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FREE! AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2017

your life on the Crystal Coast LOOK INSIDE FOR FUN & FREE

THINGS TO DO ON THE CRYSTAL COAST MID–AUGUST THROUGH MID–SEPTEMBER PG. 8

Race Fans: ‘BOY SCOUT 250’

AT SPEEDWAY Local Gems:

HARRIKA’S BREW HAUS MOVES UP Our Coast:

INCREDIBLE OYSTERS

END OF

SUMMER

ISSUE

DIVING OUR COAST SUMMER BIRDFEEDING PRESERVING YOUR HARVEST


HOME OF THE CRYSTAL COAST STEAM POT!

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Good food, good friends, great times!

Wednesdays

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Fridays

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LIVE MUSIC! 8/18 .. Hank Barbee 8/26 . 4EverAll 8/31 .. Robert Lightner 9/1 .... Rick Huff 9/8 ... Hank Barbee

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Summer

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JULY 26 • 6:30PM

JULY 12 • 6:30PM

JULY 30 • 6:30PM

PTMAcoustic ChrisBellamy JULY 19 • 6:30 PM

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MID -AUGU ST TO M ID-SE PT E M B E R 2 0 1 7

Inside This Issue your life on the Crystal Coast

15 The Incredible Oyster

Not only are oysters a delicacy and a sustainable protein source, they are also filter feeders that help to naturally clean coastal waters. They support our coastal economy and heritage as well.

16 OWLS: Summer Birdfeeding Birds also need feeding during the summer

18

months. Learn what to feed your visiting species to keep them at optimum health and happiness, as well as how to keep your feeder safe and clean.

SPEEDWAY HOSTS Local Boy Scout Race FREE!

AUGUST

/ SEPTEMBER

2017

t stal Coas on the Cry your life

END OF

R SUMME

E LOOK INSID & FREE FOR FUN

ISSUE

GS THIN TO DO L COAST CRYSTA GH ON THE GUST THROU ER MID–AU MID–SEPTEMB PG. 8

ns: Race Fa OUT 250’ ‘BOY SC DWAY

AT SPEE

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Local Ge

A’S HARRIKHAUS BREW UP MOVES :

Our Coast

IBLE INCRED S OYSTER

OUR DIVING AST CO SUMMER ING BIRDFEED VING PRESER RVEST YOUR HA

August / September ON THIS MONTH’S COVER

It’s hard to believe that the summer is coming to an end, and the new school year is beginning. Enjoy the last weeks of heat and sunshine, before the welcome cool of fall.

18 ‘Boy Scout 250’ Race at Speedway On August 26, Carteret County Speedway hosts the Boy Scout 250 to raise funds for the local council of Boy Scouts. The race at the NASCAR-sanctioned track will feature multiple levels of racing.

19 Harrika’s Brew Haus Local beer paradise Harrika’s Brew Haus started

in 2007 with a simple mission. But over the years, it has become a Top 100 Beer Bar in America. And more exciting changes are on the horizon!

20 Moment of Reflection We face challenges and we feel like we are not

making any gains. This leads to a defeatist attitude. However, if we give the devil too much domain, we are not allowing room for God to work.

21 Preserving Your Harvest Fresh produce from our gardens and 15 INCREDIBLE OYSTERS Not just a delicacy, oysters help the local ecosystem thrive.

16 SUMMER BIRDING Find out how and what to feed your local species this summer.

markets is abundant right now. With a little planning we can carry these delicious summer flavors with us into the winter months.

LOCAL INTEREST

Things To Do................................................ 8 Hooked Up Fishing..................................... 23 Diving Our Coast.. ....................................... 24 Tides. . ....................................................... 25

21 FALL HARVEST A little planning goes a long way toward preserving your harvest

23 HOOKED UP FISHING Find out what’s biting on the Crystal Coast in August. CarolinaSalt.com » August / September 2017 CAROLINA SALT 5


PUBLISHER

WILL ASHBY C R E AT I V E D I R E C TO R

C H E V Y K AY LO R

Let us put the Leisure back into your most important day!

B E C O M E A C O N T R I BU TO R

Submit your letters to the editor, photos, community listings and articles to will@carolinasalt.com. The editorial deadline for the next issue is August 16. The next issue publishes September 7.

B E C O M E A N A DV E RT I S E R

Carolina Salt is a great way to reach out to your local customers, as well as our seasonal visitors.

252-723-7628

Call us to find out how we can help you grow your local business. FROM THE PUBLISHER

Thank you for picking up Carolina Salt magazine, all about our life here on the Crystal Coast. Our articles are written by locals. Every month we look to our readers to keep our magazine fresh. If you have a story to tell, an event to promote or an interesting local photograph, send them our way. Participation is welcomed and appreciated. Reader contributions are the founding principle of the magazine. If you like what you see, tell people about it— especially our advertisers. For questions, concerns or more information, send e-mail to will@carolinasalt.com or call 252-723-7628. For up-to-date info, be sure to look us up on Facebook!

—Free Local Delivery—

Visit Our Showroom! 208-A Bogue Inlet Drive | Emerald Isle

252.354.8887

www.IslandEssentials.com

WE DEPEND ON OUR READERS! Call 252-723-7628 if you’re interested in submitting an article or photo. Our local content is what keeps our magazine fresh and relevant. PUBLISHED BY CRYSTAL COAST OUTDOORS PUBLICATIONS P.O. Box 572, Morehead City, NC 28557 | 252-723-7628


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THINGS TO DO

✪ = FREE

MID–AUGUST TO MID–SEPTEMBER

AUGUST

Harrika’s Summer Entertainment

Join us and come see what’s happening in the Biergarten! Cantina Nights every Thursday 6–10 p.m. Burritos, tacos, nachos, beergaritas, Modelos, sangrias and Los Locos on tap. Live music on the weekends 7:30–10:30 p.m. For more information call 252-354-7911 or visit them online at drinkcoastal.com. Located at 911 Cedar Point Boulevard in Cedar Point

✪ WEDNESDAYS

GARDEN AT EARTHWISE FARM

in Ocean. People of all ages join in to work the soil, plant and weed. The harvest is divided among the group. To learn more, email cpmbwmiller@gmail.com.

8/11................ Katie Basden from “The Voice” (No Cover) 8/19................................. Island Beer Fest with Zen Pirates 8/26.................................... Werewolves of Morehead City 8/30.....................................Yoga On Tap (Reserve A Spot) 8/31................................... The Hustle Souls from Asheville 9/2................................................................................4EverALL 9/6..........................................................................Pubtheology 9/7.....................................................Trivia Night with Hayley

WEDNESDAYS

EarthWise Farm Workday

[ 6PM ] The North Carolina Coastal Federation

hosts garden workdays every Wednesday at EarthWise Farm in Ocean. The farm is located next to Bogue Sound in Carteret County. People of all ages join us at our weekly farm workdays to work the soil, plant and weed. We harvest a wide variety of vegetables and melons, including squash, okra, tomatoes, cabbages, potatoes and peppers. The harvest is divided among the group. EarthWise Farm is only open to members of the federation. For more information about memberships or to join, visit nccoast.org. To learn more about participating in garden workdays, contact Cindy Miller at cpmbwmiller@gmail.com.

CONSERVATION WEDNESDAYS

Blackbeard’s Ship, Queen Anne’s Revenge

[ 10AM–NOON | 1–3PM ] Have you ever

✪ WEDNESDAYS

EVENING GUN AT FORT MACON

ERALD

IS

I

R

F

FA

EE

N

EM

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Meet in the fort from 4–4:30 p.m. to watch a 19th century cannon be loaded and fired in the tradition of the Evening Gun. At 2303 East Fort Macon Road, Atlantic Beach.

8

TR

ADE

CO

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wondered what happens to the artifacts from the Blackbeard’s Queen Anne’s Revenge once they are recovered from the bottom of the ocean? The NC Maritime Museum will host a conservator from the Queen Anne’s Revenge conservation lab. Conservators will be available every Wednesday to answer questions about the processes required to conserve the thousands of artifacts that have been

Stir a little love into everything you do. coffee local baked goods gluten-free choices •

recovered from the Queen Anne’s Revenge site. Free. At the North Carolina Maritime Museum, 315 Front Street, Beaufort. For more information visit them at ncmaritimemuseumbeaufort.com or call 252-728-7317.

