Page 1

FREE! OCTOBER / NOVEMBER 2016

your life on the Crystal Coast

LOOK INSIDE FOR FUN & FREE

THINGS TO DO AT CARTERET COMMUNITY THEATRE PAGE 17

ON THE CRYSTAL COAST MID–OCTOBER THROUGH MID–NOVEMBER PG. 8


HOME OF THE CRYSTAL COAST STEAM POT!

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Thursdays

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Starting at 4PM in the Boat Bar, CaribbeanStyle drink specials, Heineken & ShockTop $3

Fridays

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PRIME RIB Sundays

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FOOTBALL Starting at noon. Games kick off at 1PM.

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MID-OCTO B E R TO M I D-N OVE M B E R 2 0 1 6

Inside This Issue your life on the Crystal Coast

14 The Old Halloween

A hilarious look back at how much times (and we ourselves) have changed since we were all kids trick-or-treating with flashlights.

15 A Wild November Night

Enjoy a crazy fun and wild time with great food at the OWLS fundraiser on Friday, November 18, at the Civic Center in Morehead City.

15

16 The Phantom Ship In Support of Wildlife FREE!

OCTOBER

/ NOVEMBER

This historical tale from the sea excerpted from the book Ghosts By the Coast will send a gently spooky shiver up your spine.

A WILD NIGHT

2016

stal Coast on the Cry your life

E LOOK INSID & FREE FOR FUN

THINGS TO DO

COAST CRYSTAL GH ON THE R THROU BER MID–OCTOBE MID–NOVEM PG. 8

17 The Addams Family

October / November

ON THIS MONTH’S COVER Have you been to a Carteret Community Theatre production before? If you have, you know exactly the kind of fabulous night you can expect. If you haven’t, The Addams Family is the perfect show to give it a try.

ERET AT CART TRE ITY THEA COMMUN PAGE 17

The weird, wonderful, and “altogether ooky” Addams Family comes to the stage at Carteret Community Theatre in October and November.

18 All About Pumpkins

Whether you’re baking, carving or just curious, get your most pressing pumpkin questions answered by Mary Miller of Salty Air Open Market.

20 Burial Rites for Uncle Cleve

Local historian Rodney Kemp is a master of the tongue-in-cheek tall tale, and “Burial Rites for Uncle Cleve” does not disappoint!

21 Ask The Aquarium

This month’s spindly undersea creature is great for Halloween in shades of red, yellow and black. Find out more about this strange undersea denizen.

22 The Red Clay Ramblers 14 THE OLD HALLOWEEN Prepare to laugh a lot, especially if you remember the old days!

17 THE ADDAMS FAMILY comes to Carteret Community Theatre in Morehead City.

This Tony Award-winning band will be performing in Joslyn Hall at Carteret Community College for a special two-night event October 7–8.

LOCAL INTEREST

Things To Do................................................ 8 Hooked Up Fishing..................................... 23 Diving Our Coast.. ....................................... 24 Tides. . ....................................................... 25

21 ASK THE AQUARIUM What is this strange creature? Turn ahead to page 21 and find out!

22 RED CLAY RAMBLERS appear for a two-night event October 7–8 in Morehead City.

CarolinaSalt.com » October/November 2016 CAROLINA SALT 5


PUBLISHER

WILL ASHBY C R E AT I V E D I R E C TO R

C H E V Y K AY LO R C O N T R I BU T I N G W R I T E R S

Kim Murdoch, Linda Bergman-Althouse, Sherry White, Nancy Roberts, Mary Miller, Rodney Kemp, Lee Moore, Captain Jeff Cronk, Mylissa Maynard and Karen Amspacher.

Let us put the Leisure back into your most important day!

B E C O M E A C O N T R I BU TO R

Submit your letters to the editor, photos, community listings and articles to will@carolinasalt.com. The editorial deadline for the next issue is October 16. The next issue publishes November 7.

B E C O M E A N A DV E RT I S E R

Carolina Salt is a great way to reach out to your local customers, as well as our seasonal visitors.

252-723-7628

Call us to find out how we can help you grow your local business. FROM THE PUBLISHER

Thank you for picking up Carolina Salt magazine, all about our life here on the Crystal Coast. Our articles are written by locals. Every month we look to our readers to keep our magazine fresh. If you have a story to tell, an event to promote or an interesting local photograph, send them our way. Participation is welcomed and appreciated. Reader contributions are the founding principle of the magazine. If you like what you see, tell people about it— especially our advertisers. For questions, concerns or more information, send e-mail to will@carolinasalt.com or call 252-723-7628. For up-to-date info, be sure to look us up on Facebook!

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Call 252-723-7628 if you’re interested in submitting an article or photo. Our local content is what keeps our magazine fresh and relevant.

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PUBLISHED BY CRYSTAL COAST OUTDOORS PUBLICATIONS P.O. Box 572, Morehead City, NC 28557 | 252-723-7628

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8302 Emerald Drive • Emerald Isle • 252.424.8284

LIVE MUSIC October 8

FLIPSIDE 6:30–9:30pm

October 8–14

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For more information visit fishinforacure.com

October 15

THE REINDL BROTHERS 6:30–9:30pm

October 22

ATLANTIC AVENUE 6:30–9:30pm

November 5

STEVEN COMPTON 6:30–9:30pm

November 12

CHRIS BELLAMY 6:30–9:30pm

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THINGS TO DO

✪ = FREE

MID–OCTOBER TO MID–NOVEMBER

OCTOBER

Harrika’s Happenings

Come see what’s happening in the Biergarten at 911 Cedar Point Boulevard (Highway 24) in Cedar Point! Thursday Trivia and Beer Releases 6 to 10 p.m. and live music on the weekends from 7:30 to 10:30. For more information visit drinkcoastal.com or call 252-354-7911.

OCTOBER

GARNER’S CORN MAZE

and U-Pick Pumpkin Patch includes kids straw bale maze, pumpkin chunker, corn kernel pit, tire mountain and more. Open Friday–Monday. Call 252-241-1184.

10/1................................Pig n’ Pint Night Music by 4EverAll Brewery Highland from Asheville Pig by Lil Johnny’s 10/6..................................................................Mad Hatter Day 10/7......................................................................... Werewolves 10/8.................................Open Mic! We provide the guitar and amp—all musicians welcome 10/13.......................Elvis Trivia Night! Dress up, win swag! 10/14....................... Brooke McBride 2013 Carolina Music Award for Best Female Country Artist, ABC Television series “Nashville” 10/15................................................... Six Pack of Gentlemen 10/20...................................... Haus Trivia Night celebrating our tenth year serving you! 10/21........................................Pure T of pure t mommicked 10/22...................................Oktoberfest 2016: Win a trip to Asheville! Tickets on sale. 10/27...........................................Blues Brothers Trivia Night 10/28.....................................................................Hank Barbee 10/29.............................................The Low Counts: On Tour Black Sabbath meets T-Model Ford OCTOBER

Garner’s Corn Maze and U-Pick Pumpkin Patch

OCTOBER 7–9

SURF FISHING WORKSHOP

with expert, hands-on instruction. Advance registration and fees are required. For details call 252-247-4003 or visit ncaquariums.com/ pine-knoll-shores.

Corn Maze admission includes entrance to corn maze, hay rides, little kids’ straw bale maze, pumpkin chunker, corn kernel pit, sand fossil pit, tire mountain, family friendly games including checkers, tic-tac-toe and more! Food from Grill on Wheels (burgers, barbecue and more) and Garner Farms Garden Patch Kitchen (baked goods). Horse Pen Ranch will have horse rides available for $5. Garner’s Corn Maze will be open Fridays 4 to 9 p.m., Saturdays 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. and Sundays 1 to 7 p.m. Open Monday through Thursday for large and school groups by reservation only. Enjoy a complimentary hayride to our U-Pick Pumpkin Patch to pick your perfect pumpkin. At 5878 Arendell Street in Newport. For more information, call 252-241-1184.

OCTOBER 7

Family Survivor Challenge

[ 6–7:30 PM ] Race to collect what you need to

“survive” and find clues to solve the mystery— all while avoiding native curses. Come out for an evening of fun, mystery and challenge. Refreshments and snacks will be provided. Space is limited so be sure to pre-register. Fee is $5 per person. For more information, call 910-3262600 or come by the Swansboro Recreation Center, at 830 Main Street Extension. For more information visit swansboro.recdesk.com. OCTOBER 7, NOVEMBER 4

Kids’ Night In, Parents’ Night Out

[ 6–8 PM ] Calling all K–6th graders! Join

Swansboro Parks and Recreation for an evening of fun and creative crafts, games and activities. Dinner and refreshments will be served. Parents, drop the kids off for a safe and fun time while you head out for a fun evening of your own! Space is limited to 12 participants so be sure to pre-register. Cost is $5 per person with a bag of candy (for our annual Halloweenie Roast). For more information, call 910-326-2600 or come by the Swansboro Recreation Center, at 830 Main Street Extension. For more information visit swansboro. recdesk.com. OCTOBER 7–9

Surf Fishing Workshop

Make your fishing wishes come true at the 26th Annual Surf Fishing Workshop. Expert instruction and hands-on experience are the trademarks of this popular seminar. Advance registration and fees are required. For details call 252-247-4003 or visit ncaquariums.com/pine-knoll-shores. OCTOBER 7–9

Crystal Coast Fall Surf Fishing Classic

Sponsored by Fisherman’s Post, hosted by Chasin’ Tails Outdoors Bait and Tackle. Tournament headquarters and weigh-in at Chasin’ Tails, 709 Atlantic Beach Causeway, Atlantic Beach. Surf fishing will be from Emerald Isle to Atlantic Beach in four divisions: Bluefish, Flounder, Black Drum and Sea Mullet. Register Friday, October 7, from

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MID–OCTOBER TO MID–NOVEMBER

2–11 p.m. Fish time starts at midnight Friday, October 7 and ends Sunday, October 9, at noon. For more information, call 910-452-6378. 10/9..............................................Awards Dinner (12–2 p.m.) 10/9.............................................Awards Ceremony (2 p.m.) followed by Tournament Raffle

offering $2 off the price of regular admission for a donation of two items from the “Items Needed” list. Admission includes entrance to Garner’s Corn Maze. The list can be found at foodbankcenc.org/ goto/GCM. For further information call 252-2411184 or visit facebook.com/GarnersCornMaze.

