July/August 2022 - Digital Issue

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July/August 2022 | bxjmag.com

2022 NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

PORTS & AGRIBUSINESS

FOOD & BEVERAGE Making A Comeback

EXPANSION OPPORTUNITIES

TRAVEL & TOURISM

Welcomes A Steady Surge NEW BRUNSWICK, CANADA MARYLAND | KANSAS | ILLINOIS


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WE HAVE WHAT YOUR BUSINESS NEEDS TO SUCCEED Tax Incentives Business Resources Fiber Connectivity Interstate Access Designated Growth Areas 19 Million People Within 100 Miles

Business Associations Access to Higher Education 5 Sustainable Communities Educated & Trained Workforce Access to 3 International Airports & 3 Major Seaports

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TABLE OF

CONTENTS

JULY/AUGUST 2022

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FEATURES INDUSTRY OUTLOOK: Crowded seaports adjusting to increased import volumes But more and improved infrastructure is still needed to keep imports and exports rolling along in a post-pandemic business climate By David Hodes

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Alan Reyes-Guerra areyes@bxjmag.com 205-862-5175

EDITORIAL CONTRIBUTORS David Hodes

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INNOVATION AND STRATEGIES: Agri-technology adoption begins in earnest amidst the digitization of farming How new technologies and rapidly spreading connectivity with the internet are profoundly transforming farming

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Clint Cabiness clint@dialedinmediagroup.com 205-613-5910

By David Hodes

EDITORIAL OFFICE King Publishing, Inc. 1000 Stafford Court

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INDUSTRY INSIGHT: The food and beverage industry is making a strong comeback.

Birmingham, Alabama 35242

New ideas in consumer preferences and unique product marketing drive a quickening pace of development

ONLINE MEDIA ASSISTANT

By David Hodes

Nick Boliek

Tel: 205-862-5175

Sonia Buchanan

nick@dialedinmediagroup.com

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ECONOMIC SPOTLIGHT: As the pandemic (hopefully) subsides, tourism companies welcome a steady surge in business

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It’s been a long 2-plus years downturn, but tourism is showing strong signs of a comeback By David Hodes

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26 NEW BRUNSWICK, CANADA: WHERE BUSINESS MEETS OPPORTUNITY

32 MARYLAND: INNOVATION AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP

36 KANSAS: THE SMART INVESTMENT

Business Xpansion Journal magazine are solely those of the author and advertiser, respectively. © Copyright 2022, King Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. No

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Building the Future of Aerospace Boom Supersonic, developer of a new supersonic aircraft called Overture, has chosen to locate its new superfactory at Piedmont Triad International Airport, which is located in the heart of North Carolina and at the center of the East Coast. Boom is not the only global brand to discover the advantages of locating at PTI. Honda Aircraft Company, HAECO Americas, FedEx Express and Cessna/Textron are among 50 companies that already call the airport home, generating $8.6 billion for the local economy and employing 8,600 workers on the airport campus. With 1,000 acres ready for development, the airport has room for more. Visit LandatPTI.com to learn why your next big move should be to the Piedmont Triad International Airport, the Center of North Carolina Aerospace.

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INDUSTRY

OUTLOOK

PORTS Aerial shot of the Port of Baltimore. In 2019, the Port of Baltimore handled a record 43.6 million tons of international cargo, valued at $58.4 billion, up in tonnage from 42.9 million in 2018, but down in value from $59.7 billion

Crowded seaports adjusting to increased import volumes BY: DAVID HODES

But more and improved infrastructure is still needed to keep imports and exports rolling along in a post-pandemic business climate

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t’s been a tough year or two for seaports around the world, with the pandemic becoming the main impediment to generating steady revenue, but also because of the important role of seaports in the whole distribution chain of products within the U.S., from distant markets of origin to the destination of the sale. ..............................................................................................................................................

Latest seaport stats According to data from the American Association of Port Authorities (AAPA), in 2020, fifty ports were ranked among the top 25 maritime ports, with 46 in the 48 contiguous U.S. states, plus 2 (Anchorage and Valdez) in Alaska, 1 (Honolulu) in Hawaii, and 1 (San Juan) in Puerto Rico. The ports in Baltimore, Houston, Mobile, New Orleans, and Virginia are in the top 25 for all three-cargo categories—overall cargo tonnage, dry bulk cargo tonnage, and twenty-foot equivalent unit (TEU) of containerized cargo. According to the U.S. Department of Transportation Bureau of Transportation Statistics, the top 100 ports account for 95.5 percent of total tonnage handled by U.S. ports. The



INDUSTRY

OUTLOOK

PORTS New York and New Jersey. The 2020 top container port was the port of Los Angeles, California.

Adjusting, recovering from the pandemic As the pandemic drove a shift in demand from services to goods, major swings in imported goods placed significant stress on U.S. ports in 2020. The 2nd quarter of 2020 was marked by a recession as gross domestic product (GDP) decreased by 31.2 percent. GDP quickly rebounded in the 3rd quarter of 2020 with growth of 33.8 percent. The recovery from the pandemic continues to affect related port workforce. After a serious dip in the number of truck and warehouse employees in April, 2020, numbers improved significantly by September, 2021. The country’s top 10 container ports handled relatively low numbers of monthly TEU in the first half of 2020, shifting to higher numbers of monthly TEU in the latter half of 2020, which continued to grow in 2021. For example, these ports handled about half a million (12.7 percent) more TEUs in October, 2021 than in October, 2020. Container ports have continued to handle a record-breaking number of TEU through the 3rd quarter of 2021.

Port congestion and the changing nature of freight

Port of Houston circa 2016 showing the city skyline in the background. The port is the 7th largest Gulf Coast container port,and the largest Texas port with 97 percent market share in containers

highest tonnage figures come from ports that handle large quantities of both liquid bulk cargo (such as petroleum or chemicals) and dry bulk cargo (such as coal or grain). These include the ports of Houston, South Louisiana, and Corpus Christi and other ports along the Texas/Louisiana/Alabama coast. The 2020 top tonnage port was the port of Houston, handling twice as much export tonnage as import tonnage. The port of South Louisiana handled the greatest volume of dry bulk cargo. The container ports with the highest TEU volumes were coastal container ports, such as the ports of Los Angeles, Long Beach, and

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Ian Gansler, the government relations associate for the AAPA, told BXJ that, since the pandemic, there has been an increase in consumer spending on imported goods. “That increase has caused record amounts of cargo to be imported through our ports. And that is the chief cause of the congestion we’ve seen at some ports around the country. They’re moving record amounts of cargo that they’ve never seen before.” Some of that congestion has eased a little bit since the peak, he said, sometime last year. “But we’re still seeing some backups at some ports. And I’d emphasize that ports are not the only point in the supply chain that are seeing congestion. There’s congestion at rail depots, at truck depots in the United States, and congestion at foreign ports, which is even worse than it is at American ports.” He said that there may be some dozens of ships stacked up waiting to dock at Shanghai. “I’ve seen articles saying there’s over 200 ships waiting to dock at Shanghai,” Gansler said. “What I think is important for people to know is that these ports are moving record amounts of cargo there every month, compared to the same month in the previous year. These largest gateway ports are moving more cargo than they ever have before, with essentially the same amount of infrastructure that they had prior to the pandemic.” Many of the AAPA members are telling him that their operations are going just fine. They say that they’re exporting agriculture, exporting petroleum, or importing non-containerized products. “They don’t have the same congestion. So I think it’s important to recognize that the problem is not one size fits all problem and the solutions won’t be one size fits all, either.” The two independent ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach are the busiest container ports in the U.S. and are served by many


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INDUSTRY

OUTLOOK

PORTS

Seagirt Marine Terminal, Baltimore, Maryland. This panorama shows the three stages of containerization; shipping, storage, and distribution

shipping companies, most of them internationally owned. James Fawcett, adjunct professor of environmental studies at the University of Southern California, said in an interview published on the USC website that it is important to remember that the backup is a system problem. “That is most obvious at the ports. Our two ports aren’t necessarily the cause of the problem; the congestion is just more visible there. And, once the system gets out of whack as it has this past year, it takes time for it to recover back to normal across the world.”

Seaport support Federal funding for ports has grown significantly, from $3.9 billion in 2021 to a projected $6.3 billion in 2022. U.S. ports are ready to build over $49.7 billion in green infrastructure projects over the next decade, including electric cargo-handling equipment and charging stations; green energy shorepower projects; electrical grid infrastructure improvement; hydrogen power projects; and offshore wind projects. Other signs of recovery from the pandemic is that imports set another

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record high this spring as the nation’s major container ports worked to reduce congestion and retailers stocked up before dockworkers’ West Coast labor contract expired, according to the monthly Global Port Tracker report released by the National Retail Federation and Hackett Associates in July. According to the report, ports saw a surge in activity this spring as a slowdown in cargo from Chinese factories closed by the pandemic gave them a chance to clear built-up congestion. Retailers have been bringing in seasonal merchandise and importing other goods early to avoid any problems related to the contract negotiations, a move that may have also contributed to volume. The AAPA is stepping up to help modernize seaports and add crucial features to address shortcomings revealed by the pandemic. Working with some key member ports, the AAPA developed the Port Opportunities with Energy, Resilience, and Sustainability (POWERS) program, launched July 19, to provide environmental protection, energy security, and resilience from extreme weather. AAPA and stakeholders want to ensure that ports are at the center of policy

and economic discussions to modernize the U.S. transportation and energy infrastructure.

