Page 1

November/December 2017

INSIDE

THE 20 17 GIFT G UIDE

WISH YOU WERE HERE WINTER TRAVEL IDEAS

SWEET TREATS

HOMEMADE GIFTS TO SHARE

The Holiday Issue FESTIVE FOOD & FASHIONS

DRESS TO SPARKLE COCKTAIL-INSPIRED PARTY WEAR

Cary Magazine, 301 Cascade Pointe Lane Cary, NC 27513


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in this issue

The Holiday Issue

16 24 35

The

Santa Brotherhood

Cocktail

Attire

Visions of Sugarplums: Carolina Ballet’s ‘Nutcracker’ is a tradition for dancers and audience

42

A

Christmas Tour: Add the wonder of travel to your wish list

58 Homemade for the Holidays 68 Turkey All the Time 83 The CM Gift Guide 92 Before She Says Yes 101 Top Dentists

Christmas Day is one of the most popular days to get engaged, so we asked some experts for advice on ring. This platinum ring with heart-shaped diamond is from J.M. Edwards. Story, page 92.

8 NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017

Jonathan Fredin

picking the perfect


Your children. Your family. Your health. Your well-being. Your transitions. Your place. WakeMed Cary Hospital From pregnancy and childbirth to everything and anything female, the care is both comprehensive and compassionate. Embracing you and your entire family with outpatient and inpatient surgery, specialty and subspecialty care, 24/7 emergency care, imaging rehab, and more. After all, when it comes to you, your health and the health of your family, you’re the decision maker. And the decision is clearly WakeMed Cary Hospital.

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in every issue

78

CARY • APEX • MORRISVILLE • HOLLY SPRINGS • FUQUAY-VARINA

November/December 2017 • Volume 14, Number 9

Exclusive Dish: Sweet Potato Tostones from Dean’s Kitchen+Bar

EXECUTIVE

Ron Smith, Executive Publisher Bill Zadeits, Publisher EDITORIAL

116 120

Nonprofit Spotlight: The Hope Center at Pullen

Amber Keister, Editor Nancy Pardue, Editor CONTRIBUTORS

Garden Adventurer: Repeat Performer

Alexandra Blazevich, Social Media Manager L.A. Jackson Emily Uhland, Lifestyle Editor PHOTOGRAPHY

Jonathan Fredin, Chief Photographer PRODUCTION

departments 12

Editors’ Letters

14

Letters from Readers

124

Happenings

130

Write Light

ON THE COVER: If you are looking to lay on the glam for your holiday cocktail parties, we offer a few stylish suggestions, starting on page 24. Photo by Jonathan Fredin

Jennifer Casey, Graphic Designer Ronald Dowdy, Graphic Designer Lauren Earley, Graphic Designer Dylan Gilroy, Web Designer Beth Harris, Graphic Designer Matt Rice, Webmaster/SEO Rachel Sheffield, Web Designer ADVERTISING

Kris Schultz, Associate Publisher PUBLIC RELATIONS

S&A Communications Chuck Norman, APR ADMINISTRATIVE

Mor Aframian, Events & Marketing Coordinator Cherise Klug, Traffic Manager Lisa McGraw, Circulation Coordinator Valerie Renard, Human Resource Manager Kristin Black, Accounting Cary Magazine © is published nine times annually by Cherokee Media Group. Reproduction or use, without permission, of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited. Subscriptions are $18/year. CARY MAGAZINE

Westview at Weston 301 Cascade Pointe Lane Cary, North Carolina 27513 (919) 674-6020 • (800) 608-7500 • Fax (919) 674-6027 www.carymagazine.com

in the next issue

ARDS THE MAGGY AW

201 8 10 NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017

This publication does not endorse, either directly or implicitly, the people, activities, products or advertising published herein. Information in the magazine is deemed credible to the best of our knowledge.

Drum roll, please, as we announce the winners of the

2018 Maggy Awards!

Cary Magazine is a proud member and supporter of the Cary Chamber of Commerce, Apex Chamber of Commerce, Morrisville Chamber of Commerce, Holly Springs Chamber of Commerce, and Garner Chamber of Commerce. All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis.


Jonathan Fredin

editors’ letters

SANTA BROUGHT ME an extra-special, early gift this year. His name is Matthew. I could expound here, on the wonders of grandchildren and the circle of life … but I want to stay high on the magic, where all of my sentences include his name, and the word Awwww. He’s a sweet sigh and a whisper of hope, our baby boy, and each time he smiles at me I feel charmed to be chosen. Matthew’s first Christmas is a reminder that magic does still exist, and only gets better at the holidays. We want to bring you that same warm feeling in this issue: The tale of four ukulele-bearing Santas, always on cheer duty. Made-with-love recipes to feed your family and friends. Twinkling-lights excursions to bring out the kid in all of us. My wish is that you, too, will find enchantment in this holiday season. Thanks for reading,

12 NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017

WHEN SANTA RON CAMPBELL, above, walked into our office, grown men and women peeked around doors, and their eyes grew wide as they whispered: “It’s Santa.” They grabbed cell phones as word spread throughout the building. Wearing his velvet robe, gloves, black boots and furtrimmed hat, he was the image of Clement Moore’s jolly old elf. Even without the reindeer, the afternoon could have been titled, “A Visit from St. Nicholas.” The photo shoot was to take only a few minutes, but it stretched longer as Santa Ron posed for photos and recorded Christmas wishes for sons and daughters. These videos will be unveiled closer to the big day to prove that Mom and Dad know Santa well, and no naughty behavior will be tolerated. For us at Cary Magazine, it was a tiny glimpse of the delight inspired by Santa and his brothers in red. They get to experience the Christmas Spirit all year, and it is no wonder they want to share it as often as they can, (see page 16). We hope all of you will experience a little wonder and magic this holiday season.


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letters from readers

“You captured my voice in the Women of Western Wake article. I thought you would like to know that I have received many compliments on it. I am very grateful to have had the opportunity. Thank you for your excellent work!” Dr. Gayle Greene, 2017 Women of Western Wake “Thank you for your ongoing support and for this amazing article highlighting our upcoming events. I truly appreciate your support of our efforts.” Tracy Callahan, Polka Dot Mama Melanoma Foundation “It’s always a highlight of my day when each new magazine comes out and I see it at (The) Butcher’s Market or Harris Teeter!” April Morey, The Cookie People “I was thrilled to see the beautiful models and photography upon (the) pages. … Thank you again for affording me the opportunity to be part of your magazine.” Susan Sharpe, Greenville, S.C.,“Eco-Chic”

“Just found out that you guys put us on your front cover ...We are exhilarated! Thank you is not enough to express our gratitude and appreciation, but since this is the only thing we’ve got then let us say this: Our sincerest and deepest thanks to all of you that made this happen for us and the other designers.” Teresa and Giovanni Perna, Mayd in Chyna, “Eco-Chic” “Thank you so much for the excellent article you allowed My Girlfriend’s Closet to participate in, concerning sustainable clothing! It was so thorough and interesting as you covered many angles of this important and trending topic. We always love reading Cary Magazine online and in beautiful print of course!” Lois Cozart, My Girlfriend’s Closet “Thank you so much for the very nice feature in the Happenings section of your current issue about my recent awards – I really appreciate that! Thank you very much for your support.” Grace Stocker, Chocolat Grace

WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU! Email letters to the editors to editor@carymagazine.com

Editors’ note: Submitted comments may be edited for length or clarity, and become the property of Cary Magazine. 14 NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017


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a t n a S The d o o h r e h B rot OFF-DUTY SANTAS SPREAD CHRISTMAS CHEER ALL YEAR WRITTEN BY AMBER KEISTER PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

W

hat do you call four Santa Clauses with ukuleles and Hawaiian shirts? No, it’s not the Don Ho-Ho-Ho

Show. It’s the Ambassadors of Christmas Cheer! “One of the guys is the real Santa, but I’m not

going to say who,” said Jim Hastings, the tallest of the ukulele-playing ambassadors. The white-bearded performers sing carols, crack corny jokes, and enthusiastically entertain about three dozen people gathered in the dining room of Brookdale MacArthur Park in Cary. Three female companions, who cheerfully answer to “Mrs. Claus,” join in on percussion and autoharp. Even when the holidays are months away, the sounds of Christmas fill the room. After the set, residents of the retirement community pose for photos, and one impishly tugs on Santa’s beard. continued on page 18

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NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017

Resident Casey Griffen, 87, tugs on Santa Ron Campbell’s beard after a performance by the Ambassadors of Christmas Cheer at Brookdale MacArthur Park. Griffen will turn 88 on Christmas Day.


CARY MAGAZINE 17


The Ambassadors of Christmas Cheer are, clockwise from top left, Ron Campbell, Billy Quinton, Jim Hastings, Peggy Reaugh, Duane Reaugh, Marsha Quinton and Paulette Campbell.

See Santa

■ To learn more, visit Ambassadors OfChristmasCheer.com. ■ You can see Santa Ron in person on Saturday, Nov. 18, at the Raleigh Christmas Parade, grma.org/christmas-parade/

18

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017

continued from page 16

The singing Santa act is the brainchild of Ron Campbell, who has portrayed St. Nick since 1965. The Cary resident has been Santa at Cary’s Winterfest for the last 15 years, and is best known as the star of the Raleigh Christmas parade. A ukulele workshop at a July 2016 Santa convention sparked his imagination. Six months later, after the holiday rush, Campbell recruited his wife, Paulette, and invited a few fellow Santas and their wives to join his merry band. Hastings agreed to play along, as well as Billy and Marsha Quinton, and Duane and Peggy Reaugh. “When you’re Santa, you’re by yourself,” said Hastings. “But with the group, you can play one Santa off another one — poke fun at one and he’ll poke back. It’s almost like you and your brothers and sisters.” It’s clear the ambassadors enjoy each

other’s company, and the shows are an opportunity to interact with people, to entertain, and to spread some cheer all year. The group hopes to perform once a month in the off season. Even though their shows are free, Campbell says scheduling the singing Santas can be a challenge. Most people want to see Santa Claus and sing Christmas carols in November and December, but that’s when the brothers in red are busy working. “I truly love being Santa,” said Billy Quinton. “When Ron came up with the idea that we would get together and play ukuleles and sing, I thought, ‘Oh my word, this is the craziest thing I’ve ever heard of.’ But I have to admit, I have enjoyed it immensely.” Never off duty

Because of the men’s distinct looks, it’s sometimes a challenge to be out in public, so the group is a great way for the men to get


After singing Christmas carols with the four Santas, residents of Brookdale MacArthur Park sat with Santa and had their photos taken.

together and have fun. “When you have a real beard, you’re Santa 365,” said Campbell. “You’re on all the time!” The men try to keep a low profile because they want to preserve the mystery of Santa Claus, but every now and again the beard comes in handy. “We were in a restaurant eating in Melbourne, Australia, and the waitress came over,” said Duane Reaugh. “She said there was a table with two little girls, and they thought I looked like Santa. ‘Could they get a picture?’ And then Peggy reached into her bag and pulled out the Santa hat!” After some laughter, his wife picks up the story. “One of the little girls was hiding behind the waitress, poking her head out. The hat came out and Duane put it on his head, just grinning. It was everything you’d want

The show included familiar tunes and lots of corny jokes — “If athletes have athlete’s foot, what do astronauts get? Missile-toe!” (Mistletoe)

continued on page 20 CARY MAGAZINE 19


Casey Griffen, poses with her daughter Leigh Duque, son-in-law Tony Duque, and Santa Ron Campbell. “Christmas is all about families, and we get a chance to share that,” says Campbell.

“I had gotten quite cynical about our youth and parents. But when you get out there and see, and I see a lot of children and a lot of parents every

I realized that the world is still in a pretty good place. The children are Christmas,

fine, the parents are fine, but those aren’t the ones who make the headlines.” Billy Quinton, who has portrayed Santa since 2010

20

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017

continued from page 19

on Christmas morning,” said Peggy. “The little girl came running over, and the whole restaurant went berserk.” This ability to spread joy and add a bit of magic to people’s lives, says Quinton, is one of the most rewarding things in the world. “With all the negatives going on in the world, you bring some positives in there,” he said. Quinton, who lives in Angier, spends the Christmas season greeting kids of all ages at a mall in Woodbridge, N.J., outside of Manhattan. One of his favorite stories is about three brothers who have been coming to him for five years. “Last year they were 59, 58 and 56, and it was their 50th consecutive year they have had their pictures made with Santa,” he said. “Every year at Christmas, they fly from different parts of the country to meet in New York. The three of them go out to dinner,

have their picture made with Santa, and that is their Christmas present to their mother every year. I think that sums it all up, right there.” Labor of love

Many people think of Santa as part of the family and come back year after year, says Hastings, who lives in Durham and mostly appears at corporate events. “I’ve had some college kids come back and say, ‘I’ve got to get my picture taken with Santa, so I can give it to Mom at Christmas,’” he said. Last year Campbell was in Macau, China, and several multigenerational families came to get their photos taken with Santa Claus. “For these folks, China has had governments come and go, empires come and go, but families are what is important,” he said. “Christmas is all about families, and we get a chance to share that. It’s love, it really is.” t


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22 NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017


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WRITTEN B Y EMIL Y

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TOGR

APHED BY JO NATHAN FREDIN

COCKTAIL TO CRAVE:

Brandy Alexander

Perfectly polished has new meaning with a festive manicure from Paintbase Cary.

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NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017

If you aren’t a fan of eggnog, try this rich holiday indulgence. Visit carymagazine.com for recipe.


Bell sleeve blouse, $39 Black horn necklace, $42 Pleated pants, $49 From Pink Magnolia Boutique

SH

E K A

Up

your party attire with a heaping dose of sparkle, a teaspoon of texture and a zest for special details. This winter’s style muddles the lines between day and night and his and hers, all without sacrificing the sparkle and shine we love for the season. Don’t forget to garnish with the ultimate accessory for holiday merrymaking — a coordinating craft cocktail. Our festive beverages were created by Verandah Bar & Lounge at Cary’s downtown Mayton Inn. Get the recipes at carymagazine.com! CARY MAGAZINE 25


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VERY VELVET Winter’s favorite fabric comes in updated colors this season. Watch for taupe, blush, icy blue and dark green. Velvet jumpsuit, $46 Beaded necklace, $28 From Pink Magnolia Boutique Gold sequin clutch, $15 From Charming Charlie

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NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017


HIS AND HERS SUITING Voluminous silhouettes, creative colors and bold patterns are surfacing in menswear styles for guys and gals. Adventurous takes on a traditional suit will turn heads at your office party. This page: White mesh shirt, $58 Grey skirt, $215 Grey corset top, $158 Silver ball drop earrings, $28 Patent leather booties, $88 From The Art of Style Opposite page: Green and blue plaid jacket, $395 Navy tie with green dogs, $135 Pants, $175 From Ashworth’s Clothing White shirt, $109 From The Art of Style

CARY MAGAZINE 27


Red and white gingham shirt, $155 Pants, $175 Tie, $115 Polka dot pocket square, $59.50 Blue jacket with red windowpane, $795 From Ashworth’s Clothing

LEATHER AND LACE Naughty meets nice this holiday season by pairing dainty lace and edgy leather. Modest details, like a high neck and long sleeves, are balanced with an above-the-knee skirt. Leather skirt, $38 Lace top, $42 Black tank, $28 Tassel earrings, $26 From Pink Magnolia Boutique

COCKTAIL TO CRAVE:

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Sip fireside on a cold night. Visit carymagazine.com for recipe.

