The Weinland Park Tree Planting Initiative

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Weinland Park Tree Planting Initiative

> AUGUST 2021

2016 - 2021

Less stress. Cleaner air. Greener streets. Investing in lasting health and beauty.


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This historic apartment building on the east side of Summit Street between E. 9th Avenue and E. 8th Avenue received three trees as part of the Weinland Park tree program.

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Weinland Park Tree Planting Initiative One characteristic that often defines beautiful and desirable urban neighborhoods is plenty of trees. Partly an extension of the recent revitlization efforts in the Weinland Park neighborhood, the Weinland Park tree planting program was created as a collaborative effort among funders who are dedicated to improving the quality of the life in the neighborhood. Located in the University District, Weinland Park is situated between Chittenden and E. 5th Avenue, east of High Street and west of the railroad tracks. The neighborhood experienced significant disinvestment and the associated problems of high poverty and crime from the 1980s through the 2010s. Along with disinvestment and a very low owner-occupancy rate, the tree canopy of the neighborhood suffered. The tree-planting program seeks to increase the tree canopy and quantify the environmental, social, and economic impact of these efforts. Funding from The Columbus Foundation and Community Properties of Ohio, in addition to Ohio State, supported this effort to increase the number of trees and measure the impact of urban reforestation for nearly six years. By partnering with the Weinland Park Community Civic Association, the Neighborhood Design Center (NDC) was able to identify property owners and plant longlasting trees throughout Weinland Park. By using Franklin County Rental Registration data, rental property owners were contacted and encouraged to participate in the program. NDC emphasized the important of front yard trees, which help make the neighborhood more beautiful, have been linked to improved emotional states of residents, and also increased property values. The NDC handled the logistics of the planting for property owners, suggesting locations and clearing them for underground utility issues. Trees were planted by Seely’s Landscape Nursery, a local professional nursery founded in 1988 with expertise necessary to make sure the tree is planted correctly. While property owners were able to give input on the location of the trees, the exact placement of the tree was approved by the nursery consultant to make sure it worked with utilities and for the health of the tree.

This Swamp White Oak was planted in the city right-ofway by neighborhood volunteers along Indianola Avenue just north of E. 8th Avenue. It may grow to 60 feet high, providing a shady canopy for the street in the future.

All trees received a water bag, a small bag placed at the base of the tree that allows water to slowly seep out over time, keeping the tree healthy. The bags were refilled as necessary by Weinland Park neighborhood volunteers.


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After a 5 year treeplanting campaign, Weinland Park is cleaner and greener. Learn how and why NDC led this initiative.

> AUGUST 2021

ten benefits of urban trees #1 Clean the Air and Improve Health #2 Alleviate Heat Stress #3 More Successful Business Districts #4 Reduce Water Pollution and Flooding #5 Remove Carbon Dioxide from the Air and Provide Buffers for Noise #6 Contribute to a Decrease in Crime #7 Build Stronger, More Vibrant Communities #8 Boost Property Values

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#9 Reduce Energy Usage and Costs #10 Provide Essential Wildlife Habitat


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Trees are increasingly recognized as contributing to the quality of life in cities—and an important tool to fight the effects of climate change. > B A C K G R O U N D & C O N T E X T: M E D I A E X C E R P T

BRINGING BACK TREES TO ‘FOREST CITY’S’ REDLINED AREAS HELPS RESIDENTS AND THE CLIMATE

All Things Considered, NPR by Dan Charles / June 23, 2021 As the globe heats up, cities across America are taking a fresh look at their trees. They keep urban neighborhoods cooler, make air conditioning bills manageable and, most importantly, protect lives during heat waves. They help capture stormwater runoff, and as trees grow they remove heat-trapping carbon dioxide from the air. Some cities are now moving to increase their tree canopy, in part to shield against the worst effects of climate change. Those efforts also are aimed at attacking long-standing economic and racial inequity. Researchers have found that low-income neighborhoods generally have fewer trees than wealthier ones. In Cleveland, a coalition of city agencies, nonprofit organizations, and corporations has endorsed an ambitious plan to expand tree cover from its current level of 19 percent to 30 percent by 2040. That would require planting 24,000 trees each year for the next ten years, along with better maintenance of existing trees. As a result, she says, those neighborhoods are deprived of the benefits that trees can provide, including “stress reduction and an easier environment for our heart and lungs, like cleaner air and lower temperatures.” Lower temperatures can save lives. One recent study estimated that more than 5,000 people die each year in the U.S. from heatrelated illness. Other researchers found that in a large majority of American cities, people of color were more likely to live in neighborhoods that suffer from hotter temperatures, driven in part by a lack of tree cover.

