November/December 2021 - Digital Issue

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2021 – 2022 NATIONAL DIRECTORY

December 2021 | bxjmag.com

OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

STRATEGIC INFORMATION

TECHNOLOGY DATA CENTER

EVOLUTION

FINANCIAL TECHNOLOGY THE PROMISE AND PERIL

EXPANSION OPPORTUNITIES WYOMING • MONTANA • COLORADO DELAWARE • CONNECTICUT


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Prepared to do business.... Middlesex County offers a rich rural-urban landscape in the heart of Southwestern Ontario. Complete with all the must haves for multi-nationals or local businesses looking to expand or upgrade facilities, Middlesex offers prime location, affordable land prices, educated workforce, multilevel government support, and desirable quality of life. Our 401 and 402 series highways are vital in transporting goods to destinations across the globe. Rail and air transport are locally available with both Canadian National and Canadian Pacific traveling through the County and the London International Airport offering a central location for both cargo and people. Also located about an hour from here is port access to the Great Lakes’ shipping channels. The municipality’s ‘prepared-to-do business’ approach is credited as one of the many reasons why renowned companies such as Bonduelle North America, Gray Ridge Eggs, Catalent Pharma Solutions (Molnar Park), Armatec Survivability (DaVinci Park), Ideal Pipe and Algonquin Bridge (Thorndale Park) call Middlesex County ‘home.’ Companies prospecting for the optimum mix of location, (including attractive property priving) and additional amenities, really strike it rich in Middlesex. With a population of 425,683, the City of London is Canada’s 11th largest city, which serves as an advantage to Middlesex given the access to established economic sectors, and the many graduates from Western University and Fanshawe College. Both education institutions rank high as leaders in research and public/private partnerships so it’s no wonder why Stats Canada (2016) identified Middlesex County residents as possessing an education level higher than the national average. The quality of life in Middlesex is enhanced by the celebration of arts and culture and the vibrant shopping and entertainment options. As well, short commutes, traffic that moves, fresh air, safe spaces, and active living options can all be accessed by families in our intimate communities. This is a place where front porches are used, street hockey is played, and children walk to school. Come see for yourself why businesses call Middlesex County ‘home.’

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TABLE OF

CONTENTS

DECEMBER 2021

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FEATURES INDUSTRY OUTLOOK: Strategic information technology applications significantly boost economic growth IT-related services and applications are spreading into more business operations—but bring with them new privacy and intellectual property concerns. By David Hodes

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INNOVATION AND STRATEGIES: New sustainability, new power handling ideas are part of data center evolution The increase of machine learning and artificial intelligence data applications is causing more energy efficiency concerns as centers proliferate across the country. By David Hodes

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Alan Reyes-Guerra areyes@bxjmag.com 205-862-5175

EDITORIAL CONTRIBUTORS David Hodes

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Clint Cabiness clint@dialedinmediagroup.com 205-613-5910 EDITORIAL OFFICE King Publishing, Inc. 1000 Stafford Court Birmingham, Alabama 35242 Tel: 205-862-5175

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INDUSTRY INSIGHT: The promise and peril of financial technology The use of fintech got a boost from the pandemic, but a careful assessment of this financial revolution deepens. By David Hodes

ONLINE MEDIA ASSISTANT Sonia Buchanan Nick Boliek nick@dialedinmediagroup.com SUBSCRIPTION CHANGES & REQUESTS 205-862-5175 or www.bxjmag.com

EXPANSION O P P O R T U N I T I E S 18 WYOMING: SPEND LESS, EARN MORE

27 DELAWARE: DESTINED FOR SUCCESS

22 MONTANA: BIG SKY + BIG OPPORTUNITY

30 CONNECTICUT: LOCATION, LOCATION,

24 COLORADO: LOW COSTS, HIGH ROI

LOCATION

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32 INDUSTRY N E W S

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34 2021-2022 National Directory of Economic Developers 2 |

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INDUSTRY

OUTLOOK

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Strategic information technology applications significantly boost economic growth B Y: DAVID HODES

IT-related services and applications are spreading into more business operations— but bring with them new privacy and intellectual property concerns

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igital technology continues to work its way into every phase of our lives, even as governments across the world seek more regulation and try to slow its growth. ........................................................................................................ The recent Congressional hearings with Facebook’s founder Mark Zuckerberg illustrate how the U.S. is growing more concerned about the influence of such platforms as Facebook that can drive dysfunctional narratives, even as it helps connect people who are practicing various digital technology-based commerce using the Facebook platform. According to analysts at Accenture Strategy Research, a business and technology strategy firm, working with Oxford Economics, a global economics advisory firm, by 2016, the digital economy had already accounted for 22.5 percent of global GDP. Analysts at the global market intelligence firm International Data Corporation (IDC) have estimated that, going forward, as much as 60 percent of global GDP will be


Going forward internationally An international agreement about information technology, the Information Technology Agreement (ITA) originally launched in December, 1996, with revisions currently being discussed by 82 different countries within the World Trade Organization (WTO), would expand the trade agreement that eliminates tariffs on Information and Communications Technology (ICT) goods, and would spur broad-based growth for countries that sign on. The vast majority of the economic benefits that the ICT goods generate—more than 90 percent in developing countries—stem not from their production but from their adoption, as it spurs innovation and productivity gains in all sectors, the ITA agreement proponents argue. ITA expansion could help grow U.S. GDP by more than $200 billion over a decade, while increasing exports of ICT products by $3.5 billion, which would boost revenues of U.S. ICT firms by $12 billion and support more than 78,000 new U.S. jobs. Global two-way trade in ICT products has grown from $1.4 trillion in 1997 to $4.25 trillion in 2019, according to data in a report by the ITIF, adding that “it’s vital to emphasize that the central way ICT drives a country’s economic growth is not through the production of ICT goods (e.g., the manufacturing of computers or smartphones)” but rather “stem from greater adoption of ICT across an economy. Ultimately, ICTs’ productivity-enhancing and innovation-enabling benefits at the individual, firm, and industry levels aggregate to drive productivity and economic growth at an economy level.” digitized (meaning largely impacted by the introduction of digital tools) by 2023. These findings align with estimates that as much as half of all value created in the global economy over the next decade will be created digitally, according to the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation (ITIF), which bills itself as the leading think tank for science and technology policy. “While the digitalization of the global economy has brought entirely new industries and enterprises to the fore—web search, social media, artificial intelligence (AI), cloud, etc.—at least 75 percent of the value of data flows over the internet actually accrue to traditional industries such as agriculture, manufacturing, finance, hospitality, and transportation,” the study concluded.

Red Flags There are red flags popping up all around digital technology application, its use and misuse. The U.S. Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) warns that even though the information technology infrastructure “has a certain level of inherent resilience,” its interdependent and interconnected structure “presents challenges as well as opportunities for coordinating public and private sector preparedness and protection activities.”

The IT-based innovations ramp up There are IT-application devices that have demonstrated how the application of digital technology was a critical link. For example, the 3D printing process played an important role in responding to the COVID-19 pandemic, ITIF reports. Hewlett Packard, a maker of 3D printers, established a Digital Manufacturing Network leveraged by 55 companies across 30 U.S. states that established a weekly U.S. capacity of 75,000 reusable face shields, 10,000 face masks, and 1.8 million nasal swabs. Based on data collected from America Makes—one of America’s 16 Manufacturing USA Network Institutes of Manufacturing Innovation, focused on additive manufacturing—from February 15 to July 15, 2020 alone, an estimated 38 million face-shield parts, 12 million nasal swabs, 2.5 million ear savers, 241,000 mask parts, and 116,000 ventilator parts were additively manufactured in the United States. In fact, 3D printing is shaping up as a huge disruptor in terms of economic development and opportunities for new business development across the world, according to the ITIF. The current $12.6 billion global marketplace for 3D printers is expected to grow to $62.8 billion by 2028. bxjmag.com

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INDUSTRY

OUTLOOK

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

As 3D printing becomes cost competitive across a range of materials—from plastic to metals such as titanium—it creates the potential to transform manufacturing by “democratizing it” (i.e., making it more globally achievable), enabling the production of goods closer to final markets, and permitting mass customization (i.e., production lot sizes of one, as opposed to one million). A report from ING Bank, a Dutch bank and financial services company, estimates that the rise of 3D printing could see the share of 3D printed goods in global manufacturing rise to 5 percent over the next two decades—a significant increase from the current share of 0.1 percent—and that the greater extent of manufacturing closer to final consumption would at most decrease global trade flows by a modest rate of 0.2 percentage points less trade growth per year.

The positive IT disruption The list of disruptive information technologies goes on and on. Precision agriculture requires more GPS-enabled drones to monitor crop growth, as analysts predict that global food production will need to increase by 70 percent by 2050; medical devices are having a huge impact in patient health, with IT-driven implants and remote patient monitoring devices extending life expectancy and reducing the length of hospital stays; more and more electric vehicles are being built, along with more charging 6 |

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stations, as major metropolitan areas in the U.S. hope to go full electric within a couple of decades, and President Biden pushes for electric vehicles to be half of all U.S. auto sales by 2030.

Exploring new computational solutions What IT has always done is accelerate developments of machine learning, artificial technology applications, communications technology, and more of the tools of business and industry. Much of this accelerated development has come about because of the rapid advances in the computing power of the microchip, which doubles about every year. Moore’s Law, a term coined by Gordon Moore, the co-founder of Intel, stated that the advancement of microchip technology is about the number of transistors in an integrated circuit doubling about every year. Today, that process is outdated, especially in light of the growing use of artificial intelligence. “Modern computing is slowing down in some fundamental ways,” Advait Madhavan says. Madhavan is a University of Maryland (UMD) faculty specialist working for the National Institute of Standards and Technology at the UMD Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics. “We already have almost as many transistors as we can put on a chip. We have reached the limits of how fast we can turn them on and off. So we need to think about a better way of using our transistors effectively in our computing systems,” Madhavan says.


His new computational technique, called race logic, is about working with networks—or grids that link the different components of complex systems, such as traffic management or logistics systems—to solve real-life problems by determining the most efficient route for a trucking company (for example) to deliver life-saving drugs. Instead of relying on software to tackle these computationally intensive puzzles, Madhavan and two other researchers created a design for an electronic hardware system that directly replicates the architecture of many types of networks. The researchers demonstrated that their proposed hardware system, using race logic, can solve a variety of complex puzzles both rapidly and with a minimum expenditure of energy. Race logic encodes and processes information by representing it as time signals—the time at which a particular group of computer bits transition, or flip, from 0 to 1. Large numbers of bit flips are the primary cause of the large power consumption in standard computers. Race logic offers an advantage because signals encoded in time involve only a few carefully orchestrated bit flips to process information, requiring much less power than signals encoded as 0s or 1s.

Computation is then performed by delaying some time signals relative to others, determined by the physics of the system under study. Madhavan and his colleagues have begun work on more advanced race logic circuits. Simulations showed that the design, which has not yet been incorporated into a working device, can handle a much broader class of networks, enabling race logic to tackle a wider variety of computational puzzles. These puzzles include finding the best alignment between two proteins or two strings of nucleotides—the molecules that form the building blocks of DNA—and determining the shortest path between two destinations in a network. “There are certain applications that modern computing is not good for,” Madhavan says. “That includes some amount of machine learning. Artificial intelligence is now being accelerated with specific hardware that is different from conventional computing systems. So we are living in between this space in which we are looking for unconventional computing techniques that can be used in the framework of what modern computing already has to offer, with limited or no adjustments, while still being able to solve emerging problems that conventional computing is not good at solving.” X

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INNOVATIONS & STRATEGIES

DATA CENTERS

New sustainability, new power handling ideas are part of data center evolution

BY: DAVID HODES

The increase of machine learning and artificial intelligence data applications is causing more energy efficiency concerns as centers proliferate across the country

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ata centers are increasingly important to standard business operations all across the world. More data collected, more data organized, and more data being used that generates even more data are all common practices in most industries today. ............................................................................................................... Now the issue is where to store it, how safe it is wherever it is stored, and what and how data centers are both maintained and updated to handle growing data storage and use.