Lessons learned “I think the major lesson we’ve learned is that we need more infrastructure to deal with these cargo volumes,” Gansler said. Volumes will continue to rise, and, as the economy continues to grow in years and decades to come, there are likely to see even further cargo volume increases. “So I think the lesson is, our ports have been under-invested for decades,” he said. “They’ve kind of been out of sight, out of mind to the average consumer, the average small business. You order something, you order a package, you order a pallet of something for your manufacturing process, and it arrives on time, you don’t have to think about it. And now all of a sudden that it doesn’t arrive on time, people are asking, oh, where’s my package? Why isn’t it here? And the answer is we haven’t put the investment into our ports that we needed.” The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Maritime Administration (MARAD) announced in May that up to $684.3 million


is now available for Port Infrastructure Development Program (PIDP) grants, to be awarded on a competitive basis to projects that improve the safety, efficiency, and reliability of the movement of goods into, out of, around, or within a port. This amount marks the most annual funding for PIDP in history, according to the press release announcing the funding. Projects that improve the movement of goods to, through, and around ports at coastal seaports, inland river ports, and Great Lakes ports are eligible to receive funding.

Climate change and the future of seaports A research article about port infrastructure reported that recent trade scenarios suggest that global freight demand could increase between three- and seven-fold by 2050, with a 73 percent global increase in the number of containers moved to at least 2.2 billion per year over the same period. It has been estimated that port capacity will not be adequate to meet demand as early as 2030, and that increases in capacity and infrastructure are already inevitable to ensure efficient movement of goods. The article also reported that climate-related extremes and trends have important implications for ports in terms of their functionality, navigable water, and shelter from wind and waves. In any event, the costs of providing new ports dominates over adaptation of existing ports. The largest area and highest costs are likely to remain with today’s largest economies, such as the U.S. and China) although other countries, particularly in Asia and Africa, will see significant increases as trade magnitude and pathways change. “While port area estimates are reliant on the understanding of future trade directions, most scenarios foresee the movement of bulk commodities whether coal, grain or biomass remaining the main constituent of maritime trade,” the article reported. “The space requirements for handling, transport and storage of these goods are therefore likely to remain a key consideration for future port development and adaptation.” X

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INDUSTRY

S I D E B A R

OUTLOOK

PORTS

Quonset Business Park fosters an environment for business success and growth.

Once a World War II-era naval base, the park has been transformed into the region’s leading engine of economic growth with over 200 companies and 12,900 jobs. Managed by the Quonset Development Corporation (“QDC”) since 2005, Quonset has been a leader in job creation and economic growth, with nearly $3 billion in private investment and hosting one out of every six manufacturing jobs in the state. Today, Quonset continues to build on that success with major updates throughout the park. Site Readiness: Quonset’s site readiness program allows businesses to break ground on pre-permitted, pre-engineered sites within 90 days of signing a lease. In the past decade, this has created a climate where Quonset has added over 3,500 jobs with $664 million in private investment. Our latest initiative, Rhode Island Ready, is a $40 million initiative that brings our site readiness program statewide. Designed to prepare industrial sites throughout Rhode Island to support future job growth, the program has already enrolled five sites. Cleaner and greener: Three-quarters of the power needed to support QDC operations is produced from renewable sources. For businesses here, we recently were recognized with a ‘Lead by Example’ Clean Energy Award from the Rhode Island Office of Energy Resources. The honor recognized a two-year partnership between Quonset and National Grid that has conserved over 14.5 million kwH of electricity and nearly 155,000 therms of natural gas, resulting in

$2.7 million in energy savings for Quonset businesses. Quonset also took a crucial step forward in becoming an emerging hub for the offshore wind industry last week when Rhode Island Gov. Dan McKee cut the ribbon for improvements at Pier 2 at the Port of Davisville, the state’s only public port. The port has received cargo for local wind energy projects while supporting construction for the nation’s first offshore wind farm off the coast of Block Island. Flex Technology Park: Governor McKee also visited the park recently for a tour of Flex Technology Park Building #5, the latest of 11 planned buildings designed to provide flexible industrial space for manufacturing and other businesses. Southwest Louisiana prod The concept has proven very popular in the marketplace, with for the nation and Flex Building #5 already booked with tenants, including the Ørsted/ provides ch for hundreds Eversource joint wind energy venture. Ørstedplastics said that Flex Industrialof product We supply aircraft with maintenanc Building #5 will be “critical” to supporting their offshore wind custom interiors, and we propagat projects and crews. and timber. Plus, we are a des The day before the Governor’s visit, the seventh Flex Industrial world-class casino reso Building was approved at a meeting of the Quonset Board of Directors. Quonset’s world-class facilities and central location give businesses the resources they need to grow and enjoy competitive edge in the Northeast. For available space for lease or build out, visit us at www.quonset.com or call today at 401.295.0044 x218

S I D E B A R

RESILIENCE…

THAT’S SOUTHWEST LOUISIANA The Port of Lake Charles: It’s Positive Impact

LA

When we get hit hard by weather, The Port of Lake Charles the jewelquickly of Southwest weisrespond to getLouisiana. up and running. to maintain the Calcasieu Ship Channel which is crucial to existing and Economists and economic development professionals regularly point future industry. Up to 46 cents of every dollar in Southwest Louisiana is The Port of Lake Charles, Chennault Airpark, out that the port’s location, amenities, and leadership keep the facility from industry, most port related. and Lake Charles Regional Airport are opengenerated and at the front of the proverbial “class,” in recent years has led to The SWLA Alliance/Chamber supports positive initiatives by the ready for which your business. LAKE CHARLES HOUSTON 10 historic levels of growth and opportunity. Port and work in tandem to make sure area residents and businesses Our Southwest region has over 12 certified The Port of Lake Charles is one of the most powerful regional reap economic rewards improving the overall quality of life. For more industrial sites ready for your company. economic drivers on the local and international stage. Thousands of information, contact the SWLA Economic Development Alliance at jobs have been created atTo companies housed and affiliated with the 337-433-3632 or visit www.allianceswla.org hear the Southwest Louisiana port. Two casinos are on port property and generate $62.8 million in Resilience Update give us a call. revenue monthly providing $14.9 million in taxable sales monthly. Option agreements have been negotiated with several companies who will export natural gas or convert the product into other liquids. In the next few years, port officials plan to oversee $222 million in new construction and improvements. The Port is mandated by state statue

TX

(337) 433-3632 | www.ALLIANCESWLA.org 10 |

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Contact George Swift at gswift@allianceswla.org

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Approximately 37,300 jobs in Maryland are generated by port activity. 15,330 are direct jobs generated by cargo and vessel activities at the Port. 16,780 are induced jobs, i.e. jobs supported by the local purchases of goods and services by direct employees. 5,190 are indirect jobs, i.e. jobs supported by the business purchases of the employers who create the direct jobs. The Port of Baltimore is a major source of personal and business revenues in the State of Maryland. The Port was responsible for $3.3 billion in personal income. The Port’s average annual salary for the direct job holder is 9.5% higher than the average annual wage for the State of Maryland (U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics). The Port

generated $2.6 billion in business revenues. Activities of the Port generated $395 million in state, county, and municipal tax revenues. Approximately 101,880 other jobs in Maryland are directly related to activities at the Port. Related jobs are those with Maryland companies that choose to import and export their cargo through the Port of Baltimore, but they have the option of shipping their products or supplies through other ports. Combining direct, induced and indirect jobs with related jobs, there are over 139,180 jobs linked to the Port. For more information on the Port of Baltimore, please visit www.mpa.maryland.gov

The Ports of Indiana (POI) is a statewide port authority operating three ports, two on the Ohio River and one on Lake Michigan (with access to the St. Lawrence seaway). Ideally situated on two major North American freight transportation arteries -the Great Lakes and the Inland Waterway System - the state’s three-port system serves the world’s most productive industrial and agricultural regions. POI serves the steel, manufacturing, energy and agricultural sectors. Indiana’s ports offer a unique value proposition for companies because of their infrastructure, transportation connections, proximity to the country’s largest steel producing region and access to ocean shipments in the U.S. Midwest. The Ports of Indiana’s locations, innovative business model and management vision has allowed Indiana’s ports to flourish without the need for ongoing financial support from state tax dollars. POI is committed to fostering economic vitality, strengthening industries and implementing innovative solutions for its companies, communities and the State of Indiana by offering world-class infrastructure and global access to the Midwest. POI is dedicated to creating long-term value for its customers and stakeholders. The three ports contribute $8.2 billion annually to the state economy and support more than 50,000 jobs.

