor also known as a Fishmonger at the Carenage Fishing Centre (CFC). Perry has been a part of the fishing industry for over 30 years, and based on his experience, the industry has changed drastically. The number of fish vendors since his entrance has increased. The price of fish also heightened from

$2.00 - $2.50 then to $10.00 per pound presently. Fish like Jashwa and Herring that are usually given away at no cost, now have a price per pound of $10.00. The development of CFC has changed the game for the vendors as the pre-existing structure was insufficient in size and had numerous safety issues. These complications

Mr. Mahon at the Carenage Fishing Centre cleaning fish

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CARIBBEAN FISHERIES TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE


had a major impact on sales. Perry also has experience as a fisherman. His role then also included the sale of his produce simultaneously, but the lack of a proper market greatly influenced the fluctuation of his daily sales. With the Carenage Fishing Centre (CFC) established, he mainly assists other vendors such as Mr Michael Seepaul “Mitch� and Mr Angelo Balwant. His main sales drivers are King Fish, Carite, Red Fish, Salmon and Cavalli. Delivery of fresh fish varies between 8:00 am to 9:00 am on mornings or 1:00pm to 2:00pm in the mid-afternoon period as it is dependent on the times the fishermen return to shore.

Reminiscing with comparison to present times, Mr Mahon also stated that COVID-19 significantly affected his sales, with a declined impact of 80 percent in sales in comparison to life before COVID19. While being interviewed he gave a detailed account of his present-day sales status, where the sales count for the whole day was one from a local resident and considered as a very bad day to him. The first lockdown was significantly difficult on fish vendors as many of them could not come out to sell their seafood and also persons were not venturing out to buy fish. Now that the second set of restrictions have been implemented Mr Mahon stated that he has not fully

returned to work and based on the response of his colleagues sales are still very slow. One of the measures that Mr Mahon mentioned was implemented with an aim of adjusting to the new normal is looking into the retail of fish online. To help adjust on the individual level Mr Mahon has been adhering to the guidelines provided by the Ministry such as the use of masks, social distancing, gloves, and frequent handwashing when gloves are not being used. REMINISCING WITH COMPARISON TO PRESENT TIMES, MR. MAHON ALSO STATED THAT COVID-19 SIGNIFICANTLY AFFECTED HIS SALES

Mr. Mahon fish stall at the Carenage Fishing Centre

THE PORT NEWSLETTER | 13


THE GALLEY SCOOP BONITO PELAU Active Time Total Time Yield 30 MIN

40 MIN

Serves : 4 to 6

HOW TO MAKE IT

1. Skin and cube fillets of Bonito. 2. Wash with lime and season fish using chadon beni leaves, garlic and chive. Add 2 tablespoons of water with lemon juice, salt and white pepper. Set aside for 20 minutes. 3. Heat oil in pot. 4. Add sugar and brown the seasoned bonito. 5. Add cooking butter, rice, peas, corn and all vegetables. 6. Add salt to taste. 7. Add coconut milk and 1 cup of water, then leave to simmer until rice is cooked. 8. Serve with fresh salad or coleslaw. Source: Seafood Industry Development Company Limited

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CARIBBEAN FISHERIES TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE


Ingredients • • • • • • • • •

Caribbean Seafood Extravaganza, Seafood Industry Development Company Limited

• • • • • • • •

1,362 g (3 lbs) skinless fillets of Bonito 454 g (2 cups) brown rice 454 g (2 cups) cooked green pigeon peas 227 g (1 cup) pumpkin, diced 6 red ounebtis, chopped 1 medium green sweet pepper, diced 113 g (½ cup) whole corn kernel 6 ochroes, chopped (optional) 1 coconut, grated or small pack coconut milk powder (to prepare 2 cups of coconut milk) 2 tbsp oil 45g (3 tbsp) brown sugar, for browning fish 1 cup, plus 2 tbsp water 3 chadon beni leaves, finely chopped 3 cloves garlic, finely chopped 30 ml (2 tbsp) lemon juice 10 g (2 tsp) salt 5 g (1 tsp( white pepper