Lower temperatures can save lives. One recent study estimated that more than 5000 people die each year in the U.S. from heatrelated illness.


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THE U.S. NEIGHBORHOODS WITH THE GREATEST TREE INEQUITY, MAPPED

Shade from trees can make a dramatic difference in combating urban heat, especially amid blistering heat waves like the one gripping the western U.S. this week. A new analysis quantifies just now unequal tree cover is in the U.S.: Neighborhoods with a majority of people of color have, on average, 33% less tree canopy than majority-white communities, according to data from the Tree Equity Score map, a project of the conservation nonprofit American Forests. The poorest neighborhoods, where 90% of residents live in poverty, have 41% less coverage than the wealthiest ones. Nationally, some 522 million new trees are needed for every city to reach a score of 100, according to the analysis. That could lead to the creation of more than 3.8 million jobs, curb air pollution by 56,613 tons of particulates each year, and remove 9.3 million tons of carbon from the atmosphere — equivalent to 92 million cars, the analysis estimates. It could also generate roughly $5 billion in annual ecosystem service benefits, like air quality improvement and stormwater drainage. “Tree inequity has consequences, and extreme heat and reduction in air and water quality, as well as the lack of ecosystem benefits means reduced health and general well-being,” he says. “That’s what we’re trying to change.”

The poorest communities have 41% less tree cover than the wealthiest ones, a new mapping project finds.

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Bloomberg CityLab By Linda Poon / June 25, 2021


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Urban forestry master plan calls for increasing tree canopy to 40%

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This 1975 photograph of the LeVeque tower highlights the addition of two trees by the 2019 photograph. Note the improved aesthetic and consider the benefit to pedestrians passing by the historic landmark.

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TREES ARE BEAUTIFUL, ARE GOOD FOR THE ENVIRONMENT AND ENHANCE PROPERTY VALUES.

7 April 2021 ThisWeek Community News — German Village by Gary Seman Jr. But in Columbus, most neighborhoods don’t have enough of them, according to the Columbus Recreation and Parks Department. After 18 months of planning and involving community groups, individuals, companies and professionals, Columbus recreation and parks officials have released the urban-forestry master plan, which seeks to grow the canopy to 40% across the city, a process that will take 20 to 30 years. Columbus has a 22% overall tree canopy, lower than many of its peer cities, such as Pittsburgh (40%), Cincinnati (39%) and Louisville, Kentucky, (37%), according to the plan. “The tree canopy refers to the part of a city that is shaded by trees,” according to the master plan. Canopy cover is the percentage of the city that is covered by trees when viewed from above, as opposed to water, open green space, hard surfaces and bare soil. With the city’s population expected to grow by 1 million people by 2050, improving and adding to the tree stock is fundamental, Hendon said. The last survey was done in 2015 by a consultant. Hendon said the master plan calls for another tree inventory, adding that the percentages likely vary because of high-density development in some neighborhoods. The plan has three specific goals: reach a citywide tree canopy of 40%, stop net canopy loss by 30% and invest in equitable canopy loss across all neighborhoods by 2030.

https://www.thisweeknews.com/story/news/local/german-village/2021/04/06/city-ofcolumbus-urban-forestry-master-plan-calls-for-increasing-tree-canopy-40/7096481002/

The Scioto Mile project greatly increased the amount of green space downtown, and the plantable area for trees. Projects like this are important to creating a more resilient city as the effects of climate change become more frequent and harmful.


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70% of the

City of Columbus’ tree canopy is located on private property. Columbus is the fastest-growing heat island of the 60 largest U.S. cities. https://www.columbusufmp.org Columbus Urban Forestry Master Plan (UFMP)


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fifteen tree species planted AUTUMN BLAZE MAPLE Acer freemanii 14 planted Native to North America

FREEMAN MAPLE Acer freemanii 9 planted Native to North America

SNOW GOOSE CHERRY Prunus serrulata 17 planted

AUTUMN BRILLIANCE SERVICEBERRY Amelachier grandiflora 3 planted Native to North America