According to Vanta E. Coda II, chief executive officer, “The Ports of Indiana provides real estate, multimodal infrastructure and services, as well as special synergies that allow each company to operate at a competitive advantage to their peers. The availability of infrastructure, built to the highest of standards, allows each company located on Port property to expand their raw material sourcing and finished good markets from a local to global playing field.” The ports at Jeffersonville, Burns Harbor and Mount Vernon handle on an annual basis: • 2 million tons of steel • 75 ocean going ships • 5,000 US inland river barges • 66,000 railcars • 875,000 trucks

S I D E B A R

The Ports of Indiana: Big Things Happen Here

S I D E B A R

The Port of Baltimore Economic Impact

More than half of Indiana’s border is water, 400 miles of which is navigable by cargo vessels. The Ports of Indiana also serves as a Foreign Trade Zone authority for the State of Indiana, maintaining foreign trade zones at each of the ports. POI is the first statewide port authority to achieve the Green Marine certification to advance sustainable initiatives. To learn more, visit www.portsofindiana.com and follow www.twitter.com/portsofindiana

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INNOVATIONS & STRATEGIES

AGRIBUSINESS

Technician Christine Berry checks on futuristic peach and apple orchards. Each dish holds tiny experimental trees grown from lab-cultured cells to which researchers have given new genes.

Agri-technology adoption begins in earnest amidst the digitization of farming BY: DAVID HODES

How new technologies and rapidly spreading connectivity with the internet are profoundly transforming farming

A

n October, 2020 McKinsey report found that agriculture must embrace a digital transformation enabled by connectivity—but it’s behind. “Agriculture remains less digitized compared with many other industries globally,” the report found. Past advances were mostly mechanical, in the form of more powerful and efficient machinery; and genetic, in the form of more productive seed and fertilizers. “Now much more sophisticated, digital tools are needed to deliver the next productivity leap,” the report concluded. .................................................................................................................... Some of those technologies already exist to help farmers more efficiently and sustainably use resources, while more advanced digital systems and processes are in development. “These new technologies can upgrade decision making, allowing better risk and variability management to optimize yields and improve economics,” according to the report. For example, when deployed in animal husbandry, updated digital-based process can enhance the well-being of livestock, addressing the growing concerns over animal welfare.

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Terrametrics Agriculture, based in Lawrence, Kansas, offers a platform that combines sensor data, weather forecasts, satellite images, and drone images using a machine learning algorithm to detect changes in soil and microclimate.

Wheat harvest at the ARS Central Great Plains Research Station in Akron, Colorado.

The McKinsey report also found that, by the end of the decade, enhanced connectivity in agriculture could add more than $500 billion to global gross domestic product, a critical productivity improvement of 7 to 9 percent for the industry.

What does it all mean today? Even in the United States, only about one-quarter of farms currently use any connected equipment or devices to access data, and that technology isn’t exactly state-of-the-art, running on 2G or 3G networks that telcos plan to dismantle. Or, they are working on very low-band internet-of-things (IoT) networks that are complicated and expensive to set up. There is a slow but sure transition underway. Nationally, according to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) figures, 75 percent of farms reported having access to the internet, with 73 percent of farms having access to a desktop or laptop computer, led by Idaho, California, Oregon, Washington and Wyoming.

The Terrametrics Agriculture Company, based in Lawrence, Kansas, offers a platform that combines sensor data, weather forecasts, satellite images, and drone images using a machine learning algorithm to detect changes in soil and microclimate.

Farms that used a desktop or laptop computer to conduct farm business was up just 1 percent from 2017. Yet over half of the farms in the U.S. used a smart phone or tablet to conduct farm business, compared to 44 percent in 2017. In 2019, 26 percent of farms used satellite systems for GPS tracking, and 22 percent of farms used a Digital Subscriber Line (DSL) to access the internet. Since 2017, satellite and DSL continue to be the most popular choices that U. S. farms use to access the internet. There are three key ways in which satellites can support farmers to make efficient, sustainable choices: mapping, or understanding how large areas of land are used for different types of agriculture; measuring, or plugging satellite data into complex algorithms to provide measurements on a range of properties, such as yield and crop growth stage; and monitoring, where over time, images enable scientists and farmers to see how land use has developed, or spot changes in rainfall and drought patterns.

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INNOVATIONS & STRATEGIES

AGRIBUSINESS digitalization and connectivity become a strategic issue. “Thus, while the first Industrial Revolution led to machines replacing ‘muscles’ the new Digital Revolution is leading to machines replacing ‘brains and souls’, and it may eventually end family farming as we know it,” As the technology progresses, equipment will ultimately be able to tailor decisions on a yard-by-yard basis. Robots can already do much of the harvesting of lettuce and tomatoes in greenhouses. In the dairy industry, robotic milking and computer-controlled feeding equipment allow for the careful management of individual animals within a herd. And there is a similar dramatic technological revolution happening with the genetics of plants and animals, making it much easier to identify individual plants and animals that are particularly robust or productive and less dependent on nature. This dramatic technological shift has inspired a related and similarly significant trend towards globalization of trade, creating a rise in the global demand for farm products.. which has created strong incentives for further technology adoption in pursuit of productivity. All this new productivity is dependent on a workforce that is able to adapt from sometimes centuries-old methods of farming.

The economic picture of agribusiness today

Readying the nighttime surveilannce of migrating moths, using satellite assistanc to measure winds that affect moth mobility.

A developing skillset is needed Recent evidence from the digitalization in agriculture suggests that new technologies require developing capabilities in abstract and analytical skills substituting skills in routine tasks, according to a research article by the Lincoln International Business School,

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“A vision of the farming sector’s future: What is in there for farmers in the time of the Second Machine Age?” This is not the end game for farmers, according to the article, as new partnerships between technology providers and agribusiness players emerge while

There were over 10,000 fewer farms in the U.S. from 2017 to 2019. Total land in farms, at 897,400,000 acres, decreased 2,100,000 acres from 2017 to 2018. But the average farm size continued to increase in 2019 as the number of farms declined. Arizona, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, South Dakota all had the largest sized farm (at least 1,000 acres). But agriculture economists with the American Farm Bureau Federation are still trying to get a handle on what exactly is going on. It’s not been easy over the last few years, given the effects of the pandemic on all agricultural businesses (and the supply chain that they use to get to market). One head-scratcher: Nominal net farm income in 2020 was nearly $120 billion, up 43 percent from 2019 and the second-highest of


are also expected up 2 percent, or $329 million, from $15.9 billion to $16.2 billion. Solutions to bettering farm economics are cropping up. For example, as the ag-tech space heats up, an increasing number of small tech start-ups are launching products such as FarmLogs, an app that helps manage day-to-day operations with real-time field condition data; 640 Labs, a precision farming platform that collects, analyzes and distributes data to help optimize farming operations; and Climate Corporation, examining weather, soil and field data to help farmers determine potential yield-limiting factors in their fields.

How the sector can hold on and reinvent itself Cotton harvesting in Texas.

all time. Yet, farm cash receipts from crop and livestock sales are down $3 billion and the lowest since 2016. The USDA’s most recent Farm Sector Income Forecast, released February 4, anticipates a slight decline in net farm income for 2022. U.S. net farm income is currently forecasted at $113.7 billion for 2022, down 4.5 percent, or $5.4 billion, from 2021’s $119.1 billion.

What accounts for the decline? A significant portion of the decline in net farm income is linked to an expected dramatic decrease in federal support to producers who are now expecting much less pandemic-related disaster assistance. Economists at the American Farm Bureau Federation report that direct government payments are forecast to decrease by $15.5 billion, or 57 percent, between 2021 and 2022. The decrease corresponds to reductions in both USDA pandemic assistance, which includes payments from the Coronavirus Food Assistance Programs, and non-USDA pandemic assistance programs, such as funds from the Small Business Administration’s Paycheck Protection Program. From 2021 to 2022, federal payments through USDA’s pandemic assistance initiatives are expected to drop $4.4 billion, from $7.8 billion to $3.4 billion, or 56 percent, and non-USDA pandemic assistance is expected to disappear completely. In addition to the reduced pandemic-related payments, the USDA’s Market Facilitation Program, which provided a series of direct payments to farmers and ranchers impacted by trade retaliation, ended in 2021 and will not be part of net farm income going forward. Other reasons that ag businesses are struggling is production expenses, which are forecast to increase by $20.1 billion this year, or 5.1 percent, reaching $411.6 billion in 2022, the highest production costs farmers have ever faced. This includes increases in costs like cumulative feed, which is expected to increase nearly $4 billion, or 6.1 percent, to $68.9 billion. Fertilizer, lime and soil conditioner costs are expected to increase $3.4 billion, or 12 percent, from $28.5 billion to $31.9 billion. Increased production costs in the manufactured inputs category in 2021 include pesticides, which are expected up $308 million, or 2 percent, from $16.9 billion to $17.2 billion; and fuels and oils, which

The new and accessible technologies are helping to better understand and essentially manage nature for first time in history of farming. Productivity will get better, but it also means that there will be a fundamental organizational change away from family control of agricultural production towards more corporate farms. The generations of know-how that farmers have about the local weather and soil conditions is now coming out of those minds, and being transformed into data banks for use by new intelligent technologies. Weaving in more new intelligent technologies within the farm life is an awesome goal. The National Agricultural Statistics Service’s Census of Agriculture reported that family farms account for almost 96 percent of the 2,204,792 farms in the U.S. Creating better synergies between those farms to better use technologies such as drones and crop monitoring via satellites—and building in all that data from the experiences and methodologies of farmers—will take time.