WEDNESDAYS

Evening Gun at Fort Macon [ 4–4:30PM ] Meet in the fort to watch a 19th

century cannon be loaded and fired in the military tradition of the Evening Gun. US Coast Guard Base Fort Macon will provide the cannon crew. At 2303 East Fort Macon Road in Atlantic Beach. For more information call 252-726-3775.

THURSDAYS

Emeraldfest

At the Western Ocean Regional Access on Emerald Isle. Free outdoor concerts will be held each Thursday evening throughout the summer. Bring your blanket or chair and come on out and enjoy some great music with us! 8/10.............................................................. Scearce & Ketner 8/17.......................................................................Naked Knees

THURSDAYS

Natural Side of Fort Macon

[ 10–11AM ] Meet in the Visitor Center lobby for

a leisurely hike exploring the natural side of Fort Macon. Hike will cover both trail and beach. At 2303 East Fort Macon Road in Atlantic Beach. For more information call 252-726-3775.

SATURDAYS, SUNDAYS

Musket Firing Demonstration [ 10:30–11:30AM | 2:30–3:30PM ] Meet in Fort

Macon to learn about a 19th century musket’s history, loading procedures and firing. At 2303 East Fort Macon Road in Atlantic Beach. For more information call 252-726-3775.

SATURDAYS

Olde Beaufort Farmers’ Market The Olde Beaufort Farmers’ Market provides Beaufort and the surrounding communities a marketplace for local foods, arts, crafts and information. Local farmers, food producers, craftsmen and artists proudly sell their food and art that has been raised, created and produced locally and by hand. The market takes place

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MID–AUGUST TO MID–SEPTEMBER

every Saturday under the live oak trees on the grounds of the Carteret County Courthouse, 300 Courthouse Square, in Beaufort. Visit the market online at oldebeaufortfarmersmarket.org or call 252-564-8822 for more information.

SUNDAYS

SwanFest

[ 6:30PM ] The 2017 SwanFest Concert Series

takes place at the Pavilion at Olde Town Square in Swansboro. Free outdoor concerts will be held each Sunday evening throughout the summer. Bring your blanket or chair and come on out and enjoy some great music with us! 8/13...........................................................................Wild Honey 8/20.......................................................................Family Roots 8/27............................................... Notorious Clamslammers 9/3.............................................................. Phantom Playboys 9/10.............................................................. Scearce & Ketner SUNDAYS

Waterfront Cruises

[ 5–6PM ] Swansboro Parks and Recreation is

partnering with Lady Swan Boat Tours to offer a summer cruise series that will run from May to September. Join us aboard the Lady Swan on Sunday afternoons for a one-hour relaxing and scenic cruise around historic downtown Swansboro, the Intracoastal Waterway and nearby Huggins Island, a part of Hammocks Beach State Park. Enjoy the sights and sounds of being on the water and get a glimpse of some local wildlife. At the end of the cruise stay downtown and enjoy live music from bands performing as part of SwanFest 2017 at the Olde Town Square or partake in a tasty meal at one of the local restaurants. Cost is $10 per person; children under 2 are free. Reservations are required by the Friday prior to the cruise. Departs from the Main Street dock in downtown Swansboro. Make reservations at swansboro.recdesk.com or call 910-326-2600. AUGUST 7, 8

Evening at the Cape Lookout Lighthouse

[ 7:30–10PM ] This special program is offered

on select dates near the full moon. Bring your own flashlight and experience the island and the lighthouse as the keepers did: in the dark of night. Hear stories of the light keepers, watch the sunset

and moon and stars come out on the unlit beaches of Cape Lookout National Seashore. Discover a different side to your favorite beach! Cost of the program is $28 per person (price includes ferry fee) and is non-refundable (weather dependent). Reservations are required. There will be only one ferry trip on each date. Children joining the climb must be at least 44 inches tall and able to climb the steps on their own. Children 12 years of age and younger must be accompanied by an adult 16 or older. Footwear is required. Reservations for the evening programs will be accepted on Monday of the week prior to each month’s dates. All reservations must be made online through recreation.gov. You will need to create a profile (or account) on this website before you can complete your reservation. For more information, go to go.nps.gov/eveningatcape.htm.

AUGUST 8

✪ AUGUST 8

ASTRONOMY AT THE CAPE

Lunar Astronomy at Cape Lookout

[ 7:30–10PM ] We will have our telescopes set up at

Cape Lookout National Seashore headquarters on Harkers Island to observe the moon and possibly some bright planets like Jupiter and Saturn. Come out and enjoy the night sky. At 131 Charles Street, Harkers Island. For more information call 252728-2250.

THINGS TO DO

Observe the night sky through a telescope at the Cape Lookout National Seashore headquarters on Harkers Island. For information call 252-728-2250.

AUGUST 8

Invest In Your Health: Brain Health

Join Martha Vaughan for a class on how to keep your mind sharp and stay at the top of your brain game. For more information, call 910-326-2600 or come by the Swansboro Recreation Center, 830 Main Street Extension, Swansboro. You can also register online at swansboro.recdesk.com. AUGUST 9, 16

Introduction to Knitting

In this class, you will learn the knitting basics as taught by A Frayed Knot’s own Amy Wills. This includes casting on, knit stitch, purl stitch and casting off. Yarn and needles will be included for class pattern. There are no prerequisites for this class. Cost is $40, and includes supplies. For more information, call 910-326-2600 or come by the Swansboro Recreation Center, 830 Main Street

AUGUST 9, 16

INTRO TO KNITTING

At the Swansboro Recreation Center. Cost is $40, and includes supplies. Learn how to cast on, knit, purl and cast off. Taught by A Frayed Knot’s own Amy Wills.

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CarolinaSalt.com » August / September 2017 CAROLINA SALT 9


THINGS TO DO

✪ = FREE

MID–AUGUST TO MID–SEPTEMBER

Extension, Swansboro. You can also register online at swansboro.recdesk.com.

AUGUST 9, 16

Free Movies at the Circle

[ 8:30PM ] Come out for free Wednesday movie

nights at The Circle along the boardwalk in Atlantic Beach. Bring chairs or blankets. At 105 Atlantic Boulevard, Atlantic Beach. 8/9......................................................................... Finding Dory 8/16....................................................................................Frozen

keep an eye peeled for shooting stars! We will have a free movie showing at sundown, s’mores and a weenie roast. Saturday morning we will be serving pancakes and have sunrise yoga with April Clark. Keep an eye on this event as we will be adding to it. Cost is $20 for a family of 5 ($5 for each additional person). Rain date is the following weekend. For more information, call 910-326-2600 or come by the Swansboro Recreation Center, 830 Main Street Extension, Swansboro. You can also register online at swansboro.recdesk.com.

AUGUST 10

Kayak the Salt Marsh

✪ AUGUST 9

MOVIE AT THE CIRCLE

Free movie at The Circle along the boardwalk in Atlantic Beach at 105 Atlantic Boulevard. Bring chairs or blankets. On August 16, the movie will be “Frozen.”

Learn about local history and the importance of salt marshes while on the water. Basic instruction and safety lessons followed by a relaxing paddle through a salt marsh. Ages 12 and up (under 18 must be accompanied by an adult). Participants must know how to swim; some kayak experience is recommended. Reservations required. Cost is $25 per person ($15 with own kayak). At the NC Maritime Museum, 315 Front Street, Beaufort. For more information call 252-728-7317 or visit ncmaritimemuseumbeaufort.com.

AUGUST 11

Free Movie Friday: You Pick The Movie!

[ 8PM ] Join us for a free movie at Swansboro

Municipal Park—bring a blanket or chair. This month’s film will be picked by you! Go online to our Facebook event page and pick from Wall-E, Toy Story, E.T., Space Jam or Muppets from Space. The theme is space to celebrate the peak of the Perseid meteor shower. For more information, call 910-326-2600 or come by the Swansboro Recreation Center, 830 Main Street Extension, Swansboro. You can also register online at swansboro.recdesk.com. AUGUST 11–12

✪ AUGUST 11–12

BEAUFORT PIRATE INVASION

For two full days in downtown Beaufort, you can step back in time to the sights and sounds of the 17th century. Family-friendly activities, live music, demonstrations and more.