AMERICA THE BEAUTIFUL Red does double duty this season — as a holiday staple and a nod to designers’ love for all things patriotic. Subtle pattern play keeps the look sophisticated, like this mix of gingham, stripes and windowpane.

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NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017


Reimagine your Christmas experience!

DAZZLING DETAILS Standout details such as ruffles, bows, pleats and bell sleeves feel fun and feminine for the holidays. This navy dress wows with a peek-a-boo back and sleeves tied with bows. Navy tie-back dress, $198 Gold twist earrings, $32 From The Art of Style

Starting this November, the magic of Christmas can show up on your doorstep. It’s time to send in the Elves! Imagine...Not standing in a long line at the mall waiting for a generic picture with Santa. Imagine...One of Santa’s elves showing up on your doorstep, ready to engage and delight the little ones in your life. Imagine...Your child’s eyes widening when the magical elf knows them by name and what they want for Christmas, creating a personalized experience for each child. No Elf visit would be complete without taking an “Elfie” to be easily shared with friends and family on social media!

Christmas is right around the corner. Book your elf encounter today!

919.374.3399 sendintheelves.com CARY MAGAZINE 29


COCKTAIL TO CRAVE:

Holiday Sauce Cocktail Thanksgiving dinner in a glass. Visit carymagazine.com for recipe.

ALL ABOUT THE BURGUNDY Darker and moodier than red, this chic shade works for men and women. Go bold with a corduroy button-up shirt or add a hint with a velvet clutch. Lace dress, $54 Earrings, $24 From Pink Magnolia Boutique On him: Corduroy shirt, $98 Belt, $58 Black jeans, $149 Boots, $275 From The Art of Style

BOLD SHOULDERS From off-the-shoulder to one-shoulder, collar-baring styles are here to stay. An asymmetrical hi-low hem mimics the neckline in a modern shape for this black and white tunic.

30

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017

Striped tunic, $154 Black skinny jeans, $179 Gold cuff, $34 Gold twist earrings, $32 Patent leather booties, $88 From The Art of Style Clutch, $35 From Charming Charlie


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THANK YOU! Special thanks to Jessica Wright, Maggie Underhill and Jeremy Buchholz for modeling, and to The Mayton Inn for the photo shoot venue. The Mayton Inn 301 S. Academy St., Cary (919) 670-5000 maytoninn.com Cocktail recipes created by the Verandah Bar and Lounge. Verandah 301 S. Academy St., Cary (919) 670-5000 verandahcary.com

KNOT ME An off-center knot updates a classic sheath dress that’s as comfortable in the office as it is at happy hour. Pair with edgier accessories, like this tasseled choker, for night, or a blazer for day. Knotted dress, $88 Collar necklace and earring set, $38 From The Art of Style Embroidered clutch, $79 From Stella & Dot

Hair and makeup by Valerie Lester, Erin Pugh and Esther Johnson of Color Salon & Spa. Color Salon & Spa 3582 Davis Drive, Morrisville (919) 380-7772 colorsalonspa.com Nails by Paintbase. Paintbase Park West Village 3019 Village Market Place, Morrisville (919) 694-5933 cary.paintbasenails.com

SHOP THE LOOK: The Art of Style 19 W. Hargett St., Raleigh (919) 755-3333 theartofstyleboutique.com Pink Magnolia Boutique Park West Village 3021 Village Market Place, Morrisville (919) 561-1769 Parkside Town Commons 1205 Parkside Main St., Cary (919) 518-5532 lovepinkmagnolia.com Ashworth’s Clothing 210 S. Main St., Fuquay-Varina (919) 552-5201 facebook.com/AshworthsClothing Charming Charlie 2128 Village Market Drive, Morrisville (919) 465-0530 charmingcharlie.com Stella & Dot stelladot.com/maggieunderhill

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Visions of Sugarplums CAROLINA BALLET’S ‘NUTCRACKER’ IS

A TRADITION FOR DANCERS AND AUDIENCE

Armes Photography

WRITTEN BY ALEXANDRA BLAZEVICH

Lara O’Brien dances the role of the Sugarplum Fairy in 2013. This year O’Brien is dancing her 16th year of “Nutcracker” performances with the Carolina Ballet. “For so many people ‘The Nutcracker’ is a holiday tradition. It becomes a staple that’s part of what the holidays are about for them, and the magic that it brings,” she says. CARY MAGAZINE 35


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Many area families see the “The Nutcracker” as part of their holiday traditions. The classic show, and watching the performances of its young “party guests,” can serve as children’s introduction to the world of ballet.

BEFORE WE BEGIN SHOPPING for presents, cooking the holiday ham, or decorating the Christmas tree, ballet companies around the world are rehearsing for their annual “Nutcracker” performances. “The Nutcracker” is a magical tale that can inspire even the youngest imagination to run wild. It’s the story of a young girl, Clara, who receives a nutcracker doll for Christmas from her godfather. The doll transforms into a prince overnight and takes Clara on a journey to the Land of Sweets, where she meets a cast of characters, including the elegant Sugarplum Fairy. This year marks Carolina Ballet’s 20th anniversary season as a company, and the 17th year of artistic director Robert Weiss’ rendition of “Nutcracker.” In 2001, Weiss choreographed the entire show to Tchaikovsky’s “Nutcracker” score. He’s kept much of the original cho-

reography, but its costumes, sets and magic have been updated over the years. In 2011, Weiss reimagined the company’s “Nutcracker” production and brought in Las Vegas illusionist Rick Thomas to make his dream become a reality. In Carolina Ballet’s version of the classic story, Clara’s godfather, Herr Drosselmeyer, makes his grand entrance in a cloud of smoke, party scene children disappear and reappear, and an angel even lights up the growing Christmas tree. “To be able to incorporate full-scale illusions into the first act was a big upgrade for our production, and really sets our production apart from many others across the country,” said Carolina Ballet principal dancer Lara O’Brien. O’Brien is dancing her 16th year of “Nutcracker” performances this year. When she began her career with Carolina Ballet as


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an apprentice in 2001, she danced in the company’s very first production of “The Nutcracker” as a snowflake, flower, party scene mother and Spanish hot chocolate. O’Brien has since danced every female role in the entire production, with the exception of Marzipan. Her favorite roles to perform are Arabian coffee and the Sugarplum Fairy. “There’s just something really wonderful about dancing that role,” O’Brien said on the role of Sugarplum Fairy. “She’s a magical character. Dancing the role is a milestone for any ballerina and it is also one of the most well-known roles in classical ballet.” Family tradition

For many, seeing “The Nutcracker” with family and friends is part of their Christmas tradition. “Even if they’ve come to see it for 15

years, they still get so much out of it each year that they come,” O’ Brien said. The company feels the same way. Carolina Ballet co-artistic director, Zalman Raffael, says “The Nutcracker” is an essential part of the season. A part of Carolina Ballet since 2005, as a dancer and choreographer, Raffael has performed in “The Nutcracker” since he was 8 years old. “It’s a part of my life,” he said. “There’s all these little things we do in order to prepare for the season, and I think for me, the music and the story sets the tone for the holidays. “It’s an opportunity to get the families together and to go experience some form of entertainment that elevates the spirit,” Raffael added. When O’Brien is not in rehearsal, per-

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Lara O’Brien and Carolina Ballet’s co-artistic director Zalman Raffael rehearse at the company’s Raleigh studio. A part of Carolina Ballet since 2005, Raffael has performed in “The Nutcracker” since he was 8 years old. “There’s all these little things we do in order to prepare for the season, and I think for me, the music and the story sets the tone for the holidays,” he says. Jonathan Fredin

38

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017


TO SEE “THE NUTCRACKER” “The Nutcracker” will be performed on Dec. 2-3 at UNC’s Memorial Hall, Chapel Hill; Dec. 9-10 at the Durham Performing Arts Center; and Dec. 15-24 at the Duke Energy

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forming onstage or spending time with her husband or 3-year-old daughter, she’s preparing the next generation of dancers at her Tutu School locations in Cary and Raleigh. O’Brien opened Tutu School Cary in August to teach children the classic ballet stories she loves, and some of their choreography. She also teaches her students a few French words, so they can learn the meaning behind their moves. “It’s a special way for me to be able to pass on what I love and know about the world of ballet to very young children, and make it joyful and whimsical for them,” she said. For some little ones, “Nutcracker” is their introduction to seeing ballet performed onstage. They may have learned the moves in class or danced around their houses, but have not seen the lights, makeup and costumes that make live ballet performances so exciting. Carolina Ballet’s “Nutcracker” provides an opportunity. “For so many people ‘The Nutcracker’ is a holiday tradition,” O’Brien said. “It becomes a staple that’s part of what the holidays are about for them, and the magic that it brings.” t

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Check out the Omni Grove Park Inn’s 36-foot stone fireplaces and the elevators hidden in the chimneys, four locally-sourced restaurants, and the subterranean spa complete with rock walls, tunnels and water features.

A Christmas Tour

Omni Grove Park Inn

WRITTEN BY NANCY PARDUE

Add the wonder of travel to your wish list Who says there’s no place like home for the holidays? The sparkle of the season also comes from seeing and doing new things. Maybe this is the year to jolly-up your traditions — after all, travel is Santa-approved. Mountain Magic

Fall’s pumpkin spice gives way to full-on gingerbread in the mountains of Asheville, where you’re also most likely to encounter a white Christmas. Asheville is home to the annual National Gingerbread Competition, held at the historic Omni Grove Park Inn. Ann Bailey of Cary is a two-time national champion in the contest, in 2012 and 2014, and is competing again this year in honor of the event’s 25th anniversary. “The judges call out the winners from among the top 10, backward from third to second to grand prize,” said Bailey. “It was an exciting atmosphere, with reporters wanting to interview us and cameras 42

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017

everywhere, from HGTV and The Travel Channel.” Meghan Morris of Apex grew up visiting Grove Park Inn to view the gingerbread masterpieces, one of her family’s annual holiday traditions. She’s entered the competition each year since age 16, and last year landed in the adult division’s top 10 with her “Nightmare Before Christmas” themed entry. “It’s so much fun. That’s why I keep coming back,” said Morris, now 21 and a college junior, majoring in biochemistry. “And I still return to see all of the entries after the competition, displayed all over the hotel. They’re incredible, unlike anything I’ve ever seen.

LOCAL NOTE: Build your own yummy holiday house, for Cary’s seventh annual Gingerbread House Competition! The deadline to register is Nov. 22; houses must be completed by Dec. 1 and will be displayed in Downtown Cary businesses on Saturday, Dec. 2, during the town’s Heart of the Holidays Celebration. Then, view the winners Dec. 5-15 at the Cary Arts Center. townofcary.org


Top: You can view the gingerbread masterpieces — about 150 of them — at Grove Park Inn from Nov. 26 through Jan. 4, even if you’re not a guest at the hotel. Left: Meghan Morris of Apex placed in the top 10 with her “Nightmare Before Christmas” themed gingerbread entry in 2016, using a “tricky” combo of math and physics. “Before it’s beautiful, it must be sturdy,” she says. Below: The Great Gingerbread House is a 10.5x10.5-foot-replica of the inn made from more than 1,500 pounds of edible goods, from which staff serve housemade hot cocoa.

Photos by Omni Grove Park Inn

“It’s so much more than four walls and a roof. The pictures don’t do it justice,” she said. “People put hundreds of hours into these, and it shows.” Morris has been working on her latest entry since July, with a science theme. She’s learning about blown sugar and experimenting with techniques to create faux granite. “You play around to find what works and what looks good,” she said. “I’m hoping this is my year!” You can view the gingerbread masterpieces — about 150 of them — at Grove Park Inn from Nov. 26 through Jan. 4, even if you’re not a guest at the hotel. “The caliber of the entries continues to evolve,” said Tracey Johnston-Crum, director of Public Relations & Community Outreach for the inn. “Just when I think I have seen every new technique, the competitors amaze me with inventive ways to create these edible masterpieces.” The works are constructed of at least 75 percent gingerbread, with all-edible ornamentation, and are judged by a panel of culinary and arts professionals on appearance, originality, difficulty, precision and theme. “The top 10 winners in each category will be integrated into our holiday décor,” added Johnston-Crum. “The remaining entries will be displayed on Level 7 of the Vanderbilt Wing, and at the Grove Arcade in downtown Asheville. We’ll also be showcasing a holiday tree decorated with ornaments submitted by past gingerbread competitors. “The entries are genuine works of art, and you can lose yourself in the intricate detail and beauty of some of the pieces,” she said. The Omni Grove Park Inn donates half of all parking fees raised during the holiday display to Western North Carolina nonprofits. Non-guests may view the gingerbread entries anytime Monday through Thursday, or after 3 p.m. on Sundays. omnihotels.com/hotels/asheville-grove-park continued on page 44

CARY MAGAZINE 43


Biltmore House sparkles with 30,000 twinkling lights reflecting in thousands of ornaments, while miles of garland accent every corner including the Grand Staircase. continued from page 43

ALSO IN ASHEVILLE: Christmas at Biltmore

Dozens of evergreen trees bearing thousands of ornaments and miles of lights, ribbons and fresh garlands mark the extravagant celebration happening at Biltmore through STAYING HOME FOR THE Jan. 7. It’s a time travel of HOLIDAYS? Find all the sorts, to the holiday ways local holiday festivities at of George Vanderbilt and CaryMagazine.com/events! family, who first opened their new home to guests on Christmas Eve 1895. If you plan an evening visit, you can take a self-guided candlelight tour through Jan. 6, complete with luminaries and firelight, live music and wine tastings. biltmore.com Photos by the Biltmore Company

Winter Lights at the North Carolina Arboretum Biltmore House is filled with Christmas trees, with the centerpiece being the Banquet Hall’s 35-foot Fraser fir.

44

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017

This outdoor exhibit runs from Nov. 17 through Dec. 31, as a winter wonderland of nearly a half-million lights. Enjoy holiday tunes and cocoa, cider or beer while you stroll. ncarboretum.org Beer bonus: Asheville is also home to the most breweries per capita of any city in the U.S., and many of them are family friendly. exploreasheville.com


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gatherings to lavish galas, flowers add the spark that keeps your guests gushing long after the party’s over. Contact us, and we’ll make your next Join the Seagrove potters this season for their annual Holiday Open House. The self-guided pottery tour includes decorations, refreshments and a hearty dose of holiday cheer as visitors stroll through the Seagrove community.

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MORE MERRY Celebration of Seagrove Potters

Whether you go as a day trip or as a bed-and-breakfast overnighter, the Celebration of Seagrove Potters is a great way to “fire up” your holiday season. Beyond shops, Seagrove is a vision of sugar plums offering the opportunity to stroll this historic area home to the country’s largest concentration of working potters, for behind the scenes interactions with the artists who create one-of-a-kind pieces from functional to folk. Running Nov. 17-19, the Celebration of Seagrove Potters begins with a gala and auction on Friday evening featuring a 15-piece live jazz band, followed by a weekend of the Potters’ Market complete with food trucks, artisan demonstrations, children’s activities, silent auction and beer garden. Can’t make it in November? Experience holiday decorations, warm fireplaces, refreshments and fun events each Saturday from Dec. 2-23, at Seagrove Potters’ Holiday Open House. ​ discoverseagrove.com continued on page 46

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COASTAL CHRISTMAS Southport WinterFest

Winter Craft Festival on the lawn of Fort Johnston Garrison

Supper with Santa’s elves and a holiday cookie contest are fun for the kids.