OCTOBER 7–8

OCTOBER 10

Red Clay Ramblers at Joslyn Hall in Morehead City

[ 1–2 PM] Core Sound Waterfowl Museum and

Heritage Center presents the Red Clay Ramblers at Carteret Community College’s Joslyn Hall, 3505 Arendell Street, Morehead City. For more information call 252-728-1500. OCTOBER 8–9

Swansboro Mullet Festival

Mmm, mmm, mullet! Eat it fried, broiled, grilled, smoked, stewed and more! Here at the 62nd Annual Mullet Festival of Swansboro, you can get mullet any way you like it. The Swansboro Mullet Festival kicks off on Saturday with a parade down Highway 24. Admission is free and also features a street carnival, arts and crafts, games, music and more. The kiddos will love the children’s area that includes games, a climbing wall, inflatables and the always popular Mullet Toss! For more information visit swansborofestivals.com. OCTOBER 8–9, 15–16

Build Your Own Stand-Up Paddle Board (SUP)

Grab this opportunity to build your own cedar and plywood SUP, custom fit to your size! These are fun to build and fun to paddle. Once the course is over, the builder will be responsible for varnishing or painting their new board at home. This fourday course runs over two consecutive weekends, October 8–9 and October 15–16. Course fee is $1,000. Minimum age is 16. Advance registration required. For more information call 252-728-7317 or visit ncmaritimemuseums.com.

Dudley Island Cleanup

One of the Coastal Federation’s primary goals is to reduce the amount of litter along coastal marshes, beaches and waterways. Together with Hammocks Beach State Park, we invite volunteers to help clean up Dudley Island. In addition to picking up trash, volunteers will also record data for Carteret Big Sweep on the debris collected. This will help to identify the sources of debris and focus educational efforts. For more information visit nccoast.org/ event/shoreline-cleanup-at-dudleys-island/. OCTOBER 12, 19, 26 | NOVEMBER 2

Musket Firing Demonstration

[ 10 AM ] Meet in Fort Macon to learn about a 19th

century musket’s history, loading procedures and firing. At 2303 East Fort Macon Road, Atlantic Beach. For more information call 252-726-3775.

Garner’s Corn Maze Fall Food Drive

[ 1–7 PM ] Garner’s Corn Maze and Pumpkin Patch

is helping to fight hunger in our surrounding area! On Sunday, October 9, Garner’s Corn Maze is

OCTOBER 8–9 ✪ SWANSBORO MULLET FESTIVAL offers mullet any way you like it. Kicks off with a parade, and features a street carnival, crafts, games, music and more. Free admission. Visit swansborofestivals.com.

OCTOBER 12

Merry Time for Tots: Pirate Hooks and Peg Legs ✪

[ 10–11 AM ] Preschoolers and their caregivers are

invited to the Maritime Museum in Beaufort to explore the world of pirates! Following a story about a boy who joined a pirate crew, everyone will get to make their own pirate hats and explore what is inside a pirate treasure chest (it isn’t just gold and jewels). Along with learning about pirates students will review their senses, body parts and colors. Ages 2 to 5. Free. Space is limited, pre-registration is required. Call 252-728-7317 to participate. OCTOBER 12

Flu Shots by Walgreens

[ 4–6 PM ] Swansboro Parks and Recreation is

OCTOBER 9

THINGS TO DO

OCTOBER 12

partnering with Walgreens this flu season to offer flu shots. Don’t take a chance this winter! No appointments necessary. Flu shots are covered by most insurance. Low income assistance is available from Walgreens. For more information, contact Walgreens pharmacy at 910-325-0038.

✪ MERRY TIME FOR TOTS Pirate Hooks and Peg Legs at the Maritime Museum in Beaufort. For children ages 2 to 5. Free, but space is limited and pre-registration is required. Call 252-728-7317.

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THINGS TO DO

✪ = FREE

MID–OCTOBER TO MID–NOVEMBER

OCTOBER 13

OCTOBER 15 AND 29

Shackleford Banks: Horses, Hiking and History

[ 1:30 PM ] Cape Lookout National Seashore is

[ 9:30 AM–1:30 PM ] Experience Shackleford Banks

heritage and wildlife with a guided hike on the island. Not suitable for children under 12. Cost is $30. Advance reservations required. For more information call 252-728-7317. OCTOBER 14

Friday Free Flick: Hotel Transylvania 2 ✪

[ 7 PM ] Free and open to the public. Children must

OCTOBER 14 ✪ HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA 2 is free at the Emerald Isle Parks & Recreation Community Center at 7500 Emerald Drive in Emerald Isle. Showtime is 7 p.m. Popcorn and drink available for $1.

be accompanied by an adult. Popcorn and drink for $1. Please bring chairs and or blankets, but no outside beverages or snacks. At 7500 Emerald Drive, Emerald Isle. OCTOBER 15–NOVEMBER 26

Gordie McAdams Speckled Trout Surf Fishing Tournament

Emerald Isle Parks and Recreation and The Reel Outdoors are sponsoring the 14th Annual Gordie McAdams Speckled Trout Surf Fishing Tournament.The tournament will run from 8 a.m. October 15 through November 26. Registration is free through October 13, and the Reel Outdoors will be providing prizes for the top three anglers! The Reel Outdoors is the official weigh-in station. All trout must be caught by fishing on foot (surf, pier, inlet, sound) from Fort Macon to Emerald Isle (no boats). Registration forms and rules may be downloaded at emeraldisle-nc.org/eiprd. Call Emerald Isle Parks and Recreation at 252-3546350 for more information.

Fall Small Craft In-The-Water Meet in Beaufort ✪

[ 1-5:30 PM ] Traditional Small Craft Association

YOGA SCULPT & TONE

at 9 a.m. at the Swansboro Recreation Center, 830 Main Street Extension in Swansboro. For information call 910-3262600 or visit swansboro.recdesk.com.

pleased to announce the first Horse Sense and Survival trip of 2016, which will be offered as one of several Ranger-led tours on a day that honors Cape Lookout’s 50th Anniversary and the National Park Service Centennial. This opportunity will depart from the Harkers Island Visitor Center. Spaces on the tours are limited and reservations are required. The only charge is the ferry fee: $16 for adults and $9 for children (11 and under). For more information call 252-7282250, ext. 3001. OCTOBER 15

BHA Fall Fundraising Party [ 6:30–11 PM] Join the Beaufort Historical

Association in the beautiful waterfront home of Wes and Trent Ragland to enjoy music by Blue Moon Jazz, artwork by Fen Rascoe and food by Beaufort Grocery Co. At 100 Turner Street in Beaufort. For more information call 252-728-5225. OCTOBER 17–NOVEMBER 7

Yoga Sculpt and Tone

[ 9 AM ] A combination of yoga, Pilates, barré

and core work will help build strength and stamina! This sculpting class will use weightbearing exercises combined with traditional toning segments to create lean muscles and burn calories. The series registration fee is $35; drop-in fee is $10. For more information, call 910-3262600 or come by the Swansboro Recreation Center, at 830 Main Street Extension. For more information visit swansboro.recdesk.com. OCTOBER 17–21

OCTOBER 15

OCTOBER 17–NOVEMBER 7

Horse Sense and Survival Trip

hosts this gathering at the Gallants Channel docks, 172 West Beaufort Road, Beaufort. All small boats are welcome. Free boat rides for the public. Pig pickin’. Ticketed event. For more information, call 252-728-2762. Proceeds from this event help support the operations of the Friends of the North Carolina Maritime Museum and the North Carolina Maritime Museum.

Children’s Swimming Lessons [ 4 PM ] Build confidence and learn the

fundamentals of swimming. Cost is $50 for the week. At Cape Carteret Aquatic Center, 300 Taylor Notion Road, Cape Carteret. For more information call 252-393-1000 or register online at ccaw.net. OCTOBER 19

Kayak Fishing Class

[ 8 AM–2 PM ] Learn the basics of saltwater

fishing from a kayak. Kayaks, tackle and rods

LUNCH & SUNDAY BRUNCH TORPEDO ROOFTOP LOUNGE Wednesday

Live Music & Sushi sunday & monday

Football

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✪ = FREE provided; NC Saltwater Fishing license required. For intermediate or advanced paddlers ages 12 and up (under 18 must be accompanied by an adult). Reservations required. Cost is $60. For more information call 252-728-7317 or visit ncmaritimemuseums.com.

