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FREE! TAKE ONE! MAY / JUNE 2014

your life on the Crystal Coast LOOK INSIDE FOR FUN & FREE

THINGS TO DO

SOUTHERN GARDENING

The Natural Landscape

ON THE CRYSTAL COAST MID–MAY THROUGH MID–JUNE page 14

KITCHEN CREATIVES

Muffin Meals: A New Easy Way to Feed Your Family OWLS

Good Mothers: It’s Baby Bird Season Again!

CAREERFINDER

Learning Under

PRESSURE A STORY OF HOPE

A Place to Heal COMING IN JUNE!

Carolina Salt Menu Guide A GUIDE TO LOCAL RESTAURANTS & ENTERTAINMENT VENUES

SAVE OUR REEFS!

TALKING FINANCE

ASK THE AQUARIUM

If You Can’t Beat ’Em, Eat ’Em!

The Rise of Bitcoin

Do We Have Alligators?


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PUBLISHER: Will

Ashby

CREATIVE DIRECTOR: Chevy

Kaylor

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Janelle Fleming, Lee Moore, Charlie Coffman, Judy Hailey, Sherry White, Lisa Rueh, Mary Miller, Linda Bergman–Althouse, Cynthia Barber, Jessica Guesno, Julia Vradelis, Gavin M. Langley and Johnathan Day. E D I TO R I A L S & A DV E RT I S I N G Please contact the publisher at will@crystalcoastoutdoors.com or 252-723-7628 for ad rates and editorial ideas. Ad and editorial deadline for the Mid-June to Mid-July issue is May 16, 2013. Email letters to the editor, photos, community listings and articles to will@crystalcoastoutdoors.com. Next issue will publish June 7, 2013.

From the Publisher Thank you for picking up Carolina Salt magazine, published to depict your life here on the Crystal Coast. All articles are written by locals. We cover a wide range of topics including local history, outdoor sports, wildlife, special events and more. Every month we look to you, our readers, to keep our magazine fresh. If you have a story to tell, an event to promote, an interesting local photograph or just some good times stories to share, send them our way. Participation is welcomed and appreciated. Reader contributions are the founding principle of the magazine. We want to be a local resource for you, our readers. If you like what you see, tell people about it—especially our advertisers. For questions, concerns and more information about Carolina Salt, send e-mail to will@crystalcoastoutdoors.com or call 252-723-7628. For up-to-date info, be sure to look us up on Facebook!

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We Depend On Our Readers! Call 252-723-7628 if you’re interested in submitting an article or photo. Our local content is what keeps our magazine fresh and relevant.

PUBLISHED BY CRYSTAL COAST OUTDOORS PUBLICATIONS P.O. Box 572, Morehead City, NC 28557 | 252-723-7628


M ID - M AY TO MID-J U N E 2 0 1 4

Inside This Issue TH E CRYSTAL COAST LI F EST YLE

F E AT U R E S 21 If You Can’t Beat ’Em, Eat ’Em The venomous lionfish has staked a claim on the Atlantic Ocean and they’re overrunning our reefs. Luckily … they taste great!

25 Learning Under Pressure It’s never too late to consider a career change, especially into one you know you’ll love for the rest of your life. Use your military benefits!

34

ECO-FRIENDLY LAWNS FORM A NATURAL LANDSCAPE FREE! TAKE ONE!

MAY / JUNE 2014

your life on the Crystal Coast LOOK INSIDE FOR FUN & FREE

THINGS TO DO

SOUTHERN GARDENING

The Natural Landscape

ON THE CRYSTAL COAST MID–MAY THROUGH MID–JUNE page 14

KITCHEN CREATIVES

Muffin Meals: A New Easy Way to Feed Your Family OWLS

Good Mothers: It’s Baby Bird Season Again!

CAREERFINDER

Learning Under

PRESSURE A STORY OF HOPE

A Place to Heal

ON THIS MONTH’S COVER Brad Styron hits another home run with an astonishing photo that elevates a scene of great local beauty into fine art. Contact Brad at bradstyronphotography.com or stop by his gallery in Emerald Isle. [ see his ad on page 24 ]

29 A Place To Heal After tragedy struck Mary and Jeff Miller, Mary thought life would never again be worth living. Until she found hope at the market.

31 OWLS: Good Mothers It’s baby bird season again! Among the most fragile babies at Outer Banks Wildlife Shelter, nestlings take special mothering skills.

COMING IN JUNE!

Carolina Salt Menu Guide A GUIDE TO LOCAL RESTAURANTS & ENTERTAINMENT VENUES

SAVE OUR REEFS!

TALKING FINANCE

ASK THE AQUARIUM

If You Can’t Beat ’Em, Eat ’Em!

The Rise of Bitcoin

Do We Have Alligators?

Has anyone had their first beach day of the year yet? We have and more to come!

34 The Natural Landscape Check out these alternative lawns—beautiful, thrifty and eco-friendly. Replace all or part of a boring grass lawn for a naturally wild look.

36 Muffin Meals Cookbook Looking for a way to make cooking fun and easy? Worried about portions or keeping things interesting for the family? Try Muffin Meals! 21 LIONFISHING tournament helps to keep our natural and artificial reefs healthy.

36 MUFFIN MEALS make fun and easy portioncontrolled meals!

The Regulars 14 Things to Do 26 Ask the Aquarium: Alligators 31 OWLS: Good Mothers 38 Talking Finance: Bitcoin 39 Watermark: Let It Go 40 Diving the Coast 41 Tides

38 The Rise of Bitcoin We’ve all heard the word Bitcoin in the news these days. This new digital currency is enjoy a heyday and it’s pretty interesting stuff.

39 Watermark: Let It Go! Pastor Johnathan Day of Watermark Church finds some inspiration in a new Disney classic song from the movie Frozen. M AY / J U N E 2 0 1 4 | C A R O L I N A S A L T | 9


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THINGS TO DO

JUST FOR MOMS

Mother/Daughter Pamper Party [ 6 PM ] Swansboro Parks and Recreation is hosting a Mother/Daughter Pamper Party. Mothers, grandmothers and aunts are invited to create memories with their special girl. Sweet treats and refreshments will be provided. Space is limited to 12 participants each session. Pre-register by May 7 and 21. Cost is $10 for mother/daughter, $5 for each additional child. Swansboro Parks and Recreation is located at Municipal Park, 830 Main Street Extension in Swansboro. For more information, call 910-3262600 or visit swansboro.recdesk.com.

✪ JACK SAYLOR’S newest collection of work will be on display and available for purchase at the Mattie King Davis Gallery in Beaufort. Call 252-728-5225 for more information.

MAY 10

Read and Relax: A Mother’s Day Program at the Library [ 2–3 PM ] Bring your mom to the library to celebrate Mother’s Day for an hour of relaxation. Give her a manicure, read her a book and make her a card. This program is for kids in grades K through 5 and their moms. Pre-registration is preferred. Sign up at by calling 252-728-2050 or by email (jrobinson@ carteretcountylibraries.org). At the Carteret County Public Library, 1702 Live Oak Street in Beaufort.

MAY 10

Beaufort Sister Cities Mural Competition Calling all Artists! It’s time to gear up for Beaufort’s Mural Painting Competition in the parking lot of First Citizens Bank in Beaufort. This year Beaufort Sister Cities is announcing an exciting new prize option. The winner may choose a trip to France with a value of up to $1,500 or opt for $1,000 cash. The competition is limited to 20 artists. For information or to register, call Susan Smith at 252-838-1097 or email ssmith177@ ec.rr.com. MAY 15

Painting Party

MAY

✪ Jack Saylor Art Show and Sale

MAY 17–18

Mommy & Me Old Fashioned Tea [ 1 PM ] Mothers and grandmothers, bring your daughters or granddaughters out for a fancy tea party! Assorted teas and treats will be provided. At Carolina Home and Garden, 4778 N Carolina 24. For more information call 252-393-9004.

ART | THEATRE

✪ FRIDAY FREE FLICK on May 9 at the Emerald Isle Community Center, 7500 Emerald Drive, at 7 p.m. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Rated PG. Bring chairs and blankets.

[ 10 AM–1 PM ] Are you working on a painting at home and need some guidance? Do you need advice on how to shade or how to add depth, motion or texture? The Artestry Hideaway in Beaufort has an expert artist that will help you. Bring what you are working on along with your paints and brushes. To register call 919244-7354.

[ 5:30–8:30 PM ] Enjoy a girls night out or have a date night with someone special and discover your inner artist. Snacks and refreshments will be served. Class will be 2 to 3 hours; everything you need will be provided. Class is $15 per person. Ages 16 and up welcome. Must pre-register by May 12. Swansboro Parks and Recreation is located at Municipal Park, 830 Main Street Extension in Swansboro. For more information, call 910-326-2600 or visit swansboro. recdesk.com.

MAY 17

FR E E M OV IE N IG H T

MAY 8 | APRIL 10, 17

‘Paint with Help’ Class

MAY 9, 23

LO C A L A RT S H O W

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M I D – M AY T O M I D – J U N E

Jack Saylor’s newest collection of work, A Thirst for the Sea, will be on display and available for purchase through the month of May at the Mattie King Davis Art Gallery on the Beaufort Historic Site. The Beaufort Historical Association is located on the 100 Block of Turner Street in Beaufort. For information call 252‑728-5225 or visit beauforthistoricsite.org.

ARTrageous! A juried fine art show and sale on the Morehead City Waterfront. Artist booth space for ACCC members is $75 ($50 for members). Contact the Arts Council of Carteret County at www.artscouncilcarteret.org for more information.

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✪ =FREE

THINGS TO DO

M I D – M AY T O M I D – J U N E MUSIC | CONCERTS

MAY 24–25

✪ Carteret County Arts & Crafts Coalition Spring Show Juried sale held at the Beaufort Historic Site on Memorial Day, Fourth of July and Labor Day and at another venue for a three-week show between Thanksgiving and Christmas. This is the perfect occasion to browse and buy the work of coastal artists and craftsmen. For information call 252-2476366, email arts.crafts.coalition@gmail.com or visit ccartsandcrafts.com/. JUNE 5

✪ Art Opening: Larry Dean [ 4:30–6:30 PM ] Art opening for the 54th Annual Old Homes and Gardens Tour featured artist, Larry Dean. His show, Beaufort’s Colorful Palette, is a collection of nautical-themed work and will be on display at the Mattie King Davis Art Gallery on the Beaufort Historic Site through July. The Beaufort Historical Association is located on the 100 Block of Turner Street in Beaufort. For information call 252-728-5225 or visit beauforthistoricsite.org.