Southport Christmas Flotilla

Fire engine parade? Check. Christmas cookie contest? Check. Santa? Of course! Southport WinterFest includes all of the above and then some, meaning you won’t miss a thing if you hang your mistletoe in this town known as the backdrop to more than 40 movies and TV shows, where the Cape Fear River meets the Atlantic. “Festivities are centered in historic downtown Southport and kick off with ‘Christmas in Song’ at the Amuzu Theatre (circa 1912) on December 1, and continue with events for all ages through December 10,” said Karen Rife, marketing chair for Downtown Southport Inc. Learn about Colonial holiday traditions — and the storm that almost stole Christmas — during free costumed tours at the North Carolina Maritime Museum. Take the kids to Supper with Santa’s Elves and the annual Holiday Cookie Contest, or drop in at the Nutcracker Tea Party. WinterFest’s final festive Saturday, Dec. 9, offers the chance to grab handmade and homegrown gifts at the Winter Craft Festival on the lawn of Fort Johnston Garrison, overlooking the river. Stroll the Christmas Tour of Homes for a glimpse at the great history of Southport, and finally, spread your blanket beside the riverbank as boats of all sizes sail by in the night, dressed in their twinkling holiday best, at the Southport Christmas Flotilla. downtownsouthport.com, southportnc.org Cape Fear Festival of Trees

southportnc.org

From Southport, you can easily hop the Fort Fisher Ferry to catch the Cape Fear Festival of Trees, daily through Dec. 31. It’s free with a general admission ticket to the North Carolina Aquarium at Fort Fisher. The fest benefits the Lower Cape Fear Hospice Foundation. lcfhfoundation.org/event/cape-fearfestival-trees 46

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017


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If the name alone doesn’t put you in the spirit ‌ you may be a Scrooge! Each year the town of McAdenville becomes a holiday wonder-

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CARY MAGAZINE 47


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Excellence in

EDUCATION A LOOK INSIDE THE TOP SCHOOLS IN WAKE COUNTY

50 NOVEMBER/DECEMBER SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2017 2017

BRANDEDContent CONTENTSection SECTION Branded


Excellence in

EDUCATION

CHESTERBROOK ACADEMY 130 Towne Village Drive // Cary, NC 27513

Chesterbrook Academy Elementary School in Cary offers a challenging, wellrounded curriculum that helps children ages three through fifth grade master the core academics while developing important skills such as creativity, collaboration and communication. Students also enjoy a full array of specialty classes including art, music, physical education, foreign language and technology. The teachers create personalized learning plans for each child and work closely with parents and students to make learning fun, stimulating and meaningful. The school takes ad-

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CONTACT (877) 959-4181 www.cbaelementarycary.com

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GRADES 3 years 5th grade

vantage of the rich resources in the area to bring the curriculum to life through field trips, including the North Carolina Zoo, North Carolina Aquarium and Durham Museum of Life and Science. The four-acre campus, conveniently located off SW Cary Parkway, includes a soccer field, playground and newly renovated swimming pool. The school’s technology lab is outfitted with Promethean Boards, netbook laptops and iPadŽ digital devices. Chesterbrook Academy Elementary School is accredited by SACS CASI, and the preschool program has a 5-star rating.

ENROLLMENT 205

STUDENT/TEACHER RATIO 8:1

COST Tuition varies by program

CARY MAGAZINE 51


Excellence in

EDUCATION

PRIMROSE SCHOOLS

Balanced Learning at Primrose Schools More parents are recognizing the importance of enrolling their children in preschool to help them develop the right foundation for success in elementary school and beyond. Studies show that from birth to age 5, growth in all areas of development is rapid. Children form strong neural connections during this time as a result of their experiences with everyone and everything they encounter. The best programs go beyond helping children master basic academic skills by supporting their development into happy, confident, well-rounded individuals. “Informed parents look for preschool, preK and kindergarten programs that take a balanced approach to developing motor, social-emotional, creative and academic skills,” said Dr. Gloria Julius, VP of education and professional development for Primrose Schools. “It takes quality instruction, a well-rounded curriculum and a positive teacher relationship to prepare a child to suc-

QUICK LOOK

CONTACT 800.PRIMROSE www.primroseschools.com

52 NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017

GRADES Infants through Kindergarten

ceed.” Parents have heard the term STEAM in the news. STEAM is an educational approach to learning that uses Science, Technology, Engineering, the Arts and Mathematics for guiding student inquiry, discussion, and critical thinking. The Primrose Balanced Learning® curriculum supports this and children’s innate desire to learn through investigation and experimentation. In the classroom, intentional experiences introduce children to new concepts and ideas in engaging ways. And the exploration doesn’t stop there. Children instinctively ask many questions and enjoy thinking and observing what surrounds them. Encouraging this curiosity helps nurture a love of learning in children and increases their ability to think critically and creatively. Primrose Schools is a national family of dedicated leaders serving children, families and communities in our premier accredited early education and care schools. For parenting tips, visit our Parenting blog at www.PrimroseSchools.com/360Parenting.

ENROLLMENT Open Registration

STUDENT/TEACHER RATIO Varies by age

COST Varies by age

Branded Content Section


Excellence in

EDUCATION

RALEIGH CHRISTIAN ACADEMY 2110 Trawick Road // Raleigh, NC 27604

Having completed 40 years of operation, Raleigh Christian Academy seeks to provide an exceptional Christian education for families in the greater Raleigh area. It is RCA’s desire to help parents produce students who are equipped to face the challenges of tomorrow and to do so with a Christian worldview. Biblical principles are incorporated into every subject. Experienced and fully qualified teachers maintain high academic standards. Students are given opportunities to participate in award-winning and nationally recognized fine arts programs at Raleigh Christian Academy. A competitive athletic program is available for middle school and senior high school students. Students at Raleigh Christian Academy receive a wholesome, well-rounded education designed to help them build strong character, to develop physically, emotionally, and spiritually. The longevity of faculty members at the school provides children with teachers who are experienced, yet loving in their approach. Raleigh Christian Academy serves hundreds of students in preschool through grade twelve. Using a traditional approach to educa-

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CONTACT (919) 872-2215 www.raleighchristian.com

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GRADES PK-12 (coed)

tion, RCA’s students excel in a structured, academic environment. Scoring one and a half to three years ahead of their public school peers, Raleigh Christian Academy students thrive in a program that is college-preparatory, yet geared for the average student. And better yet, tuition at Raleigh Christian Academy is affordable! You can make a difference in your student’s life. Give your child a distinctively different Christian education available at Raleigh Christian Academy. • • •

Daycare – 12th Grade College Preparatory State & Regional Accreditation • Certified Teachers • STEM Activities • Dual Credit Program • Fine Arts & Athletics • Online Course Availability

ENROLLMENT 375

STUDENT/TEACHER RATIO 15:1

Open House Dates: Friday, January 19 Friday, February 16 Friday, March 16 10 AM – 2 PM

AVG. COST $7,000 (2017-18)

CARY MAGAZINE 53


Excellence in

EDUCATION

RAVENSCROFT SCHOOL 7409 Falls of Neuse Road // Raleigh, NC 27615

Equipping today’s students to succeed in tomorrow’s world. At Ravenscroft, we wondered — why wait to teach leadership skills to children? Why not integrate leadership learning into everyday classroom education for all children? In fact, why not teach children to use those leadership skills to be better students, artists, athletes and community members? Can those skills really be taught — to children of all ages? YES they can! Ravenscroft has joined forces with the Center for Creative Leadership — one of the world’s top-ranked providers of executive education — to teach the citizen leadership skills that hundreds of business, government, nonprofit and education leaders have identified as crucial, but frustratingly rare, in today’s workforce. Together, we have created an innovative curriculum combining the best citizen leadership learning into the excellent academic program for which

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CONTACT (919) 848-6470 www.ravenscroft.org

54 NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017

GRADES PreK- Grade 12

Ravenscroft is known. And we are teaching it to all of our students, in age appropriate ways, PreK - 12th grade. We call it Lead From Here. As early as pre-kindergarten, our Lead From Here trained faculty introduces students to a set of fundamental skills that they can apply to their academic, social, creative and athletic challenges. These citizen leadership skills include being accountable, resilient, growth minded, empathetic, inclusive, communicative, strategic, resourceful, adaptive and more. The result? High-achieving students with a leg up on academics and the real-world leadership skills they need to succeed in the future. Our Ravens are prepared to soar to great heights. How do we do it? The best way to understand how we teach it is to experience it yourself. We invite you to join us for a visit to learn more!

ENROLLMENT 1150

STUDENT/TEACHER RATIO 8:1

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Excellence in

EDUCATION

RESURRECTION LUTHERAN SCHOOL 100 Lochmere Drive // Cary, NC 27518

Resurrection Lutheran School (RLS) is committed to educating generations of children in the training and instruction of the Lord. Because of this commitment, we provide a Lutheran educational experience that is Christcentered as well as academically focused for children in grades kindergarten through eighth. RLS has grown from one class of eighteen kindergarten students in 2002 to a full K-8 elementary/middle school offering a Christ-centered, academically challenging and dually accredited educational alternative for families living in Wake County. Parents are attracted to our dedicated teachers, reputation in the community, caring Christian environment, active parent participation and enrichment opportunities. Students are empowered to play an active role in their own education and prepared to make “honors level� decisions in high school. Beginning in elementary school, students are motivated to participate in a wide variety of extracurricular opportunities offered at Resurrection Lutheran School to include basketball, volleyball,

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CONTACT (919) 851-7271 rlscary.org

GRADES Kindergarten 8th grade

cheerleading, golf club, running club, robotics, MATHCOUNTS, Mock Trial, National Junior Honor Society, drama, art, instrumental, choir, community service, educational travel, writing workshops and summer camp. At RLS, we place a high value on writing with a focus on both composition and intellectual depth. While technology is utilized to engage students and enhance learning, RLS students are encouraged to take the initiative to examine their natural curiosity through collaboration and a variety of interactive learning experiences. RLS families benefit from the strong congregational support offered by Resurrection Lutheran Church. Resurrection Lutheran Preschool (RLP) and Resurrection Lutheran Music School (RLM) provide additional educational opportunities for the entire family. Before and after school care is available. Visit www.rlscary.org to learn more about Resurrection Lutheran School. Contact Rosie Creasy, Admissions Director, 919-851-7271 ext 35, to schedule a school tour or shadow day.

ENROLLMENT 155-165

STUDENT/TEACHER RATIO 16:1

COST $6,800-$7400 plus fees

CARY MAGAZINE 55


Excellence in

EDUCATION

WAKE COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS 5625 Dillard Drive // Cary, NC 27518

Since 1982, Magnet Programs have offered educational choice in the community through a variety of innovative learning experiences either through a menu of electives or school-wide instructional delivery model. Magnets open doors of opportunity and spark the imagination of students, preparing them to become responsible citizens in a global society. The Leadership and Technology Pathway’s common essentials include hands-on programs and project-based learning experiences, the use of emerging technologies, with real world incorporation of community resources. The Gifted and Talented students explore a wide variety of subjects through core subjects and an extensive menu of elective courses that develop strengths and interests. Students have the opportunity to customize their academic programs by choosing elective courses according to their academic needs and interests.

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CONTACT (919) 431-7400 www.wcpss.net

56 NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017

GRADES PK-12

The International Baccalaureate (IB) students become increasingly knowledgeable and interested in international understandings, and actively work to effect positive change. Colleges and universities give special admissions consideration to students who take IB classes and earn an IB Diploma. Early college high schools blend high school and college in a rigorous yet supportive program; students enroll in college classes that allow them to earn free transferrable college credit. At Wake Leadership Academies, students complete their middle and high school academic program in single gender — all boys or all girls — learning environments. Language Immersion & Global Studies – Students are immersed in and learn in the target language (Spanish or Mandarin) all day. Beginning in 6th grade, two core courses are taught in target language. All middle and high school students participate in the Global Studies program.

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Barbara Mooty Vinson starts making caramel corn in October, handing out little bags to trick-or-treaters. By the time the corn-making slows in mid-December, she will have gone through nearly 25 pounds of popcorn. “This is a labor of love,� she says. 58

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017


Susie Oliver makes fudge for friends, family and holiday events. “I tasted it for the first time, and it was so good. It tasted like some of the fudge that is much more complicated to make.”

Homemade

for the Holidays WRITTEN BY AMBER KEISTER PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

T

alented cooks may churn out treats all year long, but during the holidays they pull out all the stops: Gallons of caramel corn, dozens of pound cakes, and plates of peanut-butter fudge, all given away to lucky friends and family. For recipients and givers alike, the season wouldn’t be the same without these delicacies, and it’s not just about the food. It doesn’t matter if it’s an heirloom recipe or a contemporary favorite. These makers carry on traditions that connect Christmases past, present and future — wrapped in a sweet, yummy bundle. continued on page 60

From October to December, Vinson’s caramel corn is packaged in themed bags and tags depending on the holiday. CARY MAGAZINE 59


“My secret is I don’t scrimp on ingredients.” Barbara Mooty Vinson

continued from page 59

“Crack corn”

Vinson pours a hot mixture of brown sugar, butter, corn syrup, cream of tartar, salt, vanilla, and baking soda over plain popcorn. She prefers not to share her exact caramel popcorn recipe, which is based on her grandmother’s, but the ingredients include, right, real butter and non-GMO popcorn.

“Popcorn has always been around in my family,” said Barbara Mooty Vinson, who has been making and giving away caramel popcorn for more than 20 years. At the holidays, the Iowa native and her family would string popcorn garlands, and her paternal grandmother, Sarah Mooty, would make caramel popcorn. Vinson was living in Los Angeles when she took on her grandmother’s tradition. She would pack the treat in gallon tubs and send it to her far-flung family at Christmas. When she moved to the Triangle in July 2002 to take a job in Morrisville, she continued making the corn, adding friends and coworkers to her growing list of recipients. “I’ve never been able to find my grandmother’s recipe, so I’ve probably modified it,” she said. “My secret is I don’t scrimp on ingredients.” She starts making caramel corn in October, handing out bags to neighborhood children at Halloween. By midDecember when the corn-making slows down, Vinson will have gone through nearly 25 pounds of popcorn. Special events, such as baby showers, during the rest of the year are also celebrated with caramel corn. Fans of the treat, which they have dubbed “crack corn,” have urged her to sell it commercially. But Vinson, who now works as a real estate agent, has no desire to go into the food business. “This is a labor of love,” she said. “I’m a Realtor with Allen Tate. I’m not at home making popcorn.” continued on page 62

60

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017


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CARY MAGAZINE 61


“At Christmas time, that’s just what I like to do, bake cakes and have some here for the people to eat. They come by to visit and ask: ‘Where’s the cake?’” Pat Guess

continued from page 60

Vanilla pound cake

Pat Guess says her pound cake recipe is similar to many others, and seems surprised that it’s so popular. Because so few people take the time to bake a pound cake, she says the homemade taste is likely what sets it apart. She also likes to have mini cakes on hand during the holidays. She’ll wrap them and take to friends at church. “It’s enough for one person or two — maybe,” she says.

