Gast Michels (1954-2013): Movement in colour, form and symbols

Page 1

Michels

1954— 2013 Gast
4 1 Untitled (detail crop), c. 2010 Acrylic on paper 15 x 21 cm Gast Michels Estate ↑

6 — 9

Foreword   Préface  Sam Tanson

10 — 11

Foreword   Préface  Lydie Polfer

12 — 14

Bibliography Bibliographie

15 — 27

Gast Michels 1954 — 2013: A Retrospective

Gast Michels 1954 — 2013 : Une rétrospective Lis Hausemer

28 — 33

Gast Michels or The considered power of forms and symbols Gast Michels ou La force réfléchie des formes et symboles Paul Bertemes

34 — 105

Artworks 1980 — 2011 Œuvres 1980 — 2011

106 — 109

“We built the airplane during the flight” « Nous avons construit l’avion en cours de vol » Katja Taylor

110 — 111 Colophon

Contents Sommaire

6

The National Museum of History and Art and the Cercle Cité have teamed up to present a retrospective exhibition of the Luxembourgish artist Gast Michels (1954 — 2013), spanning almost 30 years of his work.

Gast Michels was a versatile artist who worked as a painter, sculptor and graphic artist after graduating from the École Supérieure des Arts Saint-Luc in Liège in 1980. Growing up in the Mullerthal region, Michels was strongly influenced by the surrounding woodlands and the natural environment in general. The relationship between man and nature, thus, became a leitmotif in his oeuvre. The exhibition at the MNHA draws on this theme and shows how Michels’ unique picto rial language gradually evolved over the course of his career, from the early 1980s to around 2010, in large-scale paintings, sculptures and a tapestry. The exhibition at the Cercle Cité focuses on the artist’s works on paper, sketch books and painted coasters. Stylised signs and symbols take centre stage here and illustrate Michels’ spontaneous and at times playful approach to art.

Gast Michels’ colourful universe of signs and symbols is a familiar one in Luxem bourg thanks to his many public art projects. These include his mural L’envol de dédale at the École de Commerce et de Gestion (ECG) of 1986, the temporary flags he designed for the station tower on the occasion of the CFL’s 50th anniversary in 1996 or his 258-m2-mural Atmosphère urbaine at the Administration communale de la Ville de Luxembourg (Rocade) of 2006. Gast Michels’ distinctive visual lan guage continues to shape the urban landscape

of the capital and its surroundings to this day.

I would like to express my sincere thanks to everyone who was involved in creating this exhibition and publication and to both teams at the MNHA and the Cercle Cité. A special thanks also goes to the artist’s sons, David and Frank Michels, for founding and running the Gast Michels Estate, which will help keep their father’s legacy alive for future generations. Artists’ estates play an essential role in documenting and preserving our col lective artistic heritage. Crucially, they prompt artists, art historians and art enthusiasts to engage with the artistic legacy of previous gen erations and understand how it helped shape Luxembourg’s art scene as we know it today. With this joint project, the MNHA and the Cercle Cité underline the important part that estates play in passing on our artistic heritage. I hope everyone finds this journey through Gast Michels’ unique world of colour, form and symbols as inspiring as I do.

Foreword

Le Musée national d’histoire et d’art et le Cercle Cité présentent conjointement une exposition rétrospective de l’artiste luxembour geois Gast Michels (1954 — 2013), couvrant près de 30 ans de sa carrière.

Gast Michels était un artiste aux mul tiples facettes qui a travaillé comme peintre, sculpteur et dessinateur après avoir obtenu son diplôme de l’École Supérieure des Arts SaintLuc à Liège en 1980. Ayant grandi dans la région du Mullerthal, Michels a été fortement marqué par les forêts environnantes et le pay sage en général. La relation entre l’homme et la nature traverse comme un fil rouge dans toute son œuvre. L’exposition au MNHA explore ce thème central et montre comment le langage pictural singulier de Michels a progressivement évolué au cours de sa carrière, du début des années 1980 aux environs de 2010, dans la peinture, la sculpture et la tapisserie. L’exposition au Cercle Cité se concentre sur les œuvres sur papier, les carnets de croquis et les sous-verres peints de l’artiste. Les signes et symboles stylisés y occupent une place centrale et illustrent son approche spontanée et parfois ludique à l’art.

L’univers coloré de signes et de sym boles de Gast Michels est également bien connu au Luxembourg grâce à ses nombreuses inter ventions dans l’espace public. Parmi ceux-ci, citons sa fresque L’envol de dédale à l’École de Commerce et de Gestion (ECG) de 1986, les drapeaux temporaires qu’il a conçus pour la tour de la gare à l’occasion du 50e anniversaire des CFL en 1996 ou encore sa fresque Atmosphère urbaine de 258 m2 dans les locaux de l’Administration communale de la Ville de

Luxembourg (Rocade) en 2006. Le langage vi suel caractéristique de Gast Michels continue de marquer le paysage urbain de la capitale jusqu’à nos jours.

Je tiens à exprimer mes sincères remerciements à tous ceux qui ont participé à la création de cette exposition et de cette publi cation, ainsi qu’aux équipes du MNHA et du Cercle Cité. Un remerciement tout particulier est également adressé aux fils de l’artiste, David et Frank Michels, pour avoir fondé et géré la Gast Michels Estate, qui contribuera à perpétuer l’héritage de leur père pour les générations futures. Les successions d’artistes jouent un rôle essentiel dans la documenta tion et la préservation de notre patrimoine artistique collectif. Ils incitent notamment les artistes, les historiens de l’art et les amateurs d’art à découvrir l’héritage artistique des géné rations précédentes et à comprendre com ment celui-ci a contribué à façonner la scène artistique luxembourgeoise telle que nous la connaissons aujourd’hui. À travers ce projet commun, le MNHA et le Cercle Cité se font le relais de l’important travail de conscientisa tion presté par les successions. Je souhaite à toutes et à tous un voyage inspirant à travers le monde exceptionnel de couleurs, de formes et de symboles de Gast Michels.

Préface

9
Gast Michels sitting in the Repos du guerrier (1989). © Jochen Herling,
c. 1990 2 Untitled, c. 2008 Pen on cardboard 11 x 11 cm Gast Michels Estate

To the eye of the spectator, Gast Michels’ drawings, paintings and sculptures resemble a vast landscape of symbolic motifs. Whether in textile form, in public space, in his journal and sometimes on beer mats, the artist documented the Luxembourg of his time with an analytical and critical gaze. The artist’s two sons, David and Frank Michels, were able to assemble, inventory and digitise his estate by way of a public call for works in collabora tion with the National Museum of History and Art (MNHA).

For the first time, the Cercle Cité and the National Museum of History an Art (MNHA) present a joint retrospective of his pieces created in Luxembourg between 1980 and 2011. While the artist’s creations on paper shown at the Cercle Cité illustrate how Michels developed an elaborate language of signs and symbols, the paintings and sculptures on display at the MNHA demonstrate how he continued to expand this vocabulary over the years.

Born in Echternach in 1954, Michels lived and worked in Luxembourg for most of his life, after his studies at the École Supérieure des Arts Saint-Luc in Liège. In his art, he examines and decodes the country; his paintings feature everyday words, letters and symbols like churches, houses, cars and signs. Here, daily life is deconstructed and broken up into different formal elements, which the artist reassembles in almost Dadaist fashion. Michels left no stone unturned, creating precise yet poetic pieces in various mediums. The catalogue accompanying the show illustrates the scope and development of Gast Michels’ creativity.

On behalf of the college of the mayor and aldermen of the City of Luxembourg, I would like to thank everyone who has contrib uted to the realisation of this joint exhibition and catalogue: the curators Ruud Priem, Lis Hausemer and Paul Bertemes, as well as the teams of the two venues. I would also like to express my sincere thanks to Gast Michels’ two sons David and Frank for their excellent work in inventorying and showcasing the artist’s unique oeuvre.

I hope visitors and readers will enjoy (re)discovering Gast Michels’ extraordinary artistic world.

Foreword Préface

3 Untitled, c. 2008 Pen on cardboard 9 x 9 cm

Gast Michels Estate

Lydie Polfer Mayor of the City of Luxembourg

L’Œuvre de Gast Michels se présente au spectateur comme un vaste paysage, un univers de signes et symboles, dessiné, peint, sculpté. Sur du textile, dans l’espace public, dans ses carnets privés et même sur des coasters, Gast Michels a documenté le Luxembourg de son époque avec un regard acéré, analytique voire critique. Ce sont les deux fils de l’artiste, David et Frank Michels, qui ont avec le Musée national d’histoire et d’art (MNHA) et par le biais d’un appel à contributions, pu collecter, inventorier et digitaliser son héritage artistique, pour le faire redécouvrir au public.

Le Cercle Cité et le Musée national d’histoire et d’art (MNHA) nous présentent la première rétrospective du travail artistique de Gast Michels, créé à Luxembourg entre 1980 et 2011. Les œuvres sur papier, le travail de recherche et de développement d’un véritable vocabulaire des signes est présenté au Cercle Cité ; un langage que l’artiste a par la suite élaboré dans ses tableaux et sculptures, exposés au MNHA .

Né en 1954 à Echternach, Gast Michels a vécu et travaillé au Luxembourg presque toute sa vie, après ses études à l’École Supérieure des Arts Saint-Luc à Liège. C’est le Luxembourg qu’il observe, retrace et déchiffre dans son travail. Dans ses tableaux, on retrouve mots, lettres, symboles de la vie de tous les jours. Églises, maisons, voitures, panneaux   c’est notre quotidien même qui est déstructuré et détourné en éléments formels, pour être recomposé selon un schéma presque dadaïste. Du papier et carton, aux toiles et murs ; aucun support n’échappe à ses réflexions à la fois précises et poétiques.

Cette double exposition est accompa gnée d’un catalogue qui met en avant l’ampleur et la diversité de l’Œuvre de Gast Michels.