A data center snapshot Take a look at the consumer demand for data storage and usage. According to the U.S. Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), the vast majority of Americans own a computer or use the internet on a regular basis. Approximately 85 percent of American households have a computer, 70 percent are connected to the internet, and 75 percent of American adults use social media. Any computer connected to the internet uses data centers for storage. There are about 3


The Google data center in Douglas County, Georgia. Google has had a data center presence in the Atlanta region since 2003.

million data centers in the United States, or one data center for every 100 people. Most data centers are housed in small- and medium-sized businesses. Many data centers are small server rooms and closets found in a variety of buildings owned by small- and medium-sized businesses and organizations. Others are located in multi-tenant data centers, which are increasingly being used. The larger data centers owned by the major cloud providers and national super computer centers make up less than 10 percent of the server market. But they are growing fast. New data from Synergy Research Group, a market intelligence and analytics company for the networking and telecoms industry, shows that the total number of large data centers increased to 597 at the end of 2020, having more than doubled since the end of 2015, with the U.S. accounting for almost 40 percent of the major cloud and internet data center sites. The companies with the broadest data center footprint are the

leading cloud providers—Amazon, Microsoft, Google and IBM. Each has 60 or more data center locations, according to Synergy data. These massive data centers around the country are impressive, and growing. Google operates 14 in the U.S. and continues to expand them. For example, in July of 2019, Google officially broke ground on a $600 million data center in Henderson, Nevada. In 2019, Google finished construction on the first phase of two data centers in Loudoun County, Virginia, part of a $1.2 billion initial investment. Virginia is a leading data center state. The northern Virginia data center market is the largest in the world, with over 2,100 megawatts of power supply. Northern Virginia has the largest inventory of data center space globally, accounting for approximately 60 percent of overall demand for data centers in North America, according to JLL, a real estate research and services company. Amazon Web Services has more than 4 million square feet of data center space in northern Virginia, and is expected to add another 1.2 bxjmag.com

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INNOVATIONS & STRATEGIES

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Google servers in the 1.3 million square foot data center in Douglas County, Georgia

million square feet by the first quarter of 2021, according to Data Center Frontier, a data center reporting company. From 2010 to 2019, Facebook invested more than $16 billion in U.S. data center construction and operations, which supported over 238,000 jobs, according to the Facebook website. The company opened three new data centers this year: the $1 billion, 2.5 million square foot data center in Huntsville, Alabama; the $800 million, 950,000 square foot data center in Mesa, Arizona; and the $1 billion, 2.4 million square foot data center in Eagle Mountain, Utah. All three of these new Facebook data centers, plus 15 others built from 2013-2020, operate with 100 percent renewable energy, according to Facebook. And these centers are economic engines wherever they are located. For example, in 2016, Google data centers in operation at the time generated $1.3 billion in economic activity, $750 million in labor income, and 11,000 jobs throughout the United States, according to a

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report on the economic impact of Google data centers. “The greatest value of landing a Google data center may come from seeding future economic growth and diversification in regions that need a boost,” the report stated.

Sustainability becomes a sharper focus A 2016 report by the Berkeley National Laboratory about U.S. data center energy usage showed that these centers were projected to consume approximately 73 billion kilowatts in 2020, representing 1.8 percent of total U.S. electricity consumption. Between 2010 and 2018, data center computing grew by 500 percent, while data center energy use only grew by six percent, according to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), indicating that data center engineers are finding more energy efficient ways to build and operate the centers. Still, data centers are one of the most energy-intensive building


types, the EPA reports, consuming 10 to 50 times more energy per square foot than a typical office building. The EERE reported that, in a typical data center, every kilowatt saved with IT equipment can potentially result in nearly 2 kilowatts saved in powering the data center. Half of the energy supplied to a typical data center is used for cooling the power infrastructure. Kevin Kent, senior data center operations manager for Critical Facilities Efficiency Solutions, a global data center industry energy efficiency and sustainability consultancy service, has worked in data centers for over 30 years—such as the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Centers data center. He says that he was drawn to the mechanical/electrical side of data centers because that is where 40 percent of the cost of operating the center is going. He worked to reduce the carbon footprint at the Wexner Medical facility. That work snowballed into a global consultancy business that he now operates. “The work that I’ve been doing started out as manual optimization where I would just go in and basically baseline all the thermal attributes that were happening in the data center and all of

the attributes associated with the electrical system, and, based on that data, would make recommendations on how to save money, cut costs, and lower power usage effectiveness (PUE),” Kent says. “The PUE really seems to be the one metric that data centers keep hanging on to that shows that they are effectively using their power. If they’re doing that, they are generally very efficient.” PUE only measures the efficiency of the building infrastructure of a given data center, and indicates nothing about the efficiency of the data center equipment itself. On the mechanical cooling side of the data center operations, he says that there are thousands of monitoring points within the cooling system, but that there is a disconnect with these cooling systems. “They’re using a lot of energy,” Kent says. “And we’re trying to keep our equipment cool so we don’t have any disruption of service. Servers, switches, and storage can shut down if they get too hot. Some data centers have disruption of service that impacts their revenue. But what’s different (at a medical center) is if we have disruption of service, it could mean loss of human life.” With the cooling systems at the Wexner Medical Facility, he says,

The Google data center in Belgium uses grey water from a nearby industrial canal to cool servers. It’s the first Google data center worldwide to run entirely without energy-intensive mechanical chillers. bxjmag.com

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INNOVATIONS & STRATEGIES

DATA CENTERS

there was not a good understanding about what was going on at the rack level. “They were supplying all of this nice cold air to specific areas, and they really didn’t know how much air was needed in these areas.” There were hundreds of thousands of lines of data and algorithms in the center to go through manually and figure out what was useful and what wasn’t. “What is this data telling me? How can I use it to become more efficient? That just wasn’t possible to do manually,” Kent says. “But the machine learning and the artificial intelligence as applied to the center basically does data mining where it looks at all of this information. It learns how the environment is reacting, how the server, switches, storage are reacting. And it gives us recommendations and tells us this is how you can become more efficient.” The machine learning and the AI applications that can be installed in data centers to help operators make appropriate cooling choices “removes this risk” of operational shutdowns, Kent says. “We have sort of flipped the model where if we can reduce the risk, we can increase the reliability and we can also increase the profit.” The evolution of data center sustainability and efficiency has been about airflow management—separating or containing the supply

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air from the return air—and closing up every hole and gap. “Seal up windows, insulate, do everything you can to become more efficient,” Kent says. “But remember: You can’t manage what you do not measure. And so many of the facilities I go in, they just don’t know really where their power is going. The metering or the monitoring maybe is there, but they’re not paying attention to it. And when they really start to measure it, and get a good picture and a baseline of what’s going on, then it points us to the areas where we’re making ineffective use of the power. Then we can start to change it.” Kent says that the cloud is “incredibly secure,” but there is an evolution coming. “It’s interesting that 10 years ago or so, everybody was saying ‘Go to the cloud, go to the cloud, go to the cloud.’ Last year, we’ve seen a sort of repatriation where people are trying to come back from the cloud. It seems like we’re settling into this hybrid where it’s, ‘Hey, we want to put all of our Microsoft Office, our email, and what we maybe consider lower tier applications in the cloud, and let’s keep our homegrown apps or our clinical apps or other apps that are more vital to our business. We feel more comfortable with them here.’”


The data center of tomorrow Kent says the newest technology that will be sweeping across data centers is liquid cooling. “Full liquid immersion cooling is a little more difficult for an existing facility to transition to.” Liquid cooling means submerging computer components, or full servers, into a thermally, but not electrically, conductive liquid coolant. IT hardware or servers cooled this way don’t require fans. It provides benefits like higher energy efficiency, smaller footprint, lower total cost of ownership (TOC), and enhanced server reliability, all with little to no noise, and helps cool data centers that use new, hotter running microchips for big data analytics, AI, and machine learning algorithms. “A liquid cooling company can go into any data center, take any specific hardware service and, much like a radiator in a car or an automobile, cool your equipment that way. It’s incredibly efficient.” If a data center facility has a PUE of 1.3 to 1.4, that’s an incredibly efficient operation. “Liquid cooling can take PUEs down to as low as 1.1 to 1.2,” Kent says. “In a 510 or 520 megawatt facility, that’s huge savings.” X

Kent County, Maryland Kent County is a scenic peninsula on Maryland’s Upper Eastern Shore of the Chesapeake Bay, ideally situated less than a two-hour drive from Philadelphia, Washington D.C., Annapolis, Dover and Northern Virginia. It is home to two designated Main Streets, an Arts & Entertainment District, historic Washington College, and one of the largest marina communities in Maryland. Kent County is Open for Business Kent - County is actively providing incentives and workforce development tools to help businesses grow. The County is developing broadband infrastructure and has implemented a 110-mile fiber optic broadband network for high-speed gigabit connectivity. Portions of the County are located within Commerce Zones, an Opportunity Zone, an Enterprise Zone, and a HUBZone. The Department of Economic & Tourism Development works with businesses to identify the tax credits they are entitled to for locating to, and growing within, those designated zones. In addition, the County offers access to programs including the Maryland Commercial Property Assessed Clean Energy (MD-PACE) Program, the Maryland Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MD MEP), and the ExportMD Program. Business Overview - Kent County is home to a wide variety of businesses in industries including manufacturing, healthcare, education, maritime, aquaculture, agriculture, culinary and professional services. Several of the major employers are world-wide manufacturers. The region has access to a workforce close to 300,000 within a 30-minute drive and the unemployment rate continues to be below the national average. County businesses benefit from no county personal property tax and a variety of tax credits making it a profitable place to do business. Chestertown Business Campus - The Chestertown Business Campus is one of the largest economic development projects in many years. The 80-acre site is home to Dixon Valve & Coupling’s new distribution facility, new corporate headquarters, a new manufacturing facility, and a new facility for the growing YMCA, currently under construction. A Gigabit County - Kent County has completed the backbone implementation of a 110-mile fiber optic backbone throughout the county. The county has entered into a public-private partnership with Kent Fiber Optic Systems to provide public institutions with high-speed reliable internet access. KentFOS’ open access network allows Internet Services Providers the ability to offer 1G service to businesses and residences. The primary goal was to enhance the infrastructure needed to support new and existing businesses and organizations in Kent County, particularly with affordable, robust, and high capacity internet access. By taking this action, the county is expanding the competitive capability of local businesses and organizations and providing more opportunities. Data Center Attraction - Kent County led the efforts to pass a state-wide Sales and Use and Personal Property Tax Exemption for Data Center to locate in Maryland. Low land cost, wide open spaces, access to fiber and access to 17 million people within 100 miles make Kent County an ideal place for data centers to locate. Visit www.kentcounty.com/business/ resources/datacenter-locations for more information. If you could work from anywhere… you would live here.

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S I D E B A R

Cooling towers shown at the Dalles, Oregon Google data center. The center uses evaporative cooling which evaporates water to cool the air around the processing units stacked inside the center.


$ INDUSTRY INSIGHT

FINANCIAL SERVICES

The promise and peril of financial technology BY D AVI D HO D E S

The use of fintech got a boost from the pandemic, but a careful assessment of this financial revolution deepens

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ethods and processes of financial technology, or fintech, advanced quickly during the pandemic as more people sought to conduct business remotely. This way of delivering financial services using smartphones and the internet for mobile banking, investing, and borrowing is helping demystify financial services, and bringing them to the general public more efficiently. ........................................................................................................... Fintech developments ramp up Even before the pandemic kicked in, fintech was getting popular. Global fintech mergers and acquisitions rose to a record high of $97.3 billion in 2019, according to research by KPMG, a global network of professional firms providing audit, tax and advisory services.


Assurance IQ by Prudential; and the $850 million acquisition of Axioma by Deutsche Boerse. Corporate investment in fintech in the U.S. was very strong in 2019, with corporations investing $6.9 billion—a significant increase compared to $5.9 billion in 2018. KPMG predicts that the big tech giants like Alphabet, Alibaba and Tencent will increase their focus on the fintech space, working to increase their reach into developing markets and to increase the value of their ecosystems of offerings to their customers. Cyber security-focused fintechs will become more attractive as traditional financial institutions shift from building to buying cyber solutions, particularly in areas like fraud, security, and identity management.

Global corporate venture capital (VC) investment in fintech participation rose during every quarter of 2019, leading to $16.7 billion in total annual VC invested. The number of fintech deals by global tech giants—including Alibaba Group, Alphabet, Apple, Baidu, IBM, Microsoft and Tencent— increased for the fifth straight year, with $3.5 billion invested across 46 deals in 2019. And cybersecurity-related fintech investment more than doubled year-over-year, from $316.9 million to $646.2 million. One compelling reason this trend will continue: Banks and credit unions experienced a 1,318 percent increase in ransomware attacks during the first part of 2021, according to Congresswoman Maxine Waters (D-CA), chairwoman of the House Committee on Financial Services at a hearing about financial institutions in November. Since 2016, the financial sector has been ranked as the nation’s most targeted industry for cyberattacks. KPMG data showed that the U.S. set a new record for fintech funding in 2019, with $59.8 billion in investment compared to $58 billion in 2018. The top deals in the U.S. included the $22 billion acquisition of First Data by Fiserv; the $3.5 billion acquisition of

In October, 2019, Kabbage, a fintech company providing small businesses cash flow solutions, announced a new payment processing solution for small businesses.

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$ INDUSTRY INSIGHT

FINANCIAL SERVICES

The fintech momentum builds There is serious momentum behind this disruptive financial services technology. One example: The International Monetary Fund and the World Bank announced in 2018 that they will start developing specific work programs on fintech. “The World Bank will focus on using fintech to deepen financial markets, enhance responsible access to financial services, and improve cross-border payments and remittance transfer systems,” according to their website, building the “foundations of the digital economy that is a key pillar in the World Bank Group’s larger disruptive technologies engagement.”

When a user has a getpaidearly app from fintech company Chime, they can get access to direct deposit funds up to two days early.