Family Camp Out

[ 6PM–10AM ] Come out join us for the biggest

slumber party to hit Swansboro as we host our first ever Family Camp Out! Break out your tent and sleeping bag and join us under the stars at Swansboro Municipal Park. The evening will feature lots of fun for all including the peak of the Perseid meteor shower going on all night so

AUGUST 11–12

Beaufort Pirate Invasion

For two full days, you can step back in time to the sights and sounds of the 17th century as Beaufort comes alive with over a hundred pirate and militia reenactors as they overrun the town. Enjoy historical demonstrations such as sword fighting, cannon firing and see black powder weapons displays, a mock trial and hanging and so much more. There will be activities for everyone young and old to enjoy throughout town, such as musical entertainment, magic shows, costume contest, storytelling, period encampments and vendors. With wide eyes and amazement, aspiring young pirates will enjoy the spontaneous shenanigans as the nefarious characters roam the streets and shops, engaging in mock battles, bursting into song, posing for pictures.

AUGUST 11

Fort Macon Seashells

[ 10:30–11:30AM ] Join a ranger at Fort Macon’s

swim beach looking for and talking about some of the shells that can be found along our coast. At 2303 East Fort Macon Road in Atlantic Beach. For more information call 252-726-3775.

AUGUST 11

Stargazing at The Fort

[ 8:30–10:30PM ] Meet at the Fort Macon

bathhouse to view space through a telescope and learn more about our universe. At 2303 East Fort Macon Road in Atlantic Beach. For more information call 252-726-3775.

eBooks For the first time, our regional library system is offering eBook titles

Visit carteret.cpclib.org & click on OneClickDigital!

10 CAROLINA SALT August / September 2017 » CarolinaSalt.com


✪ = FREE

MID–AUGUST TO MID–SEPTEMBER

AUGUST 11, 12

Chairmen of the Board Live

Don’t miss this chance to see one of soul music’s all-time great group names, the Chairmen of the Board! Performing live at Southern Salt, 701 Evans Street, Morehead City. For showtimes call 252-499-9528. AUGUST 12

Yo-Ho-Ho and a Bottle of Run [ 8AM ] The Yo-Ho-Ho and a Bottle of Run is a

fundraiser to benefit the Beaufort Pirate Invasion. This event attracts participants of all ages to run, walk, swagger or jog along the scenic downtown Beaufort waterfront. Registration opens at 7 a.m. At 7:30 a fitness coach will lead participants in a warm-up session. At 8 a.m., cannon fire will resonate through Beaufort, marking the beginning of the race. Pirates will be located at various course positions along the route to encourage and cheer participants on. Prizes and awards will be presented immediately following the race for winners as well as for best pirate costumes. Early registrants will receive a race T-shirt. Strollers and four-legged friends are welcome. Registration fee is $30 per participant or $100 for a crew of 4. Onsite registration will be accepted on day of race. At the corner of Turner and Front Streets, Beaufort. For more information call 252-902-9712. AUGUST 12, 26 | SEPTEMBER 3

Bring the family and come on out for actionpacked racing at the most pristine racing arena ever! Kids 10 and under admitted free. Enjoy pizza, hamburgers, beverages and much more! At 501 Whitehouse Fork Road in Swansboro. For more information call 252-436-7223. AUGUST 12

Glow-in-the-Dark Capture the Flag

AUGUST 14

Fellowship Night For Special Needs Adults: Nutrition 101

[ 6:30–7:30PM ] Join us for fellowship and fun at

the Swansboro Recreation Center as we get ejoy an evening of fellowship. This program is geared towards adults with special needs and is held once a month as an after-dinner/evening group. We extend this invitation to anyone who is in their senior year of high school and above. This month we will be joined by Swansboro’s own Maureen Wells and she teaches the importance of proper nutrition and how we can make sure we get the most from our meals. For more information, call 910-326-2600 or come by the Swansboro Recreation Center, 830 Main Street Extension, Swansboro. You can also register online at swansboro.recdesk.com. AUGUST 15

Beach Run Series

Dust off those running shoes and join in for one of the most popular Parks and Recreation events of the season. Open to all ages and experience levels. Go for 1-Mile, 5k or 10K. Runs are on the beach at the Atlantic Beach Circle. Cost is $50 for series (includes T-shirt) or $7 per race. Pre-registration is suggested but not required. Registration begins 5:15 p.m. All races begin at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 252-808-3301.

AUGUST 12, 26

CARTERET COUNTY SPEEDWAY

Action-packed racing at the most pristine racing arena ever. Kids 10 and under admitted free. Heart pounding racing, concessions and family fun.

AUGUST 17

Carteret County Speedway

THINGS TO DO

Love the classic outdoor game capture the flag? Imagine playing it with glow-in-the-dark lights! Summer nights are the perfect time for this. Bring a friend or two and join in on the fun. Free! At Fort Benjamin Park, 100 McQueen Avenue, Newport. For more information call 252-222-5858.

Explore Rachel Carson Reserve [ 9–11:30AM ] Discover the various plants and

animals of the Rachel Carson Reserve. A guided hike will take you through the different habitats found on Town Marsh and Bird Shoal. Not suitable for children under 12. Advance reservations required. Cost is $20 per person. At the NC Maritime Museum, 315 Front Street, Beaufort. For more information call 252-728-7317 or visit ncmaritimemuseumbeaufort.com.

AUGUST 17

AUGUST 17

Shackleford Banks: Horses, Hiking and History

[ 9AM–1PM ] Experience Outer Banks heritage and

wildlife with a guided hike on Shackleford Banks, part of the Cape Lookout National Seashore.

Ryan Ayre

HIKE RACHEL CARSON RESERVE

Discover the various plants and animals of Rachel Carson Reserve. A guided hike takes you through the different habitats. Cost is $20. For information call 252-728-7317.

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THINGS TO DO

Not suitable for children under 12. Advance reservations required. Cost is $25 per person. At the NC Maritime Museum, 315 Front Street, Beaufort. For more information call 252-728-7317 or visit ncmaritimemuseumbeaufort.com.

AUGUST 17

AUGUST 18

Beach Scavenger Hunt

[ 10:30–11:30PM ] Meet a Park Ranger at the Fort

Macon bathhouse and explore the beach looking for odd and interesting items. At 2303 East Fort Macon Road in Atlantic Beach. For more information call 252-726-3775.

Junior Ranger Day at The Fort

Park Ranger to earn their Junior Ranger patch. This event is for children ages 6–12 (must be accompanied by an adult). Space is limited—call the park office in advance to register. At 2303 East Fort Macon Road in Atlantic Beach. For more information call 252-726-3775.

[ 5–8PM ] The free concert series is held the

[ 2–4:30PM ] Sign your kids up to work with a

AUGUST 17

Live On Thursdays (LOTs) Summer Concert Series

Grab a lawn chair and head to Dockhouse Park for free, family friendly fun. At 500 Front Street, Beaufort. For more information call 252-241-4485. 8/17......................................... Sulfur Springs String Dippers 8/31..............................................................................Jean Jolly

✪ = FREE

MID–AUGUST TO MID–SEPTEMBER

AUGUST 18

Red Cross Blood Drive

[ 2–7PM ] The Carteret County chapter of the

American Red Cross is holding a blood drive at Emerald Isle Parks and Recreation Community Center at 203 Leisure Lane. Please give!

AUGUST 18 | SEPTEMBER 1

Alive at Five Outdoor Concert first and third Friday of the month and features a variety of regional bands showcasing an assortment of music genres. For more information call 252-808-0440. 8/18..................................................Jan Michael Fields Band 9/1........................................................................... North Tower

AUGUST 18–19

Wild Caught Local Seafood and Music Festival

Wild Caught celebrates roots music, local seafood and garden goodies and maritime traditions. The festival is located in Gloucester. The festival opens Friday night at 7 p.m. with music until 11. Saturday’s music runs all day, from noon to 11 p.m. Wild caught seafood and fixings are served Saturday afternoon. Wild Caught is located in Gloucester at 380 Pigott Road and there is room for simple camping (no hookups). Bring something to drink, chairs, bug spray and sun protection. No admission fee, but Wild Caught is possible thanks to sponsorships and your donations! For more information call 252-729-8021 AUGUST 19–20

AUGUST 18

Creature Feature: Up Close Animal Encounter

[ 10AM–NOON ] Eastern Exotics and Swansboro

Parks and Recreation invite you to take a walk on the wild side. We will be hosting a mini-menagerie and offering a chance for you to learn more about furry and not-so-furry friends. This is a great learning opportunity for all ages. Cost is $5 per person (children 12 and younger admitted free). For more information, call 910-326-2600 or come by the Swansboro Recreation Center, 830 Main Street Extension, Swansboro. You can also register online at swansboro.recdesk.com.