62

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017

Pat Guess’ mother was a renowned baker who would whip up cakes and pies for neighbors, the elderly, or anyone else who needed cheering. She didn’t measure her ingredients, Guess says, so she had to watch carefully how her mother made things. There was plenty of time for observation, as Guess and her sister helped frequently in the kitchen, hand-mixing the cakes to fluffy heights. “On Christmas Eve, we would deliver cakes and pies to everyone,” said Guess. “Her coconut cake was a favorite. But you couldn’t buy frozen coconut, so Daddy would crack the coconut open. He’d get the meat out, and we would have to grate it by hand. And then she would give this cake away!” The hard work became part of the tradition, and now Guess is the one baking for

friends and family. During the holidays she’ll bake several cakes a week, sometimes taking a whole day to bake one cake after another. “At Christmas time, that’s just what I like to do, bake cakes and have some here for the people to eat,” she said. “They come by to visit and ask: ‘Where’s the cake?’ So, I’ll slice it and freeze it. If somebody drops by, I can take out a couple of slices, add some fruit, and it’s a quick dessert.” Guess and her husband, Charles, raised their two daughters in Morrisville, on a two-acre property that became Brier Creek Country Club. Their house in Raleigh is now the gathering place for siblings, in-laws, children and grandchildren. “Christmas time is a full house,” said Guess, who bakes with her three granddaughters. Chocolate chip cookies, not pound cakes, are their specialty. continued on page 64


Vanilla Pound Cake

By Pat Guess Serves 10 to 12 2

sticks (1 cup) butter, softened

½ cup shortening 3

cups sugar

5

large eggs, at room temperature

3

cups all-purpose flour

1

teaspoon baking powder

1

cup milk, at room temperature

1

teaspoon vanilla

1

teaspoon lemon extract

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour 12-cup tube or Bundt pan. Set aside. Cream together butter, shortening and sugar until pale and fluffy. Add eggs one at a time, beating well after each addition. Beat for 10 minutes. Sift together flour and baking powder; add to butter mixture alternately with milk, beginning and ending with flour mixture. Add vanilla and lemon extracts, beating just until blended. Pour batter into prepared pan. Bake until golden brown and a skewer inserted in middle of cake comes out with a few crumbs adhering, about 1 hour and 20 to 30 minutes. Cool cake in pan on a rack 10 to 15 minutes. Remove from pan, and cool completely on a wire rack. When cake is completely cool, spoon on vanilla glaze, if desired. Vanilla Glaze 2

cups powdered sugar, sifted

1

teaspoon vanilla

3-4 tablespoons milk

Stir together sugar, vanilla and 3 tablespoons milk. Add additional milk, up to 1 tablespoon, for desired consistency.

CARY MAGAZINE 63


continued from page 62

Double Good Fudge

Susie Oliver makes eight or 10 batches of fudge during the Christmas season, so the busy retiree appreciates that the recipe is quick and easy. “It’s a microwave fudge, and I’ve probably been making it 25 years or so,” she said. “It’s a combination of chocolate and peanut butter. It’s wonderful. My husband says it’s got the two food groups.” The Raleigh resident grew up in Cary and still attends Good Shepherd United Church of Christ, where her fudge is a staple. “I always take it to some of the church events,” said Oliver. “Usually I take it to some of the shut-in people, friends. Sometimes I give it to my neighbors, people in my garden club.” She got the recipe from her sister-in-law sometime around 1990, when people started experimenting more with the appliance. “Now it’s common to have a microwave in your house, but back then people didn’t have microwaves all the time,” Oliver said. “It was really a neat thing to make fudge easily instead of having to boil it, and do all that complicated stuff. “I tasted it for the first time, and it was so good. It tasted like some of the fudge that is much more complicated to make.” t

Double Good Fudge

By Susie Oliver Serves 12 to 16 Peanut butter layer

Cooking spray

1

pound powdered sugar

1

cup crunchy peanut butter

¼ cup plus 2 tablespoons milk ½ teaspoon vanilla

Spray 9-inch square pan with cooking spray. Line bottom of pan with waxed paper and spray again. Set aside. Combine powdered sugar, peanut butter and milk in microwave safe bowl. Stir well. Add vanilla. Cover with waxed paper and microwave on high 2 to 3 minutes, stirring once or twice. Spoon into pan. Chocolate layer ½ cup butter or margarine 1 pound powdered sugar ½ cup cocoa ¼ cup milk ½ cup chopped peanuts (optional) 1 teaspoon vanilla

The site of Susie Oliver’s childhood home is now occupied by Dillard’s department store at Cary Towne Center. “My mother actually graduated from Cary High School in 1925, and I graduated in ’65,” she says. “We are longtime Caryites.”

64

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017

Place butter or margarine in microwave safe bowl. Microwave on high 1 minute or until melted. Stir in powdered sugar, cocoa and milk. Cover with waxed paper and microwave on high 2 to 3 minutes, stirring once or twice. Stir in peanuts and vanilla. Spoon this mixture over peanut butter layer. Cool, cut into squares and store in airtight container.


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CARY MAGAZINE 49


Turkey Time All the

WRITTEN BY NANCY PARDUE

I

t’s quite a production, getting that bird on the table at the holidays, roasted golden brown and stuffed just right. But yummy holiday traditions aside, turkey is becoming a bigger deal in the food world, with trendy new takes for every meal of the day and plenty of family-friendly recipes — like these — to prove it. Citrusy marinades, spicy rubs, turkey tacos and even pizza are hits. You can take the taste of turkey on a Mexican bent, or off to Asia or the Mediterranean. “One of the reasons turkey has grown in popularity is its versatility. Turkey is the ideal canvas for whatever Holiday turkey help: flavor you want to showcase,” said Keith Now through Dec. 24, Williams, communications and marketaccess Butterball’s ing vice president for the National Turkey Turkey Talk-line via text Federation. “It’s becoming the change-up at (844) 877-3456 item on shopping lists, from lean turkey or phone at breakfast sausage and ground turkey to (800) BUTTERBALL, or turkey meatballs and turkey burgers.” (800) 288-8372. Chef Tony Seta of Garner-headquartered Butterball says it’s no surprise to him that turkey consumption has more than doubled in the U.S. since 1970. “There are a number of things that contribute to that growth, but one is certainly the health aspect,” Seta said. “Turkey has a good balance of protein but less fat, and the flavors it can take on means you can reduce calories and fat but still maintain flavor. “For example, in my Italian family, I grew up on traditional Italian sausage made of pork. I recreated the recipe using the same formula, but continued on page 70

68

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017

Chef Vivian Howard of PBS show, “A Chef’s Life,” and owner of Chef & the Farmer restaurant in Kinston, cooks up a new take on turkey at a recent event hosted by the National Turkey Federation, her Butterflied Turkey Tenders & Peach Salad; recipe next page. Industry experts cite the versatility of turkey in making it a main ingredient in breakfast, lunch and dinner menus.


Megan Kime/National Turkey Federation

CARY MAGAZINE 69


with turkey. To get the same taste, I was able to use 60 percent less salt, and it was perfect. It’s a win-win for flavor and healthy choices.” Turkey’s lean protein punch, says the NTF, means a 3-ounce serving of boneless, skinless turkey breast contains 26 grams of protein and 1 gram of fat, or 8 percent more protein than the same size serving of boneless, skinless chicken breast. Testing the trend

Not everyone is tickled over turkey just yet, however. Derek Wilkins, owner of The Butcher’s Market with locations in Cary and Raleigh, says most of his customers still think of turkey for Thanksgiving, or as lunch meat. Beef is the top-selling protein here, followed by chicken and pork. But as Wilkins works to stay ahead of trends — emu is one, believe it or not, as a red meat fowl — he recently updated The Butcher’s Market marinated turkey tenderloins, which are popular in cilantro-lime or Jamaican jerk. “We see an increase every year in orders for fresh birds at Thanksgiving,” he said of the heritage breed turkeys he orders in May each year to be specifically produced for his shops, “but that’s also reflective of our business growth.” For the holidays, Wilkins’ customers are most likely to request brining for their turkeys, a 24-hour process that involves brown sugar, rosemary, juniper berries and more to infuse flavor and moisture, or spatchcocking, a form of butterflying that’s used in open-fire cooking. Whether or not Cary runs with it, industry experts say the push toward turkey will continue. “You can use authentic ingredients and recreate delicious ethnic dishes like shawarma or bulgogi,” said Chef Seta. “Turkey chili is a staple on my menus; my secret is in the turkey chorizo I add, and just a touch of cinnamon to give it a layers of flavor. “Whether you’re craving a burger, chili or tacos, there is almost always a way to incorporate turkey.” t 70

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017

Megan Kime/National Turkey Federation

continued from page 68

Butterflied Turkey Tenders & Peach Salad with Curried Pecan Vinaigrette

By Chef Vivian Howard, Chef & the Farmer, Kinston Turkey Brine 1

cup kosher salt

1

cup sugar

1

cup lime juice

1

cup orange juice

2-inch piece ginger, chopped ½

cup fresh sage, chopped

½

cup fresh mint, chopped

1 ½ pounds turkey tenders

Peach Salad & Vinaigrette ½

cup pecans

1

medium yellow onion, diced

1

tablespoon olive oil

1

tablespoon curry powder

2

teaspoons kosher salt

2

peaches, diced

1

tablespoon lime juice

2

tablespoons fresh mint, chopped

2

tablespoons olive oil

1

tablespoon kosher salt

Bring 4 cups water, salt and sugar to a boil over high heat in a medium stockpot until salt and sugar dissolve. Remove from heat. Add remaining brine ingredients to water mixture. Refrigerate, uncovered, until cold.

Lay the turkey tenders on a cutting board, flat side down. With the edge of your knife parallel to the cutting board, begin cutting down the length of the side of each tender. Carefully slice the tenders in half, almost to the other edge. Add tenders to brine, cover and chill for 2 to 3 hours. In a medium saucepan over medium heat, spread pecans evenly over the surface. Keep the pecans moving for 3 to 4 minutes by shaking the pan to prevent burning. Pecans should become fragrant. Remove from heat. Allow to cool then roughly chop, and set aside in medium bowl. In same saucepan over medium heat, sauté yellow onion in 1 tablespoon olive oil. Add curry and salt. Once onions are translucent and beginning to brown, remove from heat and transfer to medium bowl with pecans. Add peaches, lime juice and mint. Toss to combine, and set aside. Remove turkey tenders from brine and rinse with cold water. With 1 tablespoon of salt, season each side of turkey. In a heavy-bottomed large skillet over medium-high heat, add 2 tablespoons olive oil. Heat pan for approximately one minute. Carefully place each tender smooth side down in pan and sear for 4 to 6 minutes per side. Allow turkey to rest for 3 minutes. Serve a generous spoonful of peach salad over top each turkey tender.


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Megan Kime/National Turkey Federation

”The flavors (turkey) can take on means you can reduce calories and fat but still maintain flavor,” says Butterball Chef Tony Seta, as in this turkey barbecue sandwich.

Carolina BBQ Turkey Sandwich

By Chef Tony Seta, Butterball Barbecue Pulled Turkey 1

whole grain bun

3

pounds turkey pot roast, shredded

2

tablespoons Dijonnaise

2

cups barbecue sauce; Chef Seta

5

ounces Barbecue Pulled Turkey,

recommends Sweet Baby Ray’s

recipe follows

2

tablespoons Dijon mustard

2

slices honey peppered bacon

1

tablespoon fresh garlic, chopped

½ ounce slice of smoked Gouda cheese

¾ cup apple cider

2

¼ cup honey

ounces Carolina-style cole slaw, drained

Open the bun and butter the top of the bun. Spread the bottom part of the bread with 2 tablespoons Dijonnaise. Arrange the barbecue turkey over the Dijonnaise. Cover with 1 slice of smoked Gouda. Place the sandwich on a baking sheet in a 375-degree F convection oven to crisp the bun and melt the cheese, approximately 2 to 3 minutes. Top with the cole slaw. Place the top of the bun over the slaw and serve.

72

Combine the barbecue sauce, honey and apple cider and blend well in a small stainless steel bowl. Place shredded turkey in a large stainless steel bowl, then blend with the apple cider barbecue sauce. Cover with foil, being careful the foil does not come into contact with the barbecue turkey. The sauce will have a reaction with the foil. Bake 30 minutes in a 350-degree F oven. Place in a casserole dish and serve.

Editor’s Note:

SOURCES: The Butcher’s Market thebutchersmarkets.com

Today’s Turkey serveturkey.org

Unless otherwise noted, all recipes are

Butterball butterball.com

National Turkey Federation eatturkey.com

and the National Turkey Federation,

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017

provided courtesy of Today’s Turkey

serveturkey.org.


Grilled Breakfast Pizza with Turkey Sausage, Eggs, Potatoes & Arugula

From The Culinary Institute of America Yield: 10 pizzas

New Client Specials

Torn potato croutons, recipe follows

½ pound Boursin cheese ¾ cup turkey breakfast sausage, sliced 15 eggs, beaten 2

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1 ½ cups sun-dried tomatoes

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¾ cup vinaigrette, your choice

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Pepper to taste

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½ cup Parmesan cheese, grated

Prepare your favorite pizza dough recipe, roll out 10 discs and grill pizza dough. Spread the grilled pizzas lightly with Boursin. Put the pizzas in the oven to melt the cheese. Meanwhile, sauté the sliced turkey sausage until browned and crispy. Add the beaten eggs and scramble. In a large bowl, mix the arugula, sundried tomatoes, torn potato croutons, olive oil and vinegar, salt and pepper. Top the pizzas with the scrambled egg and turkey sausage mixture. Top this with the arugula salad and a dusting of grated Parmesan cheese.

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Torn Potato Croutons 2

pounds Yukon gold potatoes

1

quart canola oil, for frying

Salt to taste

Ground black pepper to taste

Cook the potatoes in boiling salted water until tender and drain. Tap each potato with a mallet or the bottom of a small sauce pot until the potato cracks. Tear each potato into ½- to ¾-inch chunks with a craggy irregular shape. Set these aside to cool and steam dry. Your goal is to create tender pieces of potato with extra surface area. Heat the oil in a medium pot to a temperature of 375 degrees F. Fry the potato pieces in batches until deep golden brown and crispy, about 3 minutes. Drain the potatoes on an absorbent towel and season with salt and pepper. Set aside. CARY MAGAZINE 73


Fried Turkey & Waffle Bites

½ teaspoon baking soda

with Sriracha-Maple Drizzle

½

teaspoon kosher salt

From PartiesThatCook.com Makes 16

2

cups buttermilk

2

eggs

½ teaspoon vanilla

Buttermilk brine

½ cup (1 stick) butter, melted

1½ cups buttermilk ¼ cup hot sauce, such as Crystal

or Tabasco

1½ tablespoons sugar 1

tablespoon salt

3

cloves garlic, minced

2

pounds skinless turkey thigh meat,

cut into small pieces

Dredge for turkey 2

cups flour

2

teaspoons paprika

1

teaspoon salt,

plus more for after frying

1

teaspoon black pepper

1

quart vegetable or rice bran oil

In a mixing bowl, add the buttermilk, hot sauce, sugar, salt, garlic and turkey. Let marinate for at least 1 hour. Heat the oil in a skillet or other highsided pan, until it reaches 350 degrees F. Line

a sheet pan with a cooling rack. Put the flour, paprika, salt and pepper in a mixing bowl, and remove the turkey from the marinade. Dredge the turkey in the flour and line up on the rack to get ready to fry. Carefully add the turkey to the hot oil, and cook about 3 minutes on each side, or until it is golden brown. Remove from the oil and put on a sheet pan lined with paper towels. Season with salt. Continue until all the turkey is fried. Set aside.