MOVIE NIGHTS MAY 9

✪ Friday Free Flick: Turbo [ PG ] [ 7 PM ] At the Emerald Isle Community Center, 7500

MAY | JUNE

Harrika’s Brew Haus Summer Entertaintment Harrika’s Brew Haus is located at 911 Cedar Point Boulevard, Highway 24, in Cedar Point. For information call 252-354-7911 or visit teaandbeer.com. Band information is available on the website. Thirsty Thursday [ 5–8 PM ]......................... Thursdays Open Mike Night [ 6–10 PM ]............................ Fridays $3 Craft Beer Drafts [ 6–10 PM ]...................... Fridays Bands & Beer in the Biergarten [ 7–10 PM ]......Satudays MAY | JUNE

✪ Salty Air Open Market Live Entertainment Live entertainment Saturday and Sunday at the Salty Air Open Market, 307 Cedar Point Boulevard, Cedar point. For more information call 910‑650‑4933 or visit saltyairmarket.com. May 10.............................................. The Mighty Quinn May 11........................................... Scearce and Ketner May 17................................................... Now and Then May 18.............................................. Justin Castellano May 24.............................................. Justin Castellano May 25................................................... Now and Then May 31........................................... Scearce and Ketner June 1............................................... The Mighty Quinn June 7–8................................................ Now and Then

Emerald Drive in Emerald Isle. Free and open to the

MAY 9–10

public. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

✪ Beaufort Music Festival

Popcorn and drink for $1. Please bring chairs and

It’s free, it’s fun and it’s super energetic, with bluegrass, country rock, folk, swing, surf rock, reggae, roots, indie and lots of other types of music. The event attracts thousands of people. There will be multiple stages as well as live performances in local pubs and restaurants. A Family Fun Zone will engage your children with fun activities, such as games, arts and crafts, musical entertainment, face painting and storytelling. For more information visit beaufortmusicfestival.com.

blankets, but no outside beverages or snacks. MAY 16

✪ Friday Free Movie Mania: Hunger Games Catching Fire [PG–13] [ SUNSET 8 PM ] Come relax and unwind under the stars with Swansboro Parks and Recreation Friday Movie Mania. Don’t forget to bring a blanket or chair. Coolers welcome, but no glass containers.

FR EE MO VIE N IG H T

✪ FRIDAY FREE MOVIE MANIA at 8 p.m. at Swansboro Parks and Recreation on Friday, May 16. Don’t forget to bring a blanket or a chair. Coolers are welcome, but no glass containers.

LO CAL FR EE EVEN T

✪ BEAUFORT MUSIC FESTIVAL is coming May 9–10 in Beaufort. Bluegrass, country rock, folk, swing, surf rock, reggae and more. For information visit beaufortmusicfestival.com.

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THINGS TO DO

✪ =FREE

M I D – M AY T O M I D – J U N E MAY 10

MAY 31

✪ Music in the Gardens at Carolina Home & Garden

✪ Summer Concert Series: Donald Thompson Band

[ 11 AM–2 PM ] Enjoy live music in the gardens at Carolina Home and Garden, located at 4778 N Carolina 24. For more information call 252‑393-9004. May 10.............................................. Justin Castellano May 24........................................................ Gumbo Lily May 31........................................................ Wild Honey

THE GEORGIA SATELLITES at The Morehead Center on Arendell Street on May 17. Tickets are $25 and $30. For information or tickets call 252-726-1501 or visit themoreheadcenter.com.

[ 8 PM ] Upstairs at Clawson’s Restaurant in Beaufort. See www.downeastfolkarts.org or call 252-646-4657 for more information.

[ 1–3 PM ] The Boathouse at Front Street Village, 2400

MAY 17

frontstreetvillage.com.

✪ Beach Music Festival

MAY 12

[ NOON–6 PM ] At the Atlantic Beach boardwalk, hosted by the Town of Atlantic Beach. Featuring The Holiday Band, Band of Oz, Fantastik Shakers and the Mighty Saints of Soul. Call 919-750-4191 for more information.

Lennoxville Road in Beaufort, offers free wine and beer tastings. For information call 252-838-1524 or visit

Cooking with Saltwater Grill [ 5:30–8:30 PM ] Sharpen your culinary skills with Irish-kilted Chef Owens from Saltwater Grill on May 12. Learn how to plan, cook and eat delicious, healthy meals using locally sourced ingredients. Class is $20 per person, pre-registration required by

[ 8 PM ] At The Morehead Center, 1311 Arendell St. Morehead City. The Georgia Satellites in concert. Tickets are $30 and $25. For tickets visit themoreheadcenter.com, buy them at the box office or call 252-726-1501.

A FULL-SERVICE DAY SPA & SALON

WINING & DINING

✪ Free Wine & Beer Tastings at Front Street Village

The Georgia Satellites in Concert

✪ FREE WINE & BEER TASTINGS at Front Street Village, 2400 Lennoxville Road, on Saturdays. For information, call 252-838-1524 or visit frontstreetvillage.com.

information call 252‑726‑5083, ext. 3.

Down East Folk Arts Concert: Deidre McCalla

MAY 17

W I NI N G & DIN IN G

Street on the Morehead City waterfront. Free. For more

SATURDAYS

MAY 17

IN C O N C E RT

[ 7–8:30 PM ] At Jaycee Park, located at 803 Shepard

May 7. Class will be held at Swansboro Recreation Center. Swansboro Parks and Recreation is located at Municipal Park, 830 Main Street Extension in Swansboro. For more information, call 910-326-2600 or visit swansboro.recdesk.com.

MAY 25

JUNE 7

✪ SwanFest

‘Men Who Cook’ Kickoff Party for the Old Homes & Gardens Tour

[ 6:30–8 PM ] Musicians of many genres will take the Pugliese Pavilion stage this summer starting Memorial Day Sunday and running for 17 consecutive Sundays through September 14. SwanFest has grown into a great music venue, with local favorites and Nashville recording artists alike. Bring your lawn chair to the Pavilion at Olde Town Square in Swansboro, but no pets or alcohol please. For a list of performers, visit seasideartscouncil.com. May 25.................................................... 40 East Band June 1.....................................................Drew Questell

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[ 4:30–6:30 PM ] The Beaufort Historical Association will host Men Who Cook, a new event, as the official kickoff to the 54th Annual Old Homes and Gardens Tour at the Beaufort Historic Site. The Sponsor Party will feature guest chefs and tastings from the second volume of the Beaufort Cooks cookbook. The Beaufort Historical Association is located on the 100 Block of Turner Street in Beaufort. For information call 252728-5225 or visit beauforthistoricsite.org.

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✪ =FREE HISTORY | EDUCATION MAY 7–28

✪ Free Intermediate Ballroom Dancing Class [ 5 PM ] Learn more advanced steps in the waltz, foxtrot and other dances. Swansboro Parks and Recreation is offering a fou-week intermediate series of ballroom dance. This free class is for those who have completed the Basic Ballroom class. Pre-registration is preferred. Swansboro Parks and Recreation is located at Municipal Park, 830 Main Street Extension in Swansboro. For more information, call 910-326-2600 or visit swansboro.recdesk.com. MAY 16

Lunch with a Dash of History: Prose & Poetry of Carteret County [ 11:30 AM–1 PM ] At The History Place Museum, 1008 Arendell Street, Morehead City. Rodney Kemp will take a look in his bag of tricks and pull out a few stories, poems and songs that reflect the history of the county. Audience participation is welcome. Admission with lunch is $15 ($12 for members). Lecture only is $8 ($5 for members).

preferred. For information call 252-728-7317. North Carolina Maritime Museum is located at 315 Front Street, Beaufort. Visit the museum online at ncmaritimemuseums.com. May 20.......................... Queen Anne’s Revenge Project May 23........................................................ Sea Turtles May 28..........................................Wreck of the Pulaski MAY 30

Lunch with a Dash of History: The Emerald Isle Story [ 11:30 AM–1 PM ] At The History Place Museum, 1008 Arendell Street, Morehead City. Presented by Rodney Kemp. Come and find out more about this upscale community’s roots. Reservations with lunch $15 ($12 for members). Lecture only is $8 ($5 for members).

FR EE CLASS

LOCAL EVENTS MAY 10

✪ Core Sound Decoy Carvers Guild Presents Loon Day

[ 9 AM–4:30 PM ] Traditional techniques are taught in this hands-on workshop. Participants work as a team to construct a 12–14’ traditional “rack of eye” flat-bottomed skiff. This 2-day class (6 hours per day) can be used as a prerequisite for 9-Day Boatbuilding Class. Cost is $135 ($121.50 for members). Must be at least 16 years old. Advance registration required. For information call 252-7287317. North Carolina Maritime Museum is located at 315 Front Street, Beaufort. Visit the museum online at ncmaritimemuseums.com.

[ 10 AM ] Loon Day is an annual one-day event hosted by the Core Sound Decoy Carvers Guild. Loon Day is an event that recognizes a time-honored tradition and also provides a fundraising opportunity in the form of the live auction. The event boasts a decoy competition, lunch and a live auction. Decoys that are to be entered into the decoy compeition are hidden before the judging so they cannot be prejudged from a closer perspective. Everyone is invited to come to the bridge area to see the decoys out in the water. Please contact Brother Gaskill for competition rules and regulations at 252‑504‑3520. There will be a live auction of the competition decoys, including all the ribbon winners, as well as other decoys and items. For more information visit decoyguild.com or find them on Facebook.

MAY 20

MAY 10

MAY 17–18

Traditional Boatbuilding Carpentry Class

[ NOON–1 PM ] Pack a lunch for the Brown Bag Gam and join us at the Maritime Museum for an informal discussion. Gam is defined as a friendly conversation between whalers or to visit with another ship while at sea. Free Admission. Advance registration

✪ BALLROOM DANCE CLASS for intermediate dancers free at Swansboro Parks and Recreation, Municipal Park, 830 Main Street Extension. For information call 910-326-2600.

LO CAL EVEN T

Airport Appreciation Day

✪ Brown Bag Gam

daily drink specials the best mexican!

THINGS TO DO

M I D – M AY T O M I D – J U N E

[ 10 AM–4 PM ] At the MIchael J. Smith Field in Beaufort. Enjoy a 20-minute airplane ride for just $25 per person. Event sponsored by EAA Chapter 1523. Proceeds go to aviation scholarships. Visit the website at FlySouthernAir.com or call 610-212-5836.

three locations!

✪ LOON DAY at the Core Sound Decoy Carvers Guild on May 10 beginning at 10 a.m. For information call 252-5043520, visit decoyguild.com or find them on Facebook.