Intro to Wooden Boat Building In this two-day hands-on course, students will explore the art of boat building from start to finish. They begin with the design and lofting of boats and move on to the setup, steam bending and different methods of creating the back bone of small boats. In addition, they will learn how to make planking systems, both carvel and lap strake and all the appropriate fastening systems. By the end of the course, students will have the knowledge and skill to choose a design and style of boat to build on their own and the confidence to take on the job. Cost is $135. Minimum age is 16. Advance registration required. At the NC

Maritime Museum, 315 Front Street, Beaufort. For more information call 252-728-7317 or visit ncmaritimemuseumbeaufort.com. AUGUST 19

Blues Brothers Fabulous Rhythm & Blues Review

The Infusion Cafe proudly presents a freewheeling, smash-’em-up evening of blues and rock-n-roll comedy. Jake and Elwood Blues (Kurt Petersen and Dave Springle) are getting The Band back together (Tim Raynor, Gabe Raynor and Phil Routzsong) to wow you and to save the day. And they can’t lose—after all, they’re on a mission from God! Featuring a fabulous rhythm and blues review of music from the 1980 movie—funky, late ’70s at its best—served up with three courses of Blues Brothers tribute fare (that’s a full three course meal that even Aretha, owner of The Soul Food Cafe, would be pleased to serve. If you’re a fan of toe-tapping, knee-slapping, tail-shaking, four fried chickens and a Coke, this is a dinner theatre experience you don’t want to to miss! Tickets required. Seating is limited. Call 252-240-2800 for event and ticket information and to guarantee your seats. AUGUST 26

Parent and Me Paddle

[ 8AM ] Second Wind EcoTours and Yoga will

be providing a chance to get out and kayak with your little ones. We will be cruising the marsh in a tandem or single kayaks. For more information, call 910-326-2600 or come by the Swansboro Recreation Center, 830 Main Street Extension, Swansboro. You can also register online at swansboro.recdesk.com.

AUGUST 26

Hatteras Beach Cleanup

[ 9–11AM ] Marine debris takes on many different

forms, from bottle caps and balloons to lost fishing gear. Marine debris is not only unsightly, it is hazardous to fish, wildlife and humans. The North Carolina Coastal Federation is teaming up with the National Park Service to host a soundside marine debris cleanup. We need volunteers to help us with a cleanup on the Cape Hatteras National Seashore. The cleanup will take place at the Haulover Day Use Area between Avon

your life on the Crystal Coast WE DEPEND ON OUR READERS! CALL 252-723-7628 IF YOU’RE INTERESTED IN SUBMITTING AN ARTICLE OR PHOTO.

12 CAROLINA SALT August / September 2017 » CarolinaSalt.com


✪ = FREE

MID–AUGUST TO MID–SEPTEMBER

and Buxton. Volunteers should bring leather gloves, water, snacks and sunscreen and should wear appropriate clothing, including closed-toe water shoes and hats. Trash bags will be provided. Children under the age of 18 must have a parent or legal guardian with them. Pre-registration is not required. Please sign in at the Haulover Day Use Area upon arrival. For more information call 252473-1607. Come volunteer with us to expand our community network and make a difference! AUGUST 26

Carteret Community Theatre Presents ‘Country Cool’

Country Cool is a straight-shootin’, no-holdsbarred comedy show that laughs at what we’re all dealin’ with: the “this can’t really be happening” moments in life that make us feel like we’re losing our minds, one traffic jam at a time. Trish Suhr, Karen Mills and Leanne Morgan, all headlining comedians, have Southern roots but are welltraveled, diverse, razor sharp and savvy. Their nononsense approach tells it like it is but, of course, with charm and style. It’s not redneck; it’s not white trash—these girls are Country Cool! These three women have been friends for more than a decade and have stood in it, walked through it and come out the other side laughing. Whether it’s overcoming cancer, the loss of a beloved pet or talking each other down from the hormonal ledge, they continue to find the humor in everything life dishes out. At Carteret Community Theatre, 1311 Arendell Street, Morehead City. For information or tickets call 252-497-8919 or visit carteretcommunitytheatre.com. SEPTEMBER 1

Murder Mystery Dinner: Murder at the Ocean House

End your summer with a bang at our annual Murder Mystery Dinner. Museum staff and volunteers prepare an entertaining evening involving a murder plot, clues and of course a twist, all while you enjoy a catered meal! Come help us solve the museum’s latest unfortunate accident. For the museum’s eighth annual Murder Mystery Dinner, the staff have given a spooky twist to the night. Along with the normal cast of characters, visitors can expect to meet palm readers, fortunetellers and even a couple of ghosts.

Space is limited. This event will sell out, as it does every year! Reservations required. At the NC Maritime Museum, 315 Front Street, Beaufort. For more information call 252-728-7317 or visit ncmaritimemuseumbeaufort.com.

SEPTEMBER 2–3

THINGS TO DO

COUNTRY COOL

Carteret County Arts & Crafts Coalition Fall Show

Juried sale of arts and crafts of coastal artisans held three weekends a year at the Beaufort Historic Site on Memorial Day, Fourth of July and Labor Day and at another venue for a three week show between Thanksgiving and Christmas, this is the perfect occasion to browse and buy the work of coastal artists and craftsmen. At 100 Turner Street, Beaufort. For more information or to become a vendor, call 252-728-5225.

COUNTRY COOL

SEPTEMBER 8

Friday Free Flicks: Sing

[ 7PM ] Free and open to the public, children must

be accompanied by an adult. Popcorn and drink for $1. Please bring chairs or blankets, but no outside snacks. At the Emerald Isle Community Center, 203 Leisure Lane, Emerald Isle.

AUGUST 26 at the Carteret Community Theatre, 1311 Arendell Street, Morehead City. A straightshootin’, no-holds-barred comedy show. For tickets call 252-497-8919.

SEPTEMBER 11

Red Cross Blood Drive: Online Signup!

[ 1–6PM ] Swansboro Parks and Recreation will

be hosting an American Red Cross blood drive. In order to make this event happen, we need donors to go online and sign up for a time slot. Please visit redcross.org/give-blood and find the drive scheduled for August 11 at 830 Main Street Extension, Swansboro, and help save a life. For more information please visit swansboro.recdesk. com, redcross.org/give-blood, stop by 830 Main Street Extension or call 910-326-2600. €

Thank you for picking up Carolina Salt!

Our articles are written by locals. Every month we look to our readers to keep our magazine fresh. If you have a story to tell, an event to promote or an interesting local photograph, send them our way! WILL@CAROLINASALT.COM

252-723-7628

✪ SEPTEMBER 8

FRIDAY FREE FLICKS

“Sing” is playing at the Emerald Isle Community Center, 203 Leisure Lane, Emerald Isle, at 7 p.m. Popcorn and drink available for $1. No outside snacks.

The Maine Lobsters Are Coming! SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 16 • NOON TO 3PM St. Peter’s By-the-Sea E P I S C OPA L C H U RC H

LIVE $18 COOKED $21

Purchase lobsters from parishioners, at the church office or by calling 910-326-4757.

Sold in advance only; order deadline is September 10. Net proceeds will help fund our outreach programs. For more information email office@stpetersbythesea.org.

CarolinaSalt.com » August / September 2017 CAROLINA SALT 13


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An oyster reef.