Au nom du Collège des bourgmestre et échevins de la Ville de Luxembourg, je tiens à remercier tous ceux qui ont contribué à la réalisation de la double exposition et de cet ouvrage, les curateurs Ruud Priem, Lis Hausemer et Paul Bertemes, ainsi que toutes les équipes du MNHA et du Cercle Cité. Il me tient sincèrement à cœur de remercier David et Frank Michels pour leur travail complexe et complet d’inventaire et de mise en valeur de l’Œuvre unique de l’artiste.

Je souhaite aux visiteurs et aux lecteurs beaucoup de plaisir à (re)découvrir le monde artistique hors du commun de Gast Michels.

Lydie Polfer Bourgmestre de la Ville de Luxembourg

11

1954

Gaston François Michels is born on 11 January 1954 in Echternach, Luxembourg. The Mullerthal would become a key source of inspiration for his work. 1960 — 1972

Attends primary school in Consdorf and second ary school at the Lycée Classique d’Echternach. 1974 — 1980

Studies at the École Supérieure des Arts SaintLuc in Liège, Belgium.

Biography Biographie

1980

Moves to Walferdange and marries Marie-José Meyers. 1980 — 1988

Art teacher at the Lycée Technique Nic-Biever in Dudelange and the Lycée Technique des Arts et Métiers in Luxembourg City. 1982

His first son, David Michels, is born. 1983

Wins the “Prix de la Peinture” at the XIe Biennale de la Peinture et de la Sculpture des Jeunes in Esch-sur-Alzette and a six-week artist residency at Cité des Arts in Paris.

12
Gast Michels in his studio in Walferdange. © Unknown photographer, c. 1991

1983 — 1984

First solo exhibitions at Galerie Tetra in Wavre and Librairie Gutenberg in Brussels, Belgium.

1984

1985

1987

His second son, Frank Michels, is born.

First solo exhibition in Luxembourg at Galerie d’Art Municipale in Esch-sur-Alzette.

Wins the “Prix de Raville“ for the work Arc/Flèche at the annual Salon du CAL. This marks the beginning of the artist’s characteristic use of styl ised symbols such as arrows, arcs and wheels.

1988

Michels gives up teaching and begins to work as an independent painter, sculptor and graphic art ist. He has the first of numerous solo exhibitions at the Galerie de Luxembourg, whose owner Jean Aulner is a close friend of his.

1994

1996

Michels discovers a new creative tool for his work: the computer.

Michels’ wife, Marie-José Michels-Meyers (1946 — 1996), dies. Michels designs temporary flags for the station tower on the occasion of the CFL’s 50th anniversary.

1998

Creates his first series of metal sculptures, Steel drawings, after almost 8 years of dedicating himself exclusively to painting.

1954

2000

Retrospective exhibition at Théâtre Galerie d’Esch: 1980 — 2000 vingt ans d’aventure picturale.

2002 — 2011

Regular solo exhibitions at Espace Mett Goedert in Consdorf.

Gaston François Michels est né le 11 janvier 1954 à Echternach, Luxembourg. Le Mullerthal deviendra une source d’inspiration essentielle dans son travail.

1960 — 1972

Ecole primaire à Consdorf, ensuite Lycée Classique d’Echternach pour l’enseignement secondaire.

1974 — 1980

2006

Creates a 258-m2-mural, Atmosphère urbaine, for the Administration communale de la Ville de Luxembourg (Rocade 3).

Études à l’École Supérieure des Arts Saint-Luc à Liège, Belgique.

2009

2011

2013

Moves to Vaison-la-Romaine in Provence, France with his partner Yvette Tosseng.

Begins blood cancer treatment in Marseille, France.

Dies on 5 February 2013 in Marseille, France.

1980

Michels s’installe à Walferdange et épouse Marie-José Meyers.

1980 — 1988

Professeur d’éducation artistique au Lycée technique Nic-Biever à Dudelange et au Lycée Technique des Arts et Métiers à Luxembourg-Ville.

1982

1983

Naissance de son premier fils, David Michels.

Lauréat du Prix de la Peinture à la XIe Biennale de la Peinture et de la Sculpture des Jeunes à Esch-sur-Alzette et résidence d’artiste de six semaines à la Cité des Arts de Paris.

1983 — 1984

Premières expositions monographiques à la Galerie Tétra de Wavre et à la Librairie Guten berg de Bruxelles, Belgique.

1984

1985

Naissance de son deuxième fils, Frank Michels.

Première exposition monographique au Luxembourg à la Galerie d’Art Municipale d’Eschsur-Alzette.

1987

Lauréat du Prix de Raville au Salon annuel du CAL avec l’œuvre Arc/Flèche. Ceci marque le début de l’usage distinctif de Michels des symboles stylisés tels que les flèches, les arcs et les roues.

1988

Michels quitte sa fonction d’enseignant et com mence à travailler en tant que peintre, sculp teur et dessinateur indépendant. Il présente la première d’une série d’expositions personnelles à la Galerie de Luxembourg, dont le proprié taire Jean Aulner est un ami proche.

1994

1996

Découverte d’un nouvel outil de création: l’ordinateur.

Décès de son épouse, Marie-José MichelsMeyers (1946 — 1996). Michels conçoit des drapeaux temporaires pour la tour de la gare à l’occasion du 50e anniversaire des CFL.

1998

Michels crée sa première série de sculptures en métal, Steel drawings, après avoir consacré presque 8 ans exclusivement à la peinture.

2000

Exposition rétrospective au Théâtre — Galerie d’Art d’Esch: 1980 — 2000 vingt ans d’aventure picturale.

2002 — 2011

Expositions monographiques régulières à l’Espace Mett Goedert à Consdorf.

2006

Réalisation d’une fresque murale de 258 m2, Atmosphère urbaine, pour l’Administration com munale de la Ville de Luxembourg (Rocade 3).

2009

2011

2013

Déménagement à Vaison-la-Romaine en Provence, France avec sa compagne Yvette Tosseng.

Début du traitement du cancer du sang à Marseille, France.

Gast Michels meurt le 5 février 2013 à Marseille, France.

14

Gast Michels

A retrospective

1 Restany, P. : Gast Michels, « L’homme de la forêt luxembourgeoise », in: Gast Michels, Galerie du Luxembourg, 1991, p. 6. In 1991, Michels also produced a series of lithographs together with Pierre Restany, a renowned French art critic. The portfolio Les Rochers was presented alongside Restany’s Manifeste du naturalisme integral (1978).

2 Lunghi, E. : Les années 1970: A l’ombre de l’école de Paris, in : Langini, A. : L’art Au Luxembourg : De La Renaissance Au Début Du XXIe Siècle, Éditions Schortgen, Esch-sur-Alzette, 2006. p. 345.

3 Michels, D.: Gast Michels: Wie ein Boxer, Revue 48, November 1994, p. 31.

Gast Michels was not only a painter from Luxembourg, but also a painter of Luxembourg. Throughout his career, he observed the country’s natural, historical and political develop ment and translated what he saw into form and colour. His artworks reflect a deep connection to nature, but also an awareness of his roots, his terroir 1. As Michels explained in an interview in 2007, he did not travel the world, but instead found himself on a constant journey of exploration through his own inner geography and that of his home country. Interest ed in contrasts like nature versus city, light versus dark, and always putting the human figure at the centre of his art, Michels’ style was constantly evolving, resulting in a multifaceted oeuvre.

The survey exhibition at the National Museum of History and Art closely examines Gast Michels’ entire body of work, from the mid-1980s through to the early 2010s. The word “movement” in the title of the exhibition Gast Michels (1954 — 2013): Movement in colour, form and symbols not only alludes to Michels’ rhythmic use of colour and symbols, but also plays on the fact that the exhibition moves through the artist’s various creative phases of artistic expression, spanning almost thirty years.

Finally, exploring Gast Michels’ nature-inspired universe of colours and symbols seems appropriate at a time when we, as humans, are in dire need of rethinking our relationship with nature in light of the current climate crisis.

4 Les rochers, 1991

Set of lithographs

40 x 30 cm

Edition of 75

Gast Michels Estate

The early years

Part of the reason why the young Michels, who was born in Echternach in 1954, wanted to become an artist was his encounter with the Consdorfer Scheier at the end of the 1960s. The latter was a place of artistic experimenta tion founded by a group of Luxembourgish artists in Consdorf in 1967. Their goal was to introduce new ideas informed by the interna tional movements of the time, such as pop art or conceptual art, to a Luxembourgish audience, whose understanding of modern art had predominantly been shaped by the aesthetics of the École de Paris since the 1950s.2 Michels worked as a guard at the Consdorfer Scheier as a teenager. There he encountered artists such as Marc Henri Reckinger, Nico Thurm and Jeannot Bewing, which inspired him to pursue an art degree.3

1954 — 2013:

4 Audry, R.: Chronique des créateurs: Gast Michels  Entre la chute et l’élévation, Tageblatt, August 1985, n. pag.

5 Michels, G., in: Welter, R.: Interview avec Gast Michels / Gespräch mit Gast Michels, Revue culturelle

“Estuaires”, n° 6, 1988, p. 41 : “[…], j’ai parcouru pendant mon enfance les grottes, les gorges, les gigantesques falaises aux formes bizarres et oniriques dans mes forêts de la région de Consdorf. Face au ’riche silence blanc’ d’une toile ce décor fantastique et baroque en été, sobre et mystérieux en hiver, se condense en signes pour prendre forme et signification.”

6 Kolberg, G.: Über die Natur der Werke von Gast Michels, in: Gast Michels, Galerie de Luxembourg, 1991, Luxembourg, p. 79.

7 Schneider, J.P.: Gast Michels, homme des forêts, Luxemburger Wort, October 1989, n. pag.

8 Michels, G., in: Welter, R.: Interview avec Gast Michels / Gespräch mit Gast Michels, Revue culturelle “Estuaires”, n° 6, 1988, p. 42.