THE PORT NEWSLETTER | 15


HURRICANE PREPAREDNESS Although it is believed by many that Trinidad and Tobago is not susceptible to hurricanes we are still located in the southern edge of the hurricane belt and therefore can be directly hit or impacted by the outer bands of tropical disturbances, storms and hurricanes. By Ms. Kerri Griffith Training Assistant, Curriculum Development and Training Department

T

he Caribbean region is highly susceptible to a variety of hazards that has the potential to result in significant physical, social and economic loss. One such hazard that has continuously battered the region is tropical storms/ hurricanes. In the Caribbean the hurricane season begins on June 1st and ends on November 30th. Within the last three years the region has been impacted by three noteworthy hurricanes namely

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Irma and Maria which occurred in 2017 and Dorian which occurred in 2019. After observing the severe impacts on our Caribbean neighbours particularly British Virgin Islands, Dominica, Barbuda and The Bahamas the need for implementing suitable mitigation and adaptation measures was reinforced. Although it is believed by many that Trinidad and Tobago is not susceptible to hurricanes we are still located in the southern edge of the hurricane belt and

therefore can be directly hit or impacted by the outer bands of tropical disturbances, storms and hurricanes. Therefore, we need to be prepared for the current hurricane season and below are some helpful tips proposed by the Office of Disaster Preparedness and Management in Trinidad and Tobago (ODPM) in their Wet Season/ Hurricane Preparedness Guide 2019:

Hurricane in the Caribbean,

CARIBBEAN FISHERIES TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE courtesy YinTang, credit Gettiy Images


Identify risks at home and surrounding environment Storms and Hurricanes have the potential to result in a multi-hazard event as they are accompanied by phenomena such as Storm Surges, Landslides, Strong Winds. Therefore, it is important to identify location specific risks and suitably prepare for such. Develop an Emergency Plan This emergency plan should be comprehensive, displayed around the household and should be easily understood by all family members. It should comprise a Family Communication Plan and Evacuation Plan. The Family Communication Plan should include the contact numbers for all family members along with emergency contact information. Practice execution and memorization of this communication plan particularly with children. Develop an evacuation plan that caters to the needs of your family especially for the vulnerable which includes children, persons with disabilities, the elderly and pets. Identify the nearest shelter by contacting your municipal corporation and along with the selection of appropriate shelters for your pets. Plan the fastest and safest route to your nearest shelter. Prepare an Emergency Supply Kit This kit should include nonperishable food items and water that should be able to last your family for a minimum of 7 days. These items can be incorporated into a “Grab and Go” bag which possesses items that you would require in the event that you need to evacuate or stored in a

waterproof container in an easily accessible area. This bag or container should include items such as food and water, first aid kit, battery operated radio, flashlight, medication, clothing, money, important documents and hygienic products such as toothpaste, toothbrush and soap. It is critical to store all important documents in an easily accessible waterproof container or plastic bag so that they are not lost or damaged during a hurricane. Grab and Go Bags / Emergency Kits should also be prepared for pets. Be Informed Pay attention to the radio, television and trusted social media sites or applications for updates from relevant agencies such as the meteorological office, Government Agencies, Caribbean Disaster Emergency Management Agency and local news channels. Protect in and around your property • Trim and maintain trees located around the home to reduce damage from flying branches. • Secure or bring loose items located around the household indoors for example outdoor furniture • Secure loose items inside the

• • • •

household such as paintings Unplug appliances Secure windows with plywood or any other durable material. Secure roofs with hurricane straps Clear and secure drainage systems such as drains and guttering. Identify a safe space within the household that with little or no windows where emergency supplies should be stored and easily accessed when needed. Place sandbags at doorways to reduce/prevent the entry of water into the home

Develop a similar preparedness plan for your business Similar to the household plan it is important to do contingency planning for your business which includes a list of emergency contacts, securing of important documents and electronic items such as computers and securing loose material and areas such as doorways and windows.