Lazzara’s

PIZZA & SUBS

The incredible oyster

N

ational Oyster Day was August 5 and there’s a lot to celebrate about these multitasking bivalves. Not only are they a delicacy and a sustainable protein source, oysters are also filter feeders and help to naturally clean coastal waters. They support North Carolina’s coastal economy and heritage as well. Oyster season has historically lasted only during the months that contain an “R.” In North Carolina, wild harvest is still only allowed during October to March. But because of the growing shellfish mariculture industry in the state, some restaurants offer fresh, local oysters year-round. Besides being good eats themselves, oysters also provide habitat for other types of North Carolina seafood, including blue crabs and finfish, which are valued at more than $62 million annually. One oyster reef can provide habitat for an estimated 300 different adult and juvenile organisms, including shrimp, southern flounder, blue crabs and clams. Many of these species are important to the fishing industries in North Carolina. Oysters are also critical to water quality. One adult oyster can filter up to 50 gallons of water per day. They remove pollutants, sediment and excess algae from the water. With all the benefits oysters provide in North Carolina’s coastal waters, it makes sense that these organisms should be protected and restored. Every year, heavy rainfalls wash pollutants into coastal waters, causing shellfishing waters to close temporarily. Harvest of wild oysters hit a historic low in 1994. Since 2003, the North Carolina Coastal Federation has been working with partners, including the North Carolina Division of Marine Fisheries (DMF), universities and contractors, to restore oysters to North Carolina waters. Its most recent large-scale project happened right here in the waters off Carteret County in partnership with DMF. Using state and federal funding, the federation hired a contractor, Stevens Towing Company, Inc., to construct 20 acres of oyster reef in Pamlico Sound near the mouth of the Neuse River. Materials were stockpiled at DMF’s South River facility and transported by barge to the sanctuary site. These acres are part of the Swan Island Oyster Sanctuary, which is in the Senator Jean Preston Oyster Sanctuary Network. This project was also supported by individual donors and Grady-White Boats. Over the next three years, the federation and partners plan to complete the 50 Million Oyster Initiative. Initially launched in 2016, the 50 Million Oyster Initiative aims to build 50 acres of oyster sanctuaries by 2020. These sanctuary sites have been carefully located to enhance the oyster population while minimizing any interference with typical uses of the area. Each acre of sanctuary supports approximately one million oysters and those 50 million oysters will filter up to 2.5 trillion gallons of water daily. The project also provides a boost to the coastal economy. Throughout the process, private contractors, construction workers, scientists, university researchers, state agency workers and fishermen are hired to assist in implementing the project. And when the oysters get to work providing homes for other critters and filtering the water, the habitat and cleaner waters will benefit the fishing and tourism industries. There are many ways to celebrate the incredible oyster year-round: by supporting businesses and restaurants that feature North Carolina oysters, donating to organizations dedicated to restoring oysters and telling your friends. For more information about the amazing oyster and all the benefits it provides to North Carolina, visit nccoast.org/oysters or ncoysters.org. €

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OUTER BANKS WILDLIFE SHELTER LINDA BERGMAN–ALTHOUSE

Summer Birdfeeding

If you’re going to go ahead and do backyard birdfeeding this summer, why not offer a birdbath as well, to help the birds stay clean and cool off.

T

here’s always the big debate whether bird enthusiasts should feed wild birds in the summer, mainly because some folks believe the birds will become dependent on handouts, too lazy to look for natural food sources and supplemental feeding could alter their migration behaviors. Research has proven that three-fold theory to be untrue. Studies show that wild birds typically receive no more than 25 percent of their daily food from feeders, and for numerous backyard species, the percent is even lower. We at the Outer Banks Wildlife Shelter (OWLS) in Newport, as well as other professionals in wildlife fields, believe that summertime is a perfect time to feed wild birds for a variety of reasons. Of course, at OWLS, we release many birds on our property that are raised and rehabilitated during baby season, therefore we keep the feeders plentiful for the young birds to take advantage of the food offered until they feel confident to wing away on their own or have met up with bird elders who show them the way. Feeding backyard birds is beneficial to the birds and rewarding for the homeowners who enjoy seeing and listening to gorgeous birds and observing their interesting behaviors. Although, if we choose to feed, it is important to understand the needs birds have in the summer and how we can provide a suitable birdie buffet. In the summer the days are long, so there is ample time for bird watching where we can identify and appreciate different species in their more colorful breeding plumage. If convenient food is present, bird families may choose your yard for nesting and raising their young. Watching nestlings mature is extremely joyful for most birders. There is a bounty of natural foods, such as fruits, insects and seeds, in the summer, so birds may only visit a feeder briefly, especially if they have hatchlings in their nest. However, stocking your feeders with nutritional bird diet favorites will attract a variety of summer bird species. The best foods to have on hand are seeds, especially black oil sunflower seeds, mixed seed (millet, corn, thistle, safflower and sunflower) and nyjer, which attracts finches, sparrows, buntings and mourning doves. Cardinals, catbirds and tanagers will eat grains and seeds, but they also love fruit such as apple chunks, banana slices and orange halves that can be presented on a platform feeder or stuffed into a hanging suet feeder. Wrens, grosbeaks, warblers, bluebirds, mockingbirds, robins and brown thrashers, who are all insect-eating birds, will appreciate a dish of mealworms and although fresh is best, they will not snub dried mealworms added to seed mixes. Raw peanuts, shelled or whole, gets blue jays, chickadees, titmice and nuthatches very excited, but don’t offer coated or seasoned nuts which are dangerous for wild birds. No-melt suet is appetizing for woodpeckers, jays, chickadees, starlings, thrashers and grackles, as well as a great source of energy and convenience if they are caring for hungry nestlings. Some birders put jelly out as a treat, which robins, gray catbirds and orioles enjoy, but as with any sweet thing, jelly could put ants on the march and in the heat, jelly can go rancid. If you decide to provide this sweet treat, it should be offered early morning in a small amount and the dish removed before the day gets too hot or the ants 16 CAROLINA SALT August / September 2017 » CarolinaSalt.com

arrive. We all love our little jets, the hummingbirds, who draw nectar from flowers. To supplement their feedings we can offer sugar water (1 part sugar to 4 parts water, i.e. ¼ cup sugar and 1 cup water) in a special hummingbird feeder which will entice them to stop by. It’s important not to put too much sugar in the mixture to protect their liver and kidneys. Hummingbird feeders need to be changed out and cleaned every 4 to 5 days to prevent fungus which will cause infection, tongue swelling, starvation and death. You might also find orioles, woodpeckers and nuthatches taking sips from this feeder or resident bats who discover the feeder at night! Some foods that should not be offered would be in the category of kitchen scraps such as bread and rice (which is considered junk food because they provide no nutritional value and would be a death sentence for nestlings), peanut butter (which is okay in the winter but will melt in the summer becoming a hazard to a bird’s feathering—it also spoils on hot days due to the high oil content). Soft suet blends will break down in the heat, too, and grow mold and bacteria that can be dangerous to birds. The down side to summer bird feeding doesn’t involve the birds at all. It’s our responsibility to keep the feeders clean to ensure the food remains mold and bacteria free. Clean feeders will prevent diseases the birds could contract such as an eye condition called conjunctivitis, which is an affliction birds are admitted to our wildlife shelter with every summer. Their eyes are infected and crusted over which renders them blind until we can treat and clear that up. We know the bird has been eating at a dirty feeder. Also problematic are the other animals that could be attracted to your feeders, the largest being a bear! Bears in the backyard puts pets and property at risk, so to make your yard less appealing to bears, you could take your feeders down each evening or as this author does, put out a rationed amount of seed mix and other food items in the morning and when it’s gone, it’s gone until tomorrow. That way, the night roaming critters will not be enticed to come into your yard and eat your backyard birds’ food. A few tips to also be mindful of if you choose to feed are (a) position your feeders away from windows or make your windows more visible by using anti-reflective techniques to prevent bird strikes, (b) choose shaded areas for your feeders to minimize spoilage, (c) use mesh or open feeders to allow seed to dry out if it gets wet, (d) keep your cats indoors and discourage feral or free-roaming cats from trekking through your yard, (e) view feeders as only supplements to a bird’s natural foods and (f) ALWAYS CLEAN YOUR FEEDERS routinely to avoid mold, bacteria or fungal growth. No fungus amungus! If you consider yourself to be an avid bird watcher and you are going to feed backyard birds, you might as well go all the way and provide a bird bath to keep them hydrated with fresh water, clean and full of summer fun (for you and them)! Overworked bird parents will enjoy a dip at their spa to cool off! Backyard birding is a pleasure and an honor. Those fragile little beings »


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1075 Cedar Point Boulevard 252.393.7200 A brown thrasher, an insect-eating bird, enjoys a high protein trip to the suet bar. A cardinal, the state bird of North Carolina, enjoys a meal from a seed feeder.

chose your yard to visit, eat, sing, play and raise their babies because you made healthy and compassionate choices for them. Many people agree, especially birders, that there is no better way to enjoy a Summer day than sitting on your deck or patio while watching a variety of adult and fledged birds at feeders and birdbaths! Spectacular! €

ABOUT OWLS

TAKE A TOUR of the facility at 100 Wildlife Way in Newport. To volunteer, call 252-240-1200. If your organization would like to learn more about wildlife, the OWLS non-releasable education animals jump at the chance!

CarolinaSalt.com » August / September 2017 CAROLINA SALT 17


e to get more for your money. e it easy to protect everything on your list and save money too. Call now ou’ll also get a FREE lifetime membership in Good HandsSM Roadside ance. Get 24/7 access and low, flat rates on everything from tows to anges. Call me today!

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resented by Allstate agency owner Tammy Fry on August 26.