The clock is ticking An estimated 70 percent of U.S. farmland will change hands in the next 20 years, according to the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, but many family operations do not have a next generation skilled in or willing to continue farming. That farm built on generations of a family could go out of business quickly unless they embrace the competitive advantages of agri-technology today. That is the challenge for the survival of the family farm. There is a lot at stake. But there are new tools and resources available and ready to help. “We’re finding that digital tools like artificial intelligence, satellite imaging, smartphones, and other modern technologies, will intrigue youth anywhere in the world,” Trevor Nicholls, CEO of the Centre for Agriculture and Bioscience International (CABI), a nonprofit intergovernmental development and information organization focusing primarily on agricultural and environmental issues in the developing world. “These (digital tools) will hopefully have an impact on bringing more youth back into farming, as they start to see it as technologically enabled rather than straightforward muscle power. “I’m very optimistic for family farmers. They are incredibly resilient and resourceful people, and they survive and thrive in pretty difficult circumstances. But the world is getting more challenging for them by the day,” Nicholls said.. X

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INDUSTRY

FOOD AND BEVERAGE

INSIGHT

Industrial human machine interface features an aseptic washdown design in a fully sealed and stainless steel enclosure that has corrosion and chemical resistant surface with beveled edges that are dust proof and water tight.

The food and beverage industry is making a strong comeback BY D AVI D HO D E S

New ideas in consumer preferences and unique product marketing drive a quickening pace of development

T

he food and beverage industry has been taking some serious economic hits over the last year. For example, Pepsico’s net income for the second quarter announced July 12 was down almost a billion dollars from the same time last year. ........................................................................................................... Tracking earnings and revenue for the food and beverage industry is tricky when the effects of the pandemic are factored in. There are many subsectors to consider. For example, companies that served the food service industry took some significant earnings hits in 2020. The revenue of one the biggest, Aramark, took a dive in 2021 to its lowest level since 2008. But the U.S. healthcare/hospital food services subsector, featuring companies such as the Culinary Services Group, Metz Culinary Management, AVI Foodsystems, Inc. among others, is projected to reach $22.8 billion by 2026, up from $13.2 billion in 2021.

Most of the bigger food and beverage companies are doing alright today. Tyson, one of the world’s largest food companies with brands including Jimmy Dean, Hillshire Farm, Ball Park, Wright, Aidells, ibp and State Fair, had a net income of $1.95 billion for the first half of 2022, more than double the $928 million from the same period last year. The company is hoping to boost their productivity and help their bottom line, in part by launching a productivity program earlier this year designed to drive a better, faster

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and more agile organization supported by a culture of continuous improvement and faster decision making. The company is targeting $1 billion in productivity savings by the end of fiscal 2024, and more than $400 million in fiscal 2022. To meet their goals, Tyson management expects to realize capital expenditures of approximately $2 billion for fiscal 2022. Capital expenditures include spending for capacity expansion and utilization, plus automation to alleviate labor challenges and brand and product innovation, according to a company press release. The company will increasingly use machines instead of people to debone chicken, one of its most labor-intensive jobs and a position with high turnover.

The persistent problem: Supply chain While the food and beverage industry continues to crank out new products and updates their manufacturing processes, there is still a nagging problem created by the pandemic. According to the 2022 food and beverage industry outlook as presented by “Food Processing” magazine, an industry trade publication, the supply chain is stressed all through its length, from the container ships waiting offshore because they can’t be unloaded (an issue that is now substantially over), to the processed

food that can’t be stored or shipped. General Mills has experienced 500 to 600 supply chain disruptions a month over the last year, compared with 50 in a normal month. Long-haul truckers are in short supply across the U.S., contributing to supply-chain problems. In 2021, supply chain disruptions cost the world an average of $184 million, with the U.S. topping the list with an average cost of $228 million, according to a logistics report. The situation has gotten so bad that in late November, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) ordered food and beverage makers including Tyson Foods, Kraft Heinz, Associated Wholesale Grocers, WalMart and others to detail the primary factors disrupting their ability to obtain, transport and distribute their products; the impact these disruptions are having in terms of delayed and canceled orders, increased costs and prices; the products, suppliers and inputs most affected; the steps the companies are taking to alleviate disruptions; and how they allocate products among their stores when they are in short supply. The FTC also is requiring the companies to provide internal documents regarding the supply chain disruptions, including strategies related to supply chains; pricing; marketing and promotions; costs, profit margins and sales volumes; selection of suppliers and brands; and market shares. bxjmag.com

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INDUSTRY

FOOD AND BEVERAGE

INSIGHT

The Delight cream product at the Danone NA plant in Crawford, Virginia. Virginia’s food and beverage processing industry employs more than 42,000 people, accounts for over 17% of Virginia’s total manufacturing employment.

Other disruptive issues

Automation still lags

But it’s not just supply chain. Food and beverage manufacturers and distributors need to stay focused on greater flexibility and agility to respond quickly, whether that is responding to changing customer expectations, government regulations, or fluctuations in the marketplace resulting from seasonal changes in eating and drinking patterns. Companies have to increase the speed or decrease the lag time between when their products are made and when they are sold. Another challenge to the industry is workforce. For example, as of October 2021, more than 130,000 consumer packaged goods jobs remained open, partly because manufacturing is just not seen as a primary career choice among a potential younger workforce. During the pandemic, many food manufacturers accelerated their plans to automate some of the manufacturing processes to make up for missing workforce—and found that they liked it. Going forward, food manufacturers will bank more and more on automation to help them get to one of their main priorities: Productivity.

Managers responding to a survey by Packaging Machinery Manufacturers Institute (PMMI) noted that there are many automation solutions that are run as closed systems, meaning that end users are dependent on the supplier for technical support. Much of the current automation machinery is designed to do only one thing, and isn’t flexible enough to meet changing customer needs, according to survey respondents. E-commerce innovation in package design, and the need to make packaging more eco-friendly, is driving that needed flexibility. Better communication, or even new partnerships between manufacturing operations and the equipment makers, is a solution offered by respondents. Another solution could be forming a sort of “machinery-as-aservice” option to help smaller companies deal with their automation needs on an issue by issue basis for their small scale production needs.

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Yet.. steady growth continues In the first seven months of 2021, construction activity in the manufacturing sector was up 40 percent over 2020, according to


North Carolina’s southeast region is 2nd in the U.S. in food manufacturing and processing, with 26,000+ employed in food processing. Dodge Data & Analytics, a construction projects tracker, with food and beverage being one of the three most active business areas in industrial construction right now. Food Dive, a company tracking news and trends in the food industry, reported seven food and beverage facilities either completed or announced in both Missouri (including two Swift Prepared Foods facilities in Columbia and Moberly) and California; and 11 in Texas (including Frito Lay in Rosenberg and Tyson in Seguin). Other projects announced in late 2021 include a $350 million investment by Platinum Crush for a new soybean crushing plant in Buena Vista County near Alta, Iowa. The plant will be built adjacent to the CN Railway, and is expected to be fully operational by March, 2024. Koch Foods poultry processing company, the largest employer in Fairfield, Ohio, is planning to invest $220 million for a 400,000 square foot expansion on an 18 acre parcel which will include equipment upgrades on their processing facility. The company also estimates investment of $80 million in new machinery and equipment for the first phase of the project. Koch hopes to add a third, fourth, and/or fifth production line during the second phase of the project. Completion of the second phase is anticipated by or before late 2027. And Saline River Farms, LLC, a meat processing company, is planning to invest $87 million for the construction of an 83,000 square foot processing facility at Creal Springs, Illinois. They have recently received approval for the project.

The future Richard Worzel, a chartered financial analyst, futurist, and strategic planner who has worked with Coca Cola and Proctor and Gamble, among other large multinational corporation, outlined some of the major drivers of change that are going to affect customers and the grocery industry in tomorrow’s world. One of those drivers is that food competes for “ground space.” Farmers who traditionally have made their money from the ‘three f’s’(food, feed, and fiber), now have three additional f’s to deal with: fuel, industrial feedstocks, and farmaceuticals.

Another driver: Rapidly rising food prices. The rise of the middle class in rapidly developing countries, like China and India, mean that many more people are eating many more calories per day. The result is a multiplication in the demand for food—and for more resource-intensive foods like meat and dairy products. The result, when combined with the competition for ground space, will be persistent increases in food prices. A third driver: Assassin marketing. People have moved from a ‘push’ model of advertising based on cost-per-thousand advertising, to a ‘pull’ model based on the rise of social media. But the changes in marketing and advertising are nowhere near finished, according to Worzel. “As more is learned about the behavior of more consumers, and as the food and beverage industry figures out how they want to be served, then specific interests can be addressed in ways that have never been possible before.” In a presentation he gave to a joint conference on the futures of farming and alternative fuels, Worzel said that the 21st century will come to be known as the Bioscience Century, when the promise of genetics, coupled with the use of computers to perform research, will transform what we do and how we do it. “Farming for industrial feedstocks and materials will become big business because it will be both more environmentally friendly, and more cost effective than traditional manufacturing,” he said. “Agribusiness will fill the plains and prairies with plants producing feedstock for plastics and monofilaments and nanotech materials for manufacturing, livestock for pharmaceuticals and vaccines, and ethanol for both car gas tanks and hydrogen production on a rapidly expanding scale. Traditional products, especially those made from petroleum feedstocks (such as seat foam and resin panels for cars from soybeans, or injection molded plastics using flax fibers for reinforcement instead of non-biodegradable fiberglass), will increasingly be made from bio-based products instead.” Worzel said that there are great opportunities ahead in farming, both in alternative fuels, and agriculture generally—but only if farmers capitalize on them. “Alan Kay, one of the great technological visionaries of our time, once said that ‘the best way to predict the future is to invent it.’” X bxjmag.com

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ECONOMIC

SPOTLIGHT

TOURISM

The number of recreational visitors to the Grand Canyon National Park (GCNP) in the U.S. reached a total of 4.53 million in 2021, a recovery compared to the 2020 value of 2.9 million visitors.