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The two organizations have proposed a framework for fintech that calls for members to embrace the promise of fintech; foster fintech to promote financial inclusion and develop financial markets; adapt regulatory framework and supervisory practices for orderly development and stability of the financial system; and safeguard the integrity of financial systems, among other policy proposals.

The nagging challenges of fintech But there are problems with fintech. Financial industry insiders are watching an uneven development of fintech, and urging caution. A working paper by the Bank for International Settlement (BIS) found that there is increasing fintech activity in insurance markets (“insurtech”), and even in some wholesale applications like trade finance. Yet in wholesale markets, like syndicated lending, derivatives markets, or clearing and settlement, fintech penetration remains low. While fintech activities are generally small compared to the overall financial system, there are some economies in other countries where fintech is growing to an economically important scale. “While fintech is a niche activity confined to certain business lines in some countries, in others it is moving into the mainstream of financial services,” the BIS paper reported. “This pattern of fintech adoption is puzzling, as it does not reflect either economic development or political boundaries.” But evidence suggests that fintech is growing where the current financial system is not meeting demand for financial services, according to the BIS paper. “In summary, there may be greater incentives for fintech adoption where banking sectors are relatively uncompetitive and hence more profitable, and fintech new entrants can increase efficiency and lower the costs of financial services.” Devdiscourse, a portal for development stakeholders, lays out some of the fintech challenges: - While companies combine finance and technology to come up with game-changing innovations, they are still financial institutions, and virtualizing financial risk by putting it in fintech companies doesn’t change the fundamental nature of actual risk. - Even the most valuable fintech companies are, for the most part, payment companies, brokerages, and banks. Their distribution channels are new and effective, but their business models aren’t necessarily new. - Analysts are concerned about the lack of transparency regarding the algorithms fintech companies use to calculate interest rates for small business owners and individual lenders. Many fintech lending companies often don’t disclose what factors they take into account when calculating borrowing capacity and interest rates. Traditional financial institutions, on the other hand, are required to keep careful documentation and validate their underwriting as well as product-offering procedures. - Fintech startups raising millions of dollars have become commonplace now and almost every major city has already hosted a fintech event.


- This may all be a “fintech” bubble. Fintech will cause disruption but not one that overtakes traditional banking.

Where fintech came from and where it’s going Fintech rose after the financial crisis of 2008, according to Ron Shevlin, the director of research at Cornerstone Advisors, a banking consultancy firm. He is also an author and a weekly contributor to Forbes magazine. “The economy turned down, a lot of consumers’ credit scores went below prime or even subprime levels of credit worthiness,” Shevlin says. “So a whole bunch of providers emerged as ways to kind of fill the gap.” OnDeck, an online business loan provider that has provided $13 billion in loans to small business as of 2021, and Kabbage, a fintech company providing cash flow management solutions to small businesses that was acquired by American Express in August, 2020, are two examples of early fintech companies. “For a period of time, they really had the market to themselves,” Shevlin says. “But as the economy came back, and both small businesses and consumers’ credit scores improved, it kind of impinged on that business a little bit because the traditional banks were able to fight back and gain more business. “But what enabled these new players was the ability to reach people on the internet at a relatively low cost.” Shevlin says that the term fintech has become an umbrella term for so many different things. “I think originally like seven or eight years ago, fintech was kind of applied to companies that were direct to consumer. That was their business model. They all said how they were going to put legacy banks out of business because they were going to have a superior customer experience or whatever it might be,” he says. Many of the fintech companies that have started up, such as Chime, want to provide banking services to their customers. But they don’t have a banking license to do it. “So they actually partner with a bank that partners with a lot of other fintech companies to provide traditional banking services to those customers,” Shevlin says. Other examples of fintech development are Lyft and Uber. “They’re not really going after the people like us who are customers of Lyft or Uber,” Shevlin says. “They’re going after their drivers who are often underbanked consumers with cash flow issues. So they offer a debit card to their drivers with really attractive rewards rates but with the lure of getting paid instantly through the debit card. There’s still a bank behind that. But the bank is more than happy to let Uber or Lyft be the front end, and be the brand, as long as they can make money on every account that they open up. So it’s a very complex world under the umbrella of fintech these days.” Banks have been relatively slow to embrace fintech, he says, because banks are, by nature, very conservative and driven by regulations, compliance rules and guidelines. “It’s not that they can’t innovate. It’s that they always see the downside to that,” Shevlin says. “It’s a risk management issue. Think about the fraud potential. But what happens is over time the fraud detection and fraud

prevention capabilities improve. For a lot of these banks, (fintech) becomes a must-have type of thing. If you ask those bankers ‘What is the biggest barrier you have to innovation?’, they’re going to tell you it’s their core systems,” he says.

What’s next? Where is fintech going? When it started out, fintech was making financial transactions faster with digital account applications and digital loans, Shevlin says. “But they really weren’t touching the infrastructure of financial services. I think that’s next—focusing on better integration of players with platforms that enable more seamless data interaction and better analysis of data.” The interplay between financial institutions and the Feds and MasterCard, for example, is truly mind boggling, he says. “It’s not pretty. It doesn’t always work as well as you think. Yes, MasterCard and Visa have done an amazing job where you go to a store and swipe a card and within milliseconds have it approved. But when it comes to the actual data moving, and information moving about that stuff, it’s a lot slower. That’s why the next phase of fintech will be about the infrastructure.” The companies working on fintech infrastructure—such as Stripe, Shopify and Square—are creating integrated ecosystems of consumers and merchants, and enabling payments and loans. “They are leading the revolution in financial services,” Shevlin says. X bxjmag.com

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WYOMING:

SPEND LESS, EARN MORE

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yoming is the most cost efficient and lowest-cost business climate in the United States, where you can spend less and earn more. Businesses in Wyoming make a difference – to their customers, to their employees, to their communities, and to the world. ........................................................................ Wyoming’s value center around three core attributes: quality of life; workforce; and meaning. Wyoming is a right-to-work state and only 6.5% of Wyoming’s workforce are union members. There is no corporate state income tax, no personal state income tax, no inventory tax, no franchise tax, no occupation tax, and no valueadded tax. The state’s labor force of 309,000 people benefits from a strong commitment to education. Wyoming consistently ranks among the top 10 states in annual K-12 per pupil spending. World-class companies like Underwriters Laboratories, Microsoft, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Plenty and more have chosen Wyoming. They access an untapped supply of technical talent while creating new opportunities for future generations. 18 |

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For more information on Wyoming, please call 307-777-2806 or visit www.wyomingbusiness.org

WYOMING: Casper is business-driven, community-inspired

......................................................................................... Wyoming is a majorly undiscovered state, limited on people but containing immense beauty. In the heart of Wyoming is Casper, the second-largest city in the state. Casper is known to locals for its accessible community with vital solitude. Casper is a powerful hub for creating, connecting, and constructing a pipeline for businesses to thrive. “Casper is the true Wyoming experiment. Being in the central part of the state, Casper capitalizes on the unique assets that have long set it apart from other places in Wyoming,” said Justin Farley, CEO of Advance Casper. “Being the regional rail, air, and freight hub encourages local manufacturers and distributors to open their markets to wider audiences and opens the state to diverse industrial opportunities like film, aerospace, defense, technology, and biomedical innovation.” In addition, Casper has the shopping, dining, hospitality, and outdoor adventure essential to the area’s lifestyle.



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In Wyoming, diversifying the economy has been at the forefront of strategy. With the accessibility to local, state, and federal delegates, the business community has more power to thrive and drive the conversation. In addition, Casper offers a favorable business tax environment with 0% personal and corporate income taxes and a minimal 5% local sales tax. Assets like the only Foreign Trade Zone in the state, a well-positioned Qualified Opportunity Zone, a flexible, highlyskilled workforce, and a robust entrepreneurial environment make Casper a prevalent community for business and lifestyle.

Where do businesses start?

Advance Casper, Natrona County’s Economic Development

CHEYENNE, WYOMING YOUR BUSINESS’S NEXT FRONTIER

TERABYTE CAPACITY NO INVENTORY TAX NO CORPORATE INCOME TAX NO PERSONAL INCOME TAX SHOVEL READY INDUSTRIAL SITES

www.cheyenneleads.org

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Organization, is the primary resource for businesses looking to grow, move, and sustain in Casper. Copious opportunities and publicprivate partnerships make economic development accessible and welcoming for the community. Advance Casper has identified three barriers businesses face in the early stages of development or relocation and participates in eliminating those barriers and empowering these businesses for the future. First, Wyoming, as a state, is preoccupied with extractive industries like oil and natural gas. “By introducing new sectors like aerospace, defense, technology, and biomedical, Casper would experience workforce and manufacturing cross-over, generational workforce retention, and the ability to participate in national proposals competitively,” said Farley. In addition, the logistics to deliver components and finished products under the Foreign Trade Zone designation would be cost-effective for the contractor and strengthen Wyoming’s economy in the long term. Secondly, “access to capital for early-stage businesses is a challenge, nationally. Advance Casper houses the Invest307 equity crowdfunding platform, which connects investors to local business projects, keeping the money and investment local. Businesses looking to grow can submit project proposals for local investors to participate in, building momentum and attracting larger audiences for their product or service,” said Farley. “In addition, Breakthrough 307, the only organized angel fund in Wyoming, helps high-growth companies with early-stage funding. Through a series of vetting procedures, companies who prove viable become investment companies in Breakthrough 307.” Advance Casper is a participating investor. Lastly, Advance Casper is active in unifying community resources that expand Casper’s economic base. Advance Casper provides site selection, incentives, workforce determination, and infrastructure details, so businesses have the relevant information at their fingertips. “Advance Casper advocates and assists on behalf of the businesses regarding business licenses and permits to help companies get going faster. Advance Casper also maintains active involvement with Casper College, [Central Wyoming’s most comprehensive community college] in terms of degree offerings that align with community and business needs, bolstering the workforce pipeline for local businesses and residents. And finally, Advance Casper’s partnership with Visit Casper, the visitor bureau, helps support the local tourism and hospitality industry, crucial to the community,” said Farley. Visit Casper’s efforts to roll out Film Casper will provide vendor, crew, location, and permitting information, making it easy for production companies to film locally, another asset unique to the Casper community.


As business and innovation advance, Casper provides the opportunity to thrive. Though Casper is a small city, it has a mountain town spirit and unique assets that keep it rooted. Creating, connecting, and constructing a pipeline continually reinforce why Casper makes business sense--- because Casper is business-driven and community-inspired. To learn more, please visit AdvanceCasper. com or local information site, ChooseCPR.com.

WYOMING: Cheyenne Where Business Thrives

.......................................................... At the northern end of the Rocky Mountain Front Range Urban Corridor, Cheyenne benefits from its position as the capital of Wyoming as well as its proximity to the Front Range cities of Colorado with their dense populations, diverse employment and educational infrastructure. At the same time, Cheyenne enjoys a favorable tax and regulatory climate, low cost-of-doing business, and world-class communications. Cheyenne is also the home to FE Warren Air Force Base. Warren Air Force Base is a terrific source of an educated and disciplined workforce made up of current and retired military enlisted and officers. Wyoming is a right-to-work state with employer-friendly labor rates and laws. Cheyenne has invested wisely and generously in quality of life initiatives. Without the major urban reconstruction and remediation costs of larger cities, Cheyenne is able to focus its resources on improvements for the future: a $1.46 million expansion to the Greater Cheyenne Greenway, expanded parks, downtown historic districts, and new schools and community college facilities. Cheyenne is a location of choice partly because of where it is – near the geographical and time center of the North American continent. Cheyenne manages a transportation triple play with the intersection of Interstates 80 and 25, two major railroads and Denver International Airport (DIA) 90 minutes away. For more information, call Cheyenne LEADS at 800-255-0742 or visit www.cheyenneleads.org .