9 In the interview with René Welter in 1988, the artist points out that his initial inspiration for the use of the cross came from a cross engraving in a rock in Loschbur (near Consdorf), which dates back to at least 1800 BC.

After graduating from the École Supérieure des Arts Saint-Luc in Liège in 1980, Michels moved to Walferdange, where he set up his studio in a former mill and started working as an art teacher in a secondary school in Dudelange. Some of the earliest works in the exhibition date from this period (no. 7, 18) and demonstrate how Michels adopted an expressionistic graphic style and a vibrant colour palette early on. While figurative elements are prevalent in these early works, they already allude to some of Michels’ typical motifs and stylistic features, e.g. the use of symbols (in this case, the cross) or the layering of monochromatic planes of colour. They also feature the artist’s bold, expressive brushstrokes, which almost make you feel the movement of his hand across the canvas. In works such as Fortress (1984) (no. 20) or his depiction of the Schiessentümpel (1985) (no. 22), fragmented surfaces of colour blend into one another, creating shapes and forms inspired by real life. In 1985, Rich Audry referred to Michels’ style as “l’art le de la figuration brute” 4, the art of raw figuration, which he describes as an expressionistic and honest way of painting, one that seeks to be as close to reality as possible and avoids any deceptive alterations to real life. Indeed, Michels’ style is very straightforward and direct, merging the portrayal of reality and the artist’s own view of the world into power ful paintings.

The forest man

Michels grew up amidst the mystical forest landscapes and rock formations of the Mullerthal. As a young boy he loved to explore the woodlands of Consdorf and was mesmerised by the surreal shapes of the caves and gorges he found there.5 The artist’s ties to the Muller thal prompted him to develop a deep fascina tion with nature, which served as a key source of inspiration throughout his artistic career. Michels’ art is informed by a keen interest in the historical and natural qualities of these landscapes and often reveals a “tendency to venture back to the roots of […] the ’Ursprünglichkeit’ (’nativeness’)”6. His works portray nature as a mystical remnant from a bygone era when man’s relationship to nature was very different from what it is today. Within the Luxembourgish art scene, Michels thus quickly came to be known as “l’homme des forêts”7, the forest man.

Starting in the late 1980s, Michels began to incorporate symbols, often reminiscent of prehistoric cave paintings, into his art. The symbols he used carry certain meanings and often have a specific function within the overall composition of the artwork. Hence, the axe and the shield, the arch and the arrow serve as symbols of battle and protection, the tree as a symbol of life and the deer and the hunter as a representation of the good and the bad, the rational and the irrational.8 The cross, another recurring symbol in Michels’ art, is a representation of life, a symbol of vitality.9 As art historian Gerhard Kolberg rightly points

10 Kolberg, G., 1991, p. 79.

11 Michels, G., in: Welter, R.: Interview avec Gast Michels / Gespräch mit Gast Michels, Revue culturelle

“Estuaires”, n° 6, 1988, p. 45.

12 Galerie de Luxembourg: Gast Michels, Luxembourg, 1991, p. 85.

out, Michels’ works immerse the viewer in “the role of a prospector, of an archaeologist or of a prehistorian doing research, exploring the secrets of nature and mankind”10. Yet Michels is a master of contrasts. The theme of forest and nature are often juxtaposed with that of the urban environment. The symbol of the bridge, in particular, features in many of his paintings. In the work Deer — Bridge (no. 8), for example, the form of a bridge — Luxembourg’s Red Bridge, in fact — emerges from the head of a deer. For Michels, the bridge is symbolic of a constructive and collective will and is a metaphor for building bridges on a human and existential scale.11 The inclusion of the Red Bridge further demonstrates Michels’ strong connection with his origins and home country. In Michels’ art, subject matter and object, motif and means of representation also correspond to one another. Consequently, nature not only functions as a motif in his work, but can also become the foundation for or a tool with which to create an artwork. For example, the artist would often use wood that he found in the forest as a basis for his paintings. The three painted wooden steles (1989), which the artist first showed in 1989 at the Grand Palais in Paris as part of the exhibition L’Europe des créateurs — Utopies 89, are a case in point (fig. 1).12 The artist’s choice to arrange the wooden panels in horizontal fashion and his use of untreated, natural wood firmly ground the installation in the theme of the forest, evoking felled or fallen trees. Another example is the series of paintings Xylo morphies, which Michels created in 1990. For

this series of paintings, Michels collected branches in the forest, painted them, placed them on the canvas and traced their outlines, resulting in literal traces of nature in the form of abstract, sketch-like compositions (no. 30).

fig.1 The installation Réconversion (1989) presented at the Grand Palais in Paris as part of the exhibition L’Europe des créateurs   Utopies 89. © Unknown photographer, 1989.

17

13

The metaphor of the human as the constructor, related to the symbol of the bridge, comes to mind again.

14 Vermast, E.: L’homme des forêts: Neue Arbeiten von Gast Michels in der Galerie Luxembourg, Journal, November 1998, n. pag.

15 Michels, G., in: Welter, R.: Interview avec Gast Michels / Gespräch mit Gast Michels, Revue culturelle “Estuaires”, n° 6, 1988, pp. 43–44.

Balancing colourand form

Michels’ nature-inspired symbols have, alongside their symbolic value, important formal qualities that play an essential role within the artworks’ composition as a whole. In order to produce a harmonious image, the shapes must always be in balance with one another. A semicircle in the form of a shield or a bow, for instance, will help to counterbalance the harshness of an axe or an arrow (nos. 5, 23). As Elisabeth Vermast points out, Michels assem bles his compositions in a manner resembling that of a builder, where shapes, symbols and even colours are arranged in meticulous and deliberate fashion.13 What clearly sets Michels apart, however, is the way that his paintings always include some form of subjective, emotional anchor, whether in the shape of his energetic, expressive brushstrokes or the intimate groupings of figures that commonly act as the subject of his work (no. 24).14

5 Untitled, c. 1988

Acrylic on canvas

90 x 120 cm

Gast Michels Estate

Colours are also an integral part of Michels’ work. A signature colour combination that reappears in numerous of his paintings is blue and yellow. The two complementary colours produce green when mixed, linking them to the theme of nature. Since Michels sometimes found green to be too expansive, he preferred breaking it up into its component parts —  blue and yellow — as these gave him greater artistic freedom and allowed him to be more expressive in his work15. Moreover, just like the deer and the hunter, these colours highlight Michels’ concern with polarity and dualism. His works from around 1989 show seemingly archaic woodland sceneries, where human figures appear against a dark, brownish back ground, highlighting this characteristic use of blue and yellow. In these paintings, yellow planes of colour, symbolic of light shining through the dense foliage of a forest, contrast with a sombre background, while lively,

18

16 Kayser, L.: Gast Michels, Catalogue Galerie de Luxembourg, 1987, n. pag.

17 Mostly still lifes date from this year as well as the earlier mentioned series Xylomorphies.

18 Vermast, E.: Ein Dialog zwischen betonter Graphik und breiten Flächen — Neue Arbeiten von Gast Michels in der Galerie de Luxembourg II, Journal, December 1991, n. pag.

19 Kayser, L.: Un langage fort et expressif, Lëtzebuerger

December 1991, n. pag.

Video: Gast Michels making of Aubusson Tapestry

almost geometric black and blue brushstrokes trace the contours of tree trunks, fireplaces and people (nos. 24, 25). Lucien Kayser compares Michels’ style and use of colour to that of the German artist group known as the Neuen Wilden (“The New Savages”) and especially their founding member, the neo-expressionis tic painter Karl Horst Hödicke. Hödicke’s paintings are also characterised by strong brushstrokes, vibrant colours and a tendency to draw inspiration from his origins and home town of Berlin.16

Turning towards the light

The early 1990s marked the beginning of a new phase in Michels’ art. When a huge storm hit Luxembourg in the early months of 1990 and destroyed entire forests, Michels started searching for a new direction for his art. As Vermast notes, “l’homme de la forêt” (the forest man) was shaken by the abrupt brightness and nakedness of the forest, with its dead branches and uprooted trees.17 He saw this moment as a new beginning, a way of distanc ing himself from the forest he had known until then, and the setting that had shaped his artistic identity for the past decade.18 What followed was a shift towards a brighter, more abstract graphic style. His colour palette broadened and now featured vivid tones like orange, green and red in addition to blue and yellow, as well as a brighter, often white, background (no. 31). Human figures, nature and symbols remained integral components of Michels’

work, but left the dark setting of the Muller thal’s mystic caves and woodlands to enter an era of light.19 The black lines that traced the contours of figures and forms became thicker and more graphic, contrasting with expressive planes of colour (nos. 28, 29). Although figurative components were still present in these compositions, they were increasingly stylised and reduced to their most basic shapes, letting go of any sense of dimensionality and perspective. They tend to reference objects and figures taken from everyday life, but most of all, they are the product of the artist’s multifac eted imaginary universe. Stars, wheels, animal heads, arrows and other organic shapes turn into recurring symbols, forming a unique, poetic and playful language of colour and form. The artist’s large-scale wall tapestry Créatures from 1994, commissioned by Spuerkeess (Banque et Caisse d’Epargne de l’Etat) and manufactured in Aubusson (France), illustrates this new phase in Michels’ oeuvre (no. 32).20

In 1994, there is a significant shift in how the artist uses lines and backgrounds. Against a bright backdrop — usually whitebeige, occasionally grey — symbols and planes of colour now appear to be floating in space (nos. 39, 46). Sometimes, the artist would also use red, yellow, blue or green — his signature colour palette — as the background for his canvases (nos. 37, 38). The floating effect of the forms is not only enhanced by the lighter background, but also because the artist has left more space around the forms, resulting in a composition that feels light and airy. The finer, almost scribble-like appearance of the

Land,
20 Cf.
‘Créatures’ 1993 (https://vimeo.com/221073060).

lines make them feel less overpowering compared to the rest of the composition (no. 9). Michels regularly includes small references to Luxembourg in these works. Like hidden clues, they constitute an integral part of the artist’s vocabulary of signs and forms, e.g. Tourelle espagnole, 1994 (no. 45) or Stèles I-III, 1997 (nos. 61, 62). Furthermore, the arrange ment of geometric shapes — such as floating prisms or patches of colour — in the pictorial space recalls the image of Michels as a builder, meticulously constructing his compositions.