MID–OCTOBER TO MID–NOVEMBER

and will finish at the beach in Atlantic Beach on the Crystal Coast. Location: 110 E Atlantic Blvd, Atlantic Beach, NC. For more info (843) 209-3510. OCTOBER 22

Howling Hayride at Fort Macon

[ 10-11 AM ] Meet in the Visitor Center lobby for

a leisurely hike exploring the natural side of Fort Macon. Hike will cover both trail and beach. At 2303 East Fort Macon Road, Atlantic Beach.

6:30pm – until join us for a special hayride and night hike at Fort Macon State Park. Enjoy a hayride from the visitor center to the bathhouse then hike 1 mile back along the Elliott Coues Nature Trail. Location: 2303 East Fort Macon Road Atlantic Beach, NC. For more info (252) 726-3775.

OCTOBER 21

OCTOBER 22

OCTOBER 20

Natural Side of Fort Macon

Halloweenie Roast and Tales of Olde Swansboro ✪

[ 5:30 PM ] Swansboro Parks and Recreation will

host its 4th Annual Halloweenie Roast. Join us for Halloween activities, food and spooktacular fun! Come dressed in your wackiest, scariest or most creative costume for our Costume Contest. Contestants will be judged by roaming judges. Free games and activities and performances from Swansboro Dance Studio. Hot dog roast will begin at 6 p.m.; food will be served while supplies last. The Halloweenie Roast will be held at the Pug Pavilion in downtown Swansboro in conjunction with Tales of Olde Swansboro. Take a hayride through the streets of Swansboro with a narrator regaling you with tales of bootlegging, pirates and maybe a ghost or two! Tales of Olde Swansboro asks a small fee to benefit the creation of the Heritage Center. OCTOBER 21

Astronomy/Star Gazing

[ 6:30 PM ] Meet at the Fort Macon bathhouse to

view space through a telescope and learn more about our universe. At 2303 East Fort Macon Road in Atlantic Beach. OCTOBER 21–22

Tuna Run 200

The Tuna Run 200 is an amazing, overnight relay adventure in which you and your friends Run 200 Scenic Miles to finish at the beach and enjoy tuna and your beverage of choice after a job well done. The Tuna Run 200 begins just outside of Raleigh, North Carolina in Lake Benson Park in Garner

Down East Folk Arts Society Concert: Victor and Penny

Victor and Penny feature tight harmonies, dazzling guitar work and a fiery ukulele. This amazing duo crafts clever original tunes and brings a modern voice to Prohibition Era jazz with charm and hot licks. Named Best Folk Ensemble 2015 by the Pitch Magazine and Stand-Out Concert of the Year by The Joplin Globe, they are an “absolute rollicking blast.” Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and show starts at 7:30. General admission $16 (active duty military and Down East FolkArts Society members $13, full-time students $10). For tickets call 252-6464657. Visit downeastfolkarts.org/Concerts.html for information on performers. At 3505 Arendell Street, Morehead City.

OCTOBER 21 ✪ STARGAZING AT FT. MACON at 6:30 p.m. Meet at the Fort Macon bathhouse to view space through a telescope. At 2303 East Fort Macon Road in Atlantic Beach.

OCTOBER 23

Birding Cruise

Join local birding expert Joanne Powell for a birding cruise on the White Oak River in Swansboro! Slowly cruise on a covered ferryboat through the estuaries in and around the White Oak River and Bogue Sound looking for resident and migratory birds. Participants will meet at the Hammocks Beach State Park Visitor Center in Swansboro and are asked to bring their own binoculars, as well as water and a snack. Please dress appropriately for the weather. The program fee is $20 for federation members and $25 for nonmembers. All ages are welcome, but the program is geared toward adults and older children. For more information visit nccoast.org/ event/birding-cruise-8/.

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THINGS TO DO

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THINGS TO DO

✪ = FREE

MID–OCTOBER TO MID–NOVEMBER

OCTOBER 26

OCTOBER 28–30 AND NOVEMBER 4–6

Preschool Pumpkin Patch

The Addams Family Musical

[ 9 AM–NOON ] Join us for a Halloween event

specially made for preschool children. Enjoy games, stories, crafts, costumed characters and photo opportunities. For more details call 252-2474003 or visit ncaquariums.com/pine-knoll-shores. OCTOBER 26–27

Trick-or-Treat Under the Sea

[ 4:30–7:30 PM ] Bring on the ghosts, goblins and

goodies. Children collect candy from booths among the exhibits and enjoy other Halloween hijinks. For details call 252-247-4003 or visit ncaquariums.com/pine-knoll-shores.

OCTOBER 26–27

TRICK-OR-TREAT UNDER THE SEA

at the NC Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores. Bring on the ghosts, goblins and goodies. Collect candy from booths along the exhibits! Call 252-247-4003 for information.

OCTOBER 27

Alive at 5 Outdoor Concert: Jim Quick & the Coastline Band ✪

[ 5–8 PM ] Concerts take place at the Jaycee Park

on the Morehead City waterfront. Free! For a list of performers call 252-808-0440 or visit downtownmoreheadcity.com. OCTOBER 27

Ship Life, Wildlife

[ 7–9 PM ] Our Natural Science Curator Keith

Rittmaster spent several months aboard a NOAA research vessel. Keith will share photos and stories from offshore which included searching for, counting and identifying whales and other marine wildlife off the coast of North Carolina. Free admission. No advance registration. At the North Carolina Maritime Museum, 315 Front Street, Beaufort. OCTOBER 28

2016 Halloween Carnival and Trunk-Or-Treat OCTOBER 28–30

THE ADDAMS FAMILY MUSICAL at Carteret Community Theatre, 1311 Arendell Street, Morehead City. For tickets and more information call 252-497-8919.

Fun for the whole family! Includes creating a glowin-the-dark mural, face painting, photo booth, cake walk, I.D. kits by the EIPD, Trunk or Treat and more! Businesses interested in entering our Trunk or Treat contest should contact Sarah Cutillo at scutillo@emeraldisle-nc.org for details. Admission fee to carnival is two bags of candy per child. At 7500 Emerald Drive, Emerald Isle. Please call 252354-6350 for more information.

The weird and wonderful family comes to devilishly delightful life in The Addams Family. This magnificently macabre new musical comedy is created by Jersey Boys authors Marshall Brickman and Rick Elice, Drama Desk Award winner Andrew Lippa (The Wild Party), choreographer Sergio Trujillo (Jersey Boys) and Olivier Award-winning original directors and designers Phelim McDermott and Julian Crouch (Shockheaded Peter) with direction by four-time Tony Award® winner Jerry Zaks. The Addams Family features an original story and it’s every father’s nightmare. Wednesday Addams, the ultimate princess of darkness, has grown up and fallen in love with a sweet, smart young man from a respectable family. A man her parents have never met. And if that weren’t upsetting enough, she confides in her father and begs him not to tell her mother. Now, Gomez Addams must do something he’s never done before — keep a secret from his beloved wife, Morticia. Everything will change for the whole family on the fateful night they host a dinner for Wednesday’s “normal” boyfriend and his parents. At Carteret Community Theatre, 1311 Arendell Street, Morehead City. For more information and tickets, call 252-497-8919. OCTOBER 29–30

Carolina Kite Festival

Kites Unlimited presents the 29th Annual Carolina Kite Festival at Sands Villas Resorts in Atlantic Beach. See colorful kites from around the world, candy drops for the children, kite building for kids, and team flying. This annual event is designed as a thank you to our customers and is a place to gather and fly with other kiters. Visitors are welcome! Our wonderful volunteers are the reason we have been able to maintain this free event and new volunteers are welcome to join us in making this a fun event. Open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. both days. Night Flight at 6 p.m. Saturday. Held at 1400 East Fort Macon Road in Atlantic Beach. For more information, call 252-247-7011.

Stir a little love into everything you do. fair trade coffee • local baked goods • gluten-free choices

GINGERBREAD LATTE this month’s 1 6 - O Z . F O R O N LY $ 3 . 5 0 ! special OPEN MON–THURS 7AM-6PM | FRI–SUN 6:30AM–6PM Emerald Plantation | 8700 Emerald Drive | 252.354.2643

12 CAROLINA SALT October/November 2016 » CarolinaSalt.com


✪ = FREE

MID–OCTOBER TO MID–NOVEMBER

OCTOBER 29

NOVEMBER 5

Carolina Maritime Model Society Open Meeting

Friends of the NC Maritime Museum Boat Shop Bash

The Carolina Maritime Model Society exists to promote the active participation in building ship models, a craft as old as shipbuilding itself. The group is the only such organization in the entire state and has become a major vehicle for widening public interest in North Carolina’s maritime history and culture. Free admission. Membership is open to all members of the Friends of the Maritime Museum. At 315 Front Street, Beaufort. For more information call 252-728-7317. OCTOBER 31

Brown Bag Gam: Free Lunchtime Lectures ✪

Free admission. No advance registration. Walk-ins welcome. For more information call 252-728-7317. At the NC Maritime Museum, 315 Front Street, Beaufort. 10/31.......................................Maritime Myths and Legends 11/3............................................Crossing the Water By Ferry NOVEMBER 1

Essential Oils 101: Oils for Students ✪

[ 6 PM ] Study, focus, retain, relax, de-stress—

wouldn’t it be nice to offer students the tools to improve in these areas? Elementary to college students can learn to use oils to enhance their learning ability at the Essential Oils 101: Oils for Students seminar. Oil samples and light refreshments served. Class is free. Pre-registration preferred, though walk-ins are welcome! For more information, call 910-326-2600 or come by the Swansboro Recreation Center, at 830 Main Street Extension. For more information visit swansboro. recdesk.com. NOVEMBER 5

Family Palooza Fall Festival

[ 11 AM–3 PM ] Mark your calendars for a day of

fun festivities. The 2nd Annual Family Palooza Fall Festival will take place at Freedom Park in Beaufort. There will be fun for the whole family! At 201 Freedom Park Road, Beaufort. For more information call 252-808-3301.