1 ¾ cups all-purpose flour tablespoons sugar

2

tablespoons cornmeal

Sriracha-Maple Drizzle ½ cup maple syrup 1

tablespoon Sriracha

½ teaspoon salt

In a mixing bowl, add the maple syrup, Sriracha and salt. Stir to combine. To serve: Top each waffle square with a piece of turkey, and drizzle with Srirachamaple sauce.

Waffles 3

Heat the waffle iron. In a mixing bowl, combine the flour, sugar, cornmeal, baking soda and salt; mix. In a second bowl, whisk the buttermilk, eggs, vanilla and melted butter. Add the wet ingredients to the dry. Carefully add batter, a little at a time, to the well-sprayed waffle iron. Close and cook for about 8 to 10 minutes. Repeat until all the batter is gone. Evenly cut the waffles into 16 squares. Set aside.

San Antonio Red Turkey Chili

2 tablespoons tomato paste

From The Culinary Institute of America Yield: 8 to 10 servings

2 tablespoons turkey or chicken stock

4 ancho chili peppers, stem and seeds removed

4 cups black beans, cooked

¾ cup hot turkey stock

4 ounces canola oil 6 garlic cloves, minced 12 ounces onions, diced 4 poblano peppers, seeded, deveined and diced 1 red pepper, seeded, deveined and diced 2 jalapeño peppers, seeded, deveined and diced 1 pound chorizo sausage, removed from casing 3 1/3 pounds skinless turkey thigh meat, cut into small pieces 2 bay leaves 2 teaspoons oregano 1 tablespoon cumin seeds, toasted 1 teaspoon crushed red chile pepper 1 cinnamon stick 2 tablespoons dark chile (pasilla) powder 2 teaspoons ground black pepper 12 ounces dark beer 2 ½ cups fresh tomatoes, diced 74

2 tablespoons masa harina, mixed with 2 tablespoons water

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017

Salt to taste

In a stainless steel bowl, cover the ancho chili peppers with the hot turkey stock and soften for 15 minutes. Purée in food processor for 30 to 45 seconds. In a heavy-duty pan, heat oil over medium-high heat. When oil is hot, add the onions and cook for 2 minutes. Add the garlic and sauté for 15 seconds. Add the poblano, red pepper and jalapeño peppers and sauté for 2 minutes. Add chorizo and cook for about 1 minute. Add diced raw turkey and blend into mixture. Add tomato paste. Add bay leaves, oregano, cumin, crushed chili pepper, cinnamon stick, pasilla powder and black pepper, blend in, and continue cooking for 1 minute. Add diced tomatoes and dark beer, and bring to a boil. Add stock and masa harina and bring to boil, then allow to simmer for 45 to 60 minutes, until turkey is tender. Add more stock as needed. When turkey is tender, add the cooked black beans and add salt if needed. Serve with shredded cheese, diced green onions and fresh corn chips.


CARY MAGAZINE 75


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exclusive dish

WRITTEN BY AMBER KEISTER PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

Sweet Potato Tostones from Dean’s Kitchen+Bar, Cary

THE SWEET POTATO TOSTONES from Dean’s Kitchen+Bar are a plateful of contrasts. Tender sweet potato slices are fried until the edges turn crispy. The dollop of cranberry jam adds sweetness with a tart citrus bite, and the smear of goat cheese dressing brings a richness to the vegetable-based appetizer. “I always cook with sweet and acid, try to get that balance,” said executive chef Steve Zanini. “For fall we were thinking pumpkin or butternut squash. None of those worked well, but the sweet potatoes did. The sugar in them caramelized well on the outside. Their sweetness went well with the tartness of the cranberry.” 78

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017

For those wanting to make the dish at home, Zanini says it comes together quickly because many of the components can be made ahead of time. A batch of cranberry jam could be made for Thanksgiving, and the leftovers could be used for tostones. The recipe is also forgiving and extremely versatile, he adds. “You don’t have to use this vinaigrette recipe,” said Zanini. “You could use straight vinegar with the goat cheese, and adjust the seasonings with salt, pepper and a little sugar.” If you don’t want to make the sauce, crumbled goat cheese makes a fine substitute. The toasted pepitas add a nice crunch, but the

dish is delicious without them, he says. The tostones, which feature North Carolina sweet potatoes, will be on the menu at Dean’s at least until January. Featuring a seasonal menu and strong focus on locally sourced ingredients, the Kitchen is the latest concept from longtime restaurateur Dean Ogan. The menu may have been revamped when Dean’s Seafood Grill & Bar was rebranded, but a few favorites from the Maggywinning restaurant remain. The honey pecan shrimp; the baked crab, spinach and brie dip; and the white chocolate banana bread pudding aren’t going anywhere, Ogan says.


Sweet Potato Tostones With Goat Cheese Vinaigrette and Cranberry Jam

Makes 4 servings 1½ pounds sweet potatoes 2/3 cup canola oil Salt to taste ¼ cup goat cheese vinaigrette (recipe follows) ½ cup cranberry jam (recipe follows) Toasted pepitas for optional garnish (recipe follows)

Heat oven to 350 degrees F. Bake whole sweet potatoes for 30 minutes, or until they are mostly cooked, but still firm in the center. Remove from oven and set aside to cool. When potatoes are cool, peel and slice

into ½-inch rounds. In a 12-inch heavy bottomed skillet, heat oil over medium heat. Pinch off a tiny bit of sweet potato and drop it in the oil. If it starts sizzling immediately, gently place the sweet potato rounds in the oil. Do not crowd them and make sure they are in a single layer. Lightly fry the sweet potato slices until browned on the edges, about 3 minutes on each side. Remove from oil and drain on paper towels. Season both sides with salt. To serve, spread one tablespoon goat cheese vinaigrette on each plate. Arrange three to four fried sweet potato slices on the dressing, and top the potatoes with two tablespoons cranberry relish. If desired, sprinkle each serving with chopped, toasted pepitas.

Goat Cheese Vinaigrette

Cranberry Jam

2 tablespoons chopped shallots

4 cups (1 12-ounce package) fresh or frozen

1/3 cup red wine vinegar

cranberries

1 teaspoon Dijon mustard

1 cup sugar

¾ teaspoon sugar

Zest and juice from 1 orange

Pinch of salt and pepper

Zest and juice from 1 lemon

1 cup canola oil 4 ounces goat cheese

Using a blender, combine shallots, vinegar, mustard, sugar, salt and pepper until smooth. With motor running, remove the round fill cap in the blender lid and slowly drizzle in oil until dressing is thick. Use immediately on any salad, or store covered in the refrigerator for up to a week. To make the Goat Cheese Vinaigrette, blend the goat cheese in a food processor. When cheese is smooth, drizzle in 1/3 cup of the vinaigrette dressing, and process until combined. Dean’s Kitchen+Bar 1080 Darrington Drive, Cary (919) 459-5875 deanskitchenandbar.com

Using a food processor, rough chop the cranberries. Place in a saucepan with the sugar, orange and lemon zest, and the orange and lemon juices. Cook over low heat for 15 minutes or until thick. Remove from heat and transfer to another container to cool. Once cooled, the jam can be stored in the refrigerator for up to a week. Toasted Pepitas 2 cups pepitas (pumpkin seeds)

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1 tablespoon olive oil ½ teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon sugar ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. In a bowl, mix pepitas and olive oil. Once pepitas are lightly coated with oil, mix in salt, sugar and cayenne pepper. Spread pepitas on a foil-lined baking sheet. Bake for 5 minutes, stir, and bake for 5 minutes more. The cooled pepitas should be stored in a sealed container.

1077 Darrington Drive • Cary (919) 377-0152 Lunch: Monday - Friday 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. Dinner: Sunday - Thursday 4:30 p.m. - 9 p.m. Friday - Saturday 4:30 p.m. - until

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Gift Guide The

Share the joy this holiday season, with gift ideas from Cary Magazine partners. PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

CARY MAGAZINE 83


The Gift Guide

3

1 4 5

2

1

The versatile anorak jacket is waterproof, and the hood zips up into the collar for those chilly days – making it the perfect all-weather jacket! Whether you want to dress it up or dress it down, you will look fashionable in any season, $120. swaggergifts.com 84

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017

2

Cary Film Circle is a gift that keeps on giving. Members receive exclusive perks at local merchants, ticket deals, T-shirt, and more. thecary.townofcary.org

3

The gift of healthy hair: Strong Sexy hair improves hair health while Vibrant Sexy hair gives up to 10 weeks of long-lasting color. twistedscizzorsonline. com

4

Pandora rose: Smooth clasp bracelet with Radiant Hearts, Geometric Radiance and Sweet Heart charms, featured with Hearts of Pandora necklace, starting at $90. anfesasjewelers.com

5

Lunchtime facelift: Kiss face lines goodbye with FDA-approved, instant, long-lasting ‘lunchtime facelift’ with Dr. Brian Coan or Nurse April at CARE Plastic Surgery, starting at $599. careplasticsurgery.com


7

8

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Active accessories: Studiowear, athleisure apparel, and funky grip socks! Inspire Active Wear leggings made of recycled plastic bottles, starting at $15. studiovibecary.com

7

Cheers! North Carolina’s most comprehensive selection of fine wine and craft beer for everyone on your list. trianglewineco.com

9

8

Foodie paradise: If you’re looking for unique gifts for holiday entertaining or a gift for someone who enjoys cooking, Whisk is the place! whiskcarolina.com

9

We know beans! Larry’s Coffee is a tasty gift for the java-lover on your list. With more than 30 coffees varying from single origins to blends, there is something for everyone; starting at $13.45 for 12-ounce bag, $34.99 for 1-kilogram bag. larryscoffee.com CARY MAGAZINE 85


The Gift Guide

11 12

10 13

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86

Like Durham Distillery’s award-winning Conniption gin, a great party is equal parts art and science. Check out some of their spirits this holiday season and put this theory to the test, starting at $35. durhamdistillery.com NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017

11

Discipline holiday pack: Give the gift of smooth, gorgeous hair with Discipline shampoo and conditioner, also receive a complimentary travel size of reshapable blow dry lotion, $84. artisanhaircary.com

12

Premium pasta sauces: Twist open a jar of Nellino’s sauce and smell the aroma of a southern Italian kitchen. From our marinara to our hot and spicy, there’s something for everyone, $6.99-7.99. nellinos.com

13

14

Letter perfect: Initial Disc Pendants are available in 14k rose, yellow, and white gold, starting at $300. diamonds-direct.com/ diamonds-direct-raleigh

14

Pure hydration: It’s a total skin rejuvenation! One of Dr. Jeremy Pyle’s favorites, this ultra-hydrating serum quenches skin for a supple, smooth complexion, $85. skinraleigh.com


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18 19

16 17

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Bring on the sparkle: Elegant two-toned filigree cuff and 14k gold-plated statement earrings by Kendra Scott, starting at $70. lovepinkmagnolia.com

Bumble and Bumble hair care products; Parlor Beauty makeup line; “Harry Josh Pro Tools� hair appliance and tools. parlordrybar.com

17

Shop local this season from some of the finest area artisans on Sunday, Dec. 3, at The Mayton Inn from noon to 4 p.m. locallymademarket.com

18

Raise a glass. Celebrate the holidays with old school classics and new school originals from Bond Brothers. bondbrothersbeer.com

19

Custom holiday wreaths: Indoor and outdoor wreaths, swags and garlands designed to order. Visit the shop for all of your holiday gifts and arrangements! prestonflowers.com

CARY MAGAZINE 87


The Gift Guide 20

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Give a gift of beauty enhancement with a new skin care kit specially prepared and priced for the holidays: Murad Radiant and Polished Holiday Kit, $49; PCA Renewing Duo Kit, $100; or the PCA Hydrating Duo Kit, $95.  MassageEnvy.com NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017

21

Bee-youtiful! The Naked Bee Soaps, lotions and shampoos with all the good stuff, none of the bad stuff. High quality, good for you, unpretentious and easy to carry, $4.50 and up. gardensupplyco.com

22

Productivity, passion and happiness! With your busy schedule, planners and agendas are the only way to keep your life on track. shopcutebuttons.com

23

Yam good spirits: Covington Sweet Potato Vodka, and Maters & Taters Bloody Mary Mix. Available at all North Carolina ABC Stores. covingtonvodka.com

24

Big or small, Halie’s has it all: Katie Loxton purses and perfect pouches ensure you are party ready this holiday season, starting at $26.50. haliesboutique.com


25

Retractable and reusable lint roller that looks as good as you and you’ll wonder how you ever lived without it. Available in a variety of colors and designs, starting at $7.99. meetflint.com

26

Have beautiful skin with ZO Skin Health by Cary Med Spa and Wellness, starting at $49. feelgoodaboutme.com

Where to Shop Anfesa’s Jewelers

Cute Buttons

Locally Made Market

Skin Raleigh

205 New Fidelity Court, Garner (919) 773-0013 anfesasjewelers.com

Park West Village 3023 Village Market Place, Morrisville (919) 462-9618 shopcutebuttons.com

(919) 443-9214 locallymademarket.com

Massage Envy Spa

2304 Wesvill Court, Suite 310, Raleigh (919) 871-3292 Skinraleigh.com

15 area locations MassageEnvyRDU.com

StudioVIBE

Artisan Hair 5039 Arco St., Cary (919) 694-5755 artisanhaircary.com

Bond Brothers Beer Company 202 E. Cedar St., Cary (919) 459-2670 bondbrothersbeer.com

CARE Plastic Surgery

Diamonds Direct-Crabtree 4401 Glenwood Ave., Raleigh (919) 571-2881 diamonds-direct.com/ Diamonds-Direct-Raleigh

Durham Distillery 711 Washington St., Durham (919) 937-2121 durhamdistillery.com

2001 Weston Parkway, Cary (919) 484-4884 careplasticsurgery.com

Flint

The Cary

Garden Supply

122 E. Chatham St., Cary (919) 319-4560 thecary.townofcary.org

1421 Old Apex Road, Cary (919) 460-7747 gardensupplyco.com

Cary Med Spa and Wellness

Halie’s Boutique

400 Ashville Ave., Ste. 200, Cary (919) 473-6002 feelgoodaboutme.com

1209 Parkside Main St., Cary (919) 462-0902 haliesboutique.com

Covington Spirits

Larry’s Coffee

3647 Edgemont Drive, Raleigh covingtonvodka.com

1507 Gavin St., Raleigh (919) 828-1234 larryscoffee.com

meetflint.com

Nellino’s Sauce Co. Available at local retailers including Whole Foods and Harris Teeter (919) 428-4338 nellinos.com

Parlor Blow Dry Bar 302 Colonades Way Waverly Place, Cary (919) 880-3391 parlordrybar.com

200 Cornerstone Drive, No. 103, Cary (919) 466-9989 studiovibecary.com

Swagger Gifts 2425 Kildaire Farm Road, Cary (919) 858-5824 swaggergifts.com

Triangle Wine Company

Pink Magnolia

Locations in Cary, Morrisville and Southern Pines trianglewineco.com

1205 Parkside Main St., Cary (919) 518-5532

Twisted Scizzors

3021 Village Market Place, Morrisville (919) 561-1769 lovepinkmagnolia.com

Preston Flowers 1848 Boulderstone Way, Cary (919) 460-4625 prestonflowers.com

2751 NC 55, Cary (919) 303-7775 twistedscizzorsonline.com

Whisk 316 Colonades Way, Waverly Place, Cary (919) 322-2458 whiskcarolina.com

CARY MAGAZINE 89


Dr. Nick Ashford Dr. Amanda Groulx Dr. Deana McNamer Dr. Matthew Merriman Dr. Christine Boyd

Women ages 45-60 experiencing symptoms of anxiety or depression 2010 N. Salem Street

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4 pm Traditional Lessons & Carols 4 pm Family Contemporary Festival 7 pm Traditional Candlelight Service 8 pm Contemporary Christmas Festival 10:30 pm Traditional Candlelight Service

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600 Walnut Street, Cary, NC 27511 This study is conducted by Susan Girdler, Ph.D., David Rubinow, M.D., and Maria Munoz, M.D. UNC Center for Women’s Mood Disorders and Department of OB-GYN

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CARY MAGAZINE 91


This engagement ring setting and band are from the Scott Kay Embrace Collection at Anfesa’s Jewelers. Both feature diamonds and 14K white gold.