The late Gast Michels

Throughout his artistic career, Michels has worked in a variety of mediums, creating paintings, wooden sculptures, drawings and tapestries. Around the mid-1990s, he discov ered the computer as a new tool for his art, opening up a plethora of possibilities for artistic expression. In the works Stèles I, II, and III, for instance, he combined collage and painting by incorporating different prints of iconic images of the city of Luxembourg, like the Gëlle Fra or the Red Bridge (Rout Bréck), into the artwork. Most emblematic of this new creative phase are, however, a series of sculptures called Steel drawings, a term borrowed from American artist David Smith.21 As the name suggests, they are delicate steel sculptures that resemble three-dimensional drawings, featuring numerous geometrical shapes and lines from Michels’ lexicon of symbols (nos. 10, 53–56,58). He created the designs for the

6 Untitled, c. 2009

Acrylic on loose canvas

75 x 55 cm

Gast Michels Estate

sculptures on the computer, which allowed him to view the sculpture from different angles without having to use a model. Naturally, the actual realisation and welding of the sculp tures were carried out manually. As Kolberg succinctly puts it: “Gast Michels’ sculptural designs are consistently inspired by his paintings: they thus virtually transform the painterly into the sculptural”22.

The paintings from the early 2000s, which make up the last section of the exhibi tion, portray Michels at his most graphic. Sometimes painted on loose canvases, these smaller scale works show a tendency towards an almost pattern-like repetition of symbols and forms (nos. 6, 84–86). Letters, phrases and numbers increasingly appear alongside familiar forms such as human heads and arrows (nos. 11, 78–81). The playful, spontaneous and naïve use of colour and lines gives these works a graffiti-like quality, which visitors can explore further in the Cercle Cité’s exhibition featuring Michels’ coasters, sketchbooks and works on paper.

Lis Hausemer

MNHA

20
21 Kolberg, G., Gast Michels : Eiserne Zeichnungen = Steel Drawings, Mercedes-Benz, Luxembourg, 2000, p. 6. 22 Ibid.

Une rétrospective

Gast Michels n’était pas seulement un peintre luxembourgeois, mais un peintre du Luxem bourg. Tout au long de sa carrière, il a suivi les développements naturels, historiques et politiques du pays et les a traduits en formes et en couleurs. Ses œuvres reflètent non seulement un lien profond avec la nature, mais aussi une grande sensibilité pour ses racines et son terroir 1. En 2007, Michels expliquait dans une interview qu’il n’avait peut-être pas parcouru le monde, mais avait plutôt entamé un voyage permanent d’exploration de sa propre géographie intérieure et de celle de son pays d’origine. Intéressé par les contrastes tels que la nature et la ville, la lumière et l’obscurité, et accordant une place centrale à la figure humaine dans son art, le style de Michels a constamment évolué, aboutissant à une œuvre aux multiples facettes.

L’exposition rétrospective au Musée national d’histoire et d’art explore l’ensemble de l’œuvre de Gast Michels, à partir du milieu des années 1980 jusqu’au début des années 2010. Le mot “mouvement” dans le titre de l’exposi tion Gast Michels (1954   2013): Movement in colour,form and symbols fait non seulement allusion à la manière rythmique dont Michels utilise la couleur et les symboles, mais souligne également les différentes phases de création de l’artiste abordées dans l’exposition, couvrant presque trente ans de son travail.

Enfin, l’exploration de l’univers des cou leurs et des symboles de Gast Michels, inspiré par la nature, semble appropriée à un moment où nous, êtres humains, avons fortement besoin de reconsidérer notre relation avec la nature au vu de la crise climatique actuelle.

1 Restany, P. : Gast Michels, « L’homme de la forêt luxem bourgeoise », in: Gast Michels, Galerie du Luxembourg, 1991, p. 6. En 1991, Michels a également produit une série de lithographies en collaboration avec Pierre Restany, célèbre critique d'art français. Le portfolio Les Rochers a été accompagné du Manifeste du naturalisme intégral (1978) de Restany.

2 Lunghi, E. : Les années 1970: A l’ombre de l’école de Paris, in : Langini, A. : L’art Au Luxembourg : De La Renaissance Au Début Du XXIe Siècle, Éditions Schortgen, Esch-sur-Alzette, 2006. p. 345.

3 Michels, D.: Gast Michels: Wie ein Boxer, Revue 48, novembre 1994, p. 31.

Les premières années

La rencontre avec la Consdorfer Scheier, à la fin des années 1960, a motivé en partie le souhait du jeune Michels, né à Echternach en 1954, de devenir artiste. Ce lieu d’expérimen tation artistique a été fondé par un groupe d’artistes luxembourgeois à Consdorf en 1967. Leur objectif était d’introduire de nouvelles réflexions artistiques, inspirées des mouvements internationaux de l’époque, tels que le pop art ou l’art conceptuel, auprès d’un public luxembourgeois dont la perception de l’art moderne était essentiellement marquée par l’esthétique de l’École de Paris depuis les années 1950.2 Adolescent, Michels travaille comme gardien à la Consdorfer Scheier ; la rencontre avec des artistes tels que Marc Henri Reckinger, Nico Thurm et Jeannot Bewing l’incite à poursuivre des études en arts plastiques.3 Après avoir obtenu son diplôme de l’École Supérieure des Arts Saint-Luc à Liège en 1980, Michels s’installe à Walferdange, où il aménage son atelier dans un ancien moulin et commence à travailler comme enseignant d’éducation artistique dans un lycée à Dudelange. Certaines des premières œuvres de l’exposition datent de cette période (ill. 7, 18) et montrent comment Michels a adopté très tôt un style graphique expressionniste et une palette de couleurs dynamiques. Alors que les éléments figuratifs sont prédominants dans ces premières œuvres, elles font déjà allusion à certains motifs et caractéristiques stylistiques typiques de Michels, par exemple l’utilisation

Gast Michels 1954 — 2013 :

4 Audry, R.: Chronique des créateurs: Gast Michels —

Entre la chute et l’élévation, Tageblatt, août 1985, non paginé.

5 Michels, G., in: Welter, R.: Interview avec Gast Michels / Gespräch mit Gast Michels, Revue culturelle « Estuaires », n° 6, 1988, p. 41 : « […], j’ai parcouru pendant mon enfance les grottes, les gorges, les gigan tesques falaises aux formes bizarres et oniriques dans mes forêts de la région de Consdorf. Face au ’riche silence blanc’ d’une toile ce décor fantastique et baroque en été, sobre et mystérieux en hiver, se condense en signes pour prendre forme et signification ».

6 Kolberg, G.: Über die Natur der Werke von Gast

Michels, in: Gast Michels, Galerie de Luxembourg, 1991, Luxembourg, p. 79.

7 Schneider, J. P., Gast Michels, homme des forêts, Luxemburger Wort, octobre 1989, non paginé.

7 Portrait II, 1981

Acrylic on canvas

73 x 59 cm

Gast Michels Estate

de symboles (dans le présent cas, la croix) ou la superposition de plans de couleur monochro matiques. On y retrouve également les coups de pinceau énergiques et expressifs de l’artiste, qui nous font presque sentir le mouvement de sa main sur la toile. Dans les œuvres telles que Forteresse (1984) (ill. 20) ou sa représen tation du Schiessentümpel (1985) (ill. 22), les surfaces fragmentées de couleur se mêlent entre elles, créant des formes inspirées de la vie réelle. En 1985, Rich Audry a défini le style de Michels comme « l’art de la figuration brute »4, qu’il décrit comme une façon expressionniste et honnête de peindre, qui vise à être le plus proche possible de la nature et qui évite toute altération trompeuse de la vie réelle. En effet, le style de Michels est très direct et franc, et fait

fusionner des images figuratives et le regard personnel de l’artiste sur le monde dans des peintures très expressives.

L’homme des forêts

Michels a grandi au cœur des forêts mystiques et des formations rocheuses du Mullerthal. Enfant, il aimait explorer les forêts de Consdorf et était fasciné par les grottes et les gorges aux formes surréalistes de la région.5 Les liens de l’artiste avec le Mullerthal l’ont amené à développer une fascination profonde pour la nature, qui lui a servi de source d’inspiration clé tout au long de sa carrière artistique. L’art de Michels est marqué par un très grand intérêt pour les qualités historiques et naturelles de ces paysages et révèle souvent une tendance à remonter aux origines de la Ursprünglichkeit  (« l’originalité ») 6. Ses œuvres présentent la nature comme un vestige mystique d’une époque lointaine où le rapport de l’homme à la nature était très différent de ce qu’il est devenu aujourd’hui. Dans le milieu artistique luxem bourgeois, Michels a ainsi bientôt été surnom mé « l’homme des forêts »7

À partir de la fin des années 1980, Michels a commencé à incorporer des symboles, souvent évocateurs de peintures rupestres préhisto riques, dans son art. Les symboles qu’il utilise sont porteurs de significations particulières et ont souvent une fonction spécifique dans la composition globale de l’œuvre. Par conséquent, la hache et le bouclier, l’arc et la flèche sont des symboles de guerre et de protection,

8 Michels, G., in: Welter, R.: Interview avec Gast Michels / Gespräch mit Gast Michels, Revue culturelle

« Estuaires », n° 6, 1988, p. 42.

9 Dans l’interview avec René Welter en 1988, l’artiste souligne que son inspiration initiale pour l’utilisation de la croix provient d’une croix gravée dans un rocher à Loschbour (près de Consdorf), qui remonte au moins à 1800 avant J.C.