Barbuda, after Hurrican Irma

THE PORT NEWSLETTER | 17


LOCAL FOOD HERO’S WHYFARM By Ms. Kerri Griffith - Training Assistant Ms. Zozrina Edghil - Administrative Assistant

W

orld Food Day is scheduled to take place on October 16th 2020 with the theme Grow, Nourish, Sustain. Together. This theme seems fairly simple however, it has become significantly more potent in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic and its implications for food security. One of the major sub themes presented was that of Food Heroes who have continued to produce food during these uncertain times. These Food Heroes are considered part of our frontline workers and they require our attention and support more than ever during this time. Trinidad

Mr. Alpha Sennon Executive Director and Founder of WHYFARM

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and Tobago has a multitude of Food Heroes who strive to Grow, Nourish and Sustain our nation daily. One such noteworthy Food Hero is Alpha Sennon who is the founder and executive director of the non-governmental organisation WHYFARM (We Help You-th Farm). Mr. Sennon is an Agripreneur (agricultural entrepreneur) who’s skillsets allows him to operate on all levels of the agricultural spectrum. He works from the ground up beginning at the farm level, to working with local, regional, and international bodies to help make our food systems more sustainable.

WHYFARM is a local NGO with international recognition from major international bodies such as The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) and The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO). One of the methods to do this was through the development of the superhero character known as AGRIman. This superhero is featured in published comic books with intentions of eventually being a television series. Mr Sennon stated that the vision behind AGRIman was for “Youth to now have a superhero that they can look up to in society” and that “We keep telling young persons that AGRIman is a farmer and this is important”. The character was based around Captain Planet, a show from Mr. Sennons childhood and this is what cultivated the idea to have a branded superhero for agriculture that a child can read about and see on television. Mr Sennon aimed to make the character as relatable and realistic as possible because as he emphasised the fight against key concerns such as drought, hunger and famine are very real. An interest of Mr. Sennon’s is

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marketing psychology and by using the character AGRIman he hopes to convince the entire population to grow their own food, understand why they are growing their own food and to show them how to do it utilising the most sustainable methods possible. He fondly terms this venture as “AgriEdu-tainment” where he hopes that AGRIman will “Win over the hearts and minds of young people”. AGRIman/ WHYFARM is currently doing short educational videos in partnership with FAO and UNDP. Soon Mr. Sennon intends to add a female superhero and an agricultural robot to his line of characters. Some of the other current initiatives of WHYFARM include teaching kids how to grow their food from seeds. The organisation also has a farmers collective which engages young persons who are already farming or intending to farm. These farmers come together and helps on each other’s farm. WHYFARM also had a recent fundraiser themed “Back To D’ Land” as a means of raising funds to purchase equipment for the farmers collective. Another initiative is the “Plant to your Plate Movement” which is a form of information exchange for new and emerging farmers and home

AGRIman comic book character

gardeners to get assistance and knowledge about growing their own food and also it permits the bartering of items such as seeds. In the future Mr. Sennon plans to brand AGRIman onto food items utilising produce from the farmers collective. Another long-term goal that WHYFARM intends to develop is an agricultural museum where persons can come to learn about indigenous agricultural techniques along with a fun park at the WHYFARM’s farm in Siparia. When asked about the COVID19 situation regarding farmers Mr. Sennon had an optimistic outlook regarding the impact of the pandemic on agriculture. This is because he stated that during the pandemic persons decided to become home growers especially in the first phase of restrictions. When persons realised that there was the potential of restriction on food imports and a looming threat of food insecurity persons began to become innovative and go out and purchase gardening items to work from home and also to utilise land for gardening. Mr. Sennon even stated that COVID-19 allowed for a boost in WHYFARM’s sales as persons came to purchase seedlings, soil, and grow boxes. All the plants sold were accompanied by tutorials showing how to plant, grow and harvest various crops. To assist persons particularly the elderly during this time WHYFARM also implemented the “Dasheen your Doorstep” initiative where food items were packaged and delivered to persons homes. WHYFARM also distributed a variety of hampers and brought farmers together to distribute food to persons in need. COVID-19 also brought forth the importance of agriprocessing to avoid wastage. He stated that with all these positive shifts in mindset toward the need