WYOMING:­Laramie — Living and Thriving .......................................................... Laramie’s first newspaper dubbed it “The Gem City of the Plains,” in the 1870s. More

recently, “Laradise” has become an equally popular epithet. With 300 days of sunny skies each year and convenient access to hundreds of nearby outdoor recreation opportunities, Laramie is every outdoor enthusiast’s paradise. Laramie is a community where workers and businesses continue to thrive. Over the past number of years, direct and indirect economic development municipal investments have exceeded $80 million. The result of those investments has netted a marked increase in jobs and a steep growth in all business sectors, especially in the areas of technology and manufacturing. This culture of innovation and creativity has launched Laramie into Wyoming’s home-grown tech hub, expanding to 80 companies. Manufacturing in Laramie continues to expand with both small and large companies manufacturing everything from rifle scopes to craft beers and from hiking and biking gear to specialized tungsten parts and components. While Laramie is a steadily growing tech hub for technology, it is not a silo of activity. A strong regional synergy has developed in recent years between Laramie’s

growing technology cluster, advanced manufacturing, and the University of Wyoming. Regional Synergy, paired with an exceptional array of amenities, thrives in southeastern Wyoming, and has developed into a desirable environment for data centers, technology businesses, and research and development firms. To propel tech-sector growth, the City of Laramie and Laramie Chamber Business Alliance partnered to develop the State’s first technology-zoned business park. Known as the “Cirrus Sky Technology Park,” the vision is to offer a home to the growing number of technology and data management businesses. The Cirrus Sky Technology Park can accommodate a variety of businesses ranging from a start-up to a multi-national firm. Situated on the I-80 corridor, Laramie is less than 2 hours from Denver, 60 minutes from Fort Collins, and 90 minutes from Boulder. For more information on the opportunities in Laramie, please contact the Laramie Chamber Business Alliance at 307-745-7339 or visit their website at www.laramie.org . X

CIRRUS SKY TECHNOLOGY PARK

Consider the possibilities: • No corporate or personal state income tax • Multiple long haul fiber optic provider • Home of the University of Wyoming • Highly educated workforce • Labor training grants • Shovel ready

528 South Adams Street, Laramie, WY. 82070

307•745•7339 • www.laramie.org bxjmag.com

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MONTANA:

BIG SKY + BIG OPPORTUNITY

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ontana is where ideas grow into opportunities. Their spectacular nature and unparalleled access to public lands make for a one-of-a-kind backdrop to build and grow your business. The state provides confidential, streamlined business development consulting to support you during all phases of your corporate expansion/ relocation project.. ......................................................................................... Montana’s skilled and educated workforce is one of the state’s greatest assets. Many state government programs help build on this strong foundation in areas of apprenticeship, worker training, and much more. Montana ranks high in quality of infrastructure: from short average commutes to larger-scale transportation logistics. There are 15 commercial airports, 3 foreign trade zones, and more than 3,300 miles of rain infrastructure. Montana consistently ranks as a state where business can thrive, thanks to pro-business state tax policies, competitive cost of doing business, and streamlined regulatory environment. There is no sales tax and the government and economic development leaders work together 22 |

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to ensure that the business climate remains favorable to companies of all sizes, including some of the nation’s leading corporations. You probably know Montana as a scenic wonderland drawing nature-lovers and recreation enthusiasts to its majestic peaks and wide-open spaces throughout the year. What you may not know is the Big Sky State is also the most entrepreneurial place per capita in the country, according to the Kauffman Index of Entrepreneurship, with 540 residents for every 100,000 starting a business each month, nearly twice the national average. Also, there’s no traffic. Montana is the 4th largest state by area, but the 43rd in population. Only Alaska and Wyoming have fewer people per square mile. (Thus, no traffic.) But what there is is so much more. Home to 9 National Park Service Areas, including Glacier National Park, Yellowstone National Park, and Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument, plus another 55 state parks, Montana boasts more than 147,000 square miles of spectacular unspoiled nature, 57,000 square miles of public land, and nearly 11,000 square miles dedicated to gaming. There are also over 400 miles of rivers and streams designated as blue-ribbon trout waters. And lots of skiing, even in the summer.


Other important business sectors include agriculture, timber, mining, healthcare, and high-tech, which is coming on particularly strong of late. According to the Montana High Tech Business Alliance, the state’s technology sector is growing at seven times the rate of the state’s overall economy, which itself has consistently out-performed the national economy over the past ten years. The tech sector in Montana grew by more than 70 percent just from 2015 to 2016, and now generates more than $1 billion in annual revenue. Montana’s evolving workforce benefits from a stellar education system, which boasts one of the highest graduation rates in the country and a strong culture of cooperation between educators and employers to meet the needs of the state’s 21st Century economy. For mor information, please call the Montana Department of Commerce at 406431-0609 or visit www.choosemontana.com .

contributor to the economic development process, and we see our role as “energizing Montana’s economy.” Our emphasis is on “Building Montana’s Future,” and the mission of our Economic Development team is to help retain existing jobs in Montana, promote business expansion and recruit new businesses to the state. Our economic development employees assist site selection consultants, economic development agencies, government

agencies, existing businesses and potential new businesses. They are actively involved in economic development initiatives at the local, state, regional and national levels. They can answer questions about utility rates, availability of utility distribution and transmission services, utility operations, power reliability, energy supply, and energy efficiency programs. X

NorthWestern Energy

Economic vitality is crucial to Montana’s future, and for many years, NorthWestern Energy has held a strong commitment to the communities it serves. Community Works encompasses NorthWestern Energy’s tradition of funding community activities, charitable efforts and economic development within its service territory. In 2020, NorthWestern Energy’s Community Works programs provided nearly $2 million in funds for community sponsorships, charitable contributions and economic development organizations in its service territory. NorthWestern Energy is committed to serving as a meaningful and dedicated

Powering Montana’s Business Community NorthWestern Energy is proud to have a rich heritage of providing utility services that contribute to the growth and economic prosperity in our communities. The mission of our Economic Development team is to help retain existing jobs, promote business expansion, and recruit new businesses in the communities we serve. We are your partner in growth, development and success. To find out how NorthWestern Energy can assist your business, visit our website or call us at (888) 467-2669.

Connect With Us:

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COLORADO: WHERE SECTOR MEETS SUCCESS

A

spirit of collaboration, creative attitude and pro-business environment has always been part of industry growth in Colorado. Across fourteen major industry sectors, including seven STEM-based advanced industries, companies of all kinds are attracted to the wealth of resources that allow them to get in the game and make a name for themselves when doing business in Colorado. ................................................................................... Colorado employers, from Fortune 500 companies to homegrown startups know they can depend on support from a network of like-minded industry partners and a drive for innovation – all with the talent to match. Colorado continually tops the charts for job and economic growth, as well as being recognized as one of the best places in the nation to do business. Ranked as one of the best in the nation, their labor pool is essential to the innovation and drive that benefits the state’s economy. With a median age of 36.5, numerous high-performance education and research institutions, 24 |

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and a plethora of job training support organizations, Colorado’s workforce allows resident employers to create, grow and compete in a global economy. Colorado has a cutting-edge infrastructure. Denver International Airport is a top-ranking airport that offers 1,500 flights each day and serves almost 54 million passengers a year. Colorado is also a major national crossroads for Interstate Highways I-25, I-70, and I-76. BNSF Railway and Union Pacific Railroad own and operate thousands of miles of track here. They’re home to Xcel Energy, which is the largest electricity and natural gas utility in the state. For more information on the advantages of Colorado, please visit www.choosecolorado.com .

COLORADO: Cañon City - Balanced Peaceful Rural Living and Urban Productivity ....................................................................................... Nestled in a valley just west and southwest of Pueblo and Colorado Springs, sits peaceful Cañon City, Colorado, the historic county seat of Fremont County and a Gateway to Adventure


in the Rocky Mountains. Most commonly a tourist destination for its vast open spaces, beautiful Rocky Mountain and Royal Gorge vistas, adventurous white-water rafting, miles of singletrack mountain biking trails and most notably the highest suspension bridge in North America – the Royal Gorge Bridge and Park – Cañon City attracts over 400,000 visitors per year. It’s a community that offers a unique blend of historic, rural peacefulness and outdoor recreation, with easy access to the

Rocky Mountains on three sides and the fast-paced lifestyles of the I-25 corridor to the East. The qualities that attract visitors to Cañon City also make it a perfect location for business expansion. It offers a unique value proposition for an expanding business: the perfect balance between the slower pace and peaceful quality of life found in a rural community with the faster pace of commerce found in nearby Colorado Springs, Pueblo and Denver. This balance allows companies to be more productive, still enjoying easy access to national transit and commercial centers but with a workforce that benefits from lower cost of living and a slower, less stressful pace of life that includes shorter commutes and more time for a relaxed, healthy and regenerative lifestyle. Quality of life is only one benefit to expanding in Cañon City. There’s also an abundance of land for development; an easy and reliable transportation

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network; and a nationally recognized rural technology sector (FEDC TechSTART) connected to Colorado Springs and Pueblo tech, defense, entrepreneurial and startup networks. Creativity and ingenuity abound in this community that also receives national recognition as the first rural community in Colorado to participate in the national Pathways in Technology (P-TECH) program, making it a common practice for high school students to earn both a diploma and a two-year associates degree in a STEM field at the same time.

Historically an agricultural community, the Cañon City area offers several options for developable, undisturbed land. In town, smaller greenfield and individual parcels are available that are perfect for 1,000-5,000 square foot commercial or light manufacturing facilities. Larger acreage is plentiful for multisite developments of upwards of 100,000 square foot facilities close to highways and a county airport; great opportunities for manufacturing, food processing, stand-alone technical services, engineering, back-office operations or even data centers. Cañon City’s historic and vibrant downtown also offers space that would be great for expansion of burgeoning small business tech companies and incubators, remote offices, professional services or prototyping operations, all steps from local coffee shops, restaurants and the arts. Several property options, primarily the larger sites, lie within qualified Opportunity Zones, providing tax incentives to expanding companies. And Cañon City offers an urban renewal authority, making additional TIF incentives a possibility in the urban renewal area as well. There is also an unexpected incentive unique to the Cañon City area: stress-free transit. With US-50 running coast-to-coast through the heart of the community, the Cañon City area offers congestion-free transit that is far less stressful, more reliable and safer than the more popular, heavily-congested routes to the north. Drivers on US-50 experience far fewer road closures and delays than those who travel I-70 west of Denver; delays that can be very costly and time consuming. For example., in a December 2019 Event Audit Report for the period of January 1 26 |

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through December 9, Colorado Department of Transportation reported 799 full closure incidents on I-70 compared to 93 in US-50. Meanwhile, north and southbound interstate connectivity is minutes away for Cañon City companies, with I-25 nearby in Colorado Springs or Pueblo. Air transportation is simple as well, with access to anywhere in the world flying out of Colorado Springs Airport one hour away or Denver International Airport just two hours away. Connectivity doesn’t stop with transit, however. Several regional and organizations and sector partnerships connect Cañon City and Fremont County to state, regional, Colorado Springs and Pueblo markets and resources as well. Organizations like Fremont Economic Development Corporation (FEDC), FEDC TechSTART, the Emergent Campus, Colorado’s South-Central Technology Sector, Southern Colorado Startup Week 2022, and Southern Colorado Innovation Link among others, have been very successful promoting and connecting the entire region with national and Colorado technology, defense, manufacturing, entrepreneurial and startup ecosystems, as well as remote office and workforce development.

“The bottom line is Cañon City is a great place to expand a business”, says Rick Harrmann, Cañon City Economic Development Manager. “We’ve got everything here: easy access to highways, airports and population centers. And we’re surrounded by mountains and world-class outdoor recreation so our workforce is more balanced and satisfied than those in stressful, urban areas. We brand ourselves as the Gateway to Adventure. Cañon City is also the gateway to success for any business interested in expanding in Colorado. I definitely recommend checking it out.” There is a lot of momentum, creativity and ingenuity that make Cañon City and Fremont County a great opportunity for business expansion. Cañon city is actively working with industry site selection consultants to further enhance and expand on the successes of these efforts. Schedule a time to explore Cañon City, Colorado. Contact Rick Harrmann at rlharrmann@canoncity.com or by phone at 719-429-8132. X


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DELAWARE:

LOW COSTS, HIGH ROI

W

ith Forbes ranking Delaware as the state with the second-lowest business costs in America, this state is a game-changing location for companies choosing to operate on the East Coast. Delaware’s cost of business is 25 percent below the national average. In a high-cost region like the Northeast, that makes a big difference. Delaware is home to a highly attractive economic environment where today’s companies excel. Here, they merge an accessible and willing government with a low cost of doing business and powerful legal, governing, and corporate tax regulations that make Delaware one of the best places to incorporate your business and strategically position your company. ....................................................................................................

Delaware is an excellent state for business taxes. The state has no sales tax, no personal property tax, and no valueadded tax (VAT). Delaware has a corporate income tax rate of 8.7%, one of the more competitive rates in the Mid-Atlantic, and transitioned to single sales factor apportionment, which rewards companies for investing in Delaware and reduces the tax liabilities of businesses that have significant property and payroll in the state. For more information, contact the Delaware Prosperity Partnership at 302-924-8871 or visit www.choosedelaware.com .

DELAWARE: Wilmington - Be In The Middle Of It All ......................................................................................... Welcome to America’s corporate capital. Half the publicly traded US corporations are chartered in Delaware, including 58% bxjmag.com

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of FORTUNE 500 companies. That alone should give you a pretty good idea of how business-friendly this state is. The best way to take advantage of their pro-business environment is to not only charter here but to actually be here – right in the middle of it all -in Wilmington, Delaware. Wilmington sits right in the middle of the U.S.’s Northeast Corridor, roughly equidistant from Washington, D.C., and New York City, within easy reach of everything essential to business success. About one out of every three Americans – a massive market of over 100,000,000 people, live within a 350-mile radius of Wilmington. The country’s most important north-south route, Interstate 95, runs right by Wilmington, minutes from downtown. Executives catch high-speed passenger trains at their convenient Amtrak station. New Castle County Airport, just 5 miles south of town, is a major hub for corporate and other private aircraft, and Philadelphia International Airport is just a 25-minute drive. For transporting goods, you’ll have the advantage of access to the nearby deepwater Port of Wilmington, which handles over 400 ships and five million tons of cargo each year. Over the years, Wilmington has established an excellent tax climate for businesses. Their cost of business is just 88% of the national average. Corporate net income is 8.7%; equipment tax is 0%; sales tax is 0%; and historic tax credits are available.