EMERALD ISLE • ATLANTIC BEACH • MOREHEAD CITY

open 7 days a week

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THINGS TO DO

✪ =FREE

M I D – M AY T O M I D – J U N E

MAY 16–18

MAY 24

MAY 17

✪ MCAS Cherry Point Air Show

✪ Atlantic Beach Memorial Weekend Fireworks

Fitness in the Parks

Make plans now for you and your family to enjoy the best seats on the flight line for North Carolina’s largest and only nationally recognized air show. Admission and parking are free. For information call 1-866-WINGS-NC or visit cherrypointairshow.com. MAY 17

✪ Antique Car Show Held during the Crystal Coast Boat Show at Katherine Davis Park, the Morehead City Chapter, Antique Automobile Club of America will hold its 41st annual car show featuring vintage vehicles that are at least 25 years old. All day event. For information call 252‑808-0440. MAY 17–18

✪ Crystal Coast Boat Show [ 10 AM–5 PM | 11 AM–4 PM ] The 7th Annual Crystal Coast Boat Show takes place on the Morehead City waterfront and features both new and used boats, as well as a variety of marine products and services, outdoor gear, fishing tackle, outfitters, brokers, fishing clubs and resource conservation groups. There is also a vintage car show and ARTrageous public art event taking place during the show. The boat show is free and open to the public. The bands performing on Saturday will be the Carteret Community Sunshine Band (10:30 a.m.), Loose Cannons Band (noon) and Six Pack of Gentlemen (3 p.m.). The All Night Long Jazz Band is featured at noon on Sunday. For more information call 252-808-0440 or visit crystalcoastboatshow.com. MAY 18

Cornhole Tournament [ NOON ] Held in conjunction with the Crystal Coast Boat Show at Katherine Davis Park, the Morehead City After Hours Rotary Club will host a regional Cornhole Tournament. Burgers, hot dogs and beer will be available for sale. There will be free entertainment. Prizes will be awarded to the winning teams, including a special prize to the first place winner. To register email afterhoursrotary@gmail.com.

Celebrate Memorial Day weekend in Atlantic Beach with fun, sun-filled days and our annual Saturday night fireworks display at 9 p.m. at The Circle main public beach access. JUNE 5

Pine Knoll Shores Home Tour [ 3–7 PM ] Mark your calendars for an event to benefit Hope for the Warriors. Thirteen beautiful homes will be open for public viewing. Tickets are $30, adults only. The ticket includes admission to the silent and live auctions at the Pine Knoll Shores Aquarium beginning at 7 p.m. Food and drink are provided. The homes are pictured at kayakforthewarriors.org and k4tw.org. Tickets are limited and are available at PKS Town Hall or through k4tw.org.

SPORTS & FITNESS MAY 10

‘A Game to Remember’ Memorial Lacrosse Event [ 9 AM ] Local youth lacrosse organizations from Carteret and Onslow counties will gather to pay tribute to fallen military heroes during the A Game to Remember event, hosted at the Croatan High School Stadium located at 3355 Highway 24 in Newport. The day honors military members who have made the ultimate sacrifice and celebrates the game of lacrosse and its Native American heritage. For more information call 606-541-2775 or email carteretyouthlacrosse@ yahoo.com. MAY 17

[ 9 AM ] Enjoy three 20-minute fitness sessions in downtown Swansboro’s parks. Start off in Bicentennial Park with new fitness trend Pound and rock your body with a modern-day fusion of movement and music. Walk to the Town Dingy Dock for a Pilates session, then to Ward Shore and end with a relaxing session of yoga with Second Wind. Class is $10, pre-registration preferred by May 15. Swansboro Parks and Recreation is located at Municipal Park, 830 Main Street Extension in Swansboro. For more information, call 910-326-2600 or visit swansboro.recdesk.com. MAY 20 | JUNE 3

Beach Fun Run Series [ 5:30 PM ] Sponsored by Carteret County Parks & Recreation. Join the fun this summer with our Beach Run Series. All ages and skill levels welcome for 1-mile, 5K or 10K runs. Takes place on the Atlantic Beach Circle. Save money and time by registering one time for all seven races for $25 (includes the T-shirt) or register individually for $5 per race plus $6 for the T-shirt. Registration opens at 5:30 p.m. and the race begins at 6:30 p.m. Download the forms at ccpr. recdesk.com/recdeskportal/ or register on site. MAY 30–31

Relay for Life Carteret County: Teams Needed! [ 6 PM ] Relay for Life for Carteret County at the West Carteret High School track in Morehead City. The event begins Friday at 6 p.m. and ends Saturday at noon. Teams are needed. If you are interested, email galeswann@yahoo.com or call 252‑247-7446. MAY 31

Morehead Marlin Pub Run

4th Annual Beaufort Kayak & Paddleboard Race

Sponsored by the Town of Morehead City and Downtown Morehead City Revitalization Association, the Pub Run will begin on the Morehead City waterfront and finish at the Marlin Fountain on Jib Plaza on Evans Street. Call 252-726-6848 or 252-8080440 for details.

[ 10 AM ] Thye Beaufort Kayak and Paddleboard Race takes place on Taylors Creek in Beaufort. Registration is $30 and includes T-shirt, race book and race number. This event supports the Boys & Girls Clubs of Coastal Carolina. To register or for more information call 252-222-3007 or visit bgccc.net/events.

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✪ =FREE

THINGS TO DO

M I D – M AY T O M I D – J U N E

JUNE 7

JUNE 7

7 Annual Kayak for the Warriors Kayak Race

✪ Youth Fishing Derby

th

[ 8–10 AM ] A collection of family events beginning at McNeill Park and Garner Park on Oakleaf Drive in Pine Knoll Shores. Event culminates with the signature race, a 3.2-mile kayak race on Bogue Sound and thru the PKS canals. All funds raised benefit Hope for the Warriors. For more information visit kayakforthewarriors.org. Register online or by calling Sarah at PKS Town Hall at 252-247-4353.

FISHING FUN MAY 16–18

NC Offshore Challenge Dolphin Tournament This family-oriented dolphin tournament is held at the Sanitary Restaurant on the Morehead City waterfront. This tournament is a non-profit event benefitting the Wounded Warrior Project. For more information email terry.rose@hillsboroughsfc.com. MAY 30–31

Military Appreciation Day: Take The Troops Fishing [ NOON–10 PM | 4:30 AM–10 PM ] NC nonprofit corporation Military Appreciation Day, Inc.hosts a Take the Troops Fishing event in Morehead City to promote appreciation of our military heroes and downtown Morehead City waters. The event is open to all active cuty military, Guards and reservists. Events and activities take place on and around the Morehead City waterfront at Jaycee Park, Morehead City Park and the Morehead City Train Depot. JUNE 6–14

[ 9–11 AM ] This is a free event open to kids ages 5–12. Pre-registration is required and will run until June 4 or until all 100 spots are filled. Bring your own rod. Bait will be provided (while supplies last) or bring your own. To register, stop by the Emerald Isle Parks and Recreation Community Center or call 252-3546350.

FOR CRAFTERS FIRST AND THIRD SATURDAYS IN MAY & JUNE

✪ Teen Knitting and Book Chat [ NOON–2 PM ] All teens are invited to come and learn to knit or work on current projects. The Webb Library is located at 812 Evans Street in Beaufort. For information call 252-726-3012 or visit thewebblibrary. com. WEDNESDAYS IN MAY & JUNE

✪ Knit-Wits at the Webb Library [ 11:30 AM–12:30 PM ] Limber up your fingers, bring your current project or just get some helpful hints from experienced knitters. The Webb Library is located at 812 Evans Street in Beaufort. For information call 252-726-3012 or visit thewebblibrary.com.

✪ CHERRY POINT AIR SHOW May 16–18 at Cherry Point Marine base. Admission and parking are free. For information call 1‑866‑WINGS‑NC or visit cherrypointairshow.com

MAY 10, 17, 31

Quilting: Beach Blanket Project [ 9:30–11:30 AM ] Beach time is just around the corner. You will learn how to make a large, bright, colorful beach blanket over three classes May 10, 17 and 31. You will need a sewing machine and basic sewing skills. Class is $5 (instruction only). Call for a complete supply list. Swansboro Parks and Recreation is located at Municipal Park, 830 Main Street Extension in Swansboro. For more information, call 910-326-2600 or visit swansboro.recdesk.com.

FOR KIDS

Big Rock Blue Marlin Tournament One of the oldest and largest sport fishing tournaments in the country with over 200 competitors. Daily public weigh-ins on the Morehead City waterfront. Ticketed events surrounding the tournament open to the public. For details visit thebigrock.com.

MCAS AIR SH O W

PIN E K N O LL SH O R ES

THIRD SATURDAYS

✪ Kids Decoy Carving & Painting Throughout the year, the third Saturday of most months you will find Decoy Guild members working with budding decoy carvers and painters at the Guild workshop. Youngsters from ages 7 to 15 gather to

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HOME TOUR to benefit Hope for the Warriors June 5 from 3–7 p.m. Tickets are $30, for adults only and includes admission to the auctions. For information visit k4tw.org.

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THINGS TO DO learn how to carve and paint ducks and shorebirds. Pre-registration is required. Call Bob Sebecke at 252269-2088 or the Guild building on the Thursday prior between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m. at 252-838-8818. Visit the guild online at decoyguild.com WEDNESDAYS & THURSDAYS IN MAY & JUNE

✪ Story Time at the Webb Library [ 10:30–11:30 AM ] Join Ms. Laura each week for stories and more. A simple craft and snack are provided. A caregiver must accompany the children. The Webb Library is located at 812 Evans Street in Beaufort. For information call 252-726-3012 or visit thewebblibrary.com. JUNE 7

✪ Daddy/Daughter Dance [ 5 PM ] In honor of Father’s Day, take your daughters to a dance! It’s the perfect daddy/daughter date night. Formal attire is requested. Music and snacks will be provided. At Carolina Home and Garden, 4778 N Carolina 24. For more information call 252-393-9004.

GET OUTDOORS MAY 7

Explore Rachel Carson Reserve [ 9–11:30 AM ] Come explore the Rachel Carson Reserve, a North Carolina Estuarine Research Reserve. This protected area is set aside for research and is home to many diverse coastal habitats. A guided hike led by Associate Museum Curator Benjamin Wunderly will take you through the different habitats found on Town Marsh and Bird Shoal. Not suitable for children under 6. Cost is $20. Advance registration required. For information call 252-728-7317. North Carolina Maritime Museum is located at 315 Front Street, Beaufort. Visit the museum online at ncmaritimemuseums.com. MAY 15

Shackleford Banks: Horses, Hiking and History [ 9:30 AM–1:30 PM ] Come find out what makes Shackleford Banks such a unique barrier island, from the early settlers and whaling villages to tales of Blackbeard the pirate and wild horses that roam the sandy beaches. Associate Curator Benjamin Wunderly will guide participants on a hike in this designated wilderness area managed by the National Park Service as part of the Cape Lookout National Seashore. Not suitable for children under 6. Cost is $30. Advance registration required. For information call 252-7287317. North Carolina Maritime Museum is located at 315 Front Street, Beaufort. Visit the museum online at ncmaritimemuseums.com.

✪ =FREE

M I D – M AY T O M I D – J U N E MAY 22

OUTER BANKS WILDLIFE SHELTER

Kayak through History

Raptor Roundup

[ 9 AM–NOON } Before bridges and railway, travel by water was the best way to get around the coast. Ages 12 and up (under 18 must be accompanied by an adult). Some kayak experience is recommended. Cost is $45 ($25 with own kayak). Advance registration is required. For information call 252-728-7317. North Carolina Maritime Museum is located at 315 Front Street, Beaufort. Visit the museum online at ncmaritimemuseums.com.