Corbett Ave You and your family are invited to come out and join the fun! The event will raise funds for the local East Carolina Council of oro Boy Scouts. The funds generated from Allstate agents and local 7@allstate.comsponsors be donated directly to the Boy Scouts of East Carolina

Council, Boy Scouts, Cub Scouts and Scouters in Class A uniforms will be allowed in free of charge. The Scouts plan to use the additional resources to help fund a Scouting outreach program to support local Scouts. In addition, the funds will sponsor Camperships to send kids to summer camp at Camp Boddie in Blounts Creek, North Carolina. Finally, the money will help ncy for all your insurance needs. complete the Chapel project, currently underway at the camp. The race at the NASCAR-sanctioned Carteret County Speedway will levels of toracing on a ⁴⁄₁₀and -mile pavedAllstate trackProperty just offandofCasualty HwyInsurance 58 dside servicesfeature provided. multiple Discounts vary. Subject terms, conditions availability. Co., Allstate Indemnity Co., Allstate Insurance Co.. Lincoln Benefit NE and American Heritage Life Insurance Co.,Scout Jacksonville, FL. In New Yorkby life Roger insuranceBrown and annuities are issued by Allstate Life Insurance Company of New York, Hauppauge, NY. © 2011 near Peletier. The Boy 250, presented with Allstate Co. on August 26, 2017, will open its gates at 4 p.m. ET and racing will begin promptly at 7 p.m. ET. During the pre-race events, local Boy Scouts will conduct the prayer and Larry Mauldin will sing the national anthem. On behalf of the East Carolina Council and Allstate, we would like to give our sincere appreciation to the local sponsors: Roger Brown Allstate, The Stone Gallery and National Dodge. Thank you to all the following Allstate agency owners who have applied for their Allstate Helping Hands in the Community grants to go directly to the Boy Scouts of the East Carolina Council: Michelle Garcia, Deborah Powell, Mark Bailey, Michelle Bennett, Ed Mullis, Donna Parker, Dennis Knox, Morgan Scheibel, Scott Dashiell, Angela Slagle, Rusty Russ, Steve Moore, Tammy Fry, Mike Rogister, Shawn Tervelt, Carl Augustson, Nick Petrakis, David Ager, Paul Whitehead and Deborah Cook. €

18 CAROLINA SALT August / September 2017 » CarolinaSalt.com

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Carteret County Speedway Hosts Special ‘Boy Scout my Fry250’ Race

ONE-S


HARRIKA’S BREW HAUS

LOCAL GEMS

Harrika’s Brew Haus

started simple and has grown into one of the top 100 beer bars in the U.S.

Seize our venue, enjoy the bar, peruse the brews

H

arrika’s Brew Haus opened in October 2007 with a much simpler mission than it has today. Our business started with a mix of teas, gifts and one small shelf of mostly European beers. Now 10 years, 11 taps and 800-plus bottles later, we’ve been taking some time to reflect on the ride. Back in 2007 there were just 25 breweries in North Carolina (there are over 200 today). While our place in North Carolina’s beer boom history isn’t as a brewery, we’ve been proud to hand select what we’ve felt were the best brews, served or selected by knowledgable staff members, in what could only be described as a drinker’s oasis. It’s been so exciting for us to be a part of this growth, we were one of the very first shops in the state to make a delivery run in Asheville for some fresh Wicked Weed. Our history in the beer industry has been so unique, because we aren’t a brewery offering a beer experience. We are a bottle-shop-meets-beer-bar offering a beer experience with limited releases and special events and live music in our Biergarten. This is a secret probably only a handful of customers know about Harrika’s, but back in late 2011, we were set to close our doors in January 2012. “We tried this concept too early,” we told ourselves. Harry and I were sitting in the office discussing our plans to close the shop, when I noticed a large manila envelope on my desk. We opened it together and were speechless. Absolutely speechless.

We were a selected as one of the Top 100 Beer Bars in the U.S. by Draft magazine. We looked at each other and said, “Oh my word, here’s we go again! Maybe it wasn’t too early after all!” We went back to the grind. With growth inevitably comes change and as the beer industry grows in North Carolina, so does the selection of brews available at the local grocery stores, gas stations and other outlets. So instead of trying to be the destination with the largest selection of beers in eastern North Carolina, we are “transmogrifying” as Harry likes to call it. At Harrika’s, we’ve spent a great deal of time researching beer and seeking out the greatest selection we can offer and making sure our customers know everything that we do about each and every bottle on our shelves. We’ve focused on service with a smile, transporting you to a simpler place. We intend to strip down to the bare bones: great service, shared knowledge and the best craft beers, coffees, teas (soon cocktails) we can offer. But there are some changes on the horizon.

THE FUTURE OF THE BEERS The beer selection will consist of 200 hard-to-find beers, including NC breweries that aren’t distributed regularly. We will now sell beer by the case at or below grocery store prices. You can order your beers by emailing info@teaandbeer.com or by calling the shop at 252-354-7911. Keg sales of nondomestic beers (a term soon to expire) will

continue as usual.

OUR RETAIL SHOP Our shop will consist of growlers, glassware, coffee, beer soap and yes, T-shirts.

THE FUTURE OF THE BAR We are excited to announce we will be a hosting a variety of our own parties, including yoga, massage, pub theology, bier fests, trivia— it’s going to be endless. We will be getting our mixed beverage permit to host bourbon events and limited craft cocktails for your enjoyment. The Haus will be open to the public as long as the shop isn’t rented for a private event. You can check social media or call the shop at 252354-7911.

THE FUTURE OF THE VENUE: We want to offer our venue for birthdays, going-away parties, bachelorette or bachelor parties, baby showers—the list is endless, too. We will help you plan a party to remember.

STARTING SEPTEMBER 5 The shop will be open for retail or bar enjoyment Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 8 p.m., Thursdays 11 a.m. to 9 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. and Sundays 1 to 6 p.m. We hope you’ll support us during this time of change. We want to keep Harrika’s a Historic Landmark venue, bar and retail shop encompassing a Biergarten. Thank you and cheers to the next 10 years! €

CarolinaSalt.com » August / September 2017 CAROLINA SALT 19


A MOMENT OF REFLECTION

PAUL ORTIZ

Who’s in charge?

Y

ou hear it all the time. So many of us give the devil way too much domain in our lives. Let’s face it, life can be hard, and sometimes the hard times seem more often than the good times. We struggle, we face challenges, we feel stuck and as if we are not making any gains. This often leads to a defeatist attitude and a negative outlook on life. I think a lot of us can relate. However, if we are not careful and we give the devil too much domain in our lives, we are not allowing room for the understanding God is sovereign over everything. Nothing happens outside of His watch. Here is the truth: It is God that is holding you where you are, and not because He is a mean God showing you His power by picking on you. He is keeping you in a holding pattern at specific times in your life because He is maturing you. He is building your character. There are some conditions on your part that need to be met before God can allow you to move on. Yep! Hard pill to swallow, but true. If we think that it’s the devil always holding us back, we could become cynical because of frustration from this perception of a constant beat down of defeat. If we could see God is the one holding us in certain positions at specific times in life until all His conditions are met, then instead of living with a defeatist attitude we could be filled with hope. The bottom line is when we know God is in charge, faithfulness and courage come alive in us. When we have this new understanding and see God’s Hand in our lives, then strength and courage help us face the hard times of life with a new hope and joy in our hearts. We can look forward to overcoming life’s hard circumstance with an expectation of success that matches our new faith in God. Knowing and understanding God’s involvement in life’s circumstances is so uplifting! It will change your life! It will change your outlook on problems! It could actually make you approach the hard things in life with confidence. We need to understand, if we are supposed to have joy, that joy is robbed from us if the devil is the one holding us down. The devil is nothing more than a tool in God’s hand. You don’t have to worry about him. You can take your eyes off your circumstances and instead turn your attention to God. You can live with a new freedom because of God’s providence, His sovereign power and His unfailing love for you. “And we know that in all things God works for the good of those who love Him…” ROMANS 8:28

“You intended to harm me, but God intended it for good to accomplish what is now being done…” GENESIS 50:20

Think about that! You take God’s total power and God’s total love and that guarantees something good for you because if He loves you, He will use His power to help you. The problem is that our focus always lies on right now. While God cares about the now for us, He is more concerned with our forever.

ROMANS 8:28 28 And we know that in all things God works for the good of those who love Him…

GENESIS 50:20 20 You intended to harm me, but God intended it for good to accomplish what is now being done…

ROMANS 12:1–2 1 Therefore, I urge you, brothers and sisters, in view of God’s mercy, to offer your bodies as a living sacrifice, holy and pleasing to God— this is your true and proper worship.  2 Do not conform to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind. Then you will be able to test and approve what God’s will is—His good, pleasing  and perfect will.