THINGS TO DO

[ 6:30–10 PM ] Friends of the North Carolina

Maritime Museum host the annual Boat Shop Bash fundraising party for members and the public at the Harvey W. Watercraft Center. This themed event includes music, food and live and silent auctions. Costumes are optional. Space is limited. Tickets can be purchased at the Museum Store or online at maritimefriends.org. Proceeds from this event help support the operations of the Friends of the Maritime Museum and the North Carolina Maritime Museum. NOVEMBER 7

OCTOBER 29–30

Flags of Fort Macon and The Confederacy ✪

[ 10–11 AM ] Meet at the Fort Macon Visitor Center

to learn about the wide range of flags used by the Confederacy during the War Between the States. At 2303 Fort Macon Road, Atlantic Beach. €

✪ CAROLINA KITE FESTIVAL at 1400 East Fort Macon Road in Atlantic Beach. An annual event, and a great place to gather and fly with other kiters. Open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. both days. Night Flight on Saturday.

FROM THE PUBLISHER

Thank you for picking up Carolina Salt magazine, all about our life here on the Crystal Coast of North Carolina. Our articles are written by locals. Every month we look to our readers to keep our magazine fresh. If you have a story to tell, an event to promote or an interesting local photograph, send them our way. Participation is welcomed and appreciated. Reader contributions are the founding principle of the magazine. If you like what you see, tell people about it—especially our advertisers. For questions, concerns or more information, send e-mail to will@carolinasalt.com or call 252-723-7628. For up-to-date info, be sure to look us up on Facebook!

NOVEMBER 7 ✪ FLAGS OF FORT MACON and The Confederacy from 10–11 a.m. at the Fort Macon Visitor Center, 2303 Fort Macon Road, Atlantic Beach. Free.

For the first time, our regional library system is offering eBook titles

eBooks Visit carteretcplib.org & click on OneClickDigital!

CarolinaSalt.com » October/November 2016 CAROLINA SALT 13


LOL!

KIM MURDOCH

THE OLD HALLOWEEN R E M E M B E R H OW I T U S E D TO B E I N T H E O L D DAYS ?

A

h fall. The crunch of the leaves, the crispness in the air, bright starry nights and cool mornings, all heralding one thing: the dawn of holiday decorating season. Specifically, Halloween. Remember Halloween? Not the new, glittery, plastic and store-bought Halloween. OLD SCHOOL Halloween. You know the one. The one that USED to be a single day’s event. The one that didn’t require parties, planning, strategic trick-ortreat-route meetings by moms over their Starbucks pumpkin lattes, whole days dedicated to costume shopping, whole nights dedicated to carefully assembling “gift baggies” of candies tied off with expertly executed little bows to be handed out to well-coiffed, perfectly manicured tots in expensive, over-the-top costumes. Remember? Do ya? Do ya? Do ya? Back in the day, Halloween consisted of, oh, I don’t know, TWO things: you colored in a jack-o-lantern at school that day, you trick-or-treated that night. End of story. Oh, sure, sometimes a few days in advance we would make a glittery construction paper jack-o-lantern in school or we’d assemble one of those weird paper skeleton things that you attached the arms and legs to with brads so you could move them. Remember? We’d bring ’em home and Mom would pop them on the door (unless, of course, she had sprung for one of those plastic door cover deals that had Frankenstein on it—but only the coolest kids had those) and voilà! Halloween decorating was done! Sidenote: Did you guys also have a mischievous neighborhood kid who would rearrange the limbs on your door skeleton, making its knees buckle in and using its hands to cover its privates so when you came home from school, you had a skeleton on your door that looked like it desperately needed to go potty? One time we came home and our skeleton was giving us the finger. No? Hmmm. Costumes consisted of some whacko collaboration of things from your parent’s clothes closet or the linen closet if you were going ghost. I remember one time, for like, three years running, my little sister and I went as the same thing: gypsies. Was it because we had a penchant for gypsies? No. Was it because we had a great respect for the gypsy culture? No. Did we dream of growing up to be gypsy princesses? Um, no. It was because we owned funky pajamas, we had kerchiefs that could be tied onto our heads, and we were the benefactors of a handful of plastic Mardi Gras beads that came from a party that my parents wouldn’t talk about around Grandma. There you have it folks … gypsy. Talk about a minimal investment in money, time … and effort. (I don’t know that I’ve ever met a gypsy in real life, but I can’t imagine that’s the official gypsy outfit. I remember the last year of our gypsy-dom. When we scoffed at our tired-out gypsy ensembles, our mother, ever the clever one, slapped red circles on both of our cheeks and TA DA! Gyspy CLOWNS. Eh, what can I say? We fell for it one last time. The next year though? Ghosts. Mardi Gras ghosts.) Get out that easily with new, fancy Halloween? Not so much. To start out with, nothing sends hordes of Suburban-driving mommas out to the superstore like having a THEME. First stop: garden department. Why? Hay bales. Now, not a single one of these ladies is out to do a little light landscaping with this stuff or feed their herd. Nope. THESE bales shall form the base of the most beloved of early fall/Here Comes Halloween yard decorating ideas ever: the obligatory hay bale/mum/scarecrow/pumpkin sculpture. Ya can’t get away with a simple, one-bale deal anymore either. They get taller and more complicated every year. I suspect in the fancier neighborhoods, structural engineers are called in to design schematics and support systems so that the mini New York City Skylines of Straw don’t topple over onto the inflatable jack-o-lanterns or send pots of carefully color-coordinated mums flying to the ground, taking Mr. Scarecrow out at the knees in the process. Next stop: craft department, because nothing says “welcome to my 14 CAROLINA SALT October/November 2016 » CarolinaSalt.com

humble abode” like $50 worth of wide, wired candy corn-and-jacko’-lantern themed ribbon tied around a giant grapevine wreath with a hand-painted and bedazzled 18-inch tall monogram in the middle of it. At this point, the first cart becomes the “drag behind” cart because, lucky you, right as you were running out of space in your own shopping cart, you found another cart (henceforth, known as the “push” cart) that had apparently been abandoned by a lesser mom who couldn’t handle the pressure. Amateur. On to: costumes! Yeah, right. No self-respecting mommy is buying a costume from a superstore. They get purchased online … after your kid picks them out … after scrolling up and down and up and down and up and down and … because nothing says “mom fail” like your kid and some other kid wearing the same costume. Six-year-olds just don’t need the pressure of a Who Wore It Best episode in the middle of the street on Halloween night whilst their peers play judge and jury. And they will. For they are evil. And jacked up on candy corn and Pop Rocks. Next department: candy aisle. Or rather, candy aisles. Rows and rows in the middle of the store, where once summer supplies lived, are now wholly dedicated to the art of repackaging treats in Halloween wrappers so that, if you hand out the REGULAR wrapped Hershey’s minis—which in the past would have made you the “cool” house on the block—you now rank among the ill-prepared and unfashionable. Candy must be wrapped in THEMEware. And it wouldn’t hurt if the candy and the bowl holding it matched your wreath, too. Just saying … Last on the list: The humble pumpkin. Humble, that is, until you get out your Leonardo da Vinci Let’s Make A Masterpiece pumpkin carving kit. The “punkin” your kid made with those silly triangle eyes and goofy, jacked up teeth? Back porch. How can we adequately capture the essence of Halloween without one of those tediously carved Kitty Cat Juxtaposed Against the Backdrop of a Full Moon pumpkins on the front porch? Ah. The simplicity of Halloween, like everything else in life, seems to now belong to a bygone era. I miss it, I do. We’ve done it ourselves, though. We all cave in to the pressure, making everything in our lives so over-the-top that “normal” and “easy” just won’t suffice anymore. I wonder sometimes if maybe just one of us would stand up and say, “Not THIS year. This year will be simpler. I’ll add one less story on the hay bale sculpture. My KIDS will get to decorate our front door with home-made paper jack-o-lanterns. We are going to MAKE our costumes … with stuff we ALREADY have! I’m going to spread some newspaper on the kitchen floor and let those sweet babies of mine design and cut their OWN front porch ‘punkins’.” Yeah, right. Gotta go. My Dad just pulled up in the front yard with his big utility trailer. Gotta go string the lights and get the sound system set up to carry the kids trick-or-treating. We’ve only got a few weeks to get it right! What? Your kids WALK? Cretins. €