10 Kolberg, G., 1991, p. 79.

l’arbre est un symbole de vie et le cerf et le chasseur représentent le bien et le mal, le rationnel et l’irrationnel.8 La croix, autre sym bole récurrent dans l’art de Michels, est une référence à la vie, un symbole de vitalité.9 Comme le souligne l’historien d’art Gerhard Kolberg, les œuvres de Michels plongent le spectateur dans le rôle d’un prospecteur, d’un archéologue ou d’un préhistorien en train de mener des fouilles, d’explorer les secrets de la nature et de l’humanité.10 Pourtant, Michels est un maître des contrastes. Le sujet de la forêt et de la nature est souvent confronté à celui de la vie urbaine. Le symbole du pont, en particulier, est présent dans plusieurs de ses ta bleaux. Dans le tableau Cerf–Pont (ill. 8), par exemple, la forme d’un pont — le pont rouge de Luxembourg — surgit de la tête d’un cerf. Pour Michels, le pont est le symbole d’une volonté constructive et collective et constitue une métaphore pour la construction de ponts à l’échelle humaine et existentielle.11 La référence au pont rouge prouve à nouveau le lien fort de Michels avec ses racines et son pays d’origine.

11 Michels, G., in: Welter, R.: Interview avec Gast Michels / Gespräch mit Gast Michels, Revue culturelle

« Estuaires », n° 6, 1988, p. 45.

12 Galerie de Luxembourg: Gast Michels, Luxembourg, 1991, p. 85.

8 Cerf–Pont, 1987 Acrylic on paper 32 x 50 cm Musée national d’histoire et d’art

Dans l’art de Michels, sujet et objet, motif et moyen de représentation se correspondent souvent. Par conséquent, la nature ne sert pas seulement comme un motif dans ses œuvres, mais peut aussi constituer la base ou un outil pour créer une œuvre d’art. En effet, l’artiste utilise très souvent le bois qu’il trouve dans la forêt comme base pour ses peintures. Les trois stèles en bois peint (1989), que l’artiste a présentées pour la première fois en 1989 au Grand Palais à Paris dans le cadre de l’exposition L’Europe des créateur — Utopies 89, illustrent cette démarche (fig. 1).12 Le choix de l’artiste de placer les planches en bois de manière horizontale et le recours à du matériel naturel non traité ancrent l’installation dans la thématique de la forêt, évoquant des arbres abattus ou tombés. Un autre exemple est la série de peintures Xylomorphies, que Michels a créée en 1990. Pour cette série de tableaux, Michels a ramassé des branches dans la forêt, les a peintes, placées sur la toile et a retracé

23

13 On pense à la métaphore de l'homme comme construc teur, liée au symbole du pont.

14 Vermast, E., L’homme des forêts: Neue Arbeiten von Gast Michels in der Galerie Luxembourg, Journal, novembre 1998, non paginé.

15 Michels, G., in: Welter, R.: Interview avec Gast Michels / Gespräch mit Gast Michels, Revue culturelle « Estuaires », n° 6, 1988, p. 43–44.

16 Kayser, L.: Gast Michels, Catalogue Galerie de Luxembourg, 1987, non paginé.

leurs contours. Il en résulte de véritables traces de la nature prenant la forme de compositions abstraites, ressemblant à des esquisses (ill. 30).

Un équilibre entrecouleur et forme

Les symboles de Michels, inspirés de la nature, possèdent, outre leur valeur symbolique, des qualités formelles importantes qui jouent un rôle essentiel dans la composition générale de l’œuvre. Afin de produire une image harmonieuse, il faut que les formes soient toujours en équilibre les unes avec les autres. Un demicercle en forme de bouclier ou d’arc, par exemple, permettra de contrebalancer la rigidité d’une hache ou d’une flèche (ill. 5, 23). Comme le souligne Elisabeth Vermast, Michels assemble ses compositions d’une manière qui ressemble à celle d’un bâtisseur, où les formes, les symboles et même les couleurs sont arran gés de façon minutieuse et intentionnelle.13 Mais ce qui différencie clairement Michels, c’est que ses tableaux possèdent toujours une certaine dimension émotionnelle et subjective, qu’il s’agisse de ses coups de pinceau énergiques et expressifs ou des groupes de person nages intimes qui constituent souvent le sujet de ses œuvres (ill. 24).14

Les couleurs font également partie intégrante de l’œuvre de Michels. Le bleu et le jaune représentent une des principales combinaisons de couleurs que l’on retrouve dans un grand nombre de ses œuvres. Ces deux couleurs complémentaires produisent du vert une fois mélangées, ce qui les relie au motif de

la nature. Comme Michels trouvait le vert par fois trop vaste, il préférait le décomposer en ses composantes — le bleu et le jaune — ce qui lui donnait une plus grande liberté artistique et lui offrait une plus grande expressivité dans son travail.15 De plus, tout comme le cerf et le chasseur, ces couleurs mettent en évidence la préoccupation de Michels pour les notions de polarité et de dualisme. Les œuvres datant d’environ 1989 montrent des paysages fores tiers archaïques, où des figures humaines sont représentées sur un arrière-plan sombre et brunâtre, mettant en évidence l’utilisation caractéristique du bleu et du jaune. Dans ces peintures, des champs de couleur jaune, symbolisant la lumière traversant la forêt, contrastent avec un fond sombre, tandis que des coups de pinceau noirs et bleus, vifs et presque géométriques, tracent les contours de troncs d’arbres, de feux de bois et de personnages (ill. 24, 25). Lucien Kayser compare le style et l’utilisation de la couleur de Michels à ceux du groupe d’artistes allemands connu sous le nom de Neuen Wilden (« Les Nouveaux Sau vages ») et plus particulièrement à leur membre fondateur, le peintre néo-expressionniste Karl Horst Hödicke. Les peintures de Hödicke se caractérisent également par des coups de pinceau puissants, des couleurs vives et une tendance à s’inspirer de ses origines, sa ville natale de Berlin et à l’utiliser comme motif fondamental de son art.16

24

17 La majorité des natures mortes datent de cette année, ainsi que la série des Xylomorphies, mentionnée plus haut.

18 Vermast, E.: Ein Dialog zwischen betonter Graphik und breiten Flächen — Neue Arbeiten von Gast Michels in der Galerie de Luxembourg II, Journal, décembre 1991, non paginé.

19 Kayser, L.: Un langage fort et expressif, Lëtzebuerger Land, décembre 1991, non paginé.

20 Cf. vidéo: Gast Michels making of Aubusson Tapestry ‘Créatures’ 1993 (https://vimeo.com/221073060).

Vers la lumière

Le début des années 1990 marque le début d’une nouvelle période dans l’art de Michels. Alors qu’une énorme tempête a frappé le Luxembourg durant les premiers mois de 1990 et a détruit des forêts entières, Michels a com mencé à chercher une nouvelle direction pour son art. Comme le note Vermast, “l’homme de la forêt” a été bouleversé par la brusque clarté et la nudité de la forêt, avec ses branches mortes et ses arbres déracinés.17 Il a considéré ce moment comme un nouveau départ, une façon de se distancier de la forêt qu’il avait connue jusqu’alors et du paysage qui avait façonné son identité artistique depuis plus d’une décennie.18 Il en résulte une évolution vers un style graphique plus lumineux et plus abstrait. La palette de couleurs de l’artiste s’élargit et présente désormais des tons éclatants comme l’orange, le vert et le rouge, à côté du bleu et du jaune, ainsi qu’un fond plus clair, souvent blanc (ill. 31). Les figures humaines, la nature et les symboles font toujours partie intégrante de l’œuvre de Michels, mais semblent avoir été démystifiés depuis qu’ils ont quitté le décor sombre des grottes et des forêts mystiques du Mullerthal pour passer à une ère de lumière.19 Les lignes noires qui tracent les contours des figures et des formes deviennent plus épaisses et plus graphiques, et contrastent avec des pans de couleur expressifs (ill. 28, 29). Les éléments figuratifs sont toujours présents dans ces compositions, mais ils deviennent de plus en plus stylisés et sont réduits à leurs formes les plus élémentaires, abandonnant tout sens

de dimensionnalité et de perspective. Elles se réfèrent généralement à des objets et à des figures de la vie quotidienne, mais sont avant tout le produit de l’univers imaginaire com plexe de l’artiste. Étoiles, roues, têtes d’animaux, flèches et autres formes organiques y deviennent des symboles récurrents, formant un lan gage unique, poétique et ludique de couleurs et de formes. La grande tapisserie murale Créatures de 1994, commandée par la Spuerkeess (Banque et Caisse d’Epargne de l’Etat) et réali sée à Aubusson (France), illustre cette nouvelle phase dans l’œuvre de Michels (ill. 32).20

9 Untitled, 1994 Acrylic on canvas 80 x 60 cm Gast Michels Estate

En 1994, on observe un changement signifi catif dans la manière dont l’artiste utilise les lignes et les fonds. Sur un fond clair — généralement blanc beige, parfois gris — des symboles et des surfaces de couleur semblent désor mais flotter dans l’espace (ill. 39, 46). Parfois, l’artiste se sert également du rouge, du jaune, du bleu ou du vert — sa palette de couleurs caractéristique — pour le fond de ses toiles (ill. 37, 38). L’effet de flottement des formes est non seulement le résultat d’un fond plus clair, mais aussi dû au fait que l’artiste a libéré plus d’espace autour des formes, ce qui donne une composition aux allures légères et fluides. L’aspect plus fin, presque gribouillé, des lignes les fait paraître moins dominantes par rapport au reste de la composition (ill. 9). Michels insère régulièrement de petites références au Luxembourg dans ces œuvres. Comme des indices cachés, elles font partie intégrante du vocabulaire de signes et de formes de l’artiste (p. ex. Tourelle espganole, 1994, ill. 45 ou Stèles I-III, 1997, ill. 61,62). De plus, la disposition de formes géométriques — notamment des prismes flottants ou des taches de couleur — dans l’espace pictural rappelle l’image de Michels comme bâtisseur, construisant de façon minutieuse ses compositions.