Therefore, I urge you, brothers and sisters, in view of God’s mercy, to offer your bodies as a living sacrifice, holy and pleasing to God—this is your true and proper worship. 2 Do not conform to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind. Then you will be able to test and approve what God’s will is—His good, pleasing and perfect will. ROMANS 12:1–2

God’s sovereignty is absolute! What that means for us is the devil does not have in a hold that can’t be broken. So often, we are focused on the “how” of God’s coming through in our lives. We should just believe God can and will if we are willing to follow Him obediently. “…being confident of this, that He who began a good work in you will carry it on to completion until the day of Christ Jesus.” PHILIPPIANS 1:6

20 CAROLINA SALT August / September 2017 » CarolinaSalt.com

THE ISLAND CHURCH PASTOR PAUL ORTIZ

Paul Ortiz is a follower of Jesus Christ, not religion. A husband and father, he is pastor of The Island Church in Emerald Isle. Reach him at paul@TheIslandChurchEI.org


KHRISTI T. NUNNALLY

COLORED EGG HOMESTEAD

P R E S E RV I N G YO U R

Summer Harvest Fresh & delicious The summer growing season is in full swing and fresh delicious produce is abundant from our gardens, local produce stands and farmers’ markets right now. With a little planning and forethought we can carry these delicious summer flavors with us into the winter months.

RECIPE NEXT PAGE »

CarolinaSalt.com » August / September 2017 CAROLINA SALT 21


COLORED EGG HOMESTEAD

KHRISTI T. NUNNALLY

Preserving food has been an essential activity throughout history. Our ancestors spent much of their time working to feed themselves and their families, tilling, sowing, seeding, harvesting and preserving crops to avoid famine when winter came. Food preservation was not optional, it was a matter of survival. Then times changed. Grocery stores began offering commercially canned foods at reasonable prices and old traditions faded away. Recently, increased scrutiny on the commercial food industry and support for the local food movement have inspired a resurgence of interest in home food preservation. Preserving food now when it’s cheap and plentiful is also cost effective. FREEZING. Freezing is an excellent way of preserving surplus garden produce and it couldn’t be easier to do. Be aware EXCEPTIONS though, that many vegetables require blanching prior to freezing. Blanching is important because Not all vegetables it kills the enzymes in vegetables that could cause freeze well. Those unsavory colors, flavors and textures in foods once that do not freeze well they are frozen. Blanching is simple. Place the include green onions, lettuce and other vegetables in boiling water for just a few minutes salad greens, radishes (enough to stop the enzyme process, but not long and tomatoes (except enough to fully cook them) and then plunge them if going to be used for into ice water to stop the heating process. Simply cooking). Peppers do wash, seed and slice the peppers. Dry, if necessary, not require blanching. and place them in a freezer bag or container with a label and date. One summer I went a little crazy with planting zucchini squash. We had zucchini coming out of our ears! I chose to shred and freeze some for later use and it was perfect for making zucchini bread that fall. Try my recipe! DEHYDRATING. Drying foods is one of the most ancient methods of food preservation. Drying produce is not as common today as freezing and canning but is very easy to do. If you have access to a dehydrator or or even an oven with a very low setting, you can dry just about anything! Dehydrated fruits like apples, cherries, grapes, pears, plums and tomatoes are naturally sweet and make a great snack. Vegetables dehydrate well, but they usually need longer drying times. Fresh herbs can be dehydrated as well. Some important things to remember when dehydrating produce: • Select healthy produce at its peak ripeness. • Slice produce at the same thickness (usually ¼ inch or less). • Add lemon juice to fruits prior to drying to prevent color change, and blanch vegetables. • Season, if desired—cinnamon on apples, garlic salt on vegetables … the choice is yours. • Arrange food in a single layer on drying racks. • Check periodically. Fruit should be between chewy and leathery when done. Vegetables will be crisp when dried. • Store in an airtight container. CANNING. Canning is a wonderful way to store fruits and vegetables from the garden while they are in season and make the harvest last through winter when local and seasonal foods become scarce. Both water bath and pressure canning heat the food, effectively killing any microorganisms that may grow, and also vacuum seal the jar preventing spoilage. I’m still a novice at canning but am taking steps to learn more about the process so that I can begin canning my garden produce at home. Most of the folks I’ve spoken to about canning highly recommend the Ball Blue Book for all you need to know about preserving foods with this method. It is very important to use current, up-todate instructions and recipes when canning in order to ensure food safety. My absolute favorite homemade canned food is Hot Pepper Jelly. Heaven on earth with a little cream cheese on a cracker. So the next time you find yourself with tomatoes and zucchini overflowing from the garden, or if you stumble across a great sale on produce, take the time to put some by to enjoy later when the summer has gone. €

22 CAROLINA SALT August / September 2017 » CarolinaSalt.com

Zucchini Bread This bread is a perfect way to use up extra frozen shredded zucchini from an over-bountiful harvest.

1 Tbsp. cinnamon 1 Tbsp. vanilla (or pure maple syrup) 1 tsp. salt 1 tsp. baking soda ¼ tsp. baking powder 3 eggs (preferably local) 1 cup applesauce 1 cup honey (preferably local) 1 quart bag frozen shredded zucchini (or 2 cups raw) 3 cups whole-wheat flour

1. MIX together all ingredients prior to mixing in the flour. 2. POUR batter into two greased loaf pans. 3. BAKE at 350 degrees for one hour.


CAPTAIN JEFF CRONK

HOOKED UP FISHING REPORT

SCHOOLING UP!

A H O O K E D U P L O O K AT W H AT ’ S B I T I N G I N AU G U S T

August has arrived and school is in! That’s right, NC’s youth will be hitting the books and preparing to enter the real world. But our youngsters aren’t the only ones schooling up. Redfish, one of NC’s most popular recreationally targeted species, will be coming together in large schools in the fall and will feed with a vengeance. August is a great month to fish along the Crystal Coast because various baitfish (mullet, glass minnows, shrimp and menhaden) become so prevalent throughout the marshes, creeks and lower rivers that it draws the attention of all of our inshore and nearshore popular fish species. The inshore waters will produce plenty of redfish, flounder, speckled trout, black drum, sheepshead, ladyfish, bluefish, spots, croaker and more. While the nearshore waters will be alive with Spanish mackerel, king mackerel, amberjack, cobia, flounder, grey trout and plenty of other bottom fish. Knowing the best baits, tides, conditions and locations to target each species is crucial to having a successful day fishing.

TARGETING INSHORE SPECIES

Phillip Michaels from Indiana caught this upper slot redfish on a Berkley Gulp bait while fishing the Swansboro Area with Captain Jeff Cronk of Fish’n4life Charters this July.

Some of the most popular inshore species that anglers look for this month are redfish, flounder, black drum and speckled trout. Anglers can expect to find these species scattered throughout much of our backwaters this month. When working the shallow marsh bays behind our beaches or the oyster beds in the lower river for reds and flounder, I prefer to cast an ⅛-oz. jighead or a ¼-oz. spinner bait tipped with a 3–4" Berkley Gulp Alive bait. If you suspect there might be some black drum in these same areas, a popping cork rigged with a live shrimp on a small circle hook is an excellent bait and it will catch the other species as well. If the tide is high, try working a top-water bait along the flooded grass for some incredible blowups from redfish. If speckled trout is what’s peaking your interest this August, move out of the shallow bays and target the edges of the secondary channels that snake their way throughout the marsh systems or target the deeper dropoffs around oyster beds in the lower rivers. Some of the best trout baits include Berkley Gulp Shrimp, Bett’s Halo Shrimp, the VooDoo Shrimp and a variety of mirrolures. Anglers should look for current breaks pushing off the shores along deep channel walls. Anchor offshore of these locations and toss across the current breaks, working the baits back very slowly with an occasional twitch of the bait. Boat docks along the ICW and the rivers are often overlooked, but to a fish, these structures are a bait haven and provide good current breaks. Try fishing the downcurrent side of docks, casting either an artificial bait or a Carolina-rigged live bait under the dock and working out slowly for a good chance at redfish and flounder.

TARGETING NEARSHORE SPECIES

FISH’N 4 LIFE CAPTAIN JEFF CRONK

leads fishing and nature charters on the Crystal Coast. To get out on the water with him, call 910-325-8194. You can also visit him online at nccharterfishing.com.