As the pandemic (hopefully) subsides, tourism companies welcome a steady surge in business BY: DAVI D HO D E S

It’s been a long 2-plus years downturn, but tourism is showing strong signs of a comeback

T

he biggest economic development news about tourism is the end of the pandemic—hopefully. Even as another variant appears to be taking over, there is a growing sense that the worst is over and now it’s time to rebuild many things, especially tourism and the tourism-related infrastructure that provides so much of the economic power to countries around the world. .......................................................................................................

“People have been cooped up for a couple of years and they’re ready to go traveling,” Doug Lansky, destination advisor and tourism expert, told BXJ. “The 22 |

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stock market somehow has managed to survive the pandemic

tourism represents one-third to one-half of their country’s GDP.

The Golden Gate bridge leading into San Francisco. The World Travel and Tourism Council (WTTC) reported that the North America Travel and Tourism sector is projected to grow at an average annual rate of 3.9 percent over the next decade to $3 trillion..

in great form, considering what’s been happening. And the wealthy especially managed to stockpile some money while they weren’t traveling. They are up and ready to go.” According to the figures from the United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO), international tourism saw a 182 percent year-on-year increase in January-March 2022, with destinations worldwide bringing in an estimated 117 million international arrivals compared to 41 million in the first quarter of 2021. Of the extra 76 million international arrivals for the first three months, about 47 million were recorded in March, showing that the recovery is gathering steam. According to data from the World Bank, in 2020, the U.S. tourism industry generated $84.2 billion, followed by France ($35.96 billion) then Australia ($26.23 billion). For some smaller countries (Maldives, Barbados, Seychelles, Grenada, Palau),

Leading the comeback UNWTO data shows that during the first quarter of 2022, Europe welcomed almost four times as many international arrivals (+280 percent) as in Q1 of 2021, with results driven by strong intra-regional demand. In the Americas, arrivals more than doubled (+117 percent) in the same three months. However, arrivals in Europe and the Americas were still 43 percent and 46 percent below 2019 levels respectively. Although international tourism remains 61 percent below 2019 levels—some countries such as Australia, Vietnam and Japan just opened earlier this year—the gradual recovery is expected to continue throughout 2022, as more destinations ease or lift travel restrictions and pent-up demand is unleashed. As of June 2, 45 destinations (of which 31 are in Europe) had

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ECONOMIC

SPOTLIGHT

TOURISM

Dallas skyline. According to the World Travel and Tourism Council in June, 2022, the U.S. travel and tourism sector is projected to contribute over $2.6 billion in gross domestic product to the U.S. economy over the next decade.

no pandemic related restrictions in place. In Asia, an increasing number of destinations have started to ease those restrictions. Travel and tourism was the fastest-growing sector in the world in 2018, before the pandemic, expanding by 3.9 percent, ahead of automotive manufacturing (3.7 percent) and health (3.3 percent), and at a rate higher than that of the global economy for the eighth consecutive year, according to World Travel and Tourism Council. But the latest issue of the UNWTO Tourism Barometer also shows that $1 trillion was lost in export revenues from international tourism in 2021, adding to the $1 trillion lost in the first year of the pandemic. Total export revenues from tourism (including passenger transport receipts) reached an estimated $713 billion in 2021, a 4 percent increase in real terms from 2020, but still 61 percent below 2019 levels. International tourism receipts reached $602 billion, also 4 percent higher in real terms than in 2020. Europe and the

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Middle East recorded the best results, with earnings climbing to about 50 percent of pre-pandemic levels in both regions. The amount being spent per trip is on the rise—from an average $1,000 in 2019 to $1,400 in 2021.

Tourism’s economic development Tourism has become the world’s third-largest export industry after fuels and chemicals, and ahead of food and automotive products, according to an article in “Future Business Journal.” From the last few years, there has been a great surge in international tourism, culminated to 7 percent share of the world’s total exports in 2016. The importance of inbound tourism has grown exponentially over the last few years, according to the article, because of its growing contribution to the economic growth in the long run. The article also finds that tourism enhances economic


growth by augmenting the foreign exchange reserves; stimulating investments in new infrastructure, human capital and increased competition; promoting industrial development; and creating jobs. The World Health Organization is taking steps to identify new health threats that affect various (mostly smaller) countries hit hardest by the pandemic, and working to combat the economic woes it creates. They adopted the “Montenegro Statement,” which recognizes that health and tourism are deeply interconnected in the globalized world, and supports the creation of a coalition of partners on health and tourism. Another economic growth theory is the tourism growth hypothesis that states that expansion of international tourism activities exerts economic growth, offering a theoretical and empirical link between inbound tourism and economic growth. This hypothesis works under the assumption that economic growth can be generated not only by increasing the amount of labor and capital within the economy, but also by expanding exports. This “new growth theory” suggests that export expansion can trigger economic growth, because it promotes specialization and raises productivity by increasing competition, creating positive externalities by advancing the dispersal of specialized information and abilities. There is also a general belief of two schools of thought: tourism leads trade, and trade leads tourism. The result reveals that international tourism growth and financial development positively affects economic growth both in the long run and short run.

Staffing an ongoing issue There are over 15,000 leisure and hospitality workers in the U.S. as of June, 2022, according to the Department of Labor, earning on average about $20/hour. But it’s finding and retaining staff that is still the problem in workforce, Lansky said. “It’s just been a question of staffing,” he said. “Alot of people weren’t dying to start working in the service industry again. So airlines particularly haven’t been able to run at full capacity. But the demand certainly seems to be well on track to being back online, if it’s not already at 100 percent.” A Deloitte travel outlook report published in 2022 found that, as of October 2021, there were 300,000 fewer workers in the hotel industry than two years prior. Hospitality CEOs have acknowledged they have struggled to staff up, and airlines also face challenges filling their needs for pilots and mechanics. Boeing’s 2021 Pilot and Technician Outlook, for example, expressed concern that many furloughed airline workers may have left the industry. The report projects big hiring needs in commercial aviation over the next 20 years: 612,000 new pilots, 626,000 new maintenance technicians and 886,000 new cabin crew members.

The new normal in tourism The new normal in tourism is developing now, leading to not just better ways of booking and organizing travel but actually helping change lifestyles while forcing businesses to pivot. Lansky gave one example about people he met in Bermuda who were renting beach shares to cruise ship tourists for the day. “I asked them how they were doing. And they said, ‘Well, actually, we pivoted and started doing live events and selling drinks in the evening for locals. And we’re doing quite well.’ I was like, wow, that’s quite a shift.” Lansky sees one of the big differences in travel before and after pandemic in that people have gotten better at booking online. “The other thing, which I think maybe even a bigger trend that is going to come out of it getting back to normal travel, is that people got pretty comfortable working not just from home but even going to some cabin and working from there. They are working from some other remote place and realize they can be a bit of a nomad if their employer allows it. “We’re gonna see a big uptick, I think, in the global nomad community, where it’s not just the daring, late 20s or 30-somethings, but it’s going to be people with small kids, families, and other professionals that are going to just go hey, I can go to Spain for two months and work from there.”

Next? Clearly the world of travel and leisure is still not back to where it used to be. Most industry watchers say give it another two years or so to sort out workforce issues and convince an anxious public with funds to travel to do what they want to do. But there are other, less obvious issues. “My biggest disappointment with all of this,” Lansky said, “is that, a few months after the pandemic started, Finland had successfully tested the same dogs that can detect bombs or drugs in your luggage to be able to detect cancer. They had retrained them to test for Covid, and they were as accurate as a PCR, just plus or minus a few percentages. He gave an example of what this means: “If any country loses a battle or loses a war, they don’t say, well, we’ll never fight again. Let’s just not have a military. But the second the war’s over, they start rebuilding and preparing for the next eventualities. But we keep thinking, ‘Oh, this wave will end and then we’ll be fine.’ And: ‘We’ll never have another virus again.’ But it’s extremely cheap and easy to train up these dogs. Then the question is, why did that never go mainstream? We could put a trained dog searching for Covid in front of everything, and keep not just travel but all of society open because the dog can detect. We have the technology, we know how to do it. It’s not crazy expensive. We’re just not doing it.” X bxjmag.com

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EXPANSION

OPPORTUNITIES

NEW BRUNSWICK, CANADA:

WHERE BUSINESS MEETS OPPORTUNITY

B

usinesses in established and emerging sectors are waking up to New Brunswick’s competitive advantages. From digital health to cybersecurity to advanced manufacturing, this province’s location, infrastructure, research capacity, and talent pipeline are attracting a critical mass of businesses in key sectors.