LINDA BERGMAN–ALTHOUSE

OUTER BANKS WILDLIFE SHELTER

A Wild November Night for Wildlife

P

lease check the date and put us on your calendar for next month for a crazy fun and wild time with great food at our biggest annual fundraiser at the Civic Center in Morehead City! Doors open at the Outer Banks Wildlife Shelter’s (OWLS) Art and Silent Auction on Friday, November 18, at 6 p.m. Dinner will take place from 6:30 to 10 p.m. How timely for the auction to be held a month before Christmas, because who doesn’t need a few special gifts for their special folks? And what a fun way to shop! The money earned from this event is used to assist with feeding, providing medical needs, transporting, housing and eventual release of thousands of wild animals admitted to our clinic each year and also to teach fellow North Carolinians and tourists how to happily and peacefully coexist with wildlife. While OWLS has all the proper permits necessary to legally care for wild animals, we receive no state or federal funding. It is through the generosity of the public that we have been in business and continue to support a necessary service to the community since 1988. Since our founding, OWLS has admitted more than 25,000 patients, facilitated numerous educational programs for primary and secondary schools and civic organizations and has provided a series of wildlife camps during the summer that are extremely popular with school age children. All our programs and camp weeks allow our campers to get up close (but not too close) and personal with some amazing animals that they may never see in the wild and learn how to help wildlife by “going green.” Tickets to our annual fundraising event are only $35 per person and include a scrumptious dinner provided by generous and compassionate restaurants from Carteret County, a happy open bar, excellent live entertainment (that just might move you to get up and dance) and a thrilling, nail-biting silent auction. Our dinner, which we call the Taste of Carteret, is always plentiful, the auction items are must-haves for you or someone you choose to gift and the opportunity to hang out with old friends and make new ones by meeting our volunteers and staff … priceless! Some friends and family have made our wildlife party their annual reunion time! So you don’t want to miss this gala event. There are so many stories to share about unique wild animals who have been admitted to our facility for rehabilitation this year! This year we have been and still are giving our best effort second chances to numerous baby squirrels displaced during storms such as Hermine and a boatload of infant opossums orphaned by hit-and-runs or baby possum “fall-aways” that occurred while their mom was beating feet from a precarious and life-threatening situation. We are also hosting so many seabirds, including Northern Gannets, Pelicans and raptors—including owls of all shapes, sizes and colors. This year some “most unusuals” came through our clinic doors as well. Not one, but two Yellow-Billed Cuckoos needed medical attention and we’re happy to say, they both made it despite severe cat attack injuries. A tiny Tern was washed down guttering from his rocky nest situated on a rooftop. He handled being in our care very well and ate us out of house and home! Please get your tickets today to hear their stories—and take the opportunity to tell a few wildlife stories of your own—and celebrate with some of the Wildlife Ambassadors attending, such as Dinah our resident Barred Owl, who has fostered many baby Barred Owls over the years, including this year; Sweet Isabella or Little Girl, our adorable Virginia Opossums; Isabeau, our elegant Red-Tailed Hawk; one or more of our gray or amber Screech Owls; and one or more of our turtles will surely be onboard, too. Their human caretakers & handlers will be ready to answer all your questions and eager to share each animal resident’s story! Our education animals enjoy being the center of attention and our event attendees love taking pictures of them! The Outer Banks Wildlife Shelter in Newport has been a safe haven for our Down East wildlife locals and those passing through during migration who become orphaned, ill or who suffer injury for many years now and having the means to give these animals the second chance they deserve is essential! Help us help our North Carolina wildlife by calling the shelter at 252-240-1200 to lock in your reservations. Can’t wait to see you there for a this “Wild November Night!” €

This year we are giving it all for our baby squirrels (above) and orphaned opossums. Get your tickets to our Wild Night and meet some of our animal ambassadors, including Dinah, our Barred Owl (below), plus possums, raptors, and turtles!

ABOUT OWLS TAKE A TOUR of the facility at 100 Wildlife Way in

Newport. To volunteer, call 252-240-1200. If your organization would like to learn more about wildlife, the OWLS non-releasable education animals jump at the chance! CarolinaSalt.com » October/November 2016 CAROLINA SALT 15


SOUTHERN FICTION NANCY ROBERTS

THE PHANTOM SHIP A S T O RY F R O M ‘ G H O S T S B Y T H E C O A S T ’

I

t was the last of August and Captain Joe Sabiston’s ship was back in the busy port of Beaufort. This was not the first time Sabiston had noticed the girl among the crowd of villagers who came down to meet the ships when they sailed into Beaufort. She was taller than most of the women and held herself proudly. Her chestnut hair was streaked gold by the sun and he liked the way she moved—with grace and vitality—a look of eager anticipation on her face. As he walked along the dock, he found himself headed directly toward her and passed so close that his large duffel bag brushed the sky blue chambray of her dress. “Pardon me, ma’am,” he said. “It’s quite all right, sir.” Her voice was breathless. “Have you seen Robert Chadwick?” “He was one of the first off.” “Then he is already on his way home,” she said, a quick smile lighting up her face. “Thank you,” she said and, turning away, walked quickly through the crowd. An unusually attractive young woman, thought the captain, who told himself Chadwick was a lucky fellow. But marriage and the sea don’t always mix and Sabiston reflected that it was not for him. As his friends had so often told him, “You are married to the sea and your ship.” He had heard that, in Greece, a man taking command of a vessel for the first time would hang a crown of laurel leaves on the ship. It was the custom in that country for the bride to wear a crown of laurel upon the exchange of her wedding vows. Captain Sabiston was approaching thirty and had been captain of his own vessel for a year. This morning as he looked about him, he saw his friend Captain Ireland and the two men greeted each other warmly. Ireland asked where he would be staying and when Sabiston admitted he had no idea, Ireland invited him to be his houseguest. Since he would be in port for a week or more while his schooner was unloading and preparing for her next voyage, Sabiston accepted gladly. Captain Ireland’s wife, Jane, was an accomplished musician as well as a good cook and Captain Sabiston’s visit promised to be even more pleasant than he expected as he and Ireland, whom he had known but casually, discovered shared interests. Both were students of botany and enjoyed taking long walks together while Sabiston acquired considerable information about the plant life of the southern coast. The second night Sabiston was in port, Mrs. Ireland had a party and for the first time Sabiston met many of the townspeople socially

rather than primarily as customers for his cargo or as merchants who stocked his vessel with supplies for the next voyage. Chadwick was there with the girl who had been looking for him at the dock and they joined the captain as he stood listening to Mrs. Ireland play the harpsichord. “I am glad to see you again, Captain,” said Chadwick. “I think from my conversation and letters to her that Mattie here already knows our paths have crossed in various ports. Mattie, this is Captain Sabiston.” Sabiston bowed courteously yet felt strangely ill at ease and inwardly blamed his awkwardness upon his months at sea with only the rough men of a ship’s crew for company. “How do you do, Mrs. Chadwick.” Mattie looked surprised and Chadwick spoke quickly. “I’m sorry, sir. I thought you knew I am unmarried. Mattie is my sister.” The captain gazed at her. “I see and I am most happy to meet you ma’am.” “Beaufort is my home port,” explained Chadwick and I am always glad to put in here to see my sister and widowed mother. It was apparent that the captain was quite taken with Mattie, for he stood there staring at her with obvious approval and scarcely seemed to hear Chadwick’s words. Mrs. Ireland noticed this with a woman’s perception and, rising from the piano, whisked them away to seats at the dining room table. She placed the captain and Mattie on her right and before long the two were engaged in animated conversation. During the following weeks Mattie joined Captain Sabiston and Captain Ireland on their daily nature walks and at night Sabiston often called upon her at the Chadwick home. All ideas of laurel wreaths as the symbol of a captain’s marriage to his ship were forgotten. Captain Sabiston proposed and he and Mattie were married before he went on his next voyage back to Baltimore. On these trips his ship was filled with hides, fist, tar, pitch and turpentine from Carolina as well as tea, spices, rope and cloth that had arrived in the Beaufort port from abroad. John and Mattie were happy together, their marriage blessed with children and the years passed quickly. Each time Sabiston’s threemasted schooner would sail into the harbor on its return from Baltimore, he would anchor in the same place. Mattie could see it from her window and, scarcely able to contain her happiness, she would run down to the dock to greet him. When his ship, the Esmeralda, was tied in port, she would hurry to open the drapes each morning and stare out at the harbor, hoping to

16 CAROLINA SALT October/November 2016 » CarolinaSalt.com

see its sails with the salmon-tinted glow of the sunrise behind them. And then one September dawn, it was there. From her window she saw the vessel lying at anchor, the sun glinting on its brass fittings, the ship’s sleek lines a joy to behold. Her husband stood beside the mizzenmast looking toward the house as if he knew what was at the window. She saw him raise an arm and wave. Mattie’s heart quickened within her. Snatching up a small shawl, she opening the window and waved, but he did not wave again. Dressed quickly, she hurried down to the dock to greet him. But to her amazement the schooner was not there, nor was it anywhere in the harbor. As her eyes searched the waterfront, she saw her brother just stepping over on the dock from his own vessel. His lean, tanned face was grave and immediately she knew something was wrong. He put his arm around her, “Mattie, I don’t know how to break the news to you, but I must. John’s ship went down in the storm.” “No! I just saw it!” cried Mattie. “It was right in the place where he always anchors. The ship I saw was John’s. Where has it gone?” “You couldn’t possibly have seen the Esmeralda, sister or John either. We were separated during a nor’easter and near dusk when the wind abated I saw him through my glasses to the south of us. We set our sails to overtake him, but the sea was still rough and the waves towered above my ship. I saw the Esmeralda rise from the trough to the crest and then fall back on its side as if felled by some monstrous hand. It sank so rapidly no one could help them.” “But his ship—it was out in the harbor this morning in its usual place.” “Mattie, you can’t have seen it. The Esmeralda will never anchor in Beaufort Harbor again,” her brother said sadly. Mattie began to sob wildly and then to berate the sea. “Why did the sea snatch him away? I hate you! I hate you, I… hate… you!” she cried out looking across the water. “Hush, Mattie. Hush,” said her brother holding her to him until her cried died away and became soft anguished moans. “But how could I have seen his ship this morning?” “My dear, you can only have seen a phantom ship sailed by a crew from another world.” “No. It was John,” said Mattie Sabiston. She took a deep breath and straightened her shoulders. “He came back for one last good-bye,” she said quietly and walked toward the house. €


MYLISSA MAYNARD

ON THE MARQUEE

THE ADDAMS FAMILY AT THE CARTERET COMMUNITY THEATRE

T

The weird and wonderful family we all know and love comes to devilishly delightful life in this altogether ooky production. This musical features an original story and it’s every father’s nightmare. Wednesday Addams, the ultimate princess of darkness, has grown up and fallen in love with a sweet, smart young man from a respectable family. A man her parents have never met.