Anglers who want to venture outside one of the Crystal Coast’s many inlets this month will have a multitude of options available as every species that roam our nearshore waters can be caught this during the early fall months. Our tidelines, artificial reefs and nearshore hard and live bottoms will be alive with Spanish and king mackerel, amberjack, cobia, barracuda, bull, red drum, flounder and plenty of other bottom fish. Without a doubt, slow-trolling live menhaden or jigbait will produce the best action on the surface for Spanish, kings, amberjack and barracuda. If targeting big Spanish, use 4–5" menhaden rigged with No. 4–6 gold trebles rigged with 20–30-lb. wire and target tidelines and artificial reefs or hard bottoms within two miles of the beach. When focusing specifically on kings, use larger live baits with No. 2–4 trebles rigged with +40-lb. wire. Amberjack fishing is in a class of its own. If you want to double down with one of these “reef donkeys” you’ll want to step it up to a heavier rod/ reel. I prefer Penn’s Rampage jigging rod paired with a Penn 750 Spinnfisher V or Slammer Spinning Reel and loaded down with 60 to 80-lb. Spiderwire Ultracast Invisibraid. A 6–8" live menhaden pulled on a 5/0 to 6/0 hook using 60–80-lb. fluorocarbon will draw their attention and keep them hooked up during one of the strongest nearshore battles you’ll ever experience. If flounder and seabass are what you’re wanting to put onto the dinner plate, nothing will be more productive than Bett’s 2-oz. Flounder Fanatic Bucktail rigged with a 4" Berkley Gulp Alive Shrimp. This bait combo is absolutely amazing! My clients and I jig these baits each summer along our nearshore live bottoms landing deck loads of flounder and seabass each trip and never have to waste time to catch bait before our trip. Regardless of what species you’re targeting this month, chances are you’ll stretch a string and have plenty of action. Have a great time along the Crystal Coast this Fall and enjoy our beautiful marine resource. €

CarolinaSalt.com » August / September 2017 CAROLINA SALT 23


DISCOVERY DIVING

LEE MOORE

DIVING OUR COAST W H AT ’ S U N D E RWAT E R I N AU G U S T

W

arm, blue water was present on the inshore and offshore wrecks in July. The air temperatures were in the 90s and the heat index was around 105 degrees. Bottom temperatures ranged from 66 to 78 degrees and the surface temperatures ranged from 82 to 86 degrees. In August, the water temperatures should be in upper 70s on the bottom, while the surface temperatures should remain in the low 80s. An upwelling caused the visibility to drop as low as 10 feet on the offshore wrecks. Visibility on the Caribsea and the inshore wrecks was better than the offshore wrecks in the middle and the end of July. The wrecks and ledges will continue to see a wide variety of marine life, ranging from game fish to tropical fish commonly seen in the Caribbean.

WHAT TO DO ON AN OFF DAY Several charters were cancelled in July because of high wind. When the boats cannot leave the dock, the divers have to find other activities to occupy their days. A popular option is the NORTH CAROLINA AQUARIUM AT PINE KNOLL SHORES. The Living Shipwreck, their main attraction, has a three-quarter scale replica of the U-352. Also in the exhibit is a sea turtle, sand tiger sharks, nurse sharks and sandbar sharks, as well as lots of other schools of fish. The river otter exhibit also attracts a lot of visitors. The NORTH CAROLINA MARITIME MUSEUM IN BEAUFORT is great place for visitors to learn about the history of the boating industry along the coast. Many exhibits showcase the rich commercial fishing industry that has shaped North Carolina. There are several exhibits of the Lifesaving Service, the predecessor of the Coast Guard. A large portion of the museum is dedicated to Blackbeard and the Queen Anne’s Revenge. The objects on display were recovered from the wreck site in the Beaufort Inlet and have been restored. Cannons, ship’s bells, lead shot and medical supplies are just some of the items you can see. The CAPE LOOKOUT LIGHTHOUSE is a short ferry ride from the Beaufort waterfront. When you arrive at the dock, you take the walkway to the Keeper’s Quarters. A short walk away is the lighthouse. During the summer, visitors can climb 207 steps to the top of the lighthouse Wednesday through Sunday. If visitors don’t want to climb the warehouse, they can enjoy the beach. Cape Carteret and Salter Path both have MINIATURE GOLF, BATTING CAGES AND GO-CART TRACKS. These locations are fun for the whole family. The Cape Carteret location has bowling and an arcade, activities that can be enjoyed on rainy days. Both locations are open late and can be enjoyed after a day of diving. The Crystal Cost has some of the best wreck diving and large animal encounters in the world, but the weather can be unpredictable. Occasionally, there are some days you will not be able to get out to the wrecks so you will need other options. These are just a few of options that are fun and also give you a feel for the history of the Crystal Coast. For more information about charters, contact Discovery Diving at dive@discoverydiving.com, 252-728-2265 or like us on Facebook to see what charters, classes and events are coming up in the near future. €

On days when you can’t dive, the area has many other attractions to offer, including the Cape Lookout Lighthouse, just a short ferry ride from the Beaufort docks.

JOIN DISCOVERY CONTACT

Discovery Diving at 252-728-2265 or visit them on Facebook to see what classes and events are coming up. You can also visit them online at discoverydiving.com.

JOIN ECARA ECARA

works to continue sinking ships to create artificial reefs here in North Carolina, but their resources are limited. To get involved, visit carolinareef.org. 24 CAROLINA SALT August / September 2017 » CarolinaSalt.com


AUGUST 7 TO SEPTEMBER 7

CAPE HATTERAS TIDE CHART

200

NORTH CAROLINA

WET & DRY SLIPS

WILDLIFE SERVICE AGENT

BOAT SERVICE OFFICIAL CITATION WEIGH STATION

The most complete bait & tackle marina on the East Coast. Extensive boat storage and a friendly staff make Dudley’s a one-stop shop for all your boating needs.

ETHANOLFREE GAS AT THE DOCKS

HIGHWAY 24 EAST • SWANSBORO • 252-393-2204 • DUDLEYSMARINA.NET


ASK THE AQUARIUM

NCAQUARIUMS.COM/PINE-KNOLL-SHORES

What do shrimp eat?

S On average, shrimp live about two years. Because they have such a short lifespan, they are considered an annual seafood crop in North Carolina.

hrimp are omnivores and scavengers, meaning they eat most anything. Like lobsters, crayfish and crabs, shrimp are crustaceans with segmented bodies, jointed legs, eyes on stalks and hard exteriors. All crustaceans must molt to grow and some, like shrimp, even eat their discarded calcium-rich shell. There are many species of shrimp. Some live thousands of feet under the ocean on thermal vents. Others, like the ones we’re more familiar with, live in waters from low tide to about 300 feet deep. Along the East Coast, pink, brown and white shrimp are harvested and sold commercially. These familiar varieties belong to the Penaeidae family. A shrimp’s body has a relatively short upper segment containing vital organs. The remaining two-thirds consist of an abdomen and fan-like tail. Swimmerets on the abdomen enable the shrimp to walk and swim forward and a flip of the tail sends it shooting backward. Females grow larger than males. Shrimp spawn in the ocean where the new hatchlings bob about as free-floating oceanic zooplankton. When the weather warms, they move into shallow marshes and estuaries where food is more plentiful. The young grow quickly, doubling in size every few weeks. When almost full grown, they leave the estuaries and return to the ocean. On average, shrimp live about two years. Populations of this favorite seafood vary each year, depending on weather. Commercial shrimping is a valuable and highly regulated industry. In 2012, 6.1 million pounds of shrimp were harvested in North Carolina, valued at $13.2 million. Shrimp require healthy estuarine waters of bays, sounds and marshes to survive. Protection of these nursery areas is of critical importance to the industry. €

Discover more fascinating facts about North Carolina’s aquatic environments and inhabitants by visiting the aquarium in Pine Knoll Shores. Call 1-800-832FISH for more information.

LOOKING FOR THE PERFECT VENUE for your rental needs? Birthdays, going-away parties, bachelorette or bachelor parties, baby showers…the list is endless! We will help you plan a private party to remember.

Seize our venue, enjoy the bar, peruse the brews! 911 Cedar Point Boulevard • Highway 24 • Cedar Point • 252.354.7911 26 CAROLINA SALT August / September 2017 » CarolinaSalt.com

8/31 Hustle Souls (Asheville) with Urban Streets 9/23 British Invasion Night with Urban Streets


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