Session 1: June 23–27 • Session 2: August 11–15 [ 9 AM–1 PM ] In this Birds of Prey Camp, we will explore the world of flight daily with our Education birds at the shelter. Camp includes daily wildlife encounters and the opportunity to learn about local native mammals and reptiles. For ages 10–12. The Outer Banks Wildlife Shelter is located at 100 Wildlife Way in Newport. For information call 252-240-1200 or visit owlsonline.org.

MAY 30

OUTER BANKS WILDLIFE SHELTER

Marine Life Cruise [ 9:30 AM–12:30 PM ] Associate Museum Curator Benjamin Wunderly takes you aboard a Duke University research vessel to trawl for fish and marine creatures. Cost is $35. Advance registration required. For information call 252-728-7317. North Carolina Maritime Museum is located at 315 Front Street, Beaufort. Visit the museum online at ncmaritimemuseums.com.

SUMMER CAMPS & CLASSES CAMP ALBEMARLE

Summer Overnight & Day Camps The theme for summer 2013 is All Things New. Campers will learn to see God at work around us. Camp Albemarle is located at 156 Albemarle Drive in Newport. For information call 252-726-4848 or visit campalbemarle.org. NC MARITIME MUSEUM

Summer Fun For Kids: Sailing & Science Plan ahead for your child’s exciting summer. Each summer the Museum offers a Junior Sailing Program and a Summer Science School. Registration forms can be picked up in person or can be mailed to you. Course schedules will be posted one week prior to the start of registration. Classes begin in June and run through August. Registration forms must be delivered in person or by mail. No early registration. Spaces are not confirmed until payment is received. The NC Maritime Museum is located at 315 Front Street in Beaufort. For more information call 252-728-7317 or visit ncmaritimemuseums.com. OUTER BANKS WILDLIFE SHELTER

Wild By Nature Session 1: June 21–25 • Session 2: August 4–8 [ 9 AM–1 PM ] Fun, hands-on camp for the wildlife lover age 7–9! This week campers will experience the outdoors through journaling, hands-on activities, games, crafts and of course some up close wildlife encounters! The Outer Banks Wildlife Shelter is located at 100 Wildlife Way in Newport. For information call 252-240-1200 or visit owlsonline.org.

2 0 | C A R O L I N A S A L T | M AY / J U N E 2 0 1 4

Wild about Art Session: July 14–18 [ 9 AM–1 PM ] Campers participating in this weeklong camp will have a chance to learn about North Carolina animals while using them as models. Activities include sketching and sculpting, as well as using items found in nature to make collages. For ages 8–12. The Outer Banks Wildlife Shelter is located at 100 Wildlife Way in Newport. For information call 252-240-1200 or visit owlsonline.org. NORTH CAROLINA COASTAL FEDERATION

Jones Island Summer Day Camp [ 9 AM–3 PM ] Got a rising middle-schooler with a sense of adventure? This day-long camp is great for those rising third to fifth graders who love to learn. Day campers will learn about coastal ecosystems and ecology, Native American influences and coastal critters through hands-on activities on Jones Island in the White Oak River. The cost is $30 per child. The Coastal Federation is located at 3609 NC 24 in Newport. For information and more details, call 252393-8185 or visit nccoast.org. CRYSTAL COAST GYMNASTICS

Gymnastics Camps Camps are fun at Crystal Coast Gymnastics. CCG offers weekly themes and are available for full or half days. Pay for just the days you need. Multi-week and sibling discounts available. Supervised early dropoff and late pickup available for working parents. Crystal Coast Gymnastics is located at 300 Greenfield Drive in Newport. For information call 252-222-4961 or visit crystalcoastgymnastics.com. DANCE ARTS STUDIO

Dance Camps Dance Arts Studio offers awesome summer programs for kids of all ages interested in the arts. With two locations in Morehead City and Beaufort, DAS offers easy access to a variety of programs. With all types of camps and classes in the arts, we think you will find something to enjoy. Dance Arts Studio is located at 123 Bonner Avenue in Morehead City. For information, call 252-726-1720 or visit danceartsstudio.net. 


H E L P S AV E O U R R E E F S

Save Our Reefs!

LIONFISHING TOURNAMENT IF YOU CAN’T BEAT ’EM, EAT ’EM!

THE SILENT INVASION OF NATURAL AND ARTIFICIAL REEFS continues in the crystal clear waters off our coast. The Indo-Pacific Lionfish was mistakenly let into the Atlantic Ocean waters in the early 1990s and it has been moving up the coast from Florida ever since. Traditional fishing methods have not been enough to keep the population under control. Although it is native to the Indo-Pacific range, lionfish populations have exploded here for a few reasons: they have no known natural predators in the Atlantic Ocean; they develop rapidly, reaching sexual maturity after only six months; and mature females can lay 30,000 eggs every four days. A lionfish eats approximately half its own body weight each day, which has proven an incredibly toxic and destructive mix for our native species of grouper, snapper and crustaceans. Adults of our native species are competing for grazing space along some of our natural and artificial reefs, while native juveniles are quickly becoming easy dinners for the lionfish. M AY / J U N E 2 0 1 4 | C A R O L I N A S A L T | 2 1


What to do? Participate in the second annual If You Can’t Beat ’Em, Eat ’Em Lionfish Tournament and request locally caught lionfish at local restaurants. The tournament is a joint effort between Bistro-By-the-Sea, Discovery Diving, the Eastern Carolina Artificial Reef Association (ECARA), Carteret Catch and Seahorse Coastal Consulting. The core goals of the tournament are to prune lionfish populations at targeted artificial reefs, to promote public awareness of the lionfish invasive species problem in the Atlantic, to develop a management strategy, to create a sustainable commercial fishery and to encourage the sale of locally caught seafood. The tournament is a 10-day event that begins with an educational forum at Discovery Diving, a 5-Star PADI Dive Center in Beaufort. Participants in the tournament will learn about the origins of the lionfish epidemic and issues associated with it and learn how to properly spearfish and collect lionfish without being punctured by their venomous spines. Discovery Diving has also set aside special charters during the week that will take participants to locations known to be overrun with lionfish. Finally, the meat that collected as part of the tournament will be prepared by chefs at Bistro-by-the-Sea and presented at the closing ceremony at Discovery Diving and for public education at Monday’s Big Rock Blue Marlin Tournament weigh-in. Last year, despite Tropical Storm Andrea, tournament participants visited the Naeco artificial reef and brought in over 170 fish in only two dives. Charlie Coffman was the winner in terms of most lionfish caught, but was unable to take home the cash prize because he forgot to register! This year’s cash prize includes $500 for the most lionfish caught and additional cash prizes for largest lobster and other edible fish. This year we are also introducing a Lady Angler prize and category. The research and educational outreach continues beyond the spearfishing tournament. ECARA and Carteret Catch are teaming up with Dr. James Morris, a local lionfish expert who works out of NOAA’s Beaufort Lab on Pivers Island, to experiment with lionfish traps as a way to develop the commercial fishery. Plans are underway for the first deployment in May. ECARA and Carteret Catch, two non-profits, are asking for any donations that businesses can make. A contribution of $100 or more will qualify a business as a sponsor of the tournament and it will be a tax-deductible gift to the ECARA and Carteret Catch non-profit organizations. As a business sponsor, your business logo will be featured in all promotional materials and all pertinent website and media advertising. For information on the event and becoming a sponsor, visit carolinareefs.org/index.php/newsandinfo-3/30-if-you-cant-beatem-eat-em. Contributions and promotional materials can be sent to ECARA—“If You Can’t Beat ’Em, Eat ’Em”, c/o Discovery Diving, 414 Orange Street, Beaufort, NC 28516. Thank you for your support. 

2ND ANNUAL ECARA/CARETERET CATCH LIONFISH/LOBSTER TOURNAMENT MAY 30–JUNE 9 PRIZE CATEGORIES Lionfish (Total Numbers).............................................................. $500 Lobster (Longest Carapace)........................................................... $250 Miscellaneous Fish (Total Weight)................................................ $250 MANDATORY TRAINING May 30 at Discovery Diving SPECIAL CHARTERS May 31, June 1, June 6 (Naeco), June 7 CLOSING CEREMONY June 8 CONTACT Discovery Diving 252-728-2265

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CHARLES COFFMAN

CAREERFINDER

LEARNING UNDER PRESSURE

W

hile coastal eastern North Carolina living has numerous advantages to be enjoyed, one that is often forgotten is the incredible scuba diving off the Crystal Coast. Scuba diving North Carolina has been enjoyed by thousands of people for decades, but until recently, I had yet to have the opportunity to dive into the adventure of becoming a SCUBA Instructor. My name is Charlie Coffman and I would like to share how I used my veteran education benefits to add a new, exciting underwater world to my life. Like thousands of others, the Marine Corps stationed me in the heart of eastern NC for a short period of time. Working as a Radar Electronics Technician at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, my love for the ocean continued to grow as I searched for local fishing boat trips and anyone else that would get me out on the water during my time off. Lucky for me, a few of my coworkers were experienced commercial fisherman and would invite me along for a day of fishing. Hours on top of the water always left me wondering what was actually beneath the waves. However my curiosity was abandoned when I left the Marine Corps and the Crystal Coast in 2007. I began to pursue my college education at universities and local colleges around the nation, utilizing the military education benefits. After endless classroom lectures and countless papers, I realized that the traditional education experience wasn’t for me. Federal employment led me back to our coast in 2009 and the desire to live near the ocean was rekindled. During a temporary assigned duty trip to Pensacola, Florida, I decided to begin my experience as a SCUBA diver. I earned my Open Water and Advanced Certification on the Emerald Coast and fell in love with exploring artificial reefs and breathing beneath the waves. Knowing I was heading back to the North Carolina coast, I began scouring the internet for local dive sites and other places to further my passion. As luck would turn out, one of my neighbors, David Osborne, was an employee at a 5sStar Professional Association of Diving Instructors (PADI) Training center at Discovery Diving out of Beaufort. He invited me to visit the dive shop. During conversation with the owner of Discovery Diving, Debby Boyce, I learned that plans to offer an Open Water through Instructor program using military education benefits were almost completed. My excitement level was through the roof as I quickly signed up. I began my Open Water Scuba Instructor (OWSI) education in February 2012 with four other veterans and active duty marines starting out like millions

of other PADI certified divers. Early Saturday morning, class began with standard paperwork and introductions. As I began listening to the instructors introduce themselves, I realized that my limited time underwater was just a drop in the ocean compared to the thousands of dives and experiences the staff at Discovery Diving had. Discovery Diving has been certifying divers for 38 years and although not everyone has been teaching for that long, each instructor had invaluable experience to learn from. Janelle Flemming, Neil Drysdale, Bobby Rawls and Lee Moore are all accomplished instructors across multiple areas of expertise including wreck diving, technical diving, enriched air diving, dmergency O2 providers, emergency first responders, underwater hunting and lionfish collecting. PADI instructional videos, SCUBA gear lectures, knowledge review questions, gear preparation and quizzes filled the first day of class. Sunday was our first trip to the pool to complete a basic swim test and to learn confined water skills with our new underwater equipment. After a successful pool day, we headed back to the dive shop to learn about the physics of diving. Boyle, Henry, Dalton and Charles’s Law all have a vital role in the underwater world in which the knowledge and understanding of what was happening to our air supply and bodies while breathing compressed air. A thorough understanding of hazards with Decompression Sickness (DCS) completed the first weekend of training. Heading home from the shop after my first weekend, I realized what a unique experience I’d had. I was to be able to attend a college that allowed me to learn to SCUBA dive! As a veteran, being able to use my educational benefits to learn a hands-on profession rather than attending traditional universities was an amazing opportunity that I eagerly took advantage of. Realizing the difference between knowing how to do dive and being able to teach diving was a challenge I was ready to accept. However, before the staff of Discovery would ever let me give a lecture to a new student, I had to prove my knowledge and skills to the experienced staff. This was a challenge that Discovery was excited to accept and the first step was getting past Radio Island. For more information about learning to dive and using the Asset Nationally Accredited Discovery Diving Company School visit discoverydiving.com. Veterans and Active Duty military should visit benefits.va.gov/gibill/get_started.asp to learn about accessing education benefits.  M AY / J U N E 2 0 1 4 | C A R O L I N A S A L T | 2 5