ABOUT CARTERET COMMUNITY THEATRE LOCATED at 1311 Arendell Street in Morehead City, Carteret Community Theatre offers the best live shows on the Crystal Coast. For tickets or more information, visit carteretcommunitytheatre.com or call 252-497-8919.

hey’re creepy and they’re kooky, mysterious and spooky. They’re all together ookie, the Addams Family!” This can be said about the original Addams Family, but also of the new Carteret Community Theater resurrection of this famous family as well. In a building that is currently said to be haunted, the theater is now rehearsing a show recognized by all generations, living or dead. Director Mylissa Maynard’s Addams Family will usher you into the Halloween season with plenty of laughs and spookiness. This is a family that loves their family members even beyond the grave. In this show you not only get reacquainted with Gomez, Morticia, Wednesday, Pugsley, Grandma and Uncle Fester, but you also meet their deceased ancestors and the new future-in-laws, the Bieneke family. This normal family arrives to meet one of the most abnormal families there is and what a meeting it turns out to be. With Alice Bieneke now talking in rhymes and the questionable butler Lurch, played by Jamison Paylor, admiring her the moment they arrive, we realize that normal is all in perspective because as Morticia reminds us all “what is normal for the spider is a calamity for the fly.” This show picks up with Wednesday Addams, played by Maddie Leary, at 18 years old. She is still the same Princess of Darkness who hunts freely and tortures her brother religiously, but now she is in love with a normal boy. This young man has captured her heart and now they want their families to meet. This show brings to light the age old questions: Can anyone really change? and What is normal? This wonderful cast will guide you through the perils of getting the Addams Family on board with her relationship and showing this “normal” family that is visiting that they are normal too. But they are not. They still have moats with alligators, monsters under the bed and things that go bump in the night running around their house and they love it. The cast has embraced their darkness and is becoming a great depiction of the Addams Family and their deceased ancestors. Uncle Fester, played by Tony Maynard, will guide you through this perilous evening with the family as they attempt to be “normal” for the sake of dear Wednesday. Gomez and Morticia, played by Clayton Rusich and Jenn Wiggs, are wonderfully entertaining as they try to maintain a truthful marriage while handling Wednesday’s new love life. Pugsley (Nathan Thomas) mourns the impending loss of his daily tortures since his sister has moved on to her new love Lucas Bieneke (Gabe Dorsett). With a bottle of Acromonium from Grandma’s (Mandy Griggs) stash, Pugsley plans to try and get rid of Lucas for good. And watching Wednesday navigate her identity crisis will have you laughing as you watch her find someone new she wants to torture. And all of this before dinner. As you watch this calamity unfold for Wednesday and Lucas just remember the day you met your boyfriend/girlfriend’s family and I bet you can identify somehow. And when your little one finally grows up and brings home a date for your to meet, just have dinner and then play a little game of Full Disclosure to learn their deepest darkest secrets. Our wonderful band of ancestors will help you see the importance of family and how, “no matter, living or dead, family is always family.” Join us at Carteret Community Theater October 28–30 and November 4–6. The show is at 7:30 on Fridays and Saturdays and at 2 p.m. on Sundays. There will be a costume contest for adults and children on Halloween weekend so come in your costume and be ready to laugh yourself to death. €

CarolinaSalt.com » October/November 2016 CAROLINA SALT 17


THE MARKET AT CEDAR POINT 910.330.7937

All About

PUMPKINS

WHETHER YOU’RE BAKING, CARVING OR CURIOUS

Y

ou know it’s fall when you start seeing pumpkins at the grocery stores, nurseries and road-side produce stands. I never really gave much thought to choosing a pumpkin for Halloween jack-o’-lanterns until my husband I started running our own produce stand at the Salty Air Open Market in Cedar Point. I have found that there is much more to choosing a pumpkin than just picking the largest one.

HISTORY OF THE PUMPKIN The word “pumpkin” originated from the Greek word pepŌn which means “large melon.” Then the French and English changed it some, and finally the Americans changed it to today’s “pumpkin” Most historians agree that the pumpkin originated in the Ancient Americas, not as modern pumpkins, but as a crooked neck variety of squash. It was the Indians that introduced the pumpkin and squash to the early Pilgrims. Because of their high nutritional value and the fact that they can be stored for long periods of time, pumpkins played a huge role in the survival of our ancestors. When you picture the first Thanksgiving, you think of a Pilgrim woman in a starched white apron holding a pumpkin pie in a fluted pie shell. But that wasn’t even close to today’s version of pumpkin pie. The original was a pumpkin with the top cut off. The seeds and “guts” were scooped out and the cavity was filled with cream, honey, eggs and spices all mixed together. They would then put the top back on and bury it in the hot ashes of their cooking fire. Along with the cooked flesh of the pumpkin, the pilgrims scooped out the contents and ate it like custard! As far as carving pumpkins for Halloween jack-o’-lanterns, there are several theories of how it got started. Early jack-o’-lanterns were carved from turnips and potatoes by the Irish and Scottish and carried in Celtic celebrations. The English used beets. Lumps of lit coal were placed inside for light. When our ancestors arrived in America they found that pumpkins worked even better. The jack-o’-lantern is also considered to be a symbol of harvest celebrations.

FRUIT OR VEGETABLE? A pumpkin is not a vegetable—it’s a fruit! In fact, it’s a berry. Pumpkins belong to the family Cucurbitaceae, which includes cucumbers, melons, 18 CAROLINA SALT October/November 2016 » CarolinaSalt.com

squash and gourds. Within this family is the genus Cucurbita which includes gourds, winter and summer squash and all varieties of pumpkin. Four species are considered pumpkins, but only one is the species most people would recognize as the traditional carving and baking pumpkin.

CARVING VS. BAKING PUMPKINS Some varieties of pumpkin are best for carving, and some are used for baking. Pumpkins used for carving will generally be much larger than the baking varieties. When choosing a carving pumpkin you should look for one with straight and stiff walls that will stand up to the carving knife. Their outer flesh should be tougher than the smaller baking varieties so it will last longer as well. Also be sure the shape of the jack-o’-lantern is suitable for sitting on a flat surface. A pumpkin grown for food consumption is generally much smaller and sweeter. The heavier the pumpkin, the more esh it has ... and it will only get sweeter as it ages. The average size for culinary pumpkins is 3 to 8 pounds, verses the 10 to 40-pound carving pumpkins. At The Market at Cedar Point, at 1046 Cedar Point Boulevard, we are getting our pumpkins from Bullock Pumpkin Farm in Lumberton. There pumpkins are NC grown and heirloom. We will be offering a wide variety of culinary and carving pumpkins. Our carving pumpkins are the Mammoth Gold variety and weigh between 20 and 40 pounds.

CHOOSING THE PERFECT PUMPKIN Whether you are looking for a pumpkin to carve or to bake with, there are several steps to take to make sure your pumpkin will stand up to the task. FOR CARVING PUMPKINS: Before you go out to the pumpkin fields or local road stand to choose your pumpkin, have a good idea what you want to carve. Smaller pumpkins are good for simple faces. A mediumsized pumpkin will cover most stencil patterns. For the more elaborate patterns and designs you will probably want to choose a larger pumpkin. Choose a pumpkin with a smooth surface to make carving intricate designs easier. Make sure your pumpkin has a flat bottom so it will sit on a flat surface and not roll over.


FOR ALL PUMPKINS: Choose a pumpkin that feels firm and heavy for its size. You never want a soft pumpkin. A soft pumpkin is a rotting pumpkin. Knock on the pumpkin with your knuckles. You want to hear a crisp, hollow sound. Make sure your pumpkin has good color all around. A pumpkin that is still green in areas isn’t fully mature and will be harder to carve and is definitely not ready to cook.Look for a healthy stem and that is solidly attached. A green stem means that the pumpkin is very fresh and just recently harvested. A strong sturdy stem means a strong healthy pumpkin. Look for damage to the skin. Nicks, punctures and cuts can cause problems. Make sure there are no soft spots or mold present. All of these can cause your pumpkin to spoil and decay faster. Turn your pumpkin over and apply pressure on the bottom with your thumbs, if it flexes or gives, your pumpkin is not fresh. When picking your pumpkin up, never ever pick it up by the stem! The stem can break, and if it breaks at its base your pumpkin will rot very quickly. Follow your heart. Sometimes picking a less-than-perfect pumpkin can give your design more character.