Before

She Says Yes

How to find the perfect engagement ring WRITTEN BY ALEXANDRA BLAZEVICH PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

92

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017


➤ PRO TIP:

✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶

ing time with family and friends, eating delicious food and giving to those you love. According to Wedding Wire — a website that helps couples plan their wedding — Christmas Day is also the most popular time to get engaged. Christmas Eve comes in third, behind Valentine’s Day. Now ladies, let’s be real for a moment. We’ve all gushed over the stories on “How He Asked” and looked at endless engagement photos online, but how much thought have we given the diamond itself? It’s time we gave this symbol of love the attention it deserves.

✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶

CHRISTMASTIME IS ABOUT spend-

J.M. EDWARDS

Don’t know what kind of ring she wants? Take a trip to her jewelry box. “Look at the other style jewelry she has. If she likes large, bulky jewelry versus if she likes dainty, delicate, antique-style jewelry. That can really drive you in one direction or the other.” Carl Edwards, J.M. Edwards

This 14K rose gold engagement ring from J.M. Edwards has a large center stone and smaller diamonds on the band.

The Tradition The wedding ring exchange began in ancient Egypt. The Egyptians believed that circles symbolized never-ending love, and the fourth finger on the left hand had a vein that connected it to the heart. Thus it came to be known as the “ring finger.” Fast forward a few centuries to 1477, when Archduke Maximilian of Austria was the first to propose with a diamond ring. continued on page 94

➤ PRO TIP: Make sure your stone is GIA certified, says Edwards. The Gemological Institute of America is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the research and education of gems and jewelry. GIA’s diamond grading reports are the top-rated verification and certification documents in the industry.

Founder: James Michael Edwards opened the Raleigh location in 1985. Who we spoke with: Carl Edwards Credentials: GIA graduate, went to FIT in New York, learned through the family business as well What makes them special: Custom jewelry, local jeweler, family-owned 1137 Kildaire Farm Road, Cary (919) 460-1048 jmedwardsjewelry.com CARY MAGAZINE 93


Trends If you look around a group of newly engaged women, chances are quite a few of them have rose gold rings. Some of them may have mixed metal rings; those are popular now too. Just like everyday fashion, engagement ring trends change too, but the all-time favorite is a classic, round, brilliant-cut diamond set in white gold. Trends are fleeting, but diamonds are forever. That’s why Deborah Boatwright of Anfesa’s Jewelers says you have to absolutely love your ring. “You bond with it for some reason,” Boatwright said. “They say diamonds are a girl’s best friend, so I guess that’s why.” What’s New Area jewelers say customizable rings remain quite popular. It’s hard to find a jeweler that won’t let you alter your ring

➤ PRO TIP: Have a budget in mind. Diamond experts should be able to find something you like within the parameters of your budget. “If you have a budget, you want to try and stay on that. Because (with) diamonds and jewelry, it’s very easy to get in over your head and spend way more than you intended to.” Brandon Capps, Johnson’s Jewelers

This three-stone ring with a blue sapphire and diamonds from Johnson Jewelers is set in 14K white gold. 94

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017

in some way. If you want more options than your local jeweler’s inventory offers, you can personalize your ring by choosing every detail from the band material to the carat weight. This can be done online or in most jewelry stores. “Making something unique for the customer — making it exactly what she wants — is a really special thing,” said Carl Edwards of J.M. Edwards. The customer can come in with a drawing, a photograph, or just an idea of what they want their ring to look like. It’s the jeweler’s job to make that dream a reality, all while staying within the customer’s budget. Perhaps the best piece of advice if you are looking to give the gift of an engagement ring this Christmas, is to make sure you love it. If you love it, your significant other surely will too. t

✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶

continued from page 93

JOHNSON’S JEWELERS Founders: Original owner L.E. Johnson sold the business to Noah Capps in 1968. Noah’s son John is the current owner. Who we spoke with: Brandon Capps Credentials: GIA graduate What makes them special: Custom jewelry, local jeweler, family-owned 136 E. Chatham St., Cary (919) 467-9431 johnsonsjewelerscary.com


➤ PRO TIP: Don’t know her size? Offer to have her current jewelry cleaned and have it sized then. If she wears that jewelry on her nondominant hand, note that the hand she uses the most will typically be a half size larger.

ANFESA’S JEWELERS Founder: Anfesa Matthews opened the store in 1994 Who we spoke with: Deborah Boatwright and Meredith Eiseman Credentials: DCA Diamontologist What makes them special: Large selection in-house, custom jewelry, DCA Diamontologists, family-owned

This round halo engagement ring from Anfesa’s Jewelers features 14K white and rose gold.

205 New Fidelity Court, Garner (919) 773-0013 anfesasjewelers.com

CARY MAGAZINE 95


Look before you go. Whether it’s on Pinterest or the hands of your engaged friends, it’s good to have an idea of what you want in an engagement ring. “Get some ideas, take some pictures, come in – bring those with you. We love it when someone comes in and they have an idea of what they think they like, and we can find the item, put it on their hand and see how they feel about it when they see it in real time.” Browse for and purchase your diamond in person. “I think it’s really important for anyone beginning the process to understand the difference between really coming and doing the footwork and seeing a diamond with their own two eyes, versus just simply shopping characteristics through a computer screen.” Melissa Garrison-Staats, Diamonds Direct

96

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017

✶✶✶✶✶✶✶✶✶✶✶✶✶✶✶✶✶✶✶✶✶✶✶✶✶✶✶✶✶✶

➤ PRO TIPS:

DIAMONDS DIRECT Founders: Began as a diamond manufacturing company based out of Israel and the United States 30 years ago; opened its first location in Charlotte in 1995 Who we spoke with: Megan Farrell and Melissa Garrison-Staats Credentials: Learned about diamonds through the business and experts What makes them special: Large in-house selection, custom jewelry 4401 Glenwood Ave., Raleigh (919) 571-2881 diamondsdirect.com


RING STYLES Solitaire: A single diamond, the most traditional type of ring Halo: A single, larger diamond, surrounded with a halo of smaller diamonds Three-stone: A solitaire ring with two smaller stones on either side Tapered baguette: The ring contains rectangular diamonds called baguettes; found in a lot of vintagestyle rings

These rings from Diamonds Direct are examples of the popular halo style. The emeraldcut diamond engagement ring, left, has a halo of round brilliant- and baguette-cut diamonds. The yellow cushion-cut diamond ring, right, has a halo of round brilliant-cut diamonds.

unique gifts • accessories • home décor • clothing onsite monogramming • Southern hospitality Halie’s Boutique 1209 Parkside Main St Cary, NC | 919-462-0902

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CARY MAGAZINE 97


Cary’s New Luxury Salon

The place for Sushi enthusiasts and beginners of Japanese cuisine. QUALITY IS OUR RECIPE

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1361 Kildaire Farm Road | Cary 919.481.0068

(In Shoppes of Kildaire Near Trader Joes) “Ahi Tower” our best seller, selected for the cover of Cary Magazine May/June 2011

ADDRESS

Alston Town Center Next to the new Whole Foods

5039 Arco St. Cary, NC 27519 CONTACT US

919-694-5755 artisanhaircary.com FOLLOW US

ArtisanHairCary

98 NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017

www.YuriJapaneseRestaurant.com

H ave you recently made a move? Whether you’ve moved across the country, across the state, or across town, we want to meet you to say hello & to help you with tips as you get settled. Our basket is loaded with useful gifts, information & cards you can redeem for more gifts at local businesses.

ANN BATCHELOR 919-414-8820 BETH HOPPMANN 919-302-6111


Expanding SERVICE OFFERINGS

Come grow with us. In an effort to meet our community's evolving needs,

Generations Family Practice is expanding! Designed with the intention of maximizing patient-provider interactions and personal, individualized care, this new space boasts more exam rooms, comfortable waiting spaces, state-of-the art technology and a new MedSpa. All of which will allow for increased staff, on-site imaging (X-Ray), seamless integration with our electronic medical record system and improved care. And best of all, our new building is being constructed within a mile of our current office. While our physical space is growing, our commitment to quality, personalized care remains our priority!

GRAND OPENING

EARLY 2018!

www.GenerationsFamilyPractice.com

Call us today. (919)852-3999 CARY MAGAZINE Meet providers Carinne McKeever Woodworth, PA-C and Justin Glodowski, DO

99


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2017

RALEIGH | CARY WESTERN WAKE

TO CREATE OUR 2017 LIST, Cary Magazine partnered with national survey company topDentists, LLC, which sent ballots to dentists listed online with the American Dental Association and other local dental societies in Wake County, asking, “If you had a patient in need of a dentist, which dentist would you refer them to?” Dentists are also given the opportunity to nominate other dentists that they feel should be included in this list. Respondents are asked to put aside any personal bias, to use only their knowledge of their peer’s work when evaluating the other nominees. Dentists and QUESTIONS? specialists are asked to take into consideration years More information about of experience, continuing education, manner with topDentists’ survey process can patients, use of new techniques and technologies, and be found at usatopdentists.com. physical results. Dentists with the highest average ratings were vetted for active licenses and good standing with the North Carolina State Board of Dental Examiners before being selected for the final list. Of course there are many fine dentists who are not included in this representative list. It is intended as a sampling of the great body of talent in the field of dentistry in North Carolina. A dentist’s inclusion on our list is based on the subjective judgments of his or her fellow dentists. continued on page 102

CARY MAGAZINE 101


2017

RALEIGH | CARY WESTERN WAKE

continued from page 101

ENDODONTICS Geraldine Bills 875 Walnut St., Ste. 200, Cary (919) 467-8227 rootcanalsincary.com

Luke K. Dalzell 5710 Six Forks Road, Ste. 101 Raleigh (919) 866-1989 raleighendodontics.com

Bruce S. Barker 7610 Falls of Neuse Road, Ste. 250, Raleigh (919) 847-7100 northraleighdentalcare.com Michael E. Bass 1031 W. Williams St., Ste. 101, Apex (919) 362-6789 michaelbassdds.com Jonathan P. Beavers 619 W. Chatham St., Apex (919) 362-0967 beaversfamilydentistry.com Paul E. Beavers 619 W. Chatham St., Apex (919) 362-0967 beaversfamilydentistry.com

Robert M. Hermann 3368 Six Forks Road, Raleigh (919) 783-7409 hermannendodontics.com

Jennifer S. Bell 5245 Sunset Lake Road, Holly Springs (919) 355-1170 sfdsmiles.com

J. Christian Sheaffer 2310 Myron Drive, Raleigh (919) 782-8603 raleighendo.com

Michael K. Bielinski 101 SW Cary Parkway, Ste. 60, Cary (919) 467-7360 bielinskidds.com

Robert P. Sopko 3708 Forestview Road, Ste. 201, Raleigh (919) 819-9289 robertsopkoendo.com

Thomas E. Brooks 1142 Executive Circle, Ste. A, Cary (919) 467-9651 steetdds.com

Robert J. Stancill 4601 Lake Boone Trail, Ste. 2-A, Raleigh (919) 239-4940 stancillendodontics.com

Josiah B. Chen 10290 Chapel Hill Road, Ste. 600, Morrisville (919) 469-3669 morrisvillefamilydentistry.com

GENERAL DENTISTRY Allan M. Acton 1149 Kildaire Farm Road, Cary (919) 371-4442 carydental.com Steven B. Andreaus 1637 Glenwood Ave., Ste. 201, Raleigh (919) 546-9011 drandreaus.com

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Daniel Davidian 3917 Sunset Ridge Road, Raleigh (919) 783-9686 sedationdentalcare.net Tracy L. Davidian 5904 Six Forks Road, Ste. 205, Raleigh (919) 782-9955 carolinaTMJ.com

Ashley DeSaix 3420 Ten-Ten Road, Ste. 310, Cary (919) 342-8509 kildairefamilydental.com Andrew R. Farrell 7901 Strickland Road, Ste. 103, Raleigh (919) 870-9122 farrellfamilydentistry.com Angelina C. Franklin 5245 Sunset Lake Road, Holly Springs (919) 355-1170 sfdsmiles.com Susan D. Gover 3840 Ed Drive, Ste. 120, Raleigh (919) 283-4408 myraleighdentists.com W. David Gover 3840 Ed Drive, Ste. 120, Raleigh (919) 283-4408 myraleighdentists.com David B. Greenlee 1018 Oberlin Road, Raleigh (919) 833-4634 greenleedentalcenter.com Mike P. Hamby 7628 Purfoy Road, Fuquay-Varina (919) 552-2431 mikehambydds.com Rylan J. Hansen 800 W. Williams St., Ste. 240, Apex (919) 363-8444 hansendentistryapex.com Willis S. Hardesty, Jr. 2321 Blue Ridge Road, Ste. 103, Raleigh (919) 781-0018 Mark L. Helms 3600 Haworth Drive, Raleigh (919) 787-8243 markhelmsdds.com Ed Howard 2613 Green Level West Road, Cary (919) 589-0270 lanedds.com


Jennifer C. Matthews 10411 Moncreiffe Road, Ste. 107, Raleigh (919) 405-7075 reflections-dental.com

Patrick A. Lawrence 431 Keisler Drive, Ste. 200, Cary (919) 859-1330 carycosmeticdentist.com

John W. McNeill 2020 Fairview Road, Raleigh (919) 821-2595 woodallmcneilldentist.com J. Gregory Mayes 3761 NW Cary Parkway, Cary (888) 779-6401

John S. Kitzmiller III 1021 W. Williams St., Ste. 101, Apex (919) 362-1341 apexdentalgroup.com

Lisa H. Mayes 3761 NW Cary Parkway, Cary (888) 779-6401 prestondentalcenter.com

Darren G. Koch 100 Parkway Office Court, Ste. 204, Cary (919) 859-6633 caryncdentist.com Douglas K. MacLeod 6900 Six Forks Road, Ste. 104, Raleigh (919) 848-8444