......................................................................................... New Brunswick offers a skilled, bilingual (1 in 3 speak both English and French) talent pool, with 15 universities in the region producing over 15,000 graduates each year. The average job tenure is double the U.S. average. New Brunswick’s post-secondary institutions work closely with groups like The Research and Productivity Council (RPC), government, and industry to drive innovation at companies across the province. New Brunswick is home to Research Chairs in energy, agriculture, aquaculture, cannabis, and more. These chairs largely 26 |

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align with either one of the province’s primary sectors or one of those sectors’ supply chains. New Brunswick offers a modern multi-modal logistics hub, ideally situated to capitalize on world markets via an accessible, uncongested, and integrated system of efficiently run highways, ports, railways, and airports. Their telecommunication infrastructure offers you a vast fiber optic network reaching every corner of the province. All that combined with their time zone advantage and proximity to major markets make it easy to support global operations and serve clients in Europe and both the North American Eastern and Pacific Seaboards in the same business day. Some of New Brunswick sectors include Advanced Manufacturing, Agribusiness, Cybersecurity, Energy, and Information Technology. Their manufacturing sector has a world-class reputation. Their companies leverage state-of-the-art technologies and processes in the aerospace, defense, forestry, mining, marine, and oil & gas industries. Agribusiness is one of New Brunswick’s largest traditional


STRATEGICALLY LOCATED

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LEVEL II SECURITY ENABLED REDUNDANT & DIVERSIFIED

135 SQ FT WITH 365 OPERATIONS ADVANCED FIBER FACILITY

KnowledgePark.ca THE FASTEST GROWING HIGH-TECH CLUSTER IN EASTERN CANADA


EXPANSION

OPPORTUNITIES

industries. In Cybersecurity, New Brunswick is actively supporting the development of a world-class cybersecurity hub with a strong talent pipeline. New Brunswick’s safe and nimble ecosystem creates the perfect environment for the development of digital health technology to improve healthcare coast to coast. Energy innovation has become a global center of excellence in this sector due to a unique structure that goes from generator to consumer. New Brunswick’s vibrant Information Technology sector is varied, with strengths in geomatics, ocean tech, digital health, SaaS, and telecommunications. Opportunities New Brunswick connects local and worldwide businesses in traditional and emerging industries to the incredible advantages that this province has to offer. With their provincial, federal, and community partners, they are transforming New Brunswick into an entrepreneurial hub and a global destination for growth-focused enterprises. By connecting business to opportunity, they are driving economic growth and job creation, supporting innovation, and helping the next generation of business leaders realize their true potential. For more information, please contact Opportunities New Brunswick at 506-453-5471, toll-free at 855-746-4662, email at info@ onbcanada.ca or visit their website at www.onbcanada.ca

NEW BRUNSWICK, CANADA: Fredericton

“Fredericton has a bias for ‘yes’ when it comes to innovation,” says the energetic Larry Shaw, CEO of Ignite and Knowledge Park.

.........................................................................................

Recently named as one of the world’s Top7 Intelligent Communities by the Intelligent Communities Forum (ICF) for 2020 and ranked in the Smart21 Communities of the year for the past three years running, Fredericton is a city that encourages creativity, invention, adaptability, incubation and the export of technological goods and services at an impressive pace of more than $1 billion in start-up exits in the past decade alone. Building upon this notable win, Fredericton’s cyber ecosystem is helping to ensure that New Brunswick is poised to be recognized as the most innovative & collaborative cybersecurity ecosystem in Canada by 2030. Fredericton is at the heart of this ecosystem, offering state of the art facilities, investment and mentorship opportunities alongside established cybersecurity companies that are flourishing and growing in our resource-rich environment. 28 |

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Known to be a diverse and livable city, Fredericton offers 135+ parks and over 900 hectares of green space, affordable living, proximity

(20 minutes) to our international airport and boasts one of the highest immigration rates in Canada. On June 30th, 2022, Resonance Consultancy, a leading advisor in tourism, real estate and economic development, ranked Fredericton as one of the Top 10 Best Small Cities in Canada, describing us as “a small but mighty economic powerhouse [that] belies its historic provincial capital reputation”. With 4 Universities and 7 colleges offering six K-12 cybersecurity programs, eight post-secondary cybersecurity programs and five computer science programs, Fredericton can offer a skilled futureready workforce to support the investments being made in ICT-related fields. As a major learning hub for New Brunswick, Fredericton is also home to 70 per cent of the province’s knowledge-based industries, it’s a place that fDI magazine recognizes as the “#1 Micro-City in North America. The cybersecurity sector currently employs over 700 people in Fredericton, with $55 million in direct payroll. Knowledge Park’s Cyber Centre is a $37 million facility with 135,000 square feet of space that comes online as Canada’s first privately-owned, purpose-built digital/ cybersecurity infrastructure building. Co-located in Knowledge Park is Planet Hatch, an entrepreneurship centre whose mission is to develop globally competitive entrepreneurs and start-ups. It focuses on business model, business strategy, customer acquisition and markets. It supports founders through two funding avenues, five accelerators, events, facilities (including a co-working space) mentorship and coaching. The city’s growing cluster of cybersecurity companies—and institutions like the University of New Brunswick (UNB), which hosts a Canada Research Chair in Cybersecurity and the Canadian Institute for Cybersecurity (CIC), and the NB Power Cybersecurity Research Chair—works alongside other innovators to safeguard some of the world’s most critical infrastructure. The cluster contains Knowledge Park, the Cyber Centre, the University of New Brunswick and the CIC which are all enablers to the future success of participating and future organizations ready to make Fredericton their home. “There is no perfect economic development model. After all, economic development is more like a marathon, rather than a sprint. We must play to our strengths by investing in the sectors that we can lead and build upon our inherent advantages. We can build competitive advantage by leaning into opportunities that leverage our unique values and maximize our key assets. By doing this, we can access and create opportunities that are well beyond the scope of any one region, city, or community in the province.” says Larry Shaw, CEO of Ignite and Knowledge Park.


For Fredericton, clustering knowledge sector organizations, researchers, and entrepreneurs are what enables inventive, productive and often constructive disruptions to take place, thus driving innovation. Ignite can provide you and your team with the information and access to networks you need for a successful expansion into New Brunswick. Whether it be in Cyber Centre or withing the greater capital region, we can help!

NEW BRUNSWICK, CANADA: Dieppe Connecting Opportunities

......................................................................................... With a population of over 28 000, Dieppe, New Brunswick is the largest Francophone city outside of Quebec. In less than 30 years, the City of Dieppe’s population has more than quadrupled. There are more than 1200 businesses with a diversified economic base in Dieppe. The main sectors are : • Manufacturing • Support Services Sector • Retail & Service Sector • Transport & Logistics The Dieppe Industrial Park includes more than 300 companies that employ more than 5 000 people and it houses the

Romeo-LeBlanc International Airport. Dieppe is targeting sectors like advanced manufacturing, technology-based companies, transportation & logistics, retail and digital health.

Quality of life • • • • • • • •

• • •

Most Affordable Real Estate in Canada Best Small City Health Care in Canada Warm water beaches & sailing 20 minutes from Moncton. Low crime rate: Safest large size community in Atlantic Canada Best retail shopping environment in Atlantic Canada One hour drive from two fabulous National Parks Seven of NB’s top 16 tourism attractions are in our region Home of the largest multi-function outdoor stadium in Atlantic Canada, having hosted the International Track & Field competitions, CFL Games and FIFA Football (soccer) Considered Atlantic Canada’s Entertainment Hub Several parks and green spaces and more than 55 kilometers of trails and bicycle paths Selected the most connected city in Canada, according to PC Magazine, (Digital Edition, February 2021)

Makeup of workforce • •

The City of Dieppe has a young population (median age of 39.5 vs 46.1 in NB and 41.1 in the rest of Canada) In Dieppe, the median estimated household income ($76,432

DÉMARRER CROÎTRE INVESTIR

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Faites affaires à Dieppe !

Dieppe, business done right!

506.877.7847 expansiondieppe.ca

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EXPANSION

OPPORTUNITIES

in Dieppe compared to $60,717 in NB and $70,072 in the rest of Canada) Languages : 73,9 % speak both official languages

Education and training opportunities for workforce • •

There are 10 Education Institutions in the region, among which, CCNB has a campus in Dieppe Working NB, ACOA

There are many recreational activities all year round: • Aquatic and Sports Centre • Multi-purpose facility UNIplex and other arenas and skating rinks with 2 NHL size ice surfaces. • Downtown Dieppe Outdoor Skating Oval, open from December to March, this refrigerated skating oval is available even in mild weather. • Art and Culture Centre : Art gallery, performance hall, dance studios, music studios, outdoor stage • MusiquART site : venue for outdoor events and festivals, can accommodate crowds up to 20 000 people. The site will be hosting the YQM Country Fest this coming August 26&27 • Dieppe Market : Local producers, artisans, open all year round. • 70 km of walking trails and bike paths with network connecting with those of neighboring communities of Moncton and Riverview. • Parks (St-Anselme, Dover, Rotary), walking and cycling trails, sports fields • Fox Creek Golf Club, run by top PGA of Canada professionals

Modes of transportation to move goods

Highways and related services • Arterial Routes : Trans-Canada Hwy 2, 11,15, and 16

Airports and related services • Airport System : Roméo-LeBlanc International Airport (Dieppe) • Air cargo accounts for more than 40% of the world’s trade in terms of value. Roméo-LeBlanc International Airport has emerge as a gateway for air cargo activity in Atlantic Canada. Railways and Related services • Freight and passenger railways are an important component of a multimodal system. • There are two provincial regulated shortline freight operations in New Brunswick : o The East Coast Railway connects with CN mainline at Moncton and provides rail service to Quebec and to all of Canada. o The New Brunswick Southern Railway operations rail service between Saint John and Maine with connections to Central Canada and the New England states • Via Rail provides passenger service six days a week from Halifax through Sackville, Moncton, Miramichi, Bathurst and Campbellton before going on to Montreal. BXJ

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Ports and Ferries • Canada Ports Authorities : Saint John and Belldune • Regional / Local Ports : Bayside, Dalhousie and Miramichi

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The City of Dieppe is the 4th largest city in the Province of New Brunswick. Property taxes in Dieppe are below the provincial and national averages Dieppe City boundaries have expanded 7 years ago, Est of Highway 2, towards Shediac. They will expand again in 2023.