Gast Michels, l’œuvre tardive

Tout au long de sa carrière artistique, Michels a travaillé dans une variété de médiums, et a créé des peintures, des sculptures en bois, des dessins et des tapisseries. Au milieu des années 1990, il découvre l’ordinateur comme un nouvel outil pour son art, lui apportant une pléthore de possibilités d’expression artistique. Les œuvres Stèles I, II et III, par exemple, combinent collage et peinture en incorporant différentes impressions d’images emblé matiques de la ville de Luxembourg, comme la Gëlle Fra ou le Pont Rouge (Rout Bréck), dans l’œuvre. Les œuvres les plus embléma tiques de cette nouvelle phase de création sont néanmoins une série de sculptures intitulées steel drawings (« dessins en acier »), un terme emprunté à l’artiste américain David Smith.21 Comme leur titre l’indique, il s’agit de délicates sculptures en acier qui ressemblent à des dessins tridimensionnels, reprenant de nom breuses formes géométriques et lignes issues du lexique de signes et de symboles de Michels (ill. 10, 53-56, 58). Les dessins des sculptures ont été conçus sur ordinateur, ce qui lui a permis de visualiser la sculpture sous différents angles sans avoir recours à un modèle. La réalisation et la soudure des sculptures étaient naturellement effectuées à la main. Comme le résume Kolberg, les créations sculpturales de Gast Michels s’inspirent systématiquement de ses peintures, elles transforment ainsi virtuel lement le pictural en sculptural.22

21 Kolberg, G., Gast Michels : Eiserne Zeichnungen = Steel Drawings, Mercedes-Benz, Luxembourg, 2000, p. 6. 22 Ibid.

Les peintures du début des années 2000, qui constituent la dernière section de l’exposition, montrent Michels sous son aspect le plus graphique. Quelquefois peintes sur des toiles libres, ces œuvres à petite échelle révèlent une tendance à la répétition de symboles et de formes, qui ressemble davantage à un motif (ill. 6, 84-86). Lettres, phrases et chiffres apparaissent de plus en plus souvent aux côtés de formes familières telles que des visages humains et des flèches (ill. 11, 78-81). L’utilisa tion ludique, spontanée et naïve de la couleur et de la ligne confère à ces œuvres une dimension rappelant le graffiti, que les visiteurs peuvent explorer davantage dans l’exposition du Cercle Cité consacrée aux sous-verres, aux carnets de croquis et aux œuvres sur papier de l’artiste.

10

perroquet muet,

paint

steel

27
11 Untitled, c. 2005 Acrylic on canvas 70 x 90 cm Gast Michels Estate
Le
1998 Polychrome
on
178 x 52 x 50 cm Musée national d’histoire et d’art

Gast Michels or The reflected power of forms and symbols

1 Marc Theis, Elisabeth Vermast: Artistes luxembourgeois

Edition Marc Theis, Banque Internationale à Luxembourg, Luxembourg/Hanovre

p.

The painter, sculptor and draughtsman Gast Michels is a keen observer of reality, analysing the world around him with almost surgical precision in order to translate it into his own formal universe.

Armed with a large sketchpad, he is always on the lookout for clues and traces and reinterprets his surroundings with a sharp pencil and even sharper wit, delivering mes sages with striking clarity.

These are made all the more remarka ble by the fact that they are the product of the artist’s complex trajectory. Guided by his spirituality and creativity, which are deeply rooted in nature and the human condition, Michels repeatedly questions his extensive formal and pictorial language.

The art critic Elisabeth Vermast, who for many years followed Luxembourgish artists in the last decades of the 20th century, emphasised that Michels used an expressive drawing style with clear lines and contours designed to create connections between the planes of colour and the drawing itself.1

Vermast concluded that Michels has always combined symbolism and reality; he saw them as tools, just like colour and draw ing... They are objects the artist calls “the furniture of existence”, transforming how they usually look and repeating letters, wheels (of time?) and figures at a certain rhythm to great effect. Planes of colour, dots and signs with simplified contours populate the space and, time and time again, that arrow; an essential graphic element or a sign of progress in the artist’s ongoing search for new things.2

This goes to show that despite giving the impression of spontaneity, nothing is left to chance in Gast Michels’ works. Their pictorial elements and clear-cut contours are expressive components of a sophisticated visual vocabulary, which creates a charged pictorial space full of tension and suspense.

Stylised simplicity

Michels’ poetics deliberately drw on daily life; his formal language recalls the stylised simplicity of the signs and symbols that accompany and regulate our day-to-day exist ence. While this language tends to be universal, clear and condensed meaning becomes increasingly complex in Michels’ art. The artist does not only create work using the basic components of semiotics, which the dictionary defines as the study of how the various signs and symbols that make communication between individuals and/or groups of individuals possible are pro duced, how they function and are received. Michels, however, constantly questions the connotations and value of signs and sym bols and the relationship we have with them in his works, often in subtly ironic fashion. He does not just analyse symbols, signs, logos and words in his pictorial and sculptural vocabulary, but also pays attention to how they are perceived. Quite literally dis secting them, he lyrically subverts supposed truths, half-truths, slogans and common place sayings that seem normal in their

28
d’aujourd’hui,
1995,
119. 2 Ibid.

banality. This occasionally results in bizarre Dadaist compositions that can be found in the pages of his notebooks.

Sketchbooks and coasters

Michels’ works on paper, in particular, invite us to discover his world of signs, symbols and forms. His small-scale works have to be read slowly, like a book of poetry. These include his silkscreen prints, sketches and drawings as well as an impressive collection of coast ers upon which the artist recorded his ideas, reflections and observations.

That is why we chose the more intimate setting of the Ratskeller in the Cercle Cité to present this segment of Michels’ work.

12 Untitled, c. 2005

Pen on cardboard 9 x 9 cm Gast Michels Estate

In any case, the artist never creates work in the brash style of Pop Art, but rather takes a critical approach that leaves space for freedom and playfulness. Michels apparently once said that he felt like a boxer who had been training all his life to land the decisive punch with his brush or pencil. 3

Thus, we should not be fooled by the fact that certain elements in his work seem amusing or humorous at first glance; they are an expression of the artistic drive and intellectual clarity that push this painter, sculptor and draughtsman to constantly reinvent his creative process.

This is what defines this champion of contrasts; he does not try to reach for the stars, but instead salutes them with a bow.

Paul Bertemes Cercle Cité

3 Cf. Wikipedia entry « Gast Michels » (in Luxembourgish).

Gast Michels ou La force réfléchie des formes et symboles

Theis, Elisabeth Vermast :

Artistes luxembourgeois d’aujourd’hui, Editions

Marc Theis, Banque Internationale à Luxembourg, Luxembourg/Hanovre 1995, p.

Gast Michels, le peintre, plasticien, sculpteur et dessinateur, est un observateur prodigieusement attentif, qui analyse avec une précision quasi chirurgicale, déconstruit et traduit dans son propre univers formel tout ce qui surgit autour de lui.

Un releveur d’empreintes muni d’un volumineux bloc à croquis, qui refait son environnement d’un trait de crayon acéré, tout en élaborant en poète éclairé, avec une déter mination percutante, des messages à notre adresse.

Ces messages sont d’autant plus poin tus qu’ils émanent d’une évolution artistique complexe. Partant de racines spirituelles et créatives profondément ancrées dans la nature et la condition humaine, Gast Michels a constamment soumis son vocabulaire formel et graphique à de profonds questionnements.

La critique d’art Elisabeth Vermast qui, pendant de nombreuses années, a accompagné la création artistique au Luxembourg des dernières décennies du 20e siècle, sou ligne que Gast Michels exploite « le graphisme expressif […] aux traits et contours claire ment dessinés […] pour inaugurer le dialogue des surfaces de couleur et du dessin. » 1 Elisabeth Vermast conclut : « Il a toujours associé symbole et réalité, qu’il considérait comme des outils, tels les couleurs et le dessin… Ce sont des objets qu’il qualifie de ’mobilier de l’existence’ dont il métamorphose l’apparence ordinaire : des lettres et la roue (du temps ?), des figures soumises à certains rythmes, dont la répétition produit un effet saisissant. Des plages de couleur, des points,

des signes dont les contours simplifiés peuplent l’espace, et toujours et encore, cette flèche, élément graphique indispensable ou marque d’un progrès dans la quête du nouveau. » 2 En effet, en dépit d’une apparente approche spontanée, rien dans les travaux de Gast Michels n’est laissé au hasard. Les éléments picturaux, aux contours accentués, s’avèrent être les composantes expressives d’un vocabulaire pictural sophistiqué qui crée un espace empli à la fois de suspense et de tension.

Simplicité stylisée

Gast Michels puise délibérément sa poétique dans les singularités de notre quotidien : un langage formel qui rappelle la simplicité styli sée des signes et symboles qui accompagnent et règlent notre vie de tous les jours. Si d’ordinaire un tel langage est universellement compréhensible, dans l’art de Gast Michels la signification claire, condensée, revêt un caractère complexe.

L’artiste ne se limite donc pas à décli ner son art autour des éléments purs et durs que nous offrent la sémiotique, cette disci pline que le Larousse définit comme « science générale des modes de production, de fonctionnement et de réception des diffé rents systèmes de signes qui assurent et per mettent une communication entre individus et/ou collectivités d’individus ».

1 Marc
119. 2 Ibid.

13 Untitled, c. 2011 Pen on cardboard 9 x 9 cm

Gast Michels Estate

14 Untitled, c. 2011 Pen on cardboard 9 x 9 cm

Gast Michels Estate

Les connotations et les valeurs, le rapport que nous entretenons dans les œuvres de Gast Michels avec les signes et symboles sont cependant constamment mis en question, souvent avec une ironie subtile.