The City of Wilmington, Delaware

BE IN THE MIDDLE OF IT ALL • • • • • •

Business Friendly – 58% of FORTUNE 500 Companies Right in the Middle of the U.S.’s Northeast Corridor Roughly Equidistant from Washington, D.C. and New York City I-95 runs right by Wilmington Amtrak Station 0% Sales Tax, Corp net Income 8.7%

CHOOSE WILMINGTON For more information contact the Office of Economic Development:

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Wilmington understands business needs and how to meet them. They will compete aggressively for your business. For more information, please contact the office of Economic Development at 302-576-2120 or visit www.choosewilmingtonde.org

DELAWARE: Big Wins for Kent County and a Glimpse of the Future

......................................................................................... Over the last two years, Kent County, Delaware has experienced success in business expansion and job creation. The Kent Economic Partnership (KEP) has assisted in the facilitation of some big wins in the manufacturing sector. A few standout examples are the joint venture between Shoreline Vinyl and Duratec at the former PPG paint plant in Cheswold, Avalon Industries and International Container Corp. moving into the Dover Post Building, Shore Industries occupying space in the Kent County Aero Park, and most recently, a new state of the art $80 million facility built on the POW-MIA Parkway for Delmarva Corrugated Packaging. Repurposing vacant spaces in Kent County and constructing modern facilities creates a range of opportunities for residents. This is a real win for the community and brings the type of jobs that have helped Delaware families for years. With all of the recent success and increase in residents, looking toward future growth needs has been imperative. The KEP has experienced a dwindling inventory of available industrial space along a rail line. As the country moves toward reducing the carbon footprint, the use of rail rather than heavy truck volumes is a feasible option. To prepare for this effort, the KEP has initiated a Rail Study in partnership with the Dover/Kent Metropolitan Planning Organization to identify parcels along the rail to preserve for future industrial land. The team is also involved in the Harrington Multimodal Freight Terminal Feasibility Study, bringing one of the regions only multimodal facilities to Kent County. The Harrington, Delaware site for the multimodal facility will grow existing business and will attract new business and industry. The site is the best location for a facility of this nature and is well suited from a logistics and geographic perspective. Being central to Delaware, the location has a great market reach with access to more than 50 million people within 250 miles, placing it at the center of the country’s largest consumer market. It is also the most cost-effective location along the I-95 corridor between Washington DC and Boston. This rail hub will position Central Delaware and the surrounding region for economic growth and well-paying jobs. Another forward-thinking initiative by the KEP is the creation of the Kent County Rural Broadband Committee, which is comprised of various legislators, providers, and stakeholders. The two biggest issues preventing broadband expansion are


accessibility and affordability, with many areas in Kent County lacking access to broadband. With an influx in remote work and the needs of the agricultural community’s technology efforts, broadband expansion has proved to be imperative. The

committee has produced a full action plan and is working closely with State entities to witness plans come to fruition. Investments into this infrastructure will unlock opportunity, efficiency, and productivity for Delaware citizens well into the future. Over the past few years, Central Delaware has seen great success in bringing projects to life, especially in the small to medium manufacturing sector. This “sweet spot” for the region proves to create effective and prosperous opportunities for businesses and residents. The foundation has been laid to position Kent County for success well into the future and for continued growth and expansion. For more information, please contact the Kent Economic Partnership at 302-678-3057, email info@ccded.com , or visit www.choosecentraldelaware.co . X

NEW YORK PHILADELPHIA BALTIMORE

DOVER WASHINGTON

Located in the center of the Mid-Atlantic region.

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EXPANSION

OPPORTUNITIES

CONNECTICUT:

LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION

I

magine having access to major markets, financial centers, and universities – in the heart of America’s northeast corridor. Positioned within 500 miles of 30% of the total U.S. population and two-thirds of the total Canadian population, Connecticut puts you and your business closer to millions of customers. This proximity is optimized by the state’s bold multi-modal, multi-billion dollar transportation infrastructure investment strategy, 30 |

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which is moving to improve highways, bridges, airports, rail and bus systems, freight and ports. .................................................................................................... Connecticut’s interconnected ports, railways and highways expedite the transportation of goods as well as people. The state has three deepwater ports (Bridgeport, New Haven, and New London) – and a commitment from the Connecticut Port Authority to continue investing in those ports – making it ideal for national and International exports. Connecticut is served by six easily accessible airports. You can get anywhere from here. Connecticut has an International


airport and is located withing easy reach of six others, including those in New York and Boston, serving two of the nation’s largest transportation and trade hubs. Connecticut’s workforce is well-educated (38 colleges and universities) and highly industrious. Companies in the fields of bioscience, clean energy, advanced manufacturing, digital media and information technology continue to generate career opportunities. For more information, please call 800-392-2122 or visit www. portal.ct.gov/DECD .

CONNECTICUT: The Town of Berlin

Berlin’s central location is at the hub of the regional highway network including most major interstates and north/

south state highways. Being in Berlin allows firms to tap into the region’s large pool of educated workers, as well as able to send goods throughout the United States and beyond. The Town has attracted regional and International business such as COMCAST, Eversource, Assa Abloy, and Home Depot, but has still retained its New England charm, creating a magnificent quality of life. To continue to recruit and retain valuable firms and employees, Berlin has maintained its sense of community through Town-wide activities like the Berlin Fair, by encouraging civic participation and by offering a wide range of home ownership options. With the upgrades to the New Haven/Springfield Rail Line, a trip to New York City or Springfield is just a short train ride away. Its sense of place is what sets Berlin apart and makes their community a special place to live and a great place to locate a business. The area of the Berlin Train Station has seen huge investment and growth since the station’s completion in 2019. The Town of Berlin has a new brewery, Coles Road Brewing, 2 locally owned coffee shops and an $18 million mixed-use project now under construction. This project called Steele Center, will include 18,000 square feet of commercial space and 76 market rate apartments. It is being undertaken by a local firm called the Newport Realty Group out of Plantsville, Connecticut.

The Town of Berlin recognizes the importance of continued economic growth in their community and has adopted a tax abatement program based upon improvements which will increase the value of a property. The Town policy is that projects must involve one of the following activities: manufacturing, office use, warehouse/distribution, information technology, new retail developments, restaurants, or recreation. They now offer tax abatements from 3 years up to 10 years, dependent upon the level of investment within a project. For more information on the opportunities in the Town of Berlin, Connecticut, please call 860-828-7000 or visit www. berlinct.gov . X

The Center of Connecticut lin

Ber

• Center of Connecticut (Midway Between New York City and Boston) • Easy access to I – 84, I – 91 and I - 691 • commuter and freight rail in town

Chris Edge Economic Development Director 860-828-7005 cedge@town.berlin.ct.us www.town.berlin.ct.us/econdev

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INDUSTRY

NEWS

Bombardier Announces Construction of New Global Manufacturing Centre in Mississauga is on Track, Reiterates Sustainment of 2,000 Jobs and Commitment to Aerospace Community in Ontario

Set for completion in 2023, the new world-class facility for final assembly of Global aircraft will exemplify Bombardier’s commitment to sustainability Environmentally responsible features will reduce energy consumption by almost 60% and will lower greenhouse gas emissions by more than half The state-of-the-art facility at Toronto Pearson International Airport represents a private investment of approximately $400M USD by Bombardier and will provide continued employment to the 2,000 highly skilled Bombardier employees currently working at Bombardier’s existing Downsview facility Bombardier reiterates continued involvement in the aerospace cluster through active engagement in the Downsview Aerospace Innovation & Research (DAIR) consortium and other initiatives On track for completion in 2023, the facility will provide a new home to the Global Manufacturing Centre, currently located in nearby Downsview, ON. The move, which represents a private investment by Bombardier of approximately $400 million USD, will provide continued employment to the 2,000 employees currently working at Bombardier’s Downsview facility. About Bombardier Bombardier is a global leader in aviation, creating innovative and game-changing planes. Our products and services provide world-class experiences that set new standards in passenger comfort, energy efficiency, reliability and safety. News and information is available at bombardier.com or follow them on Twitter @Bombardier. Visit the Bombardier Business Aircraft website for more information on their industry-leading products and services.

The Right Place leading new charge to grow region’s tech industry The Right Place’s Technology Taskforce aims to position the Greater Grand Rapids Region as leading tech cluster in Midwest

Regional economic development agency The Right Place, Inc. has assembled a Technology Taskforce to craft a strategy that will position Grand Rapids as the leading technology cluster in the Midwest. The initiative officially launched yesterday with the assembly of nearly 100 business, academic, and community leaders to begin crafting the plan. “By gathering input from a broad array of stakeholders, the taskforce will develop a detailed roadmap to further strengthen our tech cluster into a magnet for innovation and growth,” said Randy Thelen, President and CEO of The Right Place. “We believe this is our

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Gulfstream Aerospace Corp. Announces New Aircraft Service Center at Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport Mesa, Arizona — Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation, a world leader in business jet aircraft manufacturing and maintenance, has announced they will construct a new 225,000 square foot maintenance, repair, and overhaul (MRO) facility at the Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport (Gateway Airport, Airport). “Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport is an ideal location for Gulfstream’s newest MRO facility,” said Derek Zimmerman, president, Gulfstream Customer Support. “Not only is it an established airport for business aviation operators, its infrastructure and size provide a great location for both Gulfstream and our customers. The state of Arizona, the city of Mesa and the airport authority have been incredibly welcoming and supportive of our efforts to expand our service capabilities. In addition, ChandlerGilbert Community College, Arizona State University and local school districts have been involved with us since the beginning to offer certificate, degree and training programs that will translate directly to careers at Gulfstream. The new facility and the job creation that will follow is great news for our customers, our employees and the community.” The new facility represents a $70 million investment by Gulfstream. The Mesa service center will offer a broad range of services and add additional capacity for customers in the western United States. The facility at Gateway Airport will be Gulfstream’s first in Arizona and will feature a sustainable, modern design, in line with Gulfstream’s sustainability goals. Gateway Airport is served by five commercial airlines offering nonstop service to more than 60 domestic and international destinations. The Airport also boasts of approximately one thousand acres of aeronautical and non-aeronautical land available for development. SkyBridge Arizona is a 360-acre master development offering large parcels and airfield access. The GatewayEast master development includes 400-acres of mixed-use non-aeronautical development opportunities strategically located adjacent to two highway systems. For more information about Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport, please visit www.gatewayairport.com.

region’s next big economic opportunity, and we’re confident that with the expertise and determination we’re assembling our vision can become a reality.” The Right Place has recruited Technology Taskforce co-chairs in Steve Downing, CEO of Gentex and Rick Pappas, President of Davenport University, both of whom bring a blend of industry and academic expertise. The taskforce will now divide into three committees focused on talent, innovation ecosystem, and business growth. Each committee will have a cross section of stakeholders who are tasked with making recommendations to The Right Place Board of Directors for action. The goal is for the committee work to conclude in spring of 2022 with the development and launch of a 10-year strategic plan.


HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology delivers $3.2B in economic impact

Huntsville, Ala. — Today the HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology announced the results of a new report showing that HudsonAlpha has generated $3.2 billion in economic impact for the state of Alabama. The analysis, conducted by the Center for Management & Economic Research at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), outlines HudsonAlpha’s economic impacts on employment, revenue and capital expenditures from 2006 to 2020. The results reflect the impact of the entire HudsonAlpha biotech campus, combining economic data from the nonprofit HudsonAlpha and 34 of the resident associate companies. Economic impact estimations attempt to compile the impacts of an entity on the specified economy. The report summarizes the impact of the economic output and jobs resulting from HudsonAlpha’s presence. “HudsonAlpha has a proven track record of success for job growth, scientific advancements, and economic impact,” said Carter Wells, HudsonAlpha vice president for economic development. “This report energizes us and inspires us to build on our strengths and look for new ways to innovate. More and more people are drawn to working in HudsonAlpha’s thriving, dynamic and collaborative environment. We are honored that so many have chosen to make HudsonAlpha’s biotech campus home.” “The figures presented in this economic impact study show that HudsonAlpha’s foundation is strong, the bioscience community in North Alabama and across the state is growing, and HudsonAlpha continues to contribute to the economic health of our state. My administration has been proud to support HudsonAlpha and we all look for more great things in the future,” said Alabama Governor Kay Ivey. Highlights of the new report include: • Overall economic impact of $3.2 billion from 2006-2020, a $750 million increase from the end of 2018; • The total jobs impact on the State by the HudsonAlpha campus was 2,348 in 2020; • The total payroll associated with HudsonAlpha and the associate biotech companies was approximately $147 million in 2020 and $1.1 billion since 2006; • Adding $11.6 million in tax revenue in 2020, a total of $74.6 million since 2006. As a non-profit, tax-exempt entity, HudsonAlpha generates taxes in certain areas of operations but fewer per dollar than for-profit companies; • In 2020, the capital (construction and equipment) expenditures impact totaled $21.6 million. From 2006 to the end of 2020, the capital expenditures on the HudsonAlpha campus totaled $207.5 million.