A S K T H E AQ UA R I U M

N C AQ UA R I U M S . C O M / P I N E - K N O L L - S H O R E S

FAQ

Do we have alligators here in North Carolina? Yes. Our more southern counties have the largest populations; however, alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) have been seen as far north as the Great Dismal Swamp near the Virginia border. It’s also likely they have ventured into Virginia’s wetlands. Alligators living in the waters around the USS North Carolina battleship in Wilmington have become something of a tourist attraction. Once hunted to near extinction, these ancient reptiles were listed as endangered in 1967. They have made a remarkable comeback. In 1987 their status was downgraded to threatened and even though their numbers have increased dramatically, they remain protected to prevent trafficking of lookalike reptiles such as the American crocodile. Today, populations are believed to total more than five million from the Carolinas to Texas, but habitat loss and pollution remain concerns. These aquatic giants are extremely adaptable and can live in brackish marshes, bayous, bogs, swamps, creeks, ponds, lakes, canals, ditches, backwaters and large rivers. As carnivores and opportunistic predators, they feed on almost anything that moves – frogs, snakes, birds, fish, turtles, lizards, other alligators, small mammals and larger prey such as deer. They can replace any of their 70-80 cone-shaped teeth when lost, resulting in a total of 2,0003,000 potential teeth in a lifetime. They are good swimmers, have excellent eyesight and sense of smell and an average lifespan of 35 to 50 years. Alligators are cold-blooded and can’t tolerate extreme temperatures. To warm up they bask in the sun. In winter they retire to dens that are usually accessed under water. They are fairly slow-moving on land, but don’t be fooled. They can travel quickly for short distances. To ambush prey, alligators lurk near the shoreline and lunge with lightning speed to capture unsuspecting quarry along the water’s edge. They are known for their “death roll,” pulling and drowning their victim under water before ingesting it whole or in large chunks. Alligators easily lose their fear of humans and feeding them or any wild animal endangers both the animal and people. In North Carolina, feeding alligators is illegal and carries a fine up to $200. Alligators are protected as a threatened species under federal law. Some states, however, are authorized to manage and control populations. In North Carolina, hunting or killing alligators is illegal. Only state wildlife officials are allowed to intervene or remove problem animals. For a map of known alligator occurrences in North Carolina visit http://www.fws.gov/nc-es/reptile/ alligat.html. Discover more fascinating facts about North Carolina’s aquatic animals and environments by visiting the aquariums on Roanoke Island, at Fort Fisher and at Pine Knoll Shores or Jennette’s Pier in Nags Head.  2 6 | C A R O L I N A S A L T | M AY / J U N E 2 0 1 4

lligators can be found in many of North Carolina’s wetland areas. State wildlife officials are allowed to remove problem animals if they become a threat to human populations. PHOTO COURTESY OF RICK HAAS

about the

AQUA R I U M Information provided by the North Carolina Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores. The state operates three public aquariums; one in Pine Knoll Shores, another at Fort Fisher and a third on Roanoke Island, as well as Jennette’s Pier in Nags Head. The facilities are administered by the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources and are designed to inspire appreciation and conservation of North Carolina’s aquatic environments. —F O R M O R E I N F O —

For more information, call 1-800-832-FISH or visit ncaquariums.com.


2014

by Sea the

Swansboro Arts By The Sea: Saturday, June 14 ART. STORYTELLING. SAND. WINE. All words that describe the 2014 Swansboro Arts By The Sea Event. Head over to the waterfront in Historic Downtown Swansboro on Saturday, June 14. The event starts at 9 a.m. Eventgoers will have an unbeatably good time. ART. Pottery, jewelry, paintings, stained glass, fiber, carvings, photography, sculpture and metalwork are just a few of the crafts represented at this annual event. There will also be art through entertainment, art for kids and lots more. A juried show represents some of the South’s finest crafters. Bellydancing, martial arts and choral groups will be performing at the Swansboro Pavilion from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. STORYTELLING. Big Frank, storyteller, singer and storywriter, commands attention as well as space. With astute thoughtfulness he reveals himself piece by piece through his storytelling and songs he has written. Watch the feelings play across his face as he reminisces about his travels and life experiences. Big Frank grew up in Greer, South Carolina. He retired in 2004 from the Air Force and since then has been traveling the world, telling stories and singing to anyone who will listen. SAND. Sandy Feat art sculptor Ed Moore will be on site with his talented team sculpting a exclusive creation designed especially for the festival. As a child, Ed spent hours in a sand pile behind his Raleigh home.He grew up to be an architect, but he never gave up on his childhood pastime, which matured into complex creations, from elaborate castles to sculptures cut into blocks of wet sand. The team will be transforming eight tons of sand donated by Morton Trucking of Jacksonville beginning at 9 a.m. on Saturday morning. Patrons are encouraged to bring a chair and watch as this bigger-than-life sandy art forms takes life. WINE. As the afternoon comes to a close and the shopping winds down, the festival continues into the evening with a Wine Tasting Gallery from 5–8 p.m., sponsored by the Emerald Isle Wine Market. The wine tasting tent will be located on Front Street overlooking the waterway. A number of well-known wine distributors and local restaurants will be on hand to offer samples of their special wines and foods. For those with limited wine knowledge, this is a great time to taste a variety of wines and purchase a few to take home with you. Tickets can be purchased at Emerald Isle Wine Market, Through The Looking Glass, Glory Bee and Christina’s Collectibles. Tickets for this event are $25 in advance, $30 at the gate. Due to the large volume of pedestrian traffic during the festival, guests are asked to leave their pets, bicycles and skateboards at home. For more information, visitswansborofestivals.com or call 910-3267370 for more information. 

See you at Jack’s.

MARK YOUR CALENDAR May 10 ........................................ Jupiter Jones May 11 .............Sunday Funday Open at Noon May 16–18 ................Crystal Coast Boat Show May 16 .................................Back Yard Groove May 17 ............................... Central Park Band May 18 .............Sunday Funday Open at Noon May 23 ......................................................BLP May 24 ...........................................SuperSonic May 25 .........................The Mikele Buck Band May 30 ......................................... Rubberband May 31 ..................................... The Party Nuts June 1 ..............Sunday Funday Open at Noon June 6 ..................................... Liquid Pleasure June 7 .............................................. 919 Band June 8 ............................. Sunday Funday with Bryan Mayer (Stretch) NEW SPRING HOURS Thursday–Saturday 4pm–2am Sunday Noon–Unrtil

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MOREHEAD CITY WATERFRONT

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Alive at Five Concerts Moves to Jaycee Park

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n Friday, June 6, the Alive at Five free concert series will move its location to Jaycee Park, 807 Shepard Street, on the Morehead City waterfront. Tom Kies, executive director of the Downtown Morehead City Revitalization Association (DMCRA) said, “We’re going to try something a little different this summer. We loved having the concerts at Katherine Davis Park but it was always a logistical challenge. Jaycee Park has a stage, bathrooms and power and it’s an absolutely beautiful waterfront location. Just like in past years, the Alive at Five concerts are free and family-friendly.” North Carolina native Emily Minor will be the headlining act at the second Alive at Five Concert taking place on Friday, June 6. Known as the fresh new face of country, Minor first grabbed attention when she was in the top 50 finalists of Fox’s hit series American Idol. She’s currently living in Nashville where she’s writing and recording music. Emily Minor’s self-titled EP is a lively collection of convincing stories, undeniable emotions and astounding vocals that is as honest and lovable as Minor herself. Having written four out of the six recorded songs, she is quickly catching the interest of new listeners and impressing significant members of the music industry. The Alive at Five concerts are sponsored by R. A. Jeffrey’s and Bud Light, the Boathouse at Front Street Village, Collins, Inc. at Front Street Village, Crystal Coast Boats, Bob 93.3, WRNS 95.1, Wells Fargo, Twice the Ice, Potash Corp. of Aurora, Chalk and Gibbs Insurance, Portside Marina, Sound Bank, Starling Marine, Trident Funding and Coastal Press. The concerts are hosted by the DMCRA. No coolers are allowed, but beverages will be available. The DMCRA is a non-profit organization dedicated to restoring Morehead City to a vibrant economic, cultural, historic, social and recreational center. In conjunction with the City of Morehead, the DMCRA stages the Morehead City July 4 fireworks program as well as the Christmas parade and the Crystal Coast Boat Show. For more information about Alive at Five or any other activities call 252-8080440 or visit downtownmoreheadcity.com. 


MARY MILLER

I N S P I R AT I O N

SALTY AIR

The Salty Air Open Market is open Monday through Friday from 9–6, Saturdays from 8–6 and Sundays from 10–5, with live music from local bands on Saturdays and Sundays from 11–3. For more information or to become a vendor, call 910-650-4933 or visit saltyairmarket.com. You can also find them on Facebook (Cedar Point Salty Air Open Market).