STORING AND PRESERVING YOUR CARVED PUMPKIN Once you choose your pumpkin and bring it home, there are some things you can do to prolong its life. • Never display your pumpkin in direct sunlight. Keeping it out of the sun will prolong the pumpkin’s color and keep it fresher for a longer time. • Freezing temperatures will damage a pumpkin. Bring it indoors if there is a danger of frost. You can use a towel or blanket to cover your pumpkin on nights that are just below freezing. • If you intend to display your pumpkin indoors, avoid setting it directly in contact with surfaces like tabletops, wood flooring or carpeting. The warmth of your home can cause the pumpkin to soften and weep pumpkin juice which can cause damage. Place your pumpkin on plastic, a platter or some other impervious surface. After you have carved your masterpiece, follow these suggestions to help keep your Jack-O-Lantern glowing longer: • Add a teaspoon of bleach to a bucket of water and soak your freshly carved pumpkin in it for 8 hours. This will inhibit and deter mold. Make sure you drain all the water before you put it out for display. • Use your fingertips dipped in petroleum jelly to coat cut edges. Use a cotton swab for areas that are hard to get to. This seals the wound and helps the pumpkin last longer. • During the day, keep your pumpkin out of the direct sunlight. Place it in a cool, dark place. It will spoil more quickly at room temperature. If you have room, keep it in your refrigerator when it’s not being displayed. • If your pumpkin begins to shrivel, you can sometimes revive it by placing a wet towel over it or by soaking it in a bucket of water. Some people have had success with spraying their pumpkin with hairspray or clear acrylic. This seals the flesh so it will not lose moisture.

AFTER YOUR PUMPKIN GOES BAD Don’t just throw your old jack-o’-lantern in the trash once it starts to rot. You can compost your pumpkin, bury it in your garden or feed it to your neighbor’s cows. Don’t have neighbors with cows or a compost bin or a garden? You can drop it off at The Salty Air Open Market in Cedar Point anytime during the day Monday through Sunday. We will have a Pumpkin Refuge Bin for collecting old pumpkins, which will be taken to Opossum Wood Acres, a wildlife shelter in nearby Hubert. They would love to have your old pumpkin to feed to their animals! If you can’t make it to the market, you can drop your pumpkin off directly at Opossum Wood Acres at 119 Doe Drive in Hubert. Give them a call at 910-326-6432 for more information.

BAKING A PUMPKIN I have to admit I have never cooked my pumpkin pies with fresh pumpkin—I have always used canned from the grocery store. Shame on me! Cooking pumpkin is so easy! There are several main cooking methods: boiling, steaming and baking. I am going to talk about how to bake your pumpkin. There is nothing better than the smell of warm pumpkin baking in the oven! Here are some tips on how to bake with raw pumpkin: • Choose a baking pumpkin that is heavy for its size and feels very firm. Cut it open from the top to avoid a mess, and clean the inside “guts” and seeds out. Save your seeds! They are high in protein and make a tasty snack once roasted! • Cut the pumpkin into two halves and cover each half with foil, if you like. Place on a baking sheet foil side up and bake in a preheated 350 degree oven for 1 to 1½ hours, or until the flesh is tender. The outer edges will brown and the natural sugars will caramelize and give the pumpkin more flavor. • Remove from oven and let cool. Once it has cooled down enough to handle, simply scoop out the cooked flesh. Mash it in a bowl with a fork or potato masher, or puree with a food processor or blender. Once you have a smooth consistency, just measure out the amount needed for you recipe. • A 29-ounce can of pumpkin is equivalent to about 3½ cups of fresh, cooked pumpkin. A 16-ounce can of pumpkin is equivalent to about 2 cups of cooked fresh pumpkin. Freeze your leftover fresh cooked pumpkin in pre-measured freezer bags for later use. There you have it. Everything you need to know about pumpkins. I have learned a lot in doing my research for this article. I found most of the information for this article on the Internet. There are tons of websites dedicated to pumpkins and you can find information on just about everything from growing pumpkins to pumpkin bread recipes. €

CARVING TIPS When cleaning the inside of your pumpkin, scrape the outer wall to an inch thick. This makes carving much easier. Use an ice cream scoop to clean out the seeds and guts (sometimes called the “pumpkin brains”) Pick a design that fits the size and shape of your pumpkin. You can use your copier to enlarge or shrink a design to make it fit better. Before you put the lid back on your pumpkin, sprinkle some cinnamon or pumpkin pie spice on the inside of the lid. The heat from the candle will activate the spices and a delightful aroma will fill the air. If you make a mistake and cut too much out of your pumpkin, use toothpicks to put it back together. Save the seeds! There is nothing that goes with pumpkin carving better than roasting your Pumpkin Seeds!

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION Pumpkins are very good for you. They are low in calories and high in fiber. They are also low in sodium, and the seeds are high in protein! 1 CUP OF COOKED PUMPKIN CONTAINS: Calories............................. 49 Protein............................... 2g Carbohydrate..................12g Dietary Fiber..................... 3g Calcium.........................37mg Iron............................... 1.4mg Magnesium................. 22mg Potassium.................564mg Zinc...................................1mg Selenium..................... 50mg Vitamin C..................... 12mg Niacin...............................1mg Folate............................ 21mg Vitamin A..................2650IU Vitamin E........................3mg

CarolinaSalt.com » October/November 2016 CAROLINA SALT 19


SOUTHERN FICTION

RODNEY KEMP

BURIAL RITES FOR UNCLE CLEVE

C

icero Lewis was raised in that little jewel of a Down East Carteret County community called Davis Shore. When you’re raised to Davis Shore, they raise in their “youngerns” a fierce sense of independence and self-reliance. They want their youngerns to quickly grow up and to be afraid of absolutely nothing in this world. Cicero, who in this story I call “my boyhood friend and idol, great American,” was raised just that way to Davis Shore and was afraid of absolutely nothing except one thing. He was afraid of dead people—he believed in ghosts and goblins. Well, long about 1953 Cicero’s Uncle Cleve of Davis Shore up and died. There weren’t any funeral homes at Davis Shore so you had to send the body to Beaufort to be prepared for burial. You’ve got to understand that Uncle Cleve was a humped-back man. Bent way over … Some folks say he got that from smoking Camel cigarettes all his life. Every time they pushed Uncle Cleve’s head down in the casket his feet popped up. Every time they pushed his feet down his head popped up. They messed with Uncle Cleve most of one Saturday afternoon until they finally decided the only way to prepare Uncle Cleve for the funeral was to strap him down in the casket. So they ran a strap under Uncle Cleve’s little clip-on tie and shipped his body back to Davis Shore. Tradition at Davis Shore called for “sitting up with the dead.” You placed the body in the parlor of the great home and let all the friends and relatives pay their last respects. But before you buried that thing the next morning someone had to sit up with the recently departed all night. The funeral home gave you four of those folding funeral home chairs and four of those hand-held funeral home fans, the ones with a picture of heaven on one side, and that’s the way you sat up with the dead. Sure enough my boyhood friend and idol, great American’s father came up

to him and said, “Cicero boy, I need for you to sit up with me and two other gentlemen with your Uncle Cleve tonight.” And he did. Long about 9:30 p.m. there came a cloud. Now in Carteret County when we say there came a cloud, we mean it starts to rain real strong. And we’re talking about torrential rains. And we’re talking about thunder and lighting. And we’re talking about the wind blowing outside that parlor window, and casting strange and eerie shadows inside where Uncle Cleve strapped was down in that casket. Long about 10 o’clock one of the gentleman stood up and looked at Cicero and his father and said, “As long as you two are going to sit up, I think I’ll go on to bed.” And he left. Long about 11 o’clock the other gentleman stood up and looked at Cicero and his father and said, “As long as you two are going to sit up, I think I’ll go on to bed.” And he left. Long about midnight, when that storm was at the height of its fury, my boyhood friend and idol, great American’s father stood up and said, “Cicero boy, as long as you’re going to sit up, I think I’ll go on to bed.” And HE left. Now, you with me? Alone, in that raging storm, in that darkened parlor, none but my little boyhood friend and idol, Cicero Lewis, great American, and Uncle Cleve, strapped down in that casket. Long about 2 a.m., there came a bolt of lighting so fierce and so powerful that it knocked out all the lights, all the source of power from Davis Shore, Carteret County, to downtown Raleigh. And at the very instant that lighting hit, that strap broke on Uncle Cleve. And Uncle Cleve came riding up out of that casket. I mean he came riding up there like he had good sense. Cicero, my boyhood friend and idol, great American, cast down his handheld funeral home fan, rose up out of his folding funeral home chair, walked over to the casket and said, “Well, Uncle Cleve, if you’re going to sit up, I think I’ll go on to bed.” €

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20 CAROLINA SALT October/November 2016 » CarolinaSalt.com

Katie Basden


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On a dive trip in South Carolina, my 14-year-old son brought up a strange looking crab. It was quite small and had yellow stripes and a very pointed nose. We released it. Are these crabs common?