Expansion Dieppe is the organization responsible for the economic development of the City of Dieppe and its industrial park. Its mission is to ensure the timely and efficient development of the City by acting as a source of key information, seeking to build partnerships, and brokering real estate projects and investments through advice, expertise, support and strategic site data. You have a project in mind? Contact Expansion Dieppe at 506.877.7847 or expansiondieppe@dieppe.ca

NEW BRUNSWICK, CANADA: Chaleur

The Chaleur Region: Business & Leisure Happen in Tandem

......................................................................................... The Chaleur Region continues to show itself as an adaptable and resilient region. Located in northeastern New Brunswick, the Chaleur Region is a diverse collection of coastal towns located at the most southernmost tip of the Baie des Chaleurs and the confluence of dynamic rivers with easy access to countless warm beaches and adventure-ready forests including some of the best hiking trails on the east coast. In the winter, the region offers a sweet spot for snowmobilers that connects to 8000 km of managed snowmobile trails as a NB sledder’s paradise. Here you will fall in love with the quality of live, warm hospitality, fresh seafood, burgeoning microbrewery industry, multicultural entertainment, great restaurants, various festivals, and friendly people at every turn. The lifestyle consists of an appreciation of nature, adventure and a cadence to life that is in stark contrast with urban Canada – a precious and increasingly rare location that celebrates every day and every background. The CRS’s Economic Development and Tourism is the lead economic development office for the Chaleur Region. Funded by municipalities, the focus is on promoting the distinct advantages that this region proudly offers businesses and residents. With one-on-one services, we coordinate and support economic development initiatives. We work to maintain a commercially attractive environment, foster new business creation, help ensure that established firms remain and grow here, and work to attract growing businesses to the Chaleur Region. The Chaleur Region has all the components and availability of infrastructure to support a wide range of industries including large manufacturing industries and key industries in energy, forestry, mining,


and seafood production, agriculture, and fisheries. The City of Bathurst is a hub for tourism, trade, and services and the Port of Belledune has a proud history of bringing prosperity to northern New Brunswick, while adapting to the needs of the global industry. The Port of Belledune is eastern Canada’s point of entry and is ideally suited for trans-shipment, bulk storage, warehousing, marshalling, and ensuring the integrity of cargo. Offering some of the shortest routes between Europe and North America the Port of Belledune is an ideal Atlantic Gateway to North America and a link in the St. Lawrence Seaway system. The deep-water port is expanding its existing capacity while seeking out clean energy projects with the potential to kick-off a green economic transition for the north. Air access is available locally through the Bathurst Regional Airport (ZBF) in addition to the Moncton and Fredericton International Airports located within a 2.5-hour drive. The Chaleur Region is home to the Bathurst Regional Airport with direct commercial flights to Montreal and offers a modern infrastructure that can provide quick access to major centers across Canada and the world. The Charlo Airport is a general aviation and fixed based operator handling flights from small general aviation to corporate jets and 737 aircraft as well as landing and take-off capability for cargo service aircraft. The transportation and logistical infrastructures provide the tangible and intangible support necessary for the movement of goods. Tangible assets include the highway, a deep-water port, rail, and utilities. Additional tangible support comes from fright carriers, customs pre-clearance programs, communications networks, and government funding. The region has three main routes that connect it to other cities in Atlantic Canada. NB 11 provides access to Montreal and NB Highway 2 to the United States. If you are driving an electric vehicle, the Chaleur Region has convenient EV stations available as part of NB Power’s eCharge Network. VIA Rail ’s the Ocean train hubs into the Montreal station while CN Rail is the main server for the companies out of the Chaleur Region. CN is a true supply chain enabler and provides extensive reach into North American markets, offering reliable service and competitive transit times. The main train station is conveniently located adjacent to the Bathurst downtown area, where you will find great amenities. Founded in the early 1970s, the Collège communautaire du Nouveau-Brunswick (CCNB) offers approximately eighty-five professional and technical training programs to all Francophone and Acadian communities in the province. In 2005, it entered a major pan-Canadian initiative aimed at developing applied research capacity in Canadian colleges, with a view to better assist and help innovate small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Engineers / scientists / technicians were divided into three divisions with Advanced Manufacturing located in Bathurst. The Office of Economic Development and Tourism works to advance economic opportunities across the Chaleur area. Through collaboration with local business leaders, educational institutions, and municipal governments, we help elevate the Chaleur area through coordinated and supportive economic development initiatives For more information on the opportunities in the Chaleur Region, please contact the Chaleur RSC’s Office of Economic Development and Tourism at 506-542-2688 Ext 109, email Shirley.desilva@CSRchaleurrs. ca or website at www.csrchaleurrsc.ca . X bxjmag.com

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MARYLAND:

INNOVATION AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP

M

uch of Maryland’s success is driven by its supportive, business-friendly climate and strength in innovation and entrepreneurship. The state has adopted an “Open for Business” attitude which means improving its perception, providing better customer service, and working hard to help existing companies grow and add jobs as well as attracting new companies to the state.

......................................................................................... Maryland’s strongest industry sectors include cybersecurity, life sciences, manufacturing, and aerospace & defense. Growth in these critical areas is driven by a diverse range of assets including federal laboratories and military installations, world-class research universities, and a growing community of private companies. Maryland is also a center of culture and tourism, with millions of visitors each year enjoying the state’s mountains, beaches and small towns and big cities in between. Contributing to Maryland’s strong growth is a highly educated and skilled workforce, as well as the acclaimed educational system in which record investments have been made to prepare children for the opportunities of the future. The state’s public school system consistently outperforms those in the other states and nearly 60 accredited two- and four-year colleges and universities include some of the world’s leading academic institutions. Its strategic location along the Mid-Atlantic corridor makes Maryland an excellent location to reach one-third of the U.S. population within an overnight drive, and the state has close proximity to key U.S. cities like New York and Boston. In addition, Maryland has an excellent 32 |

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transportation infrastructure, with its Port of Baltimore handling recordbreaking amounts of cargo and the Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport welcoming millions of passengers each year. The Tradepoint Atlantic development has helped draw a number of top retail companies to locate distribution facilities in the Baltimore area, including Amazon, Home Depot and Floor, and Décor, and there are a number of major logistics developments opening in both Cecil County and Washington County. Maryland has experienced a vibrant recovery since the most difficult days of the COVID-19 pandemic, thanks in no small part to the aggressive steps taken to protect the business community, including hundreds of millions of dollars in emergency grant funding for small businesses. However, when it comes to attracting and retaining businesses, competition between states remains fierce. Maryland continues to support business expansion and attraction through targeted incentive programs to support key goals such as the creation of new, high-paying manufacturing jobs and spurring investment in biotechnology and other innovative industry sectors. Additionally, over the past seven years, a priority has been placed on slashing taxes and fees; streamlining or eliminating hundreds of burdensome regulations; and emphasizing customer service to make processes like getting permits or starting a business much easier.

MARYLAND: Kent County

......................................................................................... Kent County is a scenic peninsula on Maryland’s Upper Eastern Shore of the Chesapeake Bay, ideally situated less than a two-hour drive from Philadelphia, Washington D.C., Annapolis, Dover, and Northern Virginia. It is home to two Main Street communities, an Arts


WHERE SHORE VENTURES BEGIN

DISCOVER OUR COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGES

PRIME LOCATION

SKILLED WORKFORCE

QUALITY OF LIFE

BUSINESS FRIENDLY

Queen Anne’s County is accessible to anywhere on the east coast within 1 day. We are under 3 hours to New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington D.C.

Queen Anne’s County’s workforce is well-educated with a 93% High School Graduation Rate, and 37% of residents holding a Bachelor’s Degree or higher contributing to its strong economy.

Enjoy and explore Queen Anne’s County’s many trails and parks, historic sites, farm markets, art galleries, local shops, breweries, wineries, and more! Our communities offer small-town living that attracts families, retirees, and those looking to live an Eastern Shore lifestyle.

In addition to no personal property tax, incentives include Enterprise Zone Real Property and Income Tax Credits, Commercial Property Tax Credits. Queen Anne’s County is also within the service area of the Baltimore No. 74 Foreign Trade Zone (FTZ).