David Nightingale 2945 New Bern Ave., Raleigh (919) 783-5677 nightanddaydental.com Robert L. Orander 2301 Rexwoods Drive, Ste. 112, Raleigh (919) 787-3365 roboranderdentistry.com

C. Ashley Mann 315 E. Chatham St., Ste. 100, Cary (919) 462-9338 drashleymann.com

continued on page 104

Now part of the

DENTAL BLUE NETWORK ®

Royal Oak Dental Group at Cornerstone Blake R. Jones, DMD Brandon D. Kofford, DMD Jake T. Smith, DDS 200 Cornerstone Drive, Suite 200/203 Cary, NC 27519 www.royaloakdentalgroup.com

Robert R. Watson, DDS Aaron T. Smith, DDS

Call today to schedule an appointment! (919) 468-4211

® Marks of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. U13034h, 7/17

CARY MAGAZINE 103


2017

RALEIGH | CARY WESTERN WAKE

Robert A. Englehardt 1010 High House Road, Ste. 100, Cary (919) 461-0110 caryoralsurgery.com

www.stanleysmiles.com Bobbi A. Stanley 3731 NW Cary Parkway, Ste. 201, Cary (919) 371-4454 stanleysmiles.com Michael Riccobene 1000 Crescent Green Drive, Ste. 202, Cary (919) 336-5338 brushandfloss.com Shraddha Patel Kolappa 1000 Crescent Green Drive, Ste. 200, Cary (919) 336-5694 brushandfloss.com/cary-pediatric Brooke W. Schrader 1000 Crescent Green Drive, Ste. 200, Cary (919) 336-5338 brushandfloss.com/cary-pediatric John Tomasheski 966 US 64, Apex (919) 267-2457 brushandfloss.com/apex continued from page 103

Robert J. Stanley II 3731 NW Cary Parkway, Ste. 201, Cary (919) 371-4454 stanleysmiles.com Anita J. Wells 3803-A Computer Drive, Ste. 200, Raleigh (919) 786-6766 renaissancedentalcenter.com

ORAL AND MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY Nazir Ahmad 5904 Six Forks Road, Ste. 101, Raleigh (919) 322-4500 capitalofs.com Kenneth J. Benson 2081 Shepherds Vineyard Drive, Ste. 100, Apex (919) 387-3388 centralcarolinaoralsurgery.com

Sabine E. Schtakleff 1600 Olive Chapel Road, Ste. 120, Apex (919) 372-8352 primefamilydentalnc.com

Brian H. Camp 8301 Bandford Way, Ste. 121, Raleigh (919) 876-4746 raleighoralsurgery.com

William J. Sowter 2310 Myron Drive, Raleigh (919) 781-8610 sowterdds.com

Cameron F. Cavola 5904 Six Forks Road, Ste. 101, Raleigh (919) 322-4500 capitalofs.com

Matthew R. Wassel 6837 Falls of Neuse Road, Ste. 100, Raleigh (919) 847-1322 northraleighdentist.com

104 NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017

Francis J. Cusumano 103 Parkway Office Court, Ste. 200, Cary (919) 661-1995 wisdomtoothcenter.com

Roy E. Gaines, Jr. 4201 Lake Boone Trail, Ste. 002, Raleigh (919) 787-3949 gainesoms.com Scott A. Hum 2500 Blue Ridge Road, Ste. 201, Raleigh (919) 783-9920 humoms.com Jay A. Jefferson 8301 Bandford Way, Ste. 121, Raleigh (919) 876-4746 raleighoralsurgery.com Mark F. Kozacko 6817 Falls of Neuse Road, Ste. 101, Raleigh (919) 848-9871 drkozacko.com K. Kevin Neshat 8305 Falls of Neuse Road, Ste. 105, Raleigh (844) 624-6752 ncimplant.com Robert L. Stutts III 431 Keisler Drive, Ste. 101, Cary (919) 233-0073 stuttssmitheyoms.com Bruce A. Vande Berg 1010 High House Road, Ste. 100, Cary (919) 461-0110 caryoralsurgery.com

ORTHODONTICS Edward R. Altherr 1011 W. Williams St., Ste. 101, Apex (919) 363-2221 altherrorthodontics.com

continued on page 106


CARY MAGAZINE 105


2017

RALEIGH | CARY WESTERN WAKE

continued from page 104

Jesse Arbon 7535 Carpenter Fire Station Road, Ste. 201-A, Cary (919) 846-7900 mycarolinasmile.com Todd S. Bovenizer 2625 Green Level West Road, Cary (919) 303-4557 bovorthodontics.com Reid H. Brogden 103 Parkway Office Court, Ste. 204, Cary (919) 858-0078 brogdenbraces.com James E. Buckthal 106 Lake Boone Trail, Raleigh (919) 782-2119 drjamesbuckthal.com Caroline C. Cheek-Hill

7800 Six Forks Road, Ste. 200, Raleigh (919) 870-4494 cheekhillortho.com

2305 Stafford Ave., Raleigh (919) 716-9550 wmgortho.com

Mac Collie 7401 Creedmoor Road, Raleigh (919) 719-1780 wakeorthopedo.com

Thomas J. Griffin 540 New Waverly Place, Ste. 110, Cary (919) 233-0668 griffinbraces.com

Todd G. Engstrom 7200 Falls of Neuse Road, Ste. 201, Raleigh (919) 870-4443 engstromorthodontics.com

William H. Gurley 103 Parkway Office Court, Ste. 204, Cary (919) 858-0078 brogdenbraces.com

Kristen Fritz 224 Village Walk Drive, Holly Springs (919) 285-4481 fritzorthodontics.com

C. Randy Macon 7401 Creedmoor Road, Raleigh (919) 719-1780 wakeorthopedo.com Scott R. McClure

Kelly A. Goeckner

continued on page 108

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continued from page 106

Andrew P. Wells 3803 Computer Drive, Ste. 100, Raleigh (919) 781-7330 raleighncorthodontist.com Henry S. Zaytoun, Jr. 5041 Six Forks Road, Ste. 200, Raleigh (919) 782-6911 zaytounorthodontics.com

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Richard F. Brooks 120 Preston Executive Drive, Ste. 100, Cary (919) 468-9775 pediatricdentistcarync.com

Michael J. Brenegan 1003 High House Road, Ste. 102, Cary (919) 469-9986 caryperio.com

Robert M. Poteat 1061 Bullard Court, Raleigh (919) 876-0030 fang-factory.com

Robert D. Elliott 540 New Waverly Place, Ste. 300, Cary (919) 852-1322 carypediatricdentistry.com

Carlos M. Garcia-Velez 2801 Blue Ridge Road, Ste. G-40, Raleigh (919) 510-8888 northcarolinaperio.com

Paul E. Scruggs 7201 Creedmoor Road, Ste. 120, Raleigh (919) 846-6622 ncprosthodontics.com

Daniel T. Howell 101 SW Cary Parkway, Ste. 80, Cary (919) 467-0635 carypediatricdentist.com

Steve W. Hamrick 7501 Falls of Neuse Road, Ste. 100, Raleigh (919) 846-2480 raleighperio.com Paul C. Kazmer, Jr.

William P. Scruggs 7201 Creedmoor Road, Ste. 120, Raleigh (919) 846-6622 ncprosthodontics.com

E. LaRee Johnson 108

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017


Now open in Northwest Cary is a unique shared-space partnership that’s drawing attention from nonprofits around the country: The WHY Project Inc., is an inspired collaboration between Crosspointe Church and YMCA of the Triangle, and all are welcome.

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“We didn’t want to build something for us without paying attention to the broader community. People are attracted to a place where they feel at home, and loved. It doesn’t matter what you believe. You belong.” T.J. Terry, Crosspointe Church

Greater Good WRITTEN BY NANCY PARDUE

PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

THE WHY PROJECT

CARY MAGAZINE 111


LIFE HAS COMPARTMENTS — faith, family, work and workout. Or it did, until now. In a unique partnership that’s drawing attention from nonprofits around the country, The WHY Project Inc., is an inspired collaboration between Crosspointe Church and YMCA of the Triangle, and you’re invited to be part of it. “The goal is to create an environment that draws people in every day of the week,” said T.J. Terry, lead strategist for Cary’s Crosspointe Church, led by Pastor Jonathan Bow and celebrating its 20th anniversary this year. “We didn’t want to build something for us without paying attention to the broader community,” Terry said. “People are attracted to a place where they feel at home, and loved. It doesn’t matter what you believe. You belong.” Crosspointe bought 38 acres of northwest Cary farmland back in 2001, and opened its church building here in 2003. By 2010 they were bulging at the seams with growth, and planning an expansion. Church leaders noted a lack of places for teens to connect in Northwest Cary, and immigrant families feeling isolated from their community. Then a casual conversation about faith between two friends from Crosspointe and the YMCA changed everything. “(The WHY Project) is such a great benefit to both organizations,” said Travis Hinton, director of service programming and communications at Crosspointe. “But the driving motivation is the benefit to the Cary community.” “It’s a unique partnership that can magnify our impact,” agreed longtime YMCA

An atrium features another Crosspointe tenant, White Oak Coffee, Tea & Juice, where anyone — not just Y and church members — can meet, work or just relax. The LEED-eligible Y building was constructed using wood milled from logs felled onsite, with water and energy conservation also in mind. 112

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s y a d i l Ho

WITH THE

COMMUNITY OUTREACH Separate from The WHY Project between Crosspointe Church and YMCA, at least one other Western Wake church is finding its own new ways to serve as a community resource not just on Sundays, but seven days a week. Hope Community Church, with locations in Apex, Morrisville and Raleigh, offers a fitness and community center at the Apex campus that’s open to the public as a place to connect. Community members are also welcome at the Common Grounds coffee shops at Hope’s Apex, Morrisville and Raleigh sites. gethope.net

employee Brad Emory, branch director for the new Northwest Cary facility, citing the YMCA’s mission to put Christian principles into practice and serve people of all faiths. “This area is important because of its growth,” he said. “The Y already had a footprint in local schools here with afterschool care and camps, but the cost of land here is so high, it would have been almost impossible for us (to build).” Crosspointe members gave sacrificially during a two-year campaign, pledging funds to build the Y on its land. The YMCA now has a 20-year lease for the use of the facility, operating independently of the church. With six five-year renewal options, the deal can last for the next 50 years. Terry notes that financing for this unusual partnership was turned down by 13 banks before one said yes. The Northwest Cary Y has the association’s largest wellness floor, an outdoor pool, four group exercise studios, and an extralarge gym that the church plans to use at

The Polar Express WED, NOV 22 | 3PM

The new Northwest Cary Y has the association’s largest wellness floor, an outdoor pool, four group exercise studios, and an extra-large gym. Branch director Brad Emory says The WHY Project has a special focus on the needs of area teens.

some point in the future. “The most exciting opportunities are one, to focus on the needs of teens,” Emory said. “Mills Park Middle School is one of the largest middle schools in North Carolina, and we have multiple high schools nearby. We’re already seeing Y and Crosspointe leaders serving in each other’s programs, and speaking at each other’s events. “Two is that both the Y and the church have huge bases of volunteers, and that puts us in the position to leverage pools of volunteers for organizations outside these walls, to engage with other nonprofits.” For example, the Northwest Cary Y will partner with Meals of Hope and the Cary Rotary Clubs on Nov. 17 to serve as the packaging site for 20,000 meals. “We didn’t ask for this — a conversation on faith became this,” Terry said of the project. “We believe God is in it, and feel we’re being called. “The ideal? To see a thriving church and a thriving Y, a healthy relational dynamic. To influence churches across the country to be better businesses and good stewards. To still be humble and growing and learning. I hope in 10 years, we’re more the norm.” The WHY Project 6911 Carpenter Fire Station Road, Cary thewhyproject.net

MEYMANDI CONCERT HALL, RALEIGH David Glover, conductor Scott MacLeod, baritone, narrator

Concert Sponsor: Blue Cross Blue Shield of NC

Paintings from the Caldecott Medal-winning book appear on a giant screen above the stage as a narrator and a chorus of children join the Symphony to bring this holiday tale to life.

Home Alone in Concert

FRI, NOV 24 | 7:30PM SAT, NOV 25 | 3PM

MEYMANDI CONCERT HALL, RALEIGH David Glover, conductor

Warm a child’s tummy! Bring Soup-to-Go to The Polar Express and Home Alone to support Inter-Faith Food Shuttle’s BackPack Buddies program.

Catch this comedy classic on the big screen—as the Symphony plays the charming score by John Williams live!

Music for a Winter’s Eve SAT, DEC 9 | 8:30PM

HOLY NAME OF JESUS CATHEDRAL, RALEIGH David Glover, conductor

Enjoy an evening of music that evokes the season—the sparkle of a snowflake, the drama of a blustery wind, and the warmth in our hearts as we’re surrounded by friends and family, all in Raleigh’s glorious, awe-inspiring new cathedral.

Christmas with the Callaway Sisters

FRI, DEC 15 | 8PM SAT, DEC 16 | 3PM & 8PM

MEYMANDI CONCERT HALL, RALEIGH David Glover, conductor

Saturday Sponsor: Galloway Ridge at Fearrington

Tony-nominated Broadway stars and sisters Ann Hampton Callaway and Liz Callaway shine in holiday favorites including “The Christmas Song,” “Joy to the World,” and more!

Tickets selling fast! Buy now! ncsymphony.org 919.733.2750 CARY MAGAZINE 113


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nonprofit spotlight

The Hope Center staff, from left, Kellie Burris, Kelliann Miranda, Saunya Jones, Laura Goulian, Jennifer Weiss and Meredith Yuckman. Not pictured is Erin Witcher.

The Hope Center at Pullen WRITTEN BY AMBER KEISTER PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

BECAUSE HE WAS BULLIED as a child, Jamie H. used to be afraid to ride the bus. Now the 20-year-old rides an hour each way to attend classes at Wake Tech, thanks to staff from The Hope Center who encouraged him and even accompanied him on a couple of rides. “I was nervous about going to Wake Tech, mainly because of the busing system, but The Hope Center helped me a lot with that,” he said. “They helped me get over that fear within a matter of weeks.” The achievement may seem small, but for the former foster youth, this longstanding fear stood in the way of his independence. 116

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The tall young man with glasses and a shock of dark curly hair that falls over his right eye is now looking forward to a career in psychology or nursing. “I’d be able to give back to my community for what they’ve done for me,” Jamie said. “If I were to take psychology as my career, I’d like to be a foster care specialist. That way I can be a part of the community that I was once in. “Without The Hope Center, I feel like I might have been dead by now,” he added. In 2009, The Hope Center at Pullen was founded by members of Pullen Memorial Baptist Church to combat homelessness in

IMPACT OF THE HOPE CENTER Homelessness: Nationally, 36 percent of youth with a history in foster care experience homelessness. For Hope Center participants, that number is 13 percent. Education: Only 10 percent of young people with a history in foster care, nationally, pursue higher education, as compared to 46 percent of Hope Center participants. Source: The Hope Center, 2015 figures


Wake County, but organizers soon realized that many of those on the streets had a history in foster care. The nonprofit narrowed its focus in 2012 to support young people aging out of the system, helping them transition to independent, productive adulthood. That year, 10 youth benefited from Hope Center programs; in 2016, close to 200 young people were helped. “If you wrap your arms around this population, give them a lot of support, you can really make a difference in their lives,” said Jennifer Weiss, executive director. Each young person works with Hope Center staff to create an individualized life plan, which includes goals for stable housing, education and employment. The nonprofit collaborates with government agencies, nonprofits and businesses to coordinate the necessary supportive services. Among these partners are Wake County Human Services, Wake Technical Community College, EDSI Tomorrow’s Leaders, Families Together, SAFEChild, and Triangle Family Services. Their clients often need guidance in several areas, including employment, housing, education, parenting skills, financial management, physical and mental health, and general life skills. Hope Center staff say they can’t be experts in all these areas, so they leverage the strengths of their partners. “We see results when we work together,” said Weiss.