En développant son vocabulaire pictural et plastique, l’artiste ne se contente pas d’analyser des symboles, des signes, des lo gos, des mots. Il est à l’écoute de leurs percep tions. Il les « décortique », au sens premier du terme, les interroge, détourne avec lyrisme de prétendues vérités, des semi-vérités, des slogans, des locutions établies, qui nous semblent on ne peut plus normaux dans leur banalité. Parfois naissent dans ces feuillets des compositions « bizarres », dans la plus pure veine dadaïste.

31

Carnets de croquis et ronds de bière

Ce sont notamment les œuvres sur papier qui nous invitent à découvrir cet univers de signes, de symboles et de formes. Des œuvres aux dimensions réduites qu’il faut lire lente ment comme on lit les pages d’un recueil de poésie. Les sérigraphies, puis les esquisses, les croquis et les dessins — issus des carnets de croquis — et finalement la collection im pressionnante de ronds de bière sur lesquels l’artiste a fixé sur le vif, réflexions et obser vations.

Voilà pourquoi nous avons délibéré ment choisi le cadre plus intime du Ratskeller au Cercle Cité pour présenter cette synthèse de l’Œuvre de Gast Michels.

De toute façon, cet artiste ne procède jamais à la manière bruyante d’un grand format Pop Art. Il recourt plutôt aux moyens de l’esprit critique qui a su se préserver des espaces de liberté ludique.

D’après ce qu’on rapporte, Gast Michels aurait dit se sentir comme un boxeur qui sans cesse s’entraîne pour porter, le moment venu, le coup de pinceau, le coup de crayon décisif. 3

Ne nous laissons donc pas déconcerter : les éléments qui, dans cette Œuvre peuvent à première vue sembler amusants et drôles, sont, en fait, l’expression de l’adrénaline artistique et de la lucidité intellectuelle qui donnent à ce peintre, plasticien, sculpteur et dessinateur la force de constamment réinventer sa démarche créative.

C’est cette façon de procéder qui définit ce grand amoureux des contrastes : il ne cherche pas à toucher les étoiles, il les salue avec révérence.

Paul Bertemes Cercle Cité
3 Cf. saisie « Gast Michels » dans Wikipédia en luxembourgeois. 15 Untitled, c. 2008 Pen on cardboard 9 x 9 cm Gast Michels Estate

16 Untitled, c. 2003

Pencil on cardboard

9 x 10 cm

Gast Michels Estate

17 Untitled, 1999 Sketchbook

x 16

Gast Michels Estate

33
21
cm
34
18 Prospectus pour l’avenir, 1980 Mixed technique on canvas 59 x 73 cm Gast Michels Estate
19 Le pont, 1987 Acrylic on canvas 108 x 140 cm Gast Michels Estate
37 20 Forteresse, 1984 Acrylic on paper 49 x 64 cm Musée national d’histoire et d’art
38 21 Dédale ramasse les plumes, 1985 Acrylic on canvas 108 x 140 cm Gast Michels Estate
22 Untitled, c. 1985 Acrylic on paper 50 x 65 cm Gast Michels Estate
23 Untitled, c. 1988 Acrylic on canvas 70 x 90 cm Gast Michels Estate

24 Rencontre, 1989

Acrylic on canvas

50 x 40 cm

Gast Michels Estate

25 Figure et poteau, 1989

Acrylic on canvas

50 x 40 cm

Gast Michels Estate

41
42 26 Réconversion I, 1989 Acrylic on wood 252 x 54 cm Gast Michels Estate
27 Untitled, c. 1988 Acrylic on canvas 120 x 90 cm Gast Michels Estate
28 Untitled, 1990 Acrylic on canvas 150 x 110 cm Gast Michels Estate
45 29 Untitled, 1990 Acrylic on canvas 150 x 110 cm Gast Michels Estate
46 30 Xylomorphie I, 1990 Acrylic on canvas 140 x 95 cm Gast Michels Estate
31 Cycle Europe III, 1991 Acrylic on canvas 150 x 110 cm Gast Michels Estate
32 Créatures, 1994 Aubusson tapestry 250 x 400 cm Banque et Caisse d’Epargne de l’Etat
49
50 33 Untitled, 1992 Acrylic on canvas 80 x 60 cm Gast Michels Estate
34 Formule ‘x’, 1992 Acrylic on canvas 70 x 90 cm Gast Michels Estate
35 Vaisseau, 1994 Acrylic on canvas 50 x 40 cm Gast Michels Estate
53 36 Untitled, 1994 Acrylic on canvas 40 x 30 cm Gast Michels Estate

37 Parcours (ou: saga domestique), 1994

Acrylic on canvas

x 40 cm

Gast Michels Estate

38 Amphibien, 1994

Acrylic on canvas

x 40 cm

Gast Michels Estate

54
30
30
39 Untitled, 1994 Acrylic on canvas 200 x 160 cm Gast Michels Estate

40 Untitled, 1994

Acrylic on paper

50 x 65 cm

Gast Michels Estate

41 Table méchanique, 1994

Acrylic on paper

50 x 65 cm

Gast Michels Estate

57 42 Untitled, 1994 Serigraphy on paper 50 x 33 cm Gast Michels Estate
43 Pièce de réchange II, 1994 Acrylic and oilstick on paper 65 x 50 cm Gast Michels Estate
59 44 Chapeau mongolien, 1994 Acrylic on paper 50 x 63 cm Gast Michels Estate
60
45 Tourelle espagnole, 1994 Acrylic on paper 150 x 110 cm Gast Michels Estate
62 46 Allée, 1994 Acrylic on canvas 90 x 120 cm Gast Michels Estate
47 Untitled, 1995 Mixed technique on canvas 50 x 40 cm Gast Michels Estate
48 Situation urbaine, 1995 Acrylic on canvas 90 x 70 cm Gast Michels Estate
65 49 Situation urbaine, 1995 Acrylic on canvas 90 x 70 cm Gast Michels Estate

50

Untitled (detail crop), c. 2009

Mixed technique on paper

15 x 21 cm

Gast Michels Estate

51

Untitled (detail crop), c. 2009

Mixed technique on paper

15 x 21 cm

Gast Michels Estate

52

Untitled (detail crop), c. 2009

Mixed technique on paper

15 x 21 cm

Gast Michels Estate

72
53 Hommage aux étoiles, c. 1999 Monochrome paint on steel 22 x 24 x 19 cm Edition of 8 Gast Michels Estate
54 Jeff, 1999 Polychrome paint on steel 24 x 22 x 13 cm Gast Michels Estate

55 Flèche, 1999

Monochrome paint on steel

18 x 12 x 18 cm

Edition of 8

Gast Michels Estate

56 Arc, 1999

Monochrome paint on steel

13 x 24 x 16 cm

Edition of 8

Gast Michels Estate

75

57

Gast

Gast

76
Roue et flèche, 2009 Bronze 14 x 6 x 4 cm
Michels Estate Y au losange, 2009 Bronze 20 x 12 x 6 cm
Michels Estate
58 Untitled, c. 1999 Monochrome paint on steel 38 x 42 x 7 cm Gast Michels Estate

59 Monuments II, 1997

Mixed technique on paper

15 x 21 cm

Gast Michels Estate

60 Touriste, 1997

Mixed technique on paper

15 x 21 cm

Gast Michels Estate

61 Stèle I, 1997

Mixed technique on wood 200 x 40 cm

Gast Michels Estate

62 Stèle II, 1997

Mixed technique on wood 200 x 40 cm

Gast Michels Estate

78

63 L’est te regarde, 1997

Mixed technique on paper

x 21 cm

Gast Michels Estate

64 Collage, 1997

Mixed technique on paper

x 21 cm

Gast Michels Estate

15
15

65 Piazza, 1997

Mixed technique on paper 15 x 21 cm

Gast Michels Estate

66 Jeu d’aveuglement, 1997

Mixed technique on paper

x 21 cm

Gast Michels Estate

81
15

Regards,

on paper

Gast Michels

Village et roue,

on paper

Michels

82 67
1997 Acrylic
15 x 21 cm
Estate 68
1997 Acrylic
15 x 21 cm Gast
Estate
69 Système urbain, 1997 Acrylic on paper 15 x 21 cm Gast Michels Estate
70 Débarquement — 2, 2004 Acrylic on canvas 120 x 90 cm Gast Michels Estate
85 71 Untitled, 2004 Mixed technique on canvas 90 x 120 cm Gast Michels Estate
72 Untitled, 2000 Digital print on glossy paper 43 x 60 cm Gast Michels Estate
87 73 Untitled, c. 2002 Digital print on glossy paper 40 x 50 cm Gast Michels Estate

74 Allez-y! (detail crop), c. 2010

Mixed technique on paper

15 x 21 cm

Gast Michels Estate

75 Allez-y!(detail crop), c. 2010

Mixed technique on paper

15 x 21 cm

Gast Michels Estate

76 Allez-y! (detail crop), c. 2010

Mixed technique on paper

15 x 21 cm

Gast Michels Estate

77 Allez-y! (detail crop), c. 2010

Mixed technique on paper

15 x 21 cm

Gast Michels Estate

96
78 Dates, 2004 Acrylic on canvas 60 x 50 cm Gast Michels Estate

79 Ceci, 2004

Acrylic on canvas 18 x 24 cm

Gast Michels Estate

80 Chaleur, 2004

Acrylic on canvas 18 x 24 cm

Gast Michels Estate

99 81 Untitled, 2005 Acrylic on canvas 59 x 50 cm Gast Michels Estate
100 82 Untitled, c. 2005 Acrylic on paper 57 x 38 cm Gast Michels Estate
83 One direction, 2006 Acrylic on canvas 90 x 120 cm Gast Michels Estate
102 84 Untitled, c. 2009 Acrylic on loose canvas 75 x 55 cm Gast Michels Estate
85 Untitled, c. 2009 Acrylic on loose canvas 75 x 55 cm Gast Michels Estate
86 Untitled, c. 2009 Acrylic on loose canvas 75 x 55 cm Gast Michels Estate
105
106 Inside the artist’s studio. © Frank Michels, 2012

“We built the airplane during the flight”

After the death of Gast Michels in 2013, his sons David and Frank Michels started the lengthy process of setting up the artist’s estate, compiling pieces from all his studios — three in Luxembourg and one in the Provence — and gradually inventorying them over the following years. As an architect and a product designer respectively, the brothers were well equipped to manage their father’s estate and got in touch with various museums and art historians to guide them in their work. They also read up on the relevant literature about artist estates and consulted photographers from the field on how to best document and scan artworks. However, creating and managing Gast Michels’ estate was very much a process of learning by doing, or, as Frank Michels puts it: “We built the airplane during the flight,” standing in his father’s perfectly preserved studio just above David Michels’ architecture firm.