A Place to Heal

If you are driving down Highway 24 in Cedar Point, you might be surprised to see a large open field with colorful tents and people meandering around. Or to hear the sound of a bluegrass band playing in the background. Or to get a whiff of dirty beans and rice cooking. THERE’S A NEW BUSINESS IN CEDAR POINT and it’s making travelers turn their heads and usually turn around. Its called the Salty Air Open Market. An old concept with a modern twist, the market’s popularity is growing every week. It is just one cool place. People are friendly. They smile and laugh, dance around and sing. They talk to each other. They soak up the sun while lounging in chairs listening to local bands and musicians. There is no clock at the market and no one is in a hurry. But the real story isn’t about a new business opening, it’s about how it came to be and what it means to the patrons, vendors and most importantly, the people who run it. Market managers Jeff and Mary Miller lost their daughter Hannah in January of 2012 to a car accident. Hannah was Mary’s only child and even though she was Jeff ’s stepdaughter, he had raised her since she was five years old. The loss of Hannah completely destroyed Mary. She despised God, tried to take her own life (not just once) and basically gave up on living. Jeff finally gave up his job to be with Mary. At one point they

thought they had found life again when they found themselves managing a local restaurant, but that too ended with heartache and misfortune, plunging Mary back into a place where she was again drowning in self pity and wanted nothing to do with living. In November of last year—having lost their house, down to just the change in their pockets, not knowing what to do or which way to turn—a friend of Hannah’s came to see them. He asked if they would be interested in selling Christmas trees. He had a friend who was looking for someone to run a Christmas tree lot. The money could possibly give them a chance to catch their house payments up. Jeff and Mary figured, sure, why not! How hard could it be? With one week until the trees arrived, they had to rush to find a site and get everything ready in time. An empty lot (where the Salty Air Open Market is now) owned by their friend Becky Humphrey seemed like a perfect solution. They went to Becky and asked if they could rent. Becky said yes and that she wouldn’t charge them anything. She was glad to help Jeff and Mary, knowing their situation. That is when the healing began. First of all, running a Christmas tree lot is hard work. It’s a lot M AY / J U N E 2 0 1 4 | C A R O L I N A S A L T | 2 9


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harder when just two people are trying to do it all. Jeff and Mary did it. They lived there for two months in a cargo trailor loaned by a friend. It was long, cold, hard work. But they felt something special when they were at the lot. A feeling they did not feel when they went home for showers and changes of clothes. More and more they found themselves wanting to be at the Christmas tree lot. Jeff started selling some artwork he makes out of pallet wood. The word got out: a couple in need were trying to save their house by selling Christmas trees. And the customers came out in droves. Jeff and Mary received so many blessings during this time. A hug from a stranger. A cup of coffee brought by on a cold morning by someone they had just met. Thanksgiving dinner delivered by a family that lived down the street. Friends bringing them breakfast, lunch and dinner. Those generaous donations embarrassed Mary, who had always been so strong. Jeff and Mary were humbled. And suddenly, it became evident that something much more than making money was happening. Call it a Christmas miracle, call it the hand of God. During the time that they sold their trees, they found peace. They found their faith again. They found forgiveness. They let go of pain. They started to heal. They started living again. Remember Becky Humphrey? The land owner that told Jeff and Mary they could use the land for free? She checked in on them almost daily. She saw what was happening. She helped as much as should could. She kept telling Jeff and Mary that she was happy that the land was being used for such good things. That it had always been her dream to develop the land into a market where she could help the local community. Becky’s dream was to provide a market where local artists, craftsmen, woodworkers, small farmers, fishermen and such could have a sales venue on busy Highway 24. She wanted to help those less fortunate, those down on their luck, those who may have lost their jobs due to the slow economy, those people that have talent but no way to sell it. Her strong ties to the community kept tugging at her. It was only after spending a couple of days in the mountains over Christmas that she knew this was something she really wanted to make happen. A month later, Becky went to Jeff and Mary with her idea and asked them to help her make it a reality. Jeff and Mary agreed immediately. After packing up the Christmas tree lot, a sort of letdown had set in. They wanted to be back on the land that had given them such peace and Becky’s market idea seemed perfect. For the next three months Becky, Jeff and Mary worked every day, planning, mapping and designing the Salty Air Open Market. Doing all of the work themselves, sometimes in below-freezing temperatures, the three of them finally opened their market in March. It is a dream come true. The market has space for up to 55 vendors. You can find arts and crafts, jewelry, knitters, bakers, basketweavers, woodcarvers and woodworkers, musicians, rug makers, photographers and more as you wander through the landscaped paths, working your way through the tents. From there you can head into the Salty Air Produce Market, a blueroofed building along the back of the courtyard, where you can buy locally grown produce and specialty gifts. Local strawberries as big as your fist are in season right now from Aman Family Farms, a family-owned farm located on Swansboro Belgrade Road that has been in business for over 30 years. That’s where you will find Jeff and Mary most of the time. When you walk in, be prepared to have your spirits lifted. You will always be greeted with a smile and sometimes even a hug. They will tell you that their life has been changed by this place, this land, this market. And that it is a healing place. You can’t help but feel it too, as you let the sun shine on your face and breathe in the Salty Air. 


L I N D A B E R G M A N – A LT H O U S E

O U T E R B A N K S W I L D L I F E S H E LT E R

ABOUT O.W.L.S. Take a tour of the facility at 100 Wildlife Way, Newport. To volunteer, call 252-240-1200. If your organization would like to learn more about wildlife, the O.W.L.S. non-releasable education animals jump at the chance!

GOOD MOTHERS Infant birds are among the most fragile of all babies received at the Outer Banks Wildlife Shelter. Living in the wild is harsh. Sometimes a rescue is really necessary. And sometimes it isn’t.

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ursery attendants have shifted into high gear to accommodate the every-30-minutes feeding schedule for bird newborns and fledglings at the Outer Banks Wildlife Shelter as their foster home this summer. The incubators will be full, the counters covered with crab boxes, waterless fish tanks and netted doll playpens, all housing infant and juvenile birds. Unfeathered infant birds are the most fragile of all babies we receive during spring breeding season. Compatible youngins like robins, blue jays and mockingbirds can room together, while loner species who don’t get along with anybody get their own space. We learned this the hard way when we tried to buddy a titmouse with a house finch years ago. We never knew a cute, tiny titmouse could be so vicious. There was a panicked evacuation and we apologized to the terrorized finch for the rest of the day. Wildlife rehabilitators squeeze in between the canopied human baby playpens on the floor used to restrict fully feathered adolescents who are learning to eat on their own before the big move to an outside enclosure for flight school. Well-meaning people who do not understand the natural behaviors of wildlife deliver birdnapped bobble-headed babies to the shelter every day. The list of reasons is quite extensive: “I think they’ve been abandoned,” (probably not) or “The big birds keep flying at me when I go near the nest,” (that’s understandable—protecting their children) or “They leave droppings on my car,” (so maybe move your car?) or “They nested in my mailbox,” (how about using a temporary mail container for a few weeks until the little birds wave adios). It’s a very slim chance they’ve been abandoned in most cases. Even if something happens to one bird parent the other will continue to bring food to the nest until the newborns are ready to take flight. The only excuses that really carry weight at the shelter are “The cat was about to get them,” or “I pulled the snake out of the nesting box, but he’d already eaten two.” (Yes, the snake must eat, but two is more than enough.) Living in the wild is harsh, even the semi-wild such as your backyard or workplace. Unfortunately, bird parents do not have

the defenses needed to save their young from domestic or feral cats and dogs that injure, kill or orphan millions of birds each year and they don’t pack the punch to whip up on an aggressive snake, either. Those little hollow legs just don’t have the ninja kick they need to do business. So there are some good reasons to disrupt the family unit but not many. Although natural mothers provide better care, nutrition and survival training than any wildlife rehabilitator, we do our best as foster moms for the orphans in our care. We can feed the babies comparable diets, be it syringe-fed formula, fruits, crickets, seeds, mealworms and for the robins, juicy earthworms we dig out of the compost pile. But we don’t look like their parents (although some might want to debate that) and try as we might, we can’t teach them to be wild. They just don’t take us seriously enough. They will have to depend on each other for that. Our golden advice is and has always been: If they are not in danger and there is a possibility the mother is around, wait. There are plenty of good mothers out there, even if you don’t see them. Wildlife mothers (and fathers) are devoted to the survival of their offspring, but mom must leave the nest from time to time to feed herself and find food for the babies. After fledging, young birds will still hang with their parents and beg for food, much like human babies old enough to leave the nest but smart enough to know a good thing when they’ve got it. Have faith in the good wildlife mothers. They possess instinctive loyalty and tenacity far beyond our awareness. One of the good mothers we came in contact with a while back was a mourning dove who nested in a hanging plant every year at a hardware store. After situating herself, the clerks would pull other plants around her for safety, place a “Do Not Disturb” sign and pile straw beneath her chosen nesting spot to cushion a fall if a

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baby dove took a dive. One year, during a tropical storm, the torrential rains didn’t let up for hours and we couldn’t help thinking about her, wondering if the hanging plant could possibly drain fast enough to prevent drowning the babies. A wildlife rehabilitator threw on her rain poncho and headed to the store, which was closed due to the hurricane threat, only to find the good mother hunkered down on her nest and although soaked herself, keeping her dependent brood dry. If you come across an active bird nest you feel is in a danger zone or has become a nuisance to you, please call us at 252-240-1200 or a wildlife shelter close to you before displacing it. The bird world will thank you! The first wild babies displaced this spring who reached our rehab door were mammals: squirrels, opossums and cottontails. They arrived in all stages of development and our staff morphed into the good mothers needed for each species. We have already released the strong, feisty and ready-to-go-their-wild-way early borns and we are prepared to steadfastly stay the course throughout the summer, ensuring all wildlife orphans are properly raised and become strong and cleverly keen enough to live their second chance. 

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Kayaking and Paddleboard to support Boys & Girls Clubs

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he 4th Annual Beaufort Boys & Girls Club Kayak and Paddle Board Race will be held on Saturday, May 31, at 11:45 a.m. at the park in downtown Beaufort. This year’s race will also include a junior level for kayakers and paddleboarders 16 years and younger. Last year the race was a big success, raising over $12,000 for the Beaufort club. Forty kayakers and paddleboarders came out for the 3.6-mile race down Taylors Creek. Last year’s winner Ian Johnson shattered the previous year’s results with a 41.32 minute time to be awarded this years overall winner. Kim Lewis won the women under 50 division with a 46.53 time followed by Shevel Hunt 60. 51., Ann Williams Jones 61.07 minutes. Men under 50 division Ian Johnson 41:32, Ken Rose 49:06, Don Handy 50:15. Women over 50 Mariam Sutton 51:58, Julia Nicholls 54:59 and Kim Worrell 63:28. Men over 50 Thom Foster 46:07, Rick Sykes 49:06 and Bill Brophy 55:09. “It was a very exciting race and we feel this is one of the best race venues in Carteret County”, said Bill Rawls who has co-chaired this event along with his wife Helen for the past three years. “We were delighted with the turnout—it was almost double the number of participants from last year,” said Rawls. The money raised goes directly support the Beaufort Boys & Girls Club. “Many of these kayakers and paddle boarders compete in races around our area and several said this is one of the most scenic race courses and the group of people cheering them on at the finish line was the best they ever experienced,” said Cynthia Barber, director of marketing and special events for the Boys & Girls Club. “We are so fortunate to have a hardworking advisory board at our Beaufort club who have done a fantastic job in making this a premier event,” said Barber. The Beaufort Boys & Girls Clubs would like to thank the 85 local businesses who sponsored the event in 2013 and a special thank you to their Platinum Sponsors, Al Williams Properties, Dr. Alonzo Davis, Atlantic Beach Realty, BB&T, Boathouse at Front Street Village, Dr. Lloyd Hey,Down East Medical, Radio Island Marina, West Marine, Soundside Health Care and Willis Insurance Agencies. “Putting on an event required a lot of hard work by many individuals and this group was able to secure 85 sponsors which is fantastic and proved to be the key to raising $12,000,” said Barber. If you are interested in sponsoring please contact the Boys & Girls Clubs at 252-222-3007. To register for the event go to www.bgccc.net/events. The cost is $30 and includes a T-shirt. Registration opens at 10:30 a.m. on May 31. The race begins at 11:45 a.m.  M AY / J U N E 2 0 1 4 | C A R O L I N A S A L T | 3 3