NEW HORIZON ELM Ulmus 7 planted Native to North America

SWEET GUM Liquidambar styraciflua 3 planted Native to North America

DAWN REDWOOD Metasequoia glyptostroboides 1 planted Native to North America

OKAME CHERRY Prunus yedoensis 9 planted

UPRIGHT HORNBEAM Carpinus betulus 7 planted

FASTIGIATA CHERRY Prunus serrulata 1 planted

RED JEWEL CRABAPPLE Malus x ‘Red Jewel’ 2 planted

WINTER KING HAWTHORN Crataegus viridis 3 planted Native to North America

FLOWERING CHERRY Prunus avium 3 planted Native to North America

SHINGLE OAK & SWAMP WHITE OAK Quercus imbricaria 1 shingle oak 2 swamp white oaks Native to North America

WINTER FLOWERING CHERRY Prunus subhirtella 6 planted


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Since When Have Trees Existed Only for Rich Americans?

> AUGUST 2021

By Ian Leahy and Yaryna Serkez

> PAGE 8

30 June 2021

“Areas that were given an “A” grade at the time were characterized by U.S.-born white populations in newer houses. Today, these same neighborhoods have nearly twice as much tree coverage than communities of color that were “redlined” by receiving the “D” grade, according to a recent paper analyzing 37 metro areas. These disinvestments have a tangible impact on social equity issues. A University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign study of 98 Chicago public housing buildings with residents of similar socioeconomic situations found that when controlling for a number of other factors, more vegetation near a building contributed to 52% fewer crimes overall and 56% fewer violent crimes.

With temperatures rising and economic disparities widening, trees are indispensable infrastructure. However, ensuring the right tree is planted in the right place is no easy feat. It requires expertise in selecting the most resilient and beneficial species. Planners must prepare for warming climates, allow existing trees to thrive and integrate new trees with competing infrastructure. Political will and financing from the public and private sectors are needed long before a tree is planted.” https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2021/06/30/opinion/ environmental-inequity-trees-critical-infrastructure.html

> B A C K G R O U N D & C O N T E X T: M E D I A E X C E R P T

A study of 98 Chicago public housing buildings with residents of similar socioeconomic situations found that when controlling for a number of other factors, more vegetation near a building contributed to 52 percent fewer crimes overall and 56 percent fewer violent crimes.


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Tree Equity Score — A project of American Forests While Weinland Park isn’t among the Columbus neighborhoods with the lowest tree equity scores, there is considerably disparity among census tracts within the neighborhood itself. The eastern portion, which has historically been home to African-Americans and industrial land uses, has a score of 68. This contrasts with the central portion, aligned with Hamlet Street, where the score is 81. Still, the entire neighborhood is below the City of Columbus’ average of 83.

75/100 81/ 100 68/100

75/100

83 76

Total Score for Columbus

Lowest tree equity score in the city of Columbus: 43/100

The Reeb-Hosack neighborhood on the South Side and one census tract between E. Long Street and Mt. Vernon Avenue on the Near East Side have the lowest tree equity scores in the city of Columbus, at 43 out of 100.

Highest tree equity score in the city of Columbus, with the highest percentage of people of color: 100/100

Average for Weinland Park 79/100

https://www.treeequityscore.org https://www.americanforests.org/our-work/tree-equity-score/

“But how do we know if there are enough trees in a neighborhood so everyone can reap those benefits? Our Tree Equity Score (TES) tool answers this question. It calculates a score for all 150,000 neighborhoods and 486 municipalities in urban America — cities and nearby

small towns that have at least 50,000 people. More than 70 percent of the U.S. population lives in these urban places. Each score indicates whether there are enough trees for everyone to experience the health, economic and climate benefits that trees provide. The scores

are based on how much tree canopy and surface temperature align with income, employment, race, age and health factors. A 0- to-100-point system makes it easy to understand how a community fares. With the knowledge the score provides, community leaders, tree advocates and

Two census tracts near the intersection of Morse Road and Cleveland Avenue have tree equity scores of 100, and 95% of residents are people of color.

residents alike can address climate change and public health through the lens of social equity, attract new resources, factor the scores into technical decisions and track progress toward achieving Tree Equity. A score of 100 represents Tree Equity.” Source: Tree Equity Score, American Forests


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CO2

> AUGUST 2021

estimated impact of 91 trees over 40 year lifespans CO2 Avoided 551,780 pounds CO2 Sequestered 175,351 pounds Electric Energy Saved 87,735 kWh

C

Electricity Cost Saved $10,748 Avoided Runoff 214,374 gallons O3 Removed 677 pounds VOC Avoided 12 pounds

carbon sequestration Environmental pollutants, like carbon dioxide, are released by different sources in cities and then partially captured by the process of photosynthesis in trees. The trees then release oxygen back into the atmosphere, decreasing the amount of carbon and helping achieve a more balanced atmospheric composition.