for more agricultural production and agriprocessing needs to be accompanied by proper investments and budgetary allocations. Overall, he believed that the virus raised the concern of having resilient and sustainable food systems. To make our food systems more sustainable Mr. Sennon reiterated the critical point of succession planning by getting youth involved in agriculture, retraining the minds of persons currently involved and of those who intend to become involved in the field. He believes that we must now utilise climate smart technologies that fit our local climate and ecosystem through merging indigenous techniques and information technology which he termed “Merging legacy with modernity”. He also believed in the utilisation of natural methods for pesticides and fertilisers over the use of harmful unregulated imported chemicals that many of our local farmers use. Also, in these food systems it is important to recycle as Mr. Sennon believes that nothing should be wasted, and all products should be reused in a continuous looping ecosystem. World Food Day is one day before WHYFARM’s 5th anniversary which is on the 15th of October 2020. When asked about the theme for World Food Day 2020 Mr. Sennon believed that the theme encompasses all that his organisation does. He stated that, “Growing is one thing and getting the nutrients from the food is another thing”. This then brings in the importance of sustaining the cycle and to do that persons must be provided with the inspiration and motivation to begin the farming journey and this is what WHYFARM is all about.

THE PORT NEWSLETTER | 19


MOON PHASES OCTOBER

NOVEMBER

Full Harvest Moon: October 1st, 5:06 PM

Full Moon: November 8th, 2020

Last Quarter Moon: October 9th, 8:40 PM

Last Quarter: November 15th, 2020

New Moon: October 16th, 3:31 PM

New Moon: November 21st, 2020

First Quarter: October 23rd, 9:23 AM

First Quarter: November 30th, 2020

Best Fishing Days:-

Best Fishing Days:-

October 1st, 16th-31st 2020

November 15th - 30th, 2020

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CARIBBEAN FISHERIES TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE


FISH FACT

BONITO Auxis thazard

Fishbase.se - Cada, L.A.

The species is distinguished by the following characters: a robust body, elongated and rounded; teeth small and conical, in a single series. Colour of its back is bluish, turning to deep purple or almost black on the head; a pattern of 15 or more narrow, oblique to nearly horizontal, dark wavy lines in scaleless area above lateral line; belly white; pectoral and pelvic fins purple, inner sides black.

Found in the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific (Western Central) oceans and they feed on small fish, squids, planktonic crustacean, and stomatopod larvae. They are preyed upon by larger fishes, including other tunas.

Marketed fresh and frozen and also utilized dried or salted, smoked and canned. THE PORT NEWSLETTER Maturity max length 65cm. Max weight 1.7 kg. Max reported age 5 years.

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THE PORT NEWSLETTER P.O Box 1150 Western Main Road, Chaguaramas, Port of Spain, Telephone: (868) 634-4276/1635, www.cftdi.edu.tt, facebook: @caribbeanfisheries, instagram: @cftdi

NEWSLETTER TEAM Paul Gabbadon, Colene Hoyte, Fazeel Mohammed, Emile Jobity, Kerri Griffith, Jeremy Williams, Zozrina Edghill. Front Cover: Port of Spain, Waterfront, Trinidad, by Mathew Crisp

Back Cover: Noeba Robyn Patrice

Caribbean Fisheries Training and Development Institute an Agency of

Ministry of Agriculture, Land and Fisheries

Profile for CFTDI

The Port Newsletter - October/November 2020  

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