SOUTHERN GARDENING

JESSICA GUESNO of CAROLINA HOME & GARDEN

Southern Gardening

THE NATURAL LANDSCAPE EASY CARE ECO-FRIENDLY SOLUTIONS

Save money, time and water with easy and hardy alternative lawns. 3 4 | C A R O L I N A S A L T | M AY / J U N E 2 0 1 4


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hile green grass is beautiful, it also consumes a lot of time, energy and money. The National Wildlife Federation (NWF) estimates that a typical lawn costs almost $700 per acre to maintain … per year. And, between the mowing, fertilizing, watering and weed prevention, you may find that you have little time left over for enjoying the fruits of your labor. Natural landscaping is a wonderful way to create an eco-friendly outdoor living space that allows you to spend more time enjoying the natural beauty of your surroundings. A beautiful, wildlife-friendly landscape creates a tranquil and peaceful atmosphere and attracts birds, bees and butterflies. It doesn’t have to be hard! Instead of an all-grass lawn, incorporate a butterfly garden in the center. The butterfly bush is extremely hardy and can withstand the hot sun as well as the cold. You will love the splash of color added by these fast-growing deciduous shrubs. Plus, both butterflies and hummingbirds are seduced by the sweet, nectar rich flowers. The butterfly bush can grow to a height of 8 to 10 feet, so be sure you allow at least 5 to 10 feet between bushes. Lavender thrives in the same conditions as the butterfly bush. Every part of the lavender plant is infused with an aromatic oil. Although most people think lavender only comes in purple, you can also find lavender with pink, white or blue blooms. And it stays green year round! Another great plant for the butterfly garden is the daylily. Daylilies are perennials (they come back year after year) and thrive in full sun and can grow to 4 feet. Create a border around your butterfly bush with smaller daylilies and then fill in bare areas with the larger variety. The torch lily or “redhot poker”, got its name from its bottlebrush-like flower spikes. These beautiful plants are available in shades of red orange, pink, yellow, white, creamy pastels and bicolors. They are available in sizes ranging from 2 to 6 feet. These are just a few of the alternatives available to incorporate into your lawn. By adding just one small garden area you can reduce the time you spend, mowing, watering and fertilizing. It also allows more time for cooking out or simply sitting around, enjoying the multitude of butterflies and hummingbirds while enjoying the wonderful fragrances drifting thru the air. Other plants that do well and offer almost zero maintenance are succulents and lantana. Different types of grasses add texture to any garden. 

B U T T E R F LY G A R D E N B E A U T I E S

s LAVENDER

s DAYLILY Daylilies thrive in full sun and great as a hardy, low-maintenance border plant.

Every part is infused with an aromatic oil that fills the air. Lavender comes in many colors.

s REDHOT POKER

s BUTTERFLY BUSH Extremely hardy and able to tolerate both hot sun and cold, this shrub is a butterfly garden staple.

Available in sizes ranging from 2 to 6 feet, the redhot poker is available in many colors.

IMPROVE SOIL AERATION Pesticides kill 60 to 90% of earthworms, which are required to aerate the soil. SAVE WATER The NWF estimates that 30% of the water consumed on the East Coast goes to watering lawns. By using plants with lower watering requirements, you conserve water. REDUCE SOIL EROSION Since plants and native grass-type plants have longer root systems (up to 5 to 10 feet), they help to hold the soil in place.

IMPROVE WATER QUALITY The EPA estimates that homeowners apply ten times more chemicals than farmers. These chemicals run off into our waterways and can end up in our drinking water. CUT AIR & NOISE POLLUTION Let’s face it. Lawnmowers, weed eaters and leaf blowers make a lot of noise and are heavy air polluters. In fact, the EPA estimates that lawnmowers emits 11 times the air pollution of a new car for each hour of use.

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Muffin Meals Cookbook: A New Way of Thinking About Cooking

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ulia Vradelis and Allison Worrell, both from eastern North Carolina, have recently published a cookbook unlike any others. Muffin Meals, published by Tate Publishing, was written with busy moms in mind. The idea of the cookbook is to provide innovative, easy-to-make meals in your muffin pan. Julia came up with the idea while watching a show about cupcakes. “They had asked the chefs to include jalapeños in the cupcake and I thought if you’re going to do that, why not add beef and cheese and make it a taco muffin?” She shared this with her friend Allison, who came up with the name “Muffin Meals.” For the next two years, Julia and Allison developed Muffin Meal recipes for breakfast, lunch, dinner, dessert … even holidays. The authors deconstructed old favorites such as shepherd’s pie and chicken and rice and reconstructed them in the form of a muffin. The end result is a diverse set of recipes which look as great as they taste. In addition to being simple to make, they are portion controlled. Most of the recipes are designed for large, Texas-style muffin pans—the perfect size for a meal. “I think one of the biggest challenges for people these days is to simply eat less,” says Julia. “I’ve always heard ‘make your portions about the size of your fist’ and Muffin Meals accomplishes that without leaving you feeling deprived.” Every recipe has a color photograph taken by the authors. “We didn’t want to have photos professionally taken because the end result rarely looks like a professionally styled picture,” says Allison. “These are actual photos that we took—the average cook should get the same results!” Not only did Allison and Julia share this common goal of developing the cookbook, they also shared the loss of loved ones before and during the process. “We chose to donate a portion of the proceeds to hospice, which is very near and dear to our hearts,” says Vradelis. “Both Allison and I lost our mothers to cancer. I also lost my brother and sister-in-law, Randy and Mona Eckert, to brain cancer five years ago. They were all in hospice care at the end.” Allison’s mother, Dottie Arnoult, unfortunately passed away before the cookbook was written but Julia’s mother, Vera Eckert, was able to be part of the process and lived to see the final proof. The book is dedicated to their memory. As two busy moms, Allison and Julia poke fun at themselves being “less-than-great” cooks, so the reader will find most of the recipes easy to follow. They also show how to wrap muffins as gifts. “When our mothers were sick, it was so nice to get a warm meal delivered from friends and family,” reflects Julia. “Muffin Meals freeze well, travel well and make a perfect gift to lift someone’s spirits. Our goal was to create a fun, easy cookbook. It is filled with wonderful memories of our mothers and many we created along the way. We hope we can give back to hospice for the loving care our loved ones received.” These two authors already have their sights set on their next book: “Moms, Memories and Muffin Meals.” Their next book will involve their readers (Julia fondly refers to them as “Muffin Heads”) by including some of their recipes and stories of cooking with their own Mothers. “Whenever we talk to people about the background story of the book, they immediately share something about their own moms,” says Allison. Some of these stories will be included in the book. If you would like to submit a recipe from your mom, Allison and Julia will take it and turn it in to a Muffin Meal. It could be featured along with your story about you and your Mom cooking together. Please submit


MUFFIN MEALS

Granola & Yogurt Breakfast Parfaits

is a new cookbook from the kitchen of Julia Vradelis and Allison Worrell and is available in bookstores nationwide, as well as online through Barnes and Noble, Amazon and more. Follow them on Facebook and Twitter.

Makes 12 regular size muffin meals

GRANOLA SHELL: ½ cup margarine or butter, softened 1 egg ¼ cup honey 1 cup oats ½ cup whole bran flakes cereal ½ cup chopped almonds ½ cup flaked coconut ½ tsp. cinnamon ½ tsp. salt

FILLINGS: vanilla yogurt fresh fruit jam 1. PREHEAT oven to 350 degrees. 2. INSERT muffin pulls into muffin pan cups and spray each muffin cup with nonstick cooking spray. 3. MIX first three ingredients. 4. ADD remaining ingredients. 5. DIVIDE evenly among muffing cups, filling each about half full. Take the back of a spoon and press evenly up the sides of the cup to form a shell. (If the mixture sticks to the spoon, spray nonstick cooking spray on the spoon.) 6. MAKE foil balls to insert in each cup. This helps to keep the granola shell from expanding. 7. BAKE for 10–12 minutes. Let cool before removing from pan. 8. FILL each shell first with your favorite jam (we love raspberry or blueberry), then fill with vanilla yogurt. Yummy! your recipe and story to MuffinMeals@gmail. com. Julia and Allison begin their book signing tour in May. For a list of cities where they will be appearing, go to their Facebook page under Muffin Meals. “We love meeting people and getting their reaction to the book”, Julia says, “It’s been very exciting and we are so grateful for all the local support we’ve received.” Muffin Meals Cookbook is in bookstores locally and will be in bookstores nationwide. The book can also be ordered online through Tate Publishing, Barnes and Noble and Amazon. Follow Muffin Meals on Facebook and Twitter. 

MUFFIN PULLS are strips of foil placed in each muffin cup in a criss-cross, so you can easily lift the Muffin Meal out of the cup. They should be long enough to come out of the cup. Spray non-stick cooking spray after you place the pulls in the cups.

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TA L K I N G F I N A N C E

G AV I N M . L A N G L E Y

THE R I SE OF B I TCOI N I S T H E V I RT U A L C U R R E N C Y A FA D O R T H E F U T U R E ?

M GAVIN M. LANGLEY Gavin M. Langley is a member of Capital Investment Companies at Sound Bank. Reach him at 252-727-2147 or email glangley@ capital-invest.com.