O2

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PM2.5 Removed 40 pounds Source: i-Tree Planting Calculator Estimated tree mortality rate of 10%


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88

We worked directly with property owners to plant high-impact trees for public benefit.

tons of CO2 sequestered

Tree Location

276

The Neighborhood Design Center conducted extensive outreach with residents and property owners in Weinland Park to create direct connections that would lead to successful tree plantings. Through attending the Weinland Park Festival and meetings of the Weinland Park Community Civic Association, the tree planting program was marketed thoroughly in the neighbrhood. When property owners expressed interest in the program, NDC created site plans to determine, in conjunction with the owner, the ideal placement for the new tree(s). The goal of the program was to increase the tree canopy along streets, so only front or side yard trees were permitted to be funded. If property owners requested a backyard tree, NDC referred them to other programs that could provide a free sapling for easy planting. Once the ideal locations were determined, Seely’s Nursery ensured that there would be no underground utilities in the location. Then, Seely’s planted the tree and installed a 10-gallon tree bag to support tree stabilization and growth in the early weeks of planting.

date:_________ initials:________

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tons of CO2 avoided

1489 N 5th St, Columbus OH Snowgoose Cherry

date:_________ initials:________ 1576 N. High St. • Columbus, OH 43201

www.theneighborhooddesigncenter.org

The Neighborhood Design Center completed technical analysis and siting recommendations for each tree, working with property owners and the nursery to locate the most advantagous location.

The snowgoose cherry tree was planted in the southern portion of the front yard of the house at 1489 N. 5th Street after discussions with and approval from the property owner.

$11K of electricity saved

214K gallons of stormwater runoff avoided


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Trees were also planted in the right-of-way by volunteers. In addition to trees planted in front yards, some neighborhood residents donated their time and energy to planting trees in the public right-of-way along certain streets. These trees will provide shade to people using sidewalks and will help reduce overall daytime highs in the summer.

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Request your free street tree

NOW!

These postcards were sent to the Weinland Park community to let people know about the free tree program.

ecosystem services

677 pounds of O3 removed

12

pounds of volatile organic compounds (VOC) removed

40

There are four major categories of ecosystem services: 1. Provisioning Services—A provisioning service is a benefit to people that can be extracted from nature: fruits, vegetables, trees, fish, livestock, oil, drinking water, etc. 2. Regulating Services—Plants clean air and filter water, bacteria decompose wastes, and bees pollinate flowers. Regulating services include pollination, decomposition, water purification, and carbon storage and climate regulation.

pounds of PM2.5* removed

3. Cultural Services—A cultural service is a non-material benefit that contributes to the development and cultural advancement of people. 4. Supporting Services—Ecosystems themselves couldn’t be sustained without the consistency of underlying natural processes, such as photosynthesis, nutrient cycling, the creation of soils, and the water cycle that allow the Earth to sustain life. Source: National Wildlife Foundation, https://www.nwf.org

*PM 2.5 is particulate matter with a diameter of 2.5 micrometers or less. These are fine inhalable particles of many sizes and shapes and can be made up of hundreds of different chemicals. Some are emitted directly from a source, such as construction sites, unpaved roads, fields, smokestacks or fires. Most particles form in the atmosphere as a result of pollutants emitted from power plants, industries and automobiles.

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Three trees planted in 2018 along E. 9th Avenue between N. 4th and N. 5th Streets have become established and healthy with care and nurturing from neighbors. The street experience for pedestrians and residents has improved greatly due to these plantings.

91

trees planted


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On the map: Where trees were planted This map denotes where trees were planted throughout the life of the Weinland Park tree program, from 2016 through 2021. Each green dot represents one tree, but dots are partially transparent so that when overlapping, they appear darker to indicate more than one tree was planted at that location. One primary locus was the immediate area around the intersection of E. 9th Avenue and Summit Street. Properties along Chittenden Avenue are largely rental, and plantings were agreed to by apartment owners. Many of the other locations throughout Weinland Park were owneroccupied properties, and within the city right-of-way.

targeted outreach

409 651

letters sent to properties eligible for city trees

1964

letters to properties eligible for the WP Tree Program

2019

Below: This Mediterranean inspired home at 326 E. 9th Avenue was surrounded by a lush, mature canopy of foliage in this 1964 photo. In recent years, the property has had no trees—in the yard or along the street—to shield it on hot summer days. Thanks to the Weinland Park tree program, there are now two street trees in the public right-of-way to the south that may eventually restore this home’s lost canopy from more than 50 years ago and help cool the entire neighborhood in the process.