“The inventory alone has taken six to eight years, for example. Using an inventory software that includes a module for online publishing was a crucial part of the process. Right now, we’re entering a new phase in which we’re spending more time on project work with institutions and galleries,” Frank Michels continues, when asked about the dayto-day running of the estate. The sheer number of artworks and objects to document poses a challenge, as do space constraints; indeed, the brothers had to take a number of works out of their frames to have enough space to store them all.

Now, the inventory of Gast Michels’ oeuvre is almost complete, and the estate’s website with high-resolution images of each piece has become a valuable resource for museums, galleries and art historians wishing to research the artist.1 The estate takes care of and stores the artwork in its possession, operates a loan and sales service and offers advice on framing, hanging and exhibiting works by Gast Michels. It is, in fact, one of the few current examples of a fully functioning artist estate in Luxembourg, besides that of Michel Majerus.

The ideal of keeping Gast Michels’ work alive and passing it on to future generations has always been at the heart of the project. David and Frank Michels will continue to foster relationships with collectors of their father’s work, but also hope to build up a new collector base by offering galleries a curated selection of Gast Michels pieces at regular intervals, preferably not too far apart. Featuring an estate artist like their father alongside a roster of living artists has the additional advantage of showing his continued relevance in the art world and introducing the next generation of museum and gallery visitors to his work.

1 Cf. https://gastmichels.org/.

« Nous avons construit l’avion en cours de vol »

Après la mort de leur père Gast Michels en 2013, David et Frank se sont consciencieuse ment attelés à constituer la succession de l’artiste. À cet effet, les frères Michels ont réuni les œuvres provenant de tous ses ateliers, dont trois au Luxembourg et un en Provence. Au fil du temps, ils se sont livrés à un patient travail d’inventaire. En tant qu’architecte d’une part et designer de produits d’autre part, ils disposaient du bagage technique nécessaire pour gérer le patrimoine artistique de leur père. Parallèlement, ils ont contacté différents musées et historiens de l’art pour se faire épauler dans leur entreprise. En outre, ils ont encore lu toute une panoplie de littérature de référence sur les successions d’artiste et ont sollicité l’aide de photographes expérimentés pour documenter et numériser au mieux ces œuvres d’art. Cependant, la constitution et la gestion du patrimoine de Gast Michels a été un long processus d’apprentissage sur le terrain, ou comme le formule avec humour Frank Michels, tandis que nous nous trouvons dans l’atelier parfaitement conservé de son père, situé juste au-dessus du cabinet d’architecture de David Michels: «Nous avons construit l’avion en cours de vol.»

«Rien que pour l’inventaire, par exemple, nous avons mis six à huit ans. L’utilisation d’un logiciel d’inventaire avec un module pour la publication en ligne nous a facilité cette tâche de manière cruciale. Actuellement, nous entrons dans une nouvelle phase où nous consacrons plus de temps au travail de projet avec les institutions et les galeries», poursuit Frank Michels en réponse à la question sur la

gestion quotidienne de la succession. La simple quantité d’œuvres d’art et d’objets à do-cumenter constituait à elle seule un défi, tout comme le manque de place ; les frères ont même dû ôter de leurs cadres un certain nombre d’œuvres afin de disposer de suffisam ment d’espace pour toutes les stocker.

Entre-temps, l’inventaire de l’œuvre artistique de Gast Michels est presque complet et le site web de la succession, qui contient des photos haute résolution de chaque œuvre, est devenu une source précieuse pour les musées, les galeries ainsi que les historiens de l’art souhaitant effectuer des recherches sur l’artiste.1 La Gast Michels Estate gère et entrepose les œuvres d’art en sa possession, propose un service de prêt et de vente et donne des conseils pour l’encadrement, l’accrochage et l’exposition des œuvres de l’artiste. Celle-ci constitue, à côté de l’estate de Michel Majerus, l’un des rares exemples de succession d’artiste qui fonctionne au Luxembourg.

La volonté de maintenir l’œuvre et la mémoire de Gast Michels vivantes et de transmettre celles-ci aux générations futures a dès le départ été au cœur du projet. David et Frank Michels continueront à entretenir des relations avec les collectionneurs existants des œuvres de leur père, mais ils espèrent également pouvoir former une nouvelle communauté de collectionneurs en proposant aux galeries, à intervalles réguliers et de préférence rappro chés, une sélection d’œuvres de Gast Michels spécialement assemblée et conçue par l’estate. Cette démarche d’exposer un artiste d’enver gure internationale tel que leur père aux côtés

1 Cf. https://gastmichels.org/.

d’artistes vivants permet de souligner sa pérennité dans le monde de l’art contemporain, de faire rayonner son œuvre tout comme de sensibiliser la prochaine génération de visiteurs de musées et de galeries.

Katja Taylor

MNHA

87 Untitled, c. 2008

Pen on cardboard

11 x 11 cm

Gast Michels Estate

109
David and Frank Michels in their father’s studio. © MNHA, 2022

Copyright

© 2022 Musée national d’histoire et d’art (MNHA) / Cercle Cité, Luxembourg

Editor / Editeur

Musée national d’histoire et d’art (MNHA) / Cercle Cité, Luxembourg

Curators / Commissaires

Lis Hausemer, Ruud Priem (MNHA) Paul Bertemes (Cercle Cité)

Coordination

Lis Hausemer, Iyoshi Kreutz, Laurène Him

Translations and proofreading / Traductions et relecture

Sonia Da Silva, Sandra Litzinger, Katja Taylor, Anouk Bernard

Design and layout / Conception graphique et mise en page studio mado klümper

Print / Impression Reka Print Edition / Tirage 1000 copies

Copyright

© 2022 Musée national d’histoire et d’art (MNHA) / Cercle Cité, Luxembourg

ISBN 978–2–87985–773–2

Colophon

110

This book was published on the occasion of the exhibition Gast Michels (1954 — 2013): Movement in colour, form and symbols

7 October 2022   26 March 2023 at the MNHA

7 October 2022   22 January 2023 at the Cercle Cité

Ce livre a été publié à l’occasion de l’exposition

Gast Michels (1954   2013) :

Movement in colour, form and symbols

7 octobre 2022   26 mars 2023 au MNHA

7 octobre 2022   22 janvier 2023 au Cercle Cité

Acknowledgments / Remerciements

The National Museum of History and Art and the Cercle Cité would like to express their gra titude to everyone who made this project possible through their generous loans and support:

Gast Michels Estate

Banque et Caisse d’Epargne de l’Etat Les 2 Musées de la Ville de Luxembourg and all private collectors.

A special thanks goes to Frank and David Michels for their collaboration and dedica tion throughout this entire project.

Le Musée national d’histoire et d’art et le Cercle Cité remercient vivement toutes les per sonnes qui par leur concours et leurs prêts ont permis de réaliser la présente exposition :

Gast Michels Estate

Banque et Caisse d’Epargne de l’Etat Les 2 Musées de la Ville de Luxembourg et tous les prêteurs privés.

Nous tenons à remercier tout particuliè rement Frank et David Michels pour leur collaboration et leur engagement tout au long de ce projet.

Photo credits / Crédits photographiques

pp. 2–3 | p. 9–10 | p. 15 | p. 18 | p. 20 | p. 22 | p. 25 | p. 27 | p. 29 | pp. 31–36 | pp. 38–47 | pp. 50–106 | p. 109

Gast Michels Estate, Frank Michels p. 23 | p. 27 | p. 37 | pp. 48–49 | p. 109 MNHA, Tom Lucas p. 9

Jochen Herling

All copyright owners have been carefully researched to the best of our knowledge. If you believe that any existing copyright has not been taken into account, please feel free to contact the MNHA. All justified requests will be considered in accordance with the terms and conditions in place.

MNHA

Marché-aux-Poissons L–2345 Luxembourg www.mnha.lu

Cercle Cité Place d’Armes L–2012 Luxembourg www.cerclecite.lu

Les détenteurs des copyrights ont été recherchés avec grand soin de notre part. N’hésitez pas à contacter le MNHA en cas d’un droit d’image non considéré. Toute demande dûment justifiée sera prise en compte selon les modalités en vigueur.

The Luxembourgish artist Gast Michels (1954 — 2013) was a remarkably keen observer of his environment. He meticulously analysed and decoded his surroundings, translating them into his own formal universe. Michels’ oeuvre has a unique formal language and features recurring symbols like wheels or arrows and a luminous colour palette, often dominated by the complementary colours blue and yellow. While the early work of the Echternach-born artist predominantly deals with seemingly mythical depictions of human figures in woodland settings, his later works have a more graphic pictorial language featuring highly stylised objects and signs. As a painter, sculptor and graphic artist, Michels worked in various mediums but always remained true to his expressive, symbolic and at times humorous and ironic visual language.

2022 ISBN 978–2–87985–773–2
Issuu converts static files into: digital portfolios, online yearbooks, online catalogs, digital photo albums and more. Sign up and create your flipbook.