This material was prepared by MarketingLibrary. Net Inc. and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note - investing involves risk and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment. Citations. 1 tinyurl.com/nl9n7hw [11/23/13] 2 coinbase.com/charts [4/16/14] 3 tinyurl.com/nvlxph7 [1/15/14] 4 tinyurl.com/psjsfre [3/18/14] 5 entrepreneur.com/article/233143 [4/16/14] 6 entrepreneur.com/article/230354 [12/16/13] 7 blogs.wsj.com/moneybeat/2014/04/11/bitbeat-bitcoinsurges-as-pboc-softens-up-its-tone/ [4/11/14]

ention “bitcoin” to assorted economists or investors and you trigger all kinds of associations. To some, it signifies an exciting new reality—a digital currency, with a payment system that could revolutionize finance. To others, it is a volatile commodity—propped up by hype, fraught with risk. It also refers to an open source software system and a financially startling concept: currency production through the Internet. You can’t talk about Bitcoin without talking about bitcoin. Bitcoin with a capital B references the Bitcoin network that creates the digital currency; bitcoin with a lower-case b refers to the currency itself. Where is bitcoin made? Online. All bitcoin is generated in cyberspace and the process is interesting to say the least. The first step in making bitcoin is “mining” and mining takes math skills. A bitcoin “miner” (a computer user) tries to solve one or more math problems, with success resulting in shares of bitcoin. The more miners there are, however, the smaller fractional bitcoin shares become as no more than 21 million bitcoins will ever be created.1 Once mined, a bitcoin can be sent to a miner’s password-protected digital wallet. (If the digital wallet is hacked, the bitcoin is irrevocably lost.) A miner can use bitcoin to pay for goods and services at a small-but-growing network of online and brick-and-mortar merchants.1 What is a bitcoin worth? Ask the free market—specifically, the commodities market. Look at the bitcoin charts at Coinbase.com, one of a few sites tracking historical daily settlement prices for bitcoin across various bitcoin exchanges. On July 6, 2013, a single bitcoin was worth $69.31; on November 30, 2013, a bitcoin was worth $1,126.82; on April 16, 2014, a lone bitcoin was worth $516.61.2 Volatility and bitcoin go hand in hand. Since no central bank in the world issues bitcoin, it is only worth what investors are willing to pay for it. In the worst-case scenario, bitcoin plays out like the tulip bulb mania of the 1600s and investors eventually pay little or nothing for it. In the blue-sky scenario, bitcoin becomes a part of everyday life. University of Virginia economist Peter Rodriguez neatly summed up the emergence of bitcoin in the Wall Street Journal: “It’s as if there was an effort to create gold that wasn’t gold. The longer [bitcoins] persist, the more that people will have faith in them as a legitimate store of value.”1 Who dreamed up bitcoin? A mysterious person or entity going by the name of Satoshi Nakamoto. A white paper under that authorship floated the idea of a virtual currency and a network to create it in 2008. In 2009, “Satoshi Nakamoto” created the open source software system to generate bitcoin.3 In March, Newsweek claimed it had found Nakamoto hiding in plain sight, living quietly in a middle-class Southern California suburb—but the man they profiled, Dorian Satoshi Nakamoto, told the Associated Press that he had never heard of bitcoin until February 2014. Students and researchers at Great Britain’s Aston University claim that the author of the 2008 white paper is Nick Szabo, a respected academic theorist and George Washington University law school graduate who invented Bit Gold, a conceptual forerunner of the Bitcoin network.4,5 For bitcoin to steal gold’s shine, it has to lose its dark side. If all of this sounds like something out of a dystopian science fiction novel, you aren’t alone in your skepticism. There is much that is exciting about bitcoin and its potential to streamline global finance, but there are also big question marks. As Entrepreneur notes, about 90% of bitcoin buyers are speculators. That is not the only detail about bitcoin that unnerves investors. The digitized anonymity of bitcoin transactions beckons to cybercriminals, who undoubtedly see bitcoin exchanges as upcoming grand prizes when it comes to hacking, phishing and malware.6 Where bitcoin has really taken off is China. In fact, that is where about half of daily global bitcoin trading occurred in 2013. But when the People’s Bank of China stated that bitcoin was dangerous, bitcoin values on the Mt. Gox exchange fell from $1,300 to $700 in 24 hours. (That exchange later filed for bankruptcy.) The PBOC maintains that it will not ban bitcoin.4,6,7 Bitcoin prices skyrocketed in 2013 and they could fall just as dramatically through a variety of factors (hackers raiding exchanges, crackdowns in the PRC, imitators rising to steal its thunder). At this point, it is little wonder that many regard bitcoin as a speculative play for the long run. 

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J O H N AT H A N D AY

WA T E R M A R K C H U R C H

LET IT GO AND TRUST HIM

R

ABOUT THE CHURCH If you are interested in hearing more from Johnathan Day, you can contact Watermark Church by calling 336-260-8774 or you can send email to jd@ watermarkchurchnc.org.

LET IT GO ecently I was speaking with a young lady who was sharing some of her life experiences with The snow glows white on the mountain tonight me. Though she grew up in a stable home Not a footprint to be seen environment, many of the things she experienced A kingdom of isolation, were less than acceptable. As the conversation And it looks like I’m the queen. progressed, she asked me had I ever seen the Disney movie The wind is howling like this swirling Frozen. Not being a huge movie person, I told her that I had storm inside Couldn’t keep it in, heaven knows I tried not. She told me about the popular song “Let It Go”. My Don’t let them in, don’t let them see curiosity got the best of me, so I went to YouTube and listened Be the good girl you always have to be to it. I was blown away by the message. Everyone has a story Conceal, don’t feel, don’t let them know to tell, some filled with love, joy, peace and happiness; others Well, now they know filled with hurt, dishonesty, disfunction and pain. What I find Let it go, let it go interesting is the fact that so many people choose to live in the Can’t hold it back anymore Let it go, let it go pain of their pasts. We are haunted by the chatter that tells us Turn away and slam the door we are no better than our past or current circumstances—and I don’t care we accept it! What they’re going to say I love the account of The Woman at the Well in John 4. Let the storm rage on, Jesus had just arrived in the town of Sychar. While waiting for The cold never bothered me anyway his disciples, he stopped at Jacob’s Well just outside the city. An It’s funny how some distance Makes everything seem small unnamed woman appeared with a clay jar in her hand. Jesus And the fears that once controlled me made a simple request: “Will you give me a drink?” [JOHN Can’t get to me at all 4:7]. We must understand that Jesus was going against three of It’s time to see what I can do the standard customs of that day when he ask the Samaritan To test the limits and break through Woman for a drink of water: Jews like Jesus weren’t supposed No right, no wrong, no rules for me to speak to Samaritans, men weren’t permitted to address I’m free women without their husbands present and rabbis had no Let it go, let it go I am one with the wind and sky business speaking to shady ladies. Jesus was willing to toss out Let it go, let it go all the rules, but the woman at the well wasn’t. You’ll never see me cry “You’re a Jew and I am a Samaritan woman,” she reminded Here I stand Him. “How can you ask me for a drink?” [JOHN 4:9]. The And here I’ll stay Samaritan woman was focused on the law. Jesus was focused Let the storm rage on on grace! My power flurries through the air A little history of the Samaritan woman: She had five into the ground My soul is spiraling in frozen fractals all husbands and the man she was currently living with was not around even her husband. Five marriages didn’t make her a sinner. And one thought crystallizes like an Due to warfare, famine, injury and disease, men in those days icy blast dropped like flies. A widow became either a beggar, a prostitute I’m never going back, The past is in the past or another man’s wife. Each time, the Samaritan woman had Let it go, let it go chosen the best option.But sharing her bed with a sixth man And I’ll rise like the break of dawn who wasn’t her husband? That was a sin! She tried her best to Let it go, let it go steer the conversation away from her situation but Jesus spoke That perfect girl is gone to her and said, “I am the living water and if you drink from Here I stand this water you will never thirst again.” At that moment, she let In the light of day Let the storm rage on, it go! She left her life of sin, guilt and shame behind. The cold never bothered me anyway. Just like the Samaritan woman, many of us are living in the status quo. We accept our current state of being as if it’s the best that we will ever know. On the other hand, Jesus comes to us right where we are and says, Let it Go! Leave the past, the hurt, the pain behind and follow me! Jeremiah 29:11 gives us this promise. “For I know the plans I have for you, declares the Lord, plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future.” When we look to God, He promises us that there is more to this life than hurt, pain, insecurity and dysfunction. To experience this promise, we must do one thing. Let it go and trust Him!  M AY / J U N E 2 0 1 4 | C A R O L I N A S A L T | 3 9


DISCOVERY DIVING

LEE MOORE

DIV I N G OU R COAST I N M AY

M

JOIN DISCOVERY Contact Discovery Diving at 252‑728‑2265 or visit them on Facebook to see what classes and events are coming up. You can also visit discoverydiving.com.

ay will continue the the warming trend that began in April. Offshore temperatures in April were in the mid-60s. By the end of May, they should rise to around 70. Temps at the offshore wrecks, in the 60s now, should get up into the low 70s by the end of the month. As the water warms, tropical fish should be seen in large numbers on the offshore wrecks. May is the time of year that game fishermen are getting their rods and reels ready to go. They are also preparing for the Big Rock Blue Marlin Tournament that begins on June 6. Spearfishermen are getting their spearguns ready with new bands and shock cords. At the end of May is the second annual If You Can’t Beat ‘em, Eat ‘em Lionfish / Lobster Tournament. The tournament is a joint effort between Bistro-By-the-Sea, Discovery Diving, Carteret Catch, Eastern Carolina Artificial Reef Association (ECARA) and Seahorse Coastal Consulting Lionfish first appeared off of the Crystal Coast in August of 2000 on the Naeco. Since then, lionfish have spread to all of the offshore wrecks and some of the inshore wrecks. They can also be found on the rock ledges off of the coast. Not only have the number of locations they are found increased, but their numbers have increased as well. A lionfish can eat half of its body weight every day. Many of the fish that lionfish eat are juvenile game fish, such as grouper and snapper. Lionfish also eat small shrimp, crabs and lobster. Their increase in population is partly due to the fact that the females can lay 30,000 eggs every four days. All of these eggs will not become adult lionfish. Some of the eggs will not hatch, some of the eggs will be eaten by birds and fish and some will be eaten after hatching. Another reason for the increase in the population is the fact that they do not have any natural predators. The only predator that the lionfish have off of the Crystal Coast is humans. Lionfish cannot be caught on a hook and line. Some of the lobster fishermen in Florida have found that lionfish are going into their traps and are getting trapped. Attempts at using lobster traps off of the Crystal Coast to catch lionfish have proven unsuccessful so far. Fishermen are continuing to try different configurations. As of now, the only successful way to catch a lionfish is by divers. Divers use pole spears to catch lionfish, one lionfish at a time. Because of the depths that divers have to go to get the larger lionfish, usually 120 to 140 feet, the amount of time the diver can spend hunting is limited. Divers can remove anywhere from 150 to 200 lionfish from some of the wrecks and there will be little noticeable difference. Some of the lionfish from the tournament will be served to the participants at the closing ceremony. Some of the lionfish will be served at the weigh-in at The Big Rock Blue Marlin Tournament to help raise public awareness of the lionfish problem off of the Crystal Coast and to make the public aware of how lionfish are similar in taste to sea bass. The tournament begins on May 30 and goes through June 8. For more information on the tournament, go to www.discoverydiving.com. Look under Events and look in Lionfish Tournament for rules and prize money. Charters have been set up specifically for lionfish hunting. Look under Diving, then Calendar for openings on those charters. 

Pier 58 Storage JOIN ECARA

ECARA works to continue sinking ships to create artificial reefs here in North Carolina, but their resources are limited. To $ get involved with ECARA, visit carolinareef.org to check out their current project list.

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