Your description and location fit a yellowline arrow crab, Stenorhynchus seticornis. There are numerous species of these crabs, with the yellowline variety being one of the most common. Yellowline arrow crabs measure some 2–3 inches. These odd-looking little creatures live in waters from North Carolina to Florida and Texas, as well as in the Bahamas, Bermuda and the West Indies to Brazil. Arrow crabs come in a variety of sizes, from a couple of inches up to 10 inches in length. Females are usually smaller than males. The sharp features of these spider-like crustaceans are well designed for life on coral reefs and rocky ledges, as well as in nooks and crannies or in piles of ocean rubble. Their angular structure, pointed head and spindly stilt-like legs—sometimes as much as three times the body length—give arrow crabs their name. Graceful but comical, arrow crabs are most active at night. They’re primarily carnivores and scavengers, and the smaller varieties are of little threat unless you’re a feather duster worm or other tiny sea creature. Large specimens may pinch at or ward off small, slowmoving fish that invade their territory. Triggerfish, pufferfish and other marine animals snack on these crunchy crustaceans. Discover more fascinating facts about North Carolina’s aquatic environments and inhabitants by visiting the aquarium. Call 1-800-832-FISH for more information. €

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CarolinaSalt.com » October/November 2016 CAROLINA SALT 21


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The Red Clay Ramblers Returns The Core Sound Waterfowl Museum & Heritage Center and the North Carolina Coastal Federation are teaming up to host the Tony Award-winning band, The Red Clay Ramblers, for a special two-night event October 7–8. The North Carolina natives will be performing in Joslyn Hall at Carteret Community College. The doors will open at 7 p.m. with concerts beginning at 7:30 on both Friday and Saturday nights. The string band’s music draws from multiple genres, including old-time mountain music, bluegrass, country rock, New Orleans jazz, gospel and the American musical to form its eclectic sound and unique taste. Since their formation in 1972, The Red Clay Ramblers have performed on various stages throughout the world including several local appearances at Croatan High School, the Core Sound Waterfowl Museum and Heritage Center and the Coastal Folklife Project in Beaufort. The Ramblers October features Clay Buckner on the fiddle, Chris Frank on the guitar, Jack Herrick on the trumpet and bass, Rob Ladd on the drums, and Bland Simpson on the piano. The musical group is noted as being high energy with a wide-ranging repertoire. The New York Times states, “Bluegrass, New Orleans, classical folk, and gospel sounds emerge in nutty profusion from these talented instrumentalists and singers, whose music making is perfection.” Both the Core Sound Waterfowl Museum and Heritage Center and the North Carolina Coastal Federation are preparing for milestone years in 2017. The museum will celebrate its 25th anniversary, while the NC Coastal Federation celebrates its 35th. Both presenters have big things planned in observance of these significantly historic years. Ramblers pianist Bland Simpson states, “These are two truly fine, highly significant groups, not only for Carteret County but for the whole state of North Carolina. Both of them exemplify the very best values in preserving, protecting, and celebrating our social and natural heritage here on the coast. We are thrilled to be making a joyful noise for them in Morehead City this fall!” Museum executive director Karen Amspacher states, “Core Sound is always honored to partner with the North Carolina Coastal Federation to bring great North Carolina music to the coast! Our years-long history of working together on King Mackerel and the Blues Are Running productions has become a tradition for both organizations, bringing in shared proceeds to support programs and projects that protect our environment and preserve our coastal heritage.” Ticket prices are $28 general admission, $23 for members of the museum and NCCF and $12 for students. Tickets are on sale now. Call the Core Sound Museum for yours at 252-728-1500. €


CAPTAIN JEFF CRONK

HOOKED UP FISHING REPORT

HOOKED UP HALLOWEEN A H O O K E D U P L O O K AT W H AT ’ S B I T I N G I N O C TO B E R

W

FISH’N 4 LIFE CAPTAIN JEFF CRONK

leads fishing and nature charters on the Crystal Coast. To get out on the water with him, call 910-325-8194. You can also visit him online at nccharterfishing.com.

e’re starting to see better water clarity along the beach and in the sounds along the Crystal Coast. There is no shortage of bait from the lower rivers through the sounds and out to the inlets and surf zone. We’re seeing plenty of menhaden, finger mullet, glass minnows and shrimp. All of this bait has really gotten a variety of species fired up and feeding aggressively and this should continue through October and into early November. The backwaters from the lower rivers to the inlets have been alive with redfish, flounder, bluefish, black drum, sheepshead and speckled trout. Anglers have been doing well on the speckled trout on the latter part of the rising tide in the creeks behind our beaches. Typically, speckled trout begin migrating south from our large open sounds and move along our beaches and stage up around our inlets, ICW and marsh systems behind our beaches Samantha Scuderi of Raleigh landed this monster throughout October and November. Summer Flounder this September while jigging a These fish are staging up off Bucktail and Gulp Shrimp near Bogue Inlet with eddies and current breaks along the Capt. Jeff Cronk of Fish’n4life Charters. edge of the deeper back channels behind our beaches. Some of the best baits for trout right now include Berkley Gulp Shrimp, Bett’s Halo Shrimp and a variety of Mirrolure’s sinking twitch baits. Anglers using live shrimp under slip cork rigs are also catching plenty of blowfish and hogfish while targeting speckled trout. The shallow bays behind our beaches and in the lower rivers are producing both redfish and flounder. One of my favorite baits to target both species is a spinner bait tipped with a 3" Berkley Gulp Pogy or a 3–4" Z-Man bait. Slow rolling this bait along the shorelines and oyster beds will draw plenty of strikes and is especially productive in the darker river water. Behind our beaches, in the clearer waters, I prefer to use scented soft baits on a ¹/₁₆ to ¹/₈-ounce jighead. Berkley’s 4" Gulp Shrimp, 5"n Gulp Jerkshad and Z-Man scented baits all work well. Anglers fishing around the inlets and surfzone will find plenty of action over the next few weeks. These areas are alive with bluefish, Spanish, kings and albacore on the surface and plenty of bottom fish, including spots, sea mullets, blowfish, croaker and hogfish. There will also be redfish, black drum, flounder and trout working the surf. Anglers targeting bluefish, Spanish and albacore should tie on a gold diamond jig or gotcha plug rigged with a few inches of 20 to 30-lb. wire leader and cast to schools of bait or areas where birds are prevalent. If you’re after redfish, cut mullet or shrimp fished on a Carolina rig will work great. Switching over to an artificial bait such as a 4" Berkley Gulp Shrimp fished on a ¼-ounce jighead will draw strikes from trout, flounder and redfish. Regardless of what species you’re after this October, there will be plenty of stringstretching action along the Crystal Coast! €

CarolinaSalt.com » October/November 2016 CAROLINA SALT 23


DISCOVERY DIVING

LEE MOORE

DIVING OUR COAST W H AT ’ S U N D E RWAT E R I N O C TO B E R

O

ctober is when divers will find that the marine life off of the Crystal Coast isn’t the same as they have been seeing over the summer. Water temperatures at the end of September were around 82 degrees on the surface and on the bottom. The water will still be in the mid 70s, but as it begins to cool down, the marine life that has been up north will move south to take up residence off of our coast. As the nights get cooler, the water temperatures along the beaches will begin to get into the low 70s.

BEACH SWEEP On September 24, a Beach Sweep was held at Radio Island. About 15 participants helped to clean up the popular recreation site that is used by sunbathers, fishermen and divers. Trash was collected beginning at the parking area and continuing down the beach to the rock jetty. The trash collecting didn’t stop at the water’s edge, but continued underwater. The total amount of trash collected was over 20 pounds.

DISCOVERY DIVING TREASURE HUNT October 22 is when divers, their families and friends return to Radio Island for Discovery Diving’s 37th Annual Treasure Hunt. Registration began on September 1 at 8 a.m. This year we anticipate having close to 200 participants. Painted, numbered oyster shells will be thrown out at Radio Island between the beach and the rock jetty for the divers to find. The numbers on the shells determine the drawing order for the prizes. Divers have 45 minutes to find and register their shells. When the divers return to Discovery Diving, they position their chairs around the dock in preparation for the drawing of prizes. Before the prizes are awarded, Discovery Diving has their infamous pig pickin’. The menu includes barbecue, deer ham, cole slaw, potato salad, corn, seafood bisque and a few other items. The divers eat in the order they signed up—a benefit of signing up as soon as possible! Once everyone has gone through once, everyone is allowed to get seconds. While everyone is finishing their lunch, the prizes are brought out to the dock. Prizes include dive equipment, T-shirts, hats, dinners at local restaurants and trips. The drawing begins with the person that found the shell with the numbed “1.” This continues until everyone has drawn both of their numbers. Once everyone has drawn twice, any remaining prizes are given away by drawing according to sign-up number—another benefit of signing up early! Throughout the day, small items, such as Frisbees, are tossed out to the participants. Even though the sign-up process began on September 1, divers can still sign up on the day of the Treasure Hunt. For more information on this year’s Treasure Hunt, contact Discovery Diving at dive@discoverydiving.com, 252-728-2265 or like us on Facebook to see what classes and events are coming up in the near future. €

24 CAROLINA SALT October/November 2016 » CarolinaSalt.com

JOIN DISCOVERY CONTACT

Discovery Diving at 252-728-2265 or visit them on Facebook to see what classes and events are coming up. You can also visit them online at discoverydiving.com.

JOIN ECARA ECARA

works to continue sinking ships to create artificial reefs here in North Carolina, but their resources are limited. To get involved, visit carolinareef.org.


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