TexAmericas Center Completes Construction on 150,000Square Foot Spec Building New Building Represents Investment, Confidence in Economic Development Efforts TEXARKANA, USA – TexAmericas Center (TAC) today announced the completion of a new and innovative speculative (spec) building at its campus in Texarkana. The 150,000-square-foot building on 24 acres is the first new building in the industrial park in 15 years and is now ready for new tenants to occupy the space. TexAmericas Center leaders worked with other community economic development professionals to plan the building, which includes features that are attractive to potential tenants, is flexible across a variety of industries, and scalable to meet a host of needs. The building is designed as a multitenant, mixed-use facility with 32-foot clear height ceilings, one dock door per 5,000 square feet, and two drive-in doors. The building will accommodate uses like large warehousing inventory akin to what you would find in a large metro market with the capability to subdivide down to 13,000-square-foot units as needed. The spec building is another major accomplishment in a series of successes for TexAmericas Center. Recently, the company was awarded an $864,550 grant from the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Economic Development Administration (EDA) to construct new rail facilities and repair existing ones. The grant is expected to create more than 150 jobs and expand operations within the TexAmericas Center footprint. Beyond robust rail and construction activity, TexAmericas Center’s remediation efforts also are proving its commitment to supportingbusinesses and inviting industries to the region. Earlier in 2021, TexAmericas Center successfully completed remediating 6,800 acres of land through the United States Army’s Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permit. The comprehensive remediation efforts began in 2010 and required a lengthy process to ensure all standards and assurances were met correctly and completely. Now, the nearly 7,000 acres of shovel-ready land can be complemented by other attractive features, including the spec building. TexAmericas Center is fulfilling its mission as a catalyst of economic investment in the Texarkana region. Since May 2014, it has increased its total leased square footage by more than 85 percent to more than 1 million square feet. Its 12,000 acres and 3.5 million square feet of space is fully entitled, providing potential tenants of specialized industries options that would be difficult or cost-prohibitive to secure in other regions. Its location in the Texarkana metropolitan area offers an attractive pipeline of talent and a logistics network to rival many larger – and therefore more expensive – urban hubs. Additionally, TexAmericas Center offers a complement of unique assets like industrial-grade utilities including fiber, rail, third-party logistics services, and a transload facility.

Custom Alloy Corporation, Inc. to Establish Operation in Badin, NC

Badin, NC (Stanly County): New Jersey-based Custom Alloy Corporation plans to establish a manufacturing facility in Badin, NC, adding 40 jobs and $8.1 million in machinery and equipment within the next five (5) years. Custom Alloy Corporation is a leading manufacturer of seamless and welded pipe fittings and forgings, predominantly for customers requiring time-critical maintenance or repair. Custom Alloy Corporation is a family-owned company that manufacturers pipe fittings and forgings for many specialized markets, including power generation, petrochemical, refining, gas transmission, subsea, aerospace, mining, nuclear marine, and defense and military. Some of the company’s forgings can reach up to 100,000 pounds in size. CAC also manufactures critical components for U.S. Navy submarines and aircraft carriers. The company’s new facility in Stanly County will become home for CAC’s existing Navy Fitting Product Line and new Specialty Pipe Product Line and will enable the company to provide the military with faster deliveries and increased capacity, which will lead to less turbulence in the supply chain for these important components. The Stanly County Economic Development Commission and Stanly County Board of Commissioners extend their gratitude to the Town of Badin, Economic Development Partnership for North Carolina, Rural Infrastructure Authority, Governor Roy Cooper, the North Carolina General Assembly, North Carolina Department of Commerce, North Carolina Community College System, Stanly Community College, Alcoa, North Carolina Department of Transportation, Duke Energy, and Piedmont Natural Gas for their support.

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ALABAMA

NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF

ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

ARIZONA

Cullman Economic Development Agency

Dale Greer P.O. Box 1009, Cullman, AL 35056 256-739-1891 daleg@cullmaneda.org www.cullmaneda.org .......................................................................

Etowah Economic Alliance

Marilyn Lott 800 Forrest Avenue Suite 220E Gadsden, AL 35901 256-456-9938 mlott@eeaalabama.org www.eeaalabama.org .......................................................................

Gadsden Industrial Development Authority

David Hooks, Executive Director 1 Commerce Square Gadsden, AL 35901 256-543-9423 davidhooks@gadsdenida.org www.gadsdenida.org .......................................................................

Elmore County Economic Development

Cary Cox P.O. Box 117, Wetumka , AL 36092 334-514-5843 cary.cox@elmoreeda.com www.elmoreeda.com .......................................................................

HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology

Kristina Keogh 601 Genome Way Huntsville , AL 35806 256-327-9591 kkeogh@hudsonalpha.org www.hudsonalpha.org .......................................................................

Arizona Regional Economic Develoment

Mignonne Hollis, Executive Director 750 E. Bartow Drive Suite 16 Sierra Vista, AZ 85635 520-458-6948 hollism@aredf.org www.aredf.org .......................................................................

City of Flagstaff Economic Development

John Saltonstall, AZED Pro Business Retention & Expansion Manager Economic Vitality Division City of Flagstaff 211 W. Aspen Avenue Flagstaff, AZ 86001 Office 928-213-2966 Cell 928-606-9430 jsaltonstall@flagstaffaz.gov www.flagstaffaz.gov .......................................................................

Pinal Alliance for Economic Growth

Patti King, Executive Mgr. 17235 N. 75th Avenue Suite D-145 Glendale, AZ 85308 520-836-8686 pking@pinalalliance.org www.pinalalliance.org .......................................................................

Salt River Project (SRP)

Karla Moran P.O. Box 52025 Phoenix, AZ 85072-2025 602-236-2396 Karla.moran@srpnet.com www.powertogrowphx.com .......................................................................

City of Surprise Tuscaloosa County Industrial Dev. Auth

Sissie Browning, Assistant Director P.O. Box 2667, Tuscaloosa, AL 35403 205-349-1414 info@tcida.com www.tcida.com .......................................................................

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Mike Hoover 16000 N Civic Center Plaza Surprise, AZ 85374 623-222-3328 Mike.hoover@surpriseaz.gov www.surpriseaz.gov .......................................................................

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ARKANSAS

Chaffee Crossing

Ivy Owen, Executive Director 7020 Taylor Avenue Fort Smith, AR 72916 479-452-4554 479-452-4566 (f) property@chaffeecrossing.com www.chaffeecrossing.com .......................................................................

Ouachita Partnership for Economic Development

James Lee Sillman Executive Director 625 Adams Aveune Camden, AR 71701 870-836-2210 870-836-8899 (f) director@teamcamden.com www.teamcamden.com .......................................................................

East Arkansas Crossroads Coalition

Mark O’Mell 1790 N. Falls Boulevard, Suite 2 Wynne, AR 72396 870-238-5300 momell@crossroadscoalition.org www.crossroadscoalition.org .......................................................................

Mississippi County Economic Development

Tamika Jenkins 4701 Memorial Drive Blytheville, AR 72315 870-532-6084 tamika@cottontosteel.com www.cottontosteel.com .......................................................................

CALIFORNIA

City of Eastvale

Gina Gibson-Williams Economic Development Manager 12363 Limonite Ave. Suite 910 Eastvale, CA 91752 951-703-4425 ggibson-williams@eastvaleca.gov www.eastvaleca.gov .......................................................................

City of Moreno Valley Economic Development

Mike Lee Economic Development Director 14177 Frederick Street Moreno Valley, CA 92553 951-413-3460 edteam@moval.org www.morenovalleybusiness.com .......................................................................

City of Ontario Economic Development

Jennifer McLain Hiramoto Economic Development Director 303 East B Street Ontario, CA 91764 909-395-2295 JHiramoto@ontarioca.gov www.ontariothinksbusiness.com .......................................................................

Greater Irvine Chamber

Pepper Russell 36 Executive Park Suite 100 Irvine, CA 92614 949-502-4129 prussell@irvinechamber.com www.irvinechamber.com .......................................................................

COLORADO

City of Siloam Springs

Don Clark Community Development Director P.O. Box 80 Siloam Springs , AR 72761 479-238-0930 dclark@siloamsprings.com whysiloam.com .......................................................................

City of Canon City

Rick Harrmann 128 Main Street Canon City, CO 81212 719-276-5279 rlharrmann@canoncity.org www.canoncity.org .......................................................................


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Hernando County Office of Economic Development

Santa Rosa County EDO

Valerie M. Pianta Economic Development Director 15800 Flight Path Drive Brooksville, FL 34604 352--540-6400 vpianta@hernandocounty.us www.hernandobusiness.com .......................................................................

Shannon Ogletree, Executive Director 6491 Caroline Street, Suite 4 Milton, FL 32570-4592 850-623-0174 Shannon@santarosa.fl.gov www.santarosaedo.com .......................................................................

Holmes County Development Commission

Tallahassee-Leon County Office of Economic Vitality

FLORIDA

City of Fountain Economic Development Commission

Kimberly A. Bailey Economic Development/ Urban Renewal Director 116 S. Main Street Fountain, CO 80817 719-322-2056 kbailey@fountaincolorado.org www.fountaincolorado.org .......................................................................

Grand Junction Economic Partnership

Robin Brown, Executive Director 122 N. 6th Street Grand Junction, CO 81501 970--245-4332 robin@gjep.org www.gjep.org .......................................................................

CONNECTICUT

City of Sanford

Bob Turk Economic Development Director 300 North Park Ave. Sanford, FL 32771 407-688-5015 bob.turk@sanfordfl.gov www.sanfordfl.gov .......................................................................

City of Titusville

Lisa Nicholas 555 South Washington Avenue Titusville, FL 32796-3584 321-567-3774 lisa.nicholas@titusville.com www.YEStitusvilleFL.com .......................................................................

Elevate Lake Economic Development Town of Berlin

Chris Edge Director 240 Kensington Road Berlin, CT 06037 860-828-7005 cedge@town.berlin.ct.us www.town.berlin.ct.us .......................................................................

Mary Ellen Stern Interim Director 20763 US Highway 27 Groveland, FL 34736 352-343-9647 352-801-7498 (f) mstern@lakecountyfl.gov elevatelake.com

Greater St. Petersburg Area Economic Development Corporation Linda Parkowski Executive Director 555 Bay Road Dover, DE 19901 302-678-3057 info@ccede.com www.choosecentraldelaware.com .......................................................................

Wilmington Economic Development Jeff Flynn 800 N. French St., 3rd Floor Wilmington, DE 19801 302-576-2128 jflynn@wilmingtonde.gov www.wilmingtonde.gov .......................................................................

J.P. DuBuque President and CEO 100 2nd Ave N Ste 130 St. Petersburg, FL 33701 727-388-2906 jpdubuque@stpeteedc.com StPeteEDC.com/BurgBiz .......................................................................

Haines City Economic Development Council, Inc. Cyndi Jantomaso, President Post Office Box 3845 Haines City, FL 33845-3845 863-422-2525 863-206-0007 cyndi@hainescityedc.com www.hainescityedc.com

Cristina Paredes, CEcD, Director 315 S. Calhoun Street, Suite 110 Tallahassee, FL 32301 850-219-1080 Cparedes@OEVforBusiness.org www.oevforbusiness.org .......................................................................

GEORGIA Indian River Chamber of Commerce

Helene Caseltine Economic Development Director 1216 21st Street Vero Beach, FL 32960 772-567-3491 helenec@indianrivered.com www.indianrivered.com .......................................................................

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DELAWARE

Kent Economic Partnership

Joe Rone, Executive Director 106 E Byrd Avenue Bonifay, FL 32425 850-547-6154 jrone@westflorida.coop hcdc1978@gmail.com www.holmescountyedc.com .......................................................................

City of College Park

Artie Jones III Director of Economic Development 3667 Main Street College Park, GA 30337 404-305-2052 404-305-2057 (f) artiejones@collegeparkga.com www.collegeparkga.com/ .......................................................................

Osceola County

David Rodriguez, Economic Development Manager 3 Courthouse Square, 2nd Floor Kissimmee, FL 34741 407-742-0620 407-742-4202 (f) david.rodriguez@osceola.org www.greaterosceola.org .......................................................................

Pinellas County Economic Development

City of East Point

Maceo Rogers CEcD 2757 East Point Street East Point, GA 30344 404-270-7057 jmrogers@eastpointcity.org www.eastpointcity.org .......................................................................