ChooseQueenAnnes.com | 410-604-2100 | 425 Piney Narrows Rd, Chester, MD 21619

CHOOSE

QUEEN ANNE’S


EXPANSION

OPPORTUNITIES

& Entertainment District, historic Washington College, and one of the largest marina communities in Maryland. Kent County is Open for Business Kent County is only one of five counties in Maryland with NO business personal property tax. Kent County Economic Development led the efforts to pass a state-wide Sales and Use and Personal Property Tax Exemption for Data Center to locate in Maryland. The County seat of Chestertown is a designated State Enterprise Zone, a federal Opportunity Zone, and HUBZone. In December 2021 a second Enterprise Zone was designated by the State. In 2017 the Kent County Commissioners enacted local legislation to provide a property tax credit, Commerce Zone Tax Credit, for business entities that obtain new, improved, or expanded premises in all State designated priority funding areas. This demonstrates the commitment of the County Commissioners to advocate for thoughtful growth and development. Chestertown Business Campus The Chestertown Business Campus is one of the largest economic development projects in many years. The 80-acre site is home to Dixon Valve & Coupling’s new distribution facility, new corporate headquarters, a new manufacturing facility, and a new facility for the growing YMCA. A Gigabit County Kent County has completed the backbone implementation of a 110-mile fiber optic backbone throughout the county. The county entered a public-private partnership with Kent Fiber Optic Systems to provide public institutions with high-speed reliable internet access. KentFOS’ open access network allows Internet Services Providers the ability to offer 1G service to businesses and residences. The primary goal was to enhance the infrastructure needed to support new and existing businesses and organizations in Kent County, particularly with affordable, robust, and high-capacity internet access. By taking this action, the county is expanding the competitive capability of local businesses and organizations and providing more opportunities. The rural setting provides an excellent quality of life, a supportive eco-system, and access to 19 million people within 100 miles, Kent County is an ideal place for businesses providing large talent pools, customers, and suppliers. Visit www.kentcounty.com/business for more information. If you could work from anywhere… you would live here.

MARYLAND: Queen Anne’s County:

watermen proudly working their waterways. Targeted industries include trade, transportation and utilities, niche manufacturers, as well as maritime and agricultural-related companies. The county is included in the service area of the Baltimore No. 74 Foreign Trade Zone, which is an incentive program offered to importers and manufacturers. Government contractors find the county’s proximity to federal laboratories and prime contractors appealing. Kent Island (Stevensville & Chester) is the hub of activity for hospitality and tourism related businesses. Queen Anne’s County offers highly visible, prime retail space along the US Route 50/301 corridor extending from Queenstown to Stevensville. Queen Anne’s County is recognized for its high quality of life for all ages. Their acclaimed public schools, amenities, and proximity to major metropolitan areas appeal to residents and visitors alike. The workforce of 27,125, within a labor market area of 374,027, is highly educated with the majority employed in the management and sales sectors. Local companies have access to the resources of Chesapeake College, Washington College, and the University of Maryland. The county participate in the registered and youth apprenticeship programs, and provides access to training funded on both the local and state level. Queen Anne’s County is accessible by land, air, and bay. The county is the easternmost terminus of the William Preston Lane Jr. Memorial Bridge, better known as the Chesapeake Bay Bridge. The US Route 50/301 corridor is the backbone of transportation infrastructure for the county, which provides easy access to the entire east coast via I-95 and points west via connections to other major interstates. Major international airports and shipping ports are within a few hours’ drive from any point in the county. In addition to roadway infrastructure, the county operates the Bay Bridge Airport located in Stevensville, while the northern portion of the county is served by rail. Queen Anne’s County Department of Economic and Tourism Development are committed to helping business grow and thrive by offering various incentives programs and services. Visit www. choosequeenannes.com for a complete list of the current incentives and services available or call 410-604-2100 for more information.

MARYLAND: St Mary’s County Building on Strengths

........................................................................................

Where Shore Living Begins

........................................................................................ Queen Anne’s County, is proud to be the home of companies that manufacture products valued and recognized worldwide, along with being the largest producer of corn, wheat, and soybeans in Maryland. Their landscape is a diverse as their business base and offers the perfect balance of metropolitan and rural. Companies such as PRS Guitars, Federal Resources, Miltec U.V. and Zodiac Milpro N.A., are located in Stevensville, the base of operations for many manufacturers, government contractors, and marine trades. Centreville, the county seat, is home to Tidewater Direct. The balance of the county is predominantly rural with crop and boiler production and its supporting businesses, such as Perdue Agribusiness and Nutrien. Queen Anne’s County also supports a prominent and thriving commercial/charter fishing industry. Throughout the year you will find local captains, and 34 |

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Situated in southern Maryland, just outside of Washington DC, is an ecosystem that consistently punches above its weight class.


Stretching from the Naval Air Station Patuxent River (NAS PAX) – a world class research and development facility - to the newly announced Aeropark Innovation District, St. Mary’s County is home to over 200 technology companies and support organizations driving aviation research, development, test and evaluation. The Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) and the Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division (NAWCAD) are the United States Navy’s center for naval aviation. Anything that takes off and lands from an aircraft carrier and its supported technologies, pass through NAVAIR and NAWCAD. An emerging addition is the AeroPark Innovation District. Centered around an active regional airport, AeroPark is a planned development district for resource sharing and idea exchange. Building on existing aviation and aerospace interests, AeroPark expands commercial opportunities beyond the base and incorporates education and research facilities as well as adjoining neighborhoods and retail space. Current AeroPark stakeholders include commercial aviation and aeronautic industry partners, the University System of Maryland at Southern Maryland (USMSM), the University of Maryland Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) Test Site and TechPort home of TechBridge, offering technology transfer opportunities to emerging companies. The completion of the newly constructed Southern Maryland Autonomous Research and Technology (SMART) Building at USMSM serves as a beacon of inspiration to the entire district. This $86 million, 84,000-square foot academic and research facility, will drive innovation and commercial opportunity in autonomous systems development. The innovation half of the SMART Building features an autonomous technologies research facility, which will include underwater, air, and land testing capabilities. The facility will make the University System of Maryland at Southern Maryland the USM’s only regional higher education center with a research component. The academic half of the new SMART Building offers state-of-the- art classrooms, allowing students from across the Southern

Maryland region enhanced access to in-demand educational programs. Coastal Living in High Tech Hub - St Mary’s offers a unique combination of advanced technology opportunities within a scenic, rural setting surrounded by the Potomac and Patuxent Rivers and the Chesapeake Bay. Nearly a quarter of the area’s entire workforce is employed in STEM fields, well ahead of any other U.S.

metro area. The career opportunities are plentiful with St Mary’s County offering the highest median STEM wage in the country. Each day, the people and businesses in St. Mary’s County’s innovate and inspire. There is a deeply rooted ecosystem fostering collaborations, generating new ideas and creative solutions. Its in our DNA. Visit www.YesStMarysMD.com X

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KANSAS:

THE SMART INVESTMENT

K

ansas has been, and continues to be, aggressive in its efforts to grow their economy. Major companies such as Merck Animal Health, Geico, PBI Gordon, Garmin, Overstock.com, Amazon, Kiewit, Mars, Hostess Brands, American Multi-Cinema, Dairy Farmers of America, Kubota, ServiceMaster, General Motors and most recently, Panasonic Energy, all have chosen Kansas as their preferred business location. These companies selected Kansas due to the business advantages this state offers which can translate to increased performance and profits. ......................................................................................

Panasonic Energy Co., Ltd. will invest $4 billion to build a stateof-the-art electric vehicle (EV) battery facility in De Soto, Kansas. The company’s plans could create up to 4,000 new jobs and will be the largest economic development project in state history. The Kansas Department of Commerce is the lead economic 36 |

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development agency for the state. Their business recruitment team creates customized incentive proposals based on capital investment, job creation, employee compensation and training. They also coordinate with community economic development professionals to develop proposals that include local incentives such as discounted building and land purchases, property tax reductions, build-to-suit agreements and other financing packages. Born from methods of sickle and scythe, plow and mule, to the new technologically advanced evolution of combines and semis using satellite technology, Kansas is a powerhouse of agriculture production and related industry products. Whether it’s their commitment to crop research, ensuring the safety of our nation’s food supply or remaining a top commodity producing state, Kansas’ commitment to agriculture continues to flourish. Kansas feed and forage production is an important sector of the state’s agricultural economy. Kansas livestock producers are a major outlet for hay, silage and feed grains that are produced within the state’s borders. Kansas ranks first in the nation in wheat and sorghum production and is also a leader in the production of cattle, sunflowers,


bison, hogs and soybeans. Kansas is home to agricultural equipment manufacturing and sales companies in a broad range of sizes and specializations, which combined with a strong customer base and supportive state policies make Kansas a prime location for growth in the ag equipment manufacturing and sales sector. If you’re looking to ag-related business, look no further than Kansas. Kansas, however, offers something for everyone. Some of Kansas’ other key industries include Advanced Manufacturing, Corporate & Professional Services, Logistics & Distribution, Food Processing and Manufacturing, Aerospace & Defense, Animal Health, Bioscience, and Energy & Natural Resources. Be a part of the next Kansas success story. For more information, please contact the Kansas Department of Commerce at 913205-8521 or visit www.kansascommerce.gov/ businesses

KANSAS: DODGE CITY/FORD COUNTY Shovel Ready For Development

........................................................ The area of Dodge City and Ford County, Kansas has had a long history of supplying the right needs for industry

from the early cattle drives to today’s agricultural, energy, and manufacturing markets. Ford County currently has two of the world’s largest beef processing facilities, National Beef and Cargill Meat Solutions