2021


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Calculating our environmental impact over time The Weinland Park tree program planted 91 trees, and each species affects its ecosystem in a different way. By using the i-Tree planting calculator, the environmental services impact of each species was determined, then multiplied by the number of trees planted, and displayed for the projected lifetime of the tree, approximately 40 years. To account for potential loss of trees due to disease or severe weather, a 10% tree mortality rate was assumed. The figures speak for themselves. The Weinland Park tree program has had a considerable impact on both the curb appeal of the neighborhood and the local ecosystem. NDC is hopeful that funding for similar programs at a larger scale will be made available in the future, especially as the effects of climate change worsen.

i-tree planting calculator Since 2006, i-Tree has been a cooperative effort between the USDA Forest Service, Davey Tree Expert Company, The Arbor Day Foundation, Society of Municipal Arborists, International Society of Arboriculture, Casey Trees, and SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry. i-Tree is a combination of science and free tools that: Quantifies the benefits and values of trees around the world; Aids in tree and forest management and advocacy; Shows potential risks to tree and forest health; Is based on peer-reviewed, USDA Forest Service Research.

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Quantity Tree Name

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CO2 Avoided (pounds)

CO2 Sequestered (pounds)

Electricity Saved (kWh)

Electricity Saved ($)

Avoided Runoff (gallons)

Avoided Runoff ($)

O3 Removed (pounds)

VOC Avoided (pounds)

PM2.5 Removed (pounds)

14

Autumn Blaze Maple

87,782.80

34,941.20

14,362.60

1,759.38

41,007.40

366.38

137.20

1.40

8.40

3

Autumn Brilliance Serviceberry

13,330.20

1,662.00

2,061.00

252.48

5,171.40

46.20

13.80

0.30

0.60

7

New Horizon Elm

47,624.50

28,018.90

7,735.00

947.59

20,526.10

183.40

65.80

1.40

4.20

1

Dawn Redwood

17,900.70

2,017.00

2,287.70

280.24

2,596.20

23.20

16.10

0.40

1.40

1

Fastigata Cherry

4,443.40

554.00

687.00

84.16

1,723.80

15.40

4.60

0.10

0.20

3

Flowering Cherry

13,330.20

1,662.00

2,061.00

252.48

5,171.40

46.20

13.80

0.30

0.60

9

Freeman Maple

56,431.80

22,462.20

9,233.10

1,131.03

26,361.90

235.53

88.20

0.90

5.40

9

Okame Cherry

39,990.60

4,986.00

6,183.00

757.44

15,514.20

138.60

41.40

0.90

1.80

2

Red Jewel Crabapple

5,242.20

5,064.20

773.60

94.76

4,092.60

36.58

10.60

0.20

0.60

3

Shingle Oak

31,264.50

12,796.20

5,078.40

622.08

10,161.00

90.81

36.30

0.60

2.70

17

Snowgoose Cherry

75,537.80

9,418.00

11,679.00

1,430.72

29,304.60

261.80

78.20

1.70

3.40

3

Swamp White Oak

31,264.50

12,796.20

5,078.40

622.08

10,161.00

90.81

36.30

0.60

2.70

3

Sweet Gum

34,997.10

6,876.60

5,703.60

698.70

7,326.30

65.46

29.10

0.90

2.40

7

Upright Hornbeam

52,649.10

27,110.30

8,628.90

1,057.07

19,741.40

176.40

64.40

1.40

4.20

6

Winter Flowering Cherry

26,660.40

3,324.00

4,122.00

504.96

10,342.80

92.40

27.60

0.60

1.20

3

Winter King Hawthorn

13,330.20

1,662.00

2,061.00

252.48

5,171.40

46.20

13.80

0.30

0.60


NEIGHBORHOOD DESIGN CENTER COLUMBUSNDC.ORG 614 221 5001 INFO@COLUMBUSNDC.ORG

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