Forward Forsyth

Dr. Cynthia Johnson, EDFP Director 13805 58th Street North Suite 1-200 Clearwater, FL 33760 727-464-7332 cyjohnson@pinellascounty.org www.pced.org bxjmag.com

Slade Gulledge P.O. Box 1799 Cumming GA 30028 770-887-6461 770-842-1170 sgulledge@forwardforsyth.org www.forwardforsyth.org ....................................................................... |

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Liberty County Development Authority

Ronald Tolley, CEO 425 W. Oglethorpe Highway Hinesville, GA 31313 912-977-4147 Ron.tolley@comegrow.global www.comegrow.global .......................................................................

NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF

ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

City of Litchfield Ecnomic Development

Shelly Herman 120 E. Ryder Street Litchfield, IL 62056 217-324-8146 Sherman@cityoflitchfieldil.com www.litchfieldil-development.com .......................................................................

Valdosta-Lowndes County Development Authority

Andrea Schruijer, Executive Director P.O. Box 5185 Valdosta, GA 31603-1963 229-259-9972 aschruijer@buildlowndes.com www.buildlowndes.com .......................................................................

ILLINOIS

Champaign County Economic Development Corporation

Carly McCrory-McKay, Executive Director 1817 S. Neil Street, Suite 100 Champaign, IL 61820 217-359-6261 carly@champaigncountyedc.org www.champaigncountyedc.org .......................................................................

City of Highland Economic Development

Mallord Hubbard 1115 Broadway, P.O. Box 218 Highland, IL 62249-0218 618-654-9891 618-654-4768 (f) mhubbard@highlandil.gov www.highlandil.gov .......................................................................

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Charles Witherington-Perkins Director of Planning & Community Development 33 S. Arlington Heights Arlington Heights, IL 60005 847-368-5220 cperkins@vah.com www.vah.com .......................................................................

Russell County Eco Devo & CVB

Mike Parsons, Director 331 E. Witchita, Russell, KS 67665 785-483-4000 785-324-0126 rced2@russellks.org www.russellcountyks.org .......................................................................

INDIANA

Putnam Development Authority

Terry Schwindler Econmical Devleopment Director 117 Putnam Drive, Eaton, GA 31024 706-816-8099 tschwindler@putnamdevelopmentauthority.com www.putnamdevelopmentauthority. com .......................................................................

Village of Arlington Heights Business & Economic Development

City of Marshall

Jennifer Bishop Economic Development Director 201 S. Michigan Ave Marshall, IL 62441 217-826-2034 jbishop@marshall-il.com www.marshall-il.com .......................................................................

Huntington County Economic Development

Mark Wickersham, Executive Director 8 West Market Street Huntington, IN 46750 260-356-5688 mark@hcued.com www.hcued.com ..................................................................

City of Vandalia

Amber E. Daulbaugh, Director of Economic Development 431 W. Gallatin St. Vandalia, IL 62471 618-283-1152 618-335-9510 (Mobile) vandaliaed@vandaliaillinois.com www.vandaliaillinois.com .......................................................................

Miami County Economic Development Auth.

Intersect Illinois

Dodge City/Ford County Development Corporation

Brent Case Senior Vice President Business Development 230 W. Monroe St. Chicago, IL 60606 312-667-6013 brent.case@intersectillinois.org intersectillinois.org .......................................................................

Alliance STL | St. Louis Regional Economic Development

Steven S. Johnson. CEO One Metropolitan Square Suite 1300 St. Louis, MO 63102 314-444-1105 sjohnson@alliancestl.com alliancestl.com .......................................................................

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Jim Tidd 1525 W. Hoosier Boulevard Peru, IN 46970 765-689-0159 jtidd@miamicountyeda.com www.miamicountyeda.com .......................................................................

KANSAS

Joann Knight, Executive Director 101 E. Wyatt Earp Blvd. Dodge City, KS 67801 620-227-9501 620-227-2957 (f) jknight@dodgedev.org www.dodgedev.org .......................................................................

Go Topeka

Molly Howey, CEcD President 719 S Kansas Ave. Suite 100 Topeka, KS 66603 785.231.4707 mhowey@gotopeka.com www.gotopeka.com .......................................................................

Salina Economic Development Organization

D. Mitch Robinson, CEcD 120 West Ash Street Salina, KS 67401 785-404-3131 mrobinson@salinaedo.org www.salinaedo.org .......................................................................

Shawnee Economic Development

Ann Smith-Tate, President CEO 15100 W. 67th Street Suite 202 Shawnee, KS 66217-9344 913-631-6545 asmithtate@shawneekschamber.com www.shawnee-edc.com .......................................................................

Wyandotte Economic Development Council

Greg Kindle, President 727 Minnesota Avenue Kansas City, KS 66101 913-371-3198 gkindle@wyedc.org www.wyedc.org .......................................................................

KENTUCKY

City of Pikeville

Jill Fraley Dotson, Executive Economic Development Director 773 Hambley Boulevard Pikeville, KY 41501 606-437-5128 info@whypikeville.com www.whypikeville.com .......................................................................


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ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

MAINE Northern Kentucky Tri-ED

Kimberly Rossetti VP of Economic Development 300 Buttermilk Pike, Suite 332 Ft. Mitchell, KY 41017 888-874-3365 ksr@NorthernKentuckyUSA.com www.NorthernKentuckyUSA.com .......................................................................

Kent County Department of Economic & Tourism Development Town of Richmond Community, Economic, & Business Development Darryl Sterling, Director 26 Gardiner Street Richmond, ME 04357-0159 207-737-4305 x 331 207-737-4306 (f) director@richmondmaine.com www.richmondmaine.com .......................................................................

MARYLAND South Western Kentucky EDC

Carter Hendricks Executive Director 2800 Fort Campbell Blvd. Hopkinsville, KY 42240 270-885-1499 chendricks@southwesternky.com www.southwesternky.com .......................................................................

LOUISIANA Louisiana Economic Development

Anya G. Hudnall 1201 N. Third Street Suite 7-210 Baton Rouge, LA 70802 225-342-5396 Anya.hudnal@la.gov www.la.gov .......................................................................

Calvert County Economic Development

Kelly Robertson-Slagle, Director 205 Main Street Prince Frederick, MD 20678 410-535-4583 kelly.slagle@calvertcountymd.gov www.ecalvert.com .......................................................................

Carroll County Economic Development

Paige Sunderland, Director 225 N. Center Street, Ste. 101 Westminster, MD 21157 410-386-2070 psunderland@carrollbiz.org www.carrollbiz.org .......................................................................

St. Mary Parish of Economic Development

Frank Fink, Director 500 Main Street, 5th Floor Courthouse Franklin, LA 70538 337-828-4100 ffink@stmaryparishla.gov www.stmaryparishdevelopmant.com .......................................................................

Jamie L. Williams, CEcD, Director 400 High Street, 3rd Floor Chestertown MD 21620 410-810-2168 jlwilliams@kentgov.org www.kentcounty.com/business .......................................................................

Maryland Department of Commerce

Tom Riford 100 Community Place Crownsville, MD 21032 877-634-6361 www.maryland.gov .......................................................................

Montgomery County Economic Development

Kristin O’Keefe 1801 Rockville Pike, Ste. 320 Rockville, MD 20852 240-641-6703 kristin@thinkmoco.com www.thinkmoco.com .......................................................................

Talbot County Economic Development

Cassandra M. Vanhooser, Director 11 S. Harrison Street Easton, MD 21601 410-770-8000 Cvanhooser@talbgov.org www.talbgov.org .......................................................................

MICHIGAN

SWLA Economic Development ALLIANCE

George Swift 4310 Ryan Street Lake Charles LA 70605 337-433-3632 gswift@allianceswla.org www.allianceswla.org .......................................................................

MINNESOTA

Cecil County Economic Development

Steven Overbay, Director 200 Chesapeake Blvd., Ste 2700 Elkton, MD 21921 410-996-8471 cmoyer@ccgov.org www.ccgov.org .......................................................................

Dorchester County Economic Development

Susan Banks, Director 104 Tech Park Drive Cambridge, MD 21613 410-228-0155 sbanks@choosedorchester.org www.choosedorchester.org .......................................................................

Economic Development Alliance (EDA) of St. Clair County Dan Casey, CEO 100 McMorran Boulevard 4th Floor, Suite B Port Huron, Michigan 48060 Ph: 810.982.9511 www.edascc.com stclairhotjobs.com .......................................................................

The Right Place, Inc.

Andria Romkema 125 Ottawa Avenue, Suite 450 Grand Rapids, MI 49503 616-771-0563 romkemaa@rightplace.org www.Rightplace.org ....................................................................... bxjmag.com

City of Lakeville Community & Economic Development

David Olson Director 20195 Holyoke Avenue Lakeville, MN 55044 952-985-4421 dolson@lakevillemn.gov www.lakevillemn.gov .......................................................................

MISSOURI

Alliance STL | an initiative of Greater St. Louis, Inc. Steven S. Johnson Chief Business Attraction Officer One Metropolitan Square Suite 1300 St. Louis, MO 63102 314-444-1105 Steve@GreaterSTLinc.com www.GreaterSTLinc.com .......................................................................

Sikeston Regional Chamber & Economic Development Corp.

Mike Marshall 128 N. New Madrid Street Sikeston, MO 63801 573-471-2498 mike.marshall@sikeston.net www.sikeston.net .......................................................................

NEVADA

Las Vegas Global Ecnomic Alliance Perry Ursem Vice President, Business Retention + Expansion 6720 via Austi Parkway Suite #330 Las Vegas, NV 89119 702-791-0000 www.Ivgea.org .......................................................................

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NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF

ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

The Agency-Broome County IDA/LDC

Northeastern Nevada Regional Development Authority

Sheldon Mudd, Executive Director 1500 College Pkwy McMullen Hall #103 Elko, NV 89801 775-738-2100 775-738-7978(f) smudd@nnrda.com www.nnrda.com .......................................................................

NEW JERSEY

Stacey Duncan, Executive Director of Community & Economic Development Five South College Drive Suite 201 Binghamton, NY 13905 607-584-9000 607-584-9009 (f) smd@theagency-ny.com www.theagency-ny.com .......................................................................

Fulton County Center for Regional Growth

Gloucester County Department of Economic Development

Tom Bianco, Director 1480 Tanyard Rd., Sewell, NJ 08080 856-384-6930 tbianco@co.gloucester.nj.us www.gloucestercountynj.gov .......................................................................

New Jersey EDA

Pat J. Rose 36 West State Street Trenton, NJ 08625 609-858-6705 prose@njeda.com www.njeda.com .......................................................................

NEW MEXICO

Ronald M. Peters 34 West Fulton Street Gloversville, NY 12078 518-725-7700 ext. 2 ronp@fccrg.org www.fccrg.org .......................................................................

Mohawk Valley Edge

Nick Bruno 584 Phoenix Drive Rome, NY 13441-4105 315-338-0393 nbruno@mvedge.org www.mvedge.org ..................................................................

NORTH CAROLINA

Jennifer Grassham, CEO 200 E. Broadway Street Hobbs, NM 88240 573-397-2039 jennifer@edclc.org www.edclc.org .......................................................................

Shannon Allen 1000A Ted Johnson Parkway Greensboro, NC 27409 336-665-5602 allens@gsoair.org www.landatpti.com .......................................................................

Stanly County Economic Development Commission

Candice Boyd Lowder, Director 704-986-3682 704-986-3685 (f) clowder@stanlyedc.com 1000 North First Street, Suite 11 Albemarle, NC 28001 www.stanlyedc.com .......................................................................

Martyn Johnson, Director 705 Page Road Washington, NC 27889 252-946-3970 252-946-0849 (f) martyn.johnson@beaufortedc.com www.co.beaufort.nc.us ..................................................................

Bismarck Mandan Chamber EDC

Nathan Schneider , CEcD-Vice President 1640 Burnt Boat Dr. Bismark, ND 58503 701-223-5660 nschneider@bmcedc.com www.bismarckmandan.com .......................................................................

OKLAHOMA Harnett County Economic Development

Allegany County Industrial Development Agency

Craig Clark, Executive Director CrossRoads Center 6087 State Route 19N, Suite 100 Belmont, NY 14813 585-268-7445 585-268-7473 (f) clarkcr@alleganyco.com www.acida.org ....................................................................... BXJ DECEMBER 2021

Piedmont Triad Airport Authority

NORTH DAKOTA

NEW YORK

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John W. Rouse, Executive Director 2780 Jetport Road Kinston, NC 28504 252-775-6183 252-522-1765 (f) jwrouse@ncdot.gov www.ncgtp.com ......................................................................

Ponca City Development Authority David Myers, Executive Director 102 S. Fifth Street Suite 3 Ponca City, OK 74601 580-765-7070 580-765-7070 (f) dmyers@goponca.com www.goponca.com .......................................................................

RHODE ISLAND

City of Cranston

Lawrence DiBoni, Director of Economic Development 869 Park Avenue Cranston, RI 02910 401-780-3166 401-780-3179 (f) ldiboni@cranstonri.org www.cranstonri.com .......................................................................

City of Warwick Department of Tourism, Culture, and Development

Elizabeth J. Dunton, Acting Director 3275 Pos t Road Warwick, RI 2886 401-921-7711 401-732-7662 elizabeth.j.dunton@warwickri.com movetowarwickri.com ..................................................................