“If you wrap your arms around this population, give them a lot of support, you can really make a difference in their lives.” — Jennifer Weiss, executive director

FOSTER CARE FACTS ➤ According to the Annie E. Casey Foundation, for every young person who ages out of foster care at 18 without support, taxpayers and communities pay an average of $300,000 in social costs such as public assistance and incarceration. ➤ In 2016 there were 690 children in foster care in Wake County. Between 30-40 young people age out of foster care every year in Wake County without ever finding a permanent home.

Much of the Hope Center’s work begins while the young person is still in foster care. The nonprofit partners with Wake County Human Services on the LINKS program which provides academic and other support for teens in foster care. Frequent moves and a lack of a stable home can derail education, so once-a week tutoring can help children catch up at school and graduate high school on time, says Meredith Yuckman, program and volunteer coordinator at The Hope Center. Every other week, volunteer mentors also meet with youth, and the relationship itself is the primary goal. Studies show that if a youth has three supportive, caring adults in his or her life, a host of outcomes improve. “A lot of our youth don’t get their birthdays celebrated, period,” said Yuckman. “We had a mentor who showed up on the teen’s birthday, took her out, and spent the whole evening with her. When the girl was dropped off, she said, ‘When I woke up this morning, I didn’t even remember that it was my birthday. You have made it the best birthday ever.’” There is a significant problem with trust in this population, says Laura Goulian, clinical director. She and two transition specialists at The Hope Center work first to establish trust with their clients and then to offer advice. “A lot of what we take for granted, how

HOW TO HELP The Hope Center’s greatest need is for volunteers willing to provide transportation or to serve as tutors and mentors. For information, email volunteer@ hopecenteratpullen.org. For more on how to support The Hope Center, visit hopecenteratpullen.org.

we raise our kids, what our kids are exposed to, or the safety net that our children have — it doesn’t exist, and this creates tremendous complications for these young people,” she said. Difficulty with interpersonal relationships is common, says Goulian. These youth may need guidance on how to interact with landlords, how to be a successful parent, and how to deal with job conflicts. “We celebrate their accomplishments,” said Weiss. “We are so excited when they pass a probationary period in a job. To go three months in a job is a big deal for some of our young people. We walk beside them and when they stumble, we help them get up.” Jamie has gained self-confidence and independence in the years he has worked with The Hope Center, and is especially grateful for the work skills he gained through summer internships at the Habitat for Humanity ReStore and the Interfaith Food Shuttle. His journey hasn’t been easy, he says, admitting that he hasn’t always taken the help offered. “It was hard enough to realize everything I was doing wrong,” he said. “But it was even harder to realize that there are people out there willing to help put you back on track, no matter what your situation. “They see in you what you are not able to see yourself.” The Hope Center at Pullen 1801 Hillsborough St., Raleigh (919) 322-2751 hopecenteratpullen.org CARY MAGAZINE 117


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garden adventurer WRITTEN AND PHOTOGRAPHED BY L.A. JACKSON

Repeat Performer For many Cary gardeners, hybrid tulips are must additions to the spring bloom season. So, every year at this time, copious quantities of these bulbous beauties are dutifully planted in area landscapes. And this ritual will be repeated every fall until we run out of falls. Most hybrid tulips, while gorgeous, are fleeting flowers in the Southeast — one-shot wonders that grace the garden for only a single spring. This because, in our region, there are usually not enough days in the winter of extended cold to stimulate tulip bulbs into flowering spring Lady tulips come in many varieties including the popular ‘Cynthia,’ a bright selection with after spring. yellow flowers flamed in red. However, exceptions exist, and one particularly pretty example is the lady tulip (TuThere are many lady tulip variations. For lipa clusiana), variously described as a botanistarters, ‘Lady Jane’ is a real charmer with its cal, species, heirloom or miscellaneous tulip. bicolor coat of outer red and inner white petAlthough humble in height — only about a als, an appealing look that is echoed by the foot tall — and with smallish flower heads, it similar, well-named ‘Peppermint Stick.’ can still be a real cutie in the spring garden. ‘Tinka’ has comparable colors, but it And a definite plus the lady tulip has over bigblushes more, having its rich red contrasted ger, fancier hybrids is that, true to its temperwith a pale yellow. For a real zinger though, go ate East Asian origins, it doesn’t need the chill with the popular ‘Cynthia,’ a sassy selection of winter to wake up its inner flower power. that combines stop sign red on the outside of In short, with just a little care, lady tulips ‘Lady Jane’ is another bicolor tulip with white inner petals and red accents. the petals with taxi cab yellow on the inside. can become reliable repeat performers in the Although an odd tulip, the lady tulip will spring garden, even naturalizing — thriving not be that hard to find. I have even spotted ‘Cynthia’ bulbs at local rather than just surviving to the point of actually spreading by way big-box garden shops. There are, of course, online avenues, and three of stolons or offsets. good e-retailers to check out are: Lady tulips love full sun, and they should be planted in neutral n Brent and Becky’s Bulbs: brentandsoil, which can be easily pH-balanced by dusting their growing sites beckysbulbs.com with lime every year or two. Good drainage is essential, but this only n Terra Ceia Farms: terraceiafarms.com means these springtime dazzlers are great additions to raised beds, n John Scheepers, Inc.: johnscheepers.com rock gardens and even containers. L.A. Jackson is the former editor of CarIf deer are a problem in your area, stay vigilant — Bambi could olina Gardener Magazine. Want to ask L.A. munch on these pretties. Want to get sneaky? Interplant lady tulips a question about your garden? Contact him by with summer snowflakes (Leucojum aestivum) that bloom about the email at lajackson1@gmail.com. same time in the spring and are more deer-resistant. 120

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To Do in the

GARDEN

November •

Kentucky bluegrass and fescue lawns will benefit from being fertilized at a rate of one pound of nitrogen per 1,000 square feet of lawn this month.

Landscape to conserve energy? You bet, especially if you plant evergreen trees and shrubs on the northern and northwestern sides of your house to help block heatrobbing effects of the coldest winter winds, which usually come from the north.

Black spot on roses is a soil-borne fungus, so to help break up its life cycle in the ground, rake up all spent flowers and leaves as well as any surrounding summer mulch and toss away. Then add a fresh, clean layer of mulch to protect roots through the winter.

A jade plant will survive indoors in low light, but in order for it to thrive, the more direct sunlight it gets, the better it will look.

December •

If you cranked up a compost pile this fall, cover it with black plastic to speed decomposition and prevent winter rains from chilling the internal heat that keeps the pile working.

African violets might look crowded in their tiny pots, but they like it that way — and flower better in confined containers — so resist giving a four-dollar plant the elbow room of a $40 pot.

Still want to pamper your African violets? Once a month, wash the rims around their pots, which will often become encrusted with fertilizer salts that can burn and curl the undersides of the leaves. The pleasures of the past summer garden can brighten up holiday settings with homegrown wreaths and garlands woven from evergreen foliage, grapevines, onion and garlic stalks, corn husks and dried chilies. If you want to add more homegrown interest to winter floral decorations, look no further than the dried blooms on your hydrangea.

12 9

3 6

TIMELY TIP With the growing season winding down, now is a good time to take a walk through the garden and search for areas where permanent features can be added to enhance visual interest year-round. There are plenty of conventional choices when it comes to such constant focal points, including vases, statuary, fences, benches, walls, a greenhouse, arbors, sundials and bird baths. But if you like to recycle and enjoy perpetuating a playful state of unexpected whimsy in your garden, opt for the unusual, such as a wildly painted mail box to store hand tools, a claw foot bathtub for water-loving marginal plants, a crusty wood stove converted into a planter, or even an old metal bed frame to define a planting area, making it, ahem, a planting bed.

We have all your holiday needs from gifts to party wear! Check us out online or come see us in the store.

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CARY MAGAZINE 121


Recognized by Cary Magazine readers as one of the best special occasion restaurants WINNER 2006

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The Moving Truck is Leaving! Are you ready to learn about your new community?

Your local welcome team is ready to visit you with a basket full of maps, civic information, gifts, and gift certificates from local businesses. From doctors to dentists and restaurants to repairmen...we help newcomers feel right at home in their new community! For your complimentary welcome visit, or to include a gift for newcomers, call 919.809.0220. Or, visit our website, www.nnws.org.

CARY | APEX | MORRISVILLE | HOLLY SPRINGS | FUQUAY-VARINA | GARNER ANGIER | WILLOW SPRING | CLAYTON | CLEVELAND 122 NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017


SPEND CHRISTMAS WITH YOUR FAVORITE CHARACTERS BASED ON CHARACTERS BY

CHARLES M SCHULZ

DEC 1-10 DEC 15-24

WRITTEN BY

CHARLES DICKENS ADAPTATION BY

IRA DAVID WOOD III

Duke Energy Center for the Performing Arts

DEC 6 - 10

DukeEnergyCenterRaleigh.com

Durham Performing Arts Center

DEC 14 - 17 DPACnc.com

919.831.6058 TheatreInThePark.com CARY MAGAZINE 123


happenings

Locally Made Market will be held on Sunday,

The

Dec. 3 from noon to 4 p.m., at The Mayton Inn in downtown Cary, featuring 36 local vendors and a giveaway for the first 50 shoppers. Each purchase enters shoppers for additional giveaways, with drawings held at the end of the event; you must be present to win. Locally Made Market, founded by 2016 Cary Magazine Mover & Shaker Susan Silver, showcases local artisans and their handmade works, focusing on diverse, high-quality and original creations. locallymademarket.com

Howard Manning, executive director of Dorcas Ministries, was named the

Cary Chamber of Commerce 2017 Citizen of the Year at the chamber’s annual banquet on Sept. 13. Dorcas Ministries provides crisis relief to residents of Cary and Morrisville through food and financial assistance, scholarships, training programs, referrals and a thrift shop. dorcas-cary.org

The

Cary Unity Walk & Fun Run will take place on Saturday,

Nov. 11 from 8 a.m. to noon, beginning with a walk from Downtown Cary to WakeMed Soccer Park,​where participants will be greeted by a​ Veterans Day and Law Enforcement Festival with the Bandit Flight Team Flyover, performances, exhibits, activities, and 5K and 10K races. The event benefits the 200 Club of Wake County and Special Olympics North Carolina, and is directed by local nonprofit Fit & Able Productions. Register: bit.ly/CUWalk 124

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017

A Holiday Vendor Fair will be held at SALEM

BAPTIST CHURCH PRESCHOOL

in Apex, Nov. 15-17, featuring the Apex Hot Dog Man and the Buoy Bowls Acai Food Truck. salem-bc.org/preschool


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CARY MAGAZINE 125


happenings

The V Foundation for Cancer Research, headquartered in Cary, announces the inaugural

VICTORY RIDE TO CURE CANCER, which will take place May 19, 2018, beginning in Raleigh. The Victory Ride benefits Duke Cancer Institute, UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center and the Wake Forest Baptist Health Comprehensive Cancer Center, as well as breakthrough cancer research nationwide. The ride will start and finish at N.C.

takes riders through central North

NATIONAL WREATHS ACROSS AMERICA DAY, wreath laying ceremonies to honor our nation’s veterans are

Carolina neighborhoods and includes

conducted at Arlington National Cemetery, and at more than 1,200 additional locations across

State University’s On the Oval on

Each December, on

Centennial Campus. The course

100-, 60- and 30-mile ride options, as well as a shorter Family Ride. thevictoryride.org

the country. On Saturday, Dec. 16 at noon, a ceremony will be held at Hillcrest Cemetery in Cary. All are welcome, and the event will be held rain or shine. To donate a wreath, contact Jennifer McFadyen at jmmcfadyen@aol.com. wreathsacrossamerica.org

Owners Missy and Lionel Vatinet of

La Farm

Bakery will open a new venue inside the Whole Foods

Market opening at Alston Town Center in Cary. The 1,500-squarefoot space will feature a European hearth oven, and bakers will be visible mixing, shaping and

Cary Community Choir have been invited to Director David Mellnik and the

pulling loaves from the oven throughout the day. La Farm will also

participate in a performance of Handel’s “Messiah” at Carnegie

offer full coffee service and a café menu, with seating for 30 indoors

Hall on Nov. 26, as part of the Distinguished Concerts

and 30 outdoors. Also, the Vatinets are expanding their footprint at

International New York City concert series. Conductor Dr.

the original Preston Corners location of La Farm, and this summer

Jonathan Griffith will lead the performance and serve as the

opened a production facility in downtown Cary. lafarmbakery.com

clinician for the residency. carycommunitychoir.org

126

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017


CARY MAGAZINE 127


happenings

Vicky Serany, owner of

SOUTHERN STUDIO INTERIOR

DESIGN, has moved her business from Apex to a restored home on West Park Street in downtown Cary. The interior of the 4,200-square foot house, which was built in 1951, has been completely reconfigured with offices, a design studio, showroom and client gathering spaces. Southern Studio Interior Design was founded in 2001. southernstudio.com

The Friends of The Page-Walker Hotel honored Cary High School junior Charlie

The 34th annual Jump for the Children Horse Show, benefiting Duke Children’s Hospital and

2016-2017 President’s Volunteer Service Award, an initiative

Health Center, will be held Nov. 8-12 and

of the Corporation for National and

Nov. 15-19, at the Gov. James B. Hunt

Community Service. The Friends of the

Jr. Horse Complex, 4601Trinity Road,

Page-Walker Hotel recently became a

Raleigh. Jump for the Children is the longest

certifying organization of this award, which

continuously-held, annual fundraiser for

recognizes individuals who demonstrate

Duke Children’s, raising more than $1.9

outstanding volunteer service and civic

million to date. This year, 10 percent of show

Loyack with the

Anne Gittins Photography

participation over the course of a 12-month

proceeds will go to research on therapy dogs for child patients. Show highlights include

period. Loyack received the Gold Award

the Kid Fun & Stick Horse Race, and $50,000 Duke Children’s Grand Prix, featuring the

for his service, associated with activities

best riders on the East Coast. Pictured is 2016 Grand Prix winner Brooke Kemper, riding

sponsored by The Friends of The Page-

Classified. jumpforthechildren.org

Walker Hotel. friendsofpagewalker.org

128

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017


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write light

BY JONATHAN FREDIN

Flower to the people

130 NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017

A youngster tugs on a stilted lotus flower, genus LotuSapiens, at the NC State Fair’s Flower and Garden Show. Performance artists Heather and Marco Landin of Las Vegasbased Dream City Presents charmed fairgoers with their strolling stilt characters, which towered over the crowds and illuminated at night.


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Cary Magazine Nov/Dec 2017  

The Holiday Issue: Festive food and fashion to make the season bright, and the annual gift guide.

Cary Magazine Nov/Dec 2017  

The Holiday Issue: Festive food and fashion to make the season bright, and the annual gift guide.