Beaufort County Economic Development

EDC of Lea County

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Debbie Taylor, Marketing & Business Recruitment Manager 200 Alexander Dr. or PO Box 1270 Lillington, NC 27546 910-814-6891 919-814-8298 (f) dhtaylor@harnett.org www.harnettedc.org .......................................................................

bxjmag.com

Bartlesville Development Authority

Jared Patton, Vice President 201 SW Keeler Bartlesville, OK 74003 918-337-8086 918-337-0216 (f) jpatton@bdaok.org www.bdaok.org .......................................................................

Quonset Development Corporation

Steven J. King, Managing Director 95 Cripe Street North Kingstown, RI 2852 401-295-0044 sking@quonset.com www.quonset.com .......................................................................

SOUTH CAROLINA

Charleston Regional Development Alliance Claire Gibbons 4401 Belle Oaks Drive, Suite 420 North Charleston, SC 29405 843-760-3351 cgibbons@crda.org www.crda.org .......................................................................


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Lexington County Economic Development

Sarah J. Johnson Department Director 212 South Lake Drive Lexington, SC 29072 803-785-6818 sjjohnson@lex-co.com www.LexingtonCountyUSA.com .......................................................................

South Carolina I-77 Alliance

Christopher Finn 3200 Commerce Drive, Suite D Richburg, SC 29729 803-789-3467 chris.finn@i77alliance.com www.i77alliance.com ........................................................................

SouthernCarolina Regional Alliance

Kay Maxwell 1750 Jackson Street, Suite 100 Barnwell, SC 29812 803-541-0023 kmaxwell@southerncarolina.org www.southerncarolina.org .....................................................................

TENNESSEE

NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF

ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

City of Lebanon

Sarah Haston Economic Development Director 200 North Castle Heights Ave. Lebanon, TN 37087 615-443-2839 EXT. 2120 Sarah.Haston@lebanontn.org www.lebanontn.org .......................................................................

Bryan Daniels CEcD, CCE, IOM President and CEO 201 S. Washington Street St. Maryville, TN 37804 865-983-2247 865-984-1386 bdaniels@blountpartnership.com www.blountchamber.com .......................................................................

Bristol Tennessee Essential Services April Eads Business Development Manager 2470 Volunteer Parkway Bristol, TN 37620 423-793-5532 423-793-5545 (f) aeads@btes.net www.btes.net/index.php/economic-development .......................................................................

Carolyn Gibson Executive Director 707 Fahrenthold El Campo, TX 77437 979-543-6727 979-320-7727 cell cgibson@elcampoeco.org www.elcampoeco.org .......................................................................

NETWORKS – Sullivan Partnership

Clay Walker PO Box 747, Blountville, TN 37617 423-279-7681 cwalker@networkstn.com www.networkstn.com .......................................................................

TEXAS

Mark Willis 215 W. 3rd Street Big Spring, TX 79720 432-264-6032 markwillis@bigspringtx.com www.bigspringtx.com .......................................................................

Ginger Watkins, Executive Director 102 E. First Street, Suite A Cameron, TX 76520 254-697-4970 254-482-1119 (c) gwatkins@cameronindustrialfoundation.com www.cameronindustrialfoundation. com .......................................................................

Cedar Hill Economic Development Corporation

Andy J. Buffington, CEcD, IOM 285 Uptown Boulevard, Bldg. 100 Cedar Hill, TX 75104 972-291-5132 chedc@cedarhilltx.com www.cedarhilledc.com .......................................................................

Karen Dickson Economic Development Manager 3700 Lake Austin Blvd. Austin, TX 78703 512-578-3291 karen.dickson@lcra.org www.lcra.org/economic-development/ pages/default.aspx .......................................................................

McKinney Economic Development Corporation City of Fort Worth

Robert Sturns, Director 1150 S. Freeway Fort Worth, TX 76104 817-392-2663 Robert.Sturns@fortworthtexas.gov .......................................................................

Big Spring Economic Development Corporation

Cameron Industrial Foundation Blount Partnership

LCRA City Development Corporation of El Campo

Peter Tokar III President/CEO 5900 S. Lake Forest Drive McKinney, TX 75070 972-435-6953 ptokar@mckinneyedc.com www.uniquemckinney.com .......................................................................

Odessa Economic Development Corporation

City of Leander

Evan Milliorn Economic Development Director 201 N Brushy Leander, TX 78641 512-528-2852 emilliorn@leandertx.gov www.leanderbusiness.com .......................................................................

Wesley Burnett 700 N. Grant Ave. Odessa, TX 79761 432-333-7880 wburnett@odessaecodev.com www.odessatx.com .......................................................................

Jacksboro Economic Development Corporation Conroe Economic Development Council

Danielle Scheiner, Executive Director 300 W Davis St, Ste 510 Conroe, TX 77301 USA 936-538-7118 scheiner@conroeedc.org www.conroeedc.org .......................................................................

DeSoto Economic Development

Joe Newman, CEO 211 E. Pleasant Run Road DeSoto, TX 75115 Ph: 972-230-9611 jnewman@dedc.org www.dedc.org ....................................................................... bxjmag.com

Lynda Pack Executive Director P.O. Box 610 Jacksboro, TX 76458 940-567-3151 lyndapack@jacksboroedc.com www.jacksboroedc.com ..................................................................

Laredo Economic Development

Olivia Varela President & CEO P.O. Box 2682 Laredo, TX 78044 956-722-0563 ovarela@laredoedc.org www.laredoedc.org ....................................................................... |

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NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF

ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

WASHINGTON Marble Falls EDC

Christian Fletcher 801 Fourth Street Marble Falls, TX 78654 830-798-7079 cfletcher@marblefallseconomy.com www.marblefallseconomy.com .......................................................................

Mount Pleasant EDC

Nathan Tafoya, Executive Director 1604 N. Jefferson Ave. Mount Pleasant, TX 75455 903-572-6602 nathan@mpedc.org www.mpedc.org .......................................................................

Whitesboro Economic Development Corp.

Lynda Anderson Director P.O. Box 340 or 111 W. Main Whitesboro, TX 76273 930-564-3311 landerson@whitesborotexas.com www.whitesborotexas.com .......................................................................

Holly Covington-Malish Marketing/Research Director 390 S. Seguin Avenue New Braunfels, TX 78130 830-608-2817 holly@innewbraunfels.com www.newbraunfelsedc.com .......................................................................

Aaron Sanborn City Administrator 1650 E. Stagecoach Run Eagle Mountain, UT 84005 801-789-6621 asanborn@emcity.org www.eaglemountaincity.com .......................................................................

Pflugerville Community Development

Plainview Economic Development Corporation

Michael Fox, Executive Director 1906 West 5th Plainview, TX 79072 806-293-8536 michael.fox@plainviewedc.org www.plainviewedc.org .......................................................................

TexAmericas Center

Eric Voyles, Executive Vice President Chief Economic Development Officer 107 Chapel Lane New Boston, TX 75570 903-306-8923 Eric.Voyles@texamericascenter.com www.texamericascenter.com .......................................................................

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Becky Newton, Manager 6000 Main Street SW Lakewood, WA 98499 877-421-9126 bnewton@cityoflakewood.us www.buildyourbetterhere.com .......................................................................

City of Maple Valley

VIRGINA

Amy Madison 3801 Helios Way Suite 130 Pflugerville, TX 78660 512-990-3725 amym@pfdevelopment.com www.pfevelopment.com .......................................................................

City of Lakewood Economic Development

Barb LaMue, President & CEO 2740 W. Mason Street Green Bay, WI 54303 920-676-1960 barb.lamue@thenewnorth.com www.thenewnorth.com .......................................................................

UTAH

Eagle Mountain Economic Development

New Braunfels EDC

New North, Inc

Arlington Economic Development

Telly Tucker, AED Director 1100 N Glebe Rd Suite 1500 Arlington, VA 22201 703-228-0808 703-228-0805 (f) ttucker@arlingtonva.us www.arlingtoneconomicdevelopment. com .......................................................................

Bedford County Office of Economic Development

Pam Bailey Director of Economic Development Bedford County 122 East Main Street, Suite 202 Bedford, Virginia 24523 540-587-5670 540-586-0406 (f) pbailey@bedfordcountyva.gov www.bedfordeconomicdevelopment. com .......................................................................

bxjmag.com

Tim Morgan Economic Development Manager P.O. Box 320 Maple Valley, WA 98038 425-413-8800 tim.morgan@maplevalleywa.gov www.maplevalleywa.gov ..................................................................

Portage County Business Council, Inc. PCB

Todd Kuckkahn, Executive Director 5501 Vern Holmes Drive Stevens Point, WI 54482 715-344-1940 715-344-1940 (f) tkuckkah@portagecountybiz.com www.portagecountyconnects.com .......................................................................

WYOMING Try-City Development Council

Karl Dye, President & CEO 7130 W. Grandridge Blvd #A Kennewich, WA 99336 509-735-1000 kdye@tridec.org www.tridec.org ..................................................................

WISCONSIN City of Franklin Economic Development

Calli Berg, Director 9229 W. Loomis Road Franklin, WI 53132 414-427-7566 cberg@franklinwi.gov www.franklinwi.gov .......................................................................

Madison Region Economic Partnership

Kathy Collins, VP Economic Development 8517 Excelsior Drive, Suite 107 Madison, WI 53717 608-571-0407 kcollins@madisonregion.org www.madisonregion.org .......................................................................

Advance Casper

Morryah McCurdy 111 S. Durbin, Suite 200 Casper, WY 82601 307-577-7011 morryah@advancecasper.com www.advancecasper.com .......................................................................

Cheyenne LEADS

Betsey Hale, Chief Executive Officer One Depot Square 121 W. 15th St. Suite 304 Cheyenne, WY 82001 307-638-6000 betseyh@cheyenneleads.org cheyenneleads.org .......................................................................

The Laramie Chamber Business Alliance

Josh Boudreau VP Economic Development 528 South Adams Street Laramie, WY 82070 307-745-7339 receptionist@laramie.org www.laramie.org .......................................................................


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CANADA

NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF

ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

ONTARIO City of Mississauga Economic Development

City of Guelph

ALBERTA Town of Ajax

Don Terry Manager, Economic Development & Tourism 65 Harwood Avenue South Ajax, Ontario, Canada L1S 2H9 905-619-2529 ext. 3252 don.terry@ajax.ca www.ajaxfirstforbusiness.com .......................................................................

Calgary Economic Development

500 Centre Street S, 32nd Floor Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2G 1A6 403-221-7831 info@calgaryeconomicdevelopment.com www.calgaryeconomicdevelopment.com .......................................................................

MANITOBA

City of Brandon

County of Elgin

Dan Fontaine Business Development Specialist Main Floor, 410 9th Street Brandon, Manitoba, Canada R7A 6A2 204-729-2133 d.fontaine@brandon.ca www.economicdevelomentbrandon. com .......................................................................

Kate Burns-Gallagher Manager Economic Development And Tourism 450 Sunset Drive St. Thomas, Ontario, Canada N5R 5V1 519-631-1460 ext. 137 kburns@elgin.ca www.progressivebynature.com .......................................................................

Christine Chapman 1 Carden Street Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1H 3A1 519--822-1260 ext. 2823 Christine.chapman@guelph.ca www.guelph.ca/business .......................................................................

Bonnie Brown Mississauga City Hall 300 City Centre Drive, 3rd Floor Mississauga, ON L5B 3C1 Canada 800-456-2181 905-896-5931 bonnie.brown@mississauga.ca www.TheFuturelsUnlimited.ca .......................................................................

Middlesex County

Vaughan Economic and Cultural Development

Cara A. Finn, BBA, M. Ad.Ed. Director of Economic Development 399 Ridout St. North London, ON N6A 2P1 519-434-7321 cfinn@middlesex.ca www.investinmiddlesex.ca .......................................................................

Raphael Costa Vaughan City Hall, Level 200 2141 Major Mackenzie Drive Vaughan, Ontario, Canada L6A 1T1 905-832-8526 ext. 8891 raphael.costa@vaughan.ca www.vaughan.ca/Business .......................................................................

ADVERTISER & EDIT INDEX Advertiser

COLORADO Canon City

CONNECTICUT Town of Berlin

DELAWARE Kent County Wilmington

AD

25 24 31 31 29 28 28 27

KENTUCKY

Pikeville 3

LOUISIANA

Edit

Advertiser

AD

MARYLAND Kent County

Edit

BC 13

MONTANA

Northwest Energy

23 23

WYOMING Casper Cheyenne Laramie

19 18 20 20 21 20

Ontario, Canada Middlesex County

1

Southwest Louisiana Alliance IFC bxjmag.com

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WE HAVE WHAT YOUR BUSINESS NEEDS TO

SUCCEED ● ●

● ●

Fiber Connectivity

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5 Sustainable Communities

Educated & Trained Workforce

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Contact Us to Find Out How We Can Help Your Business Grow (410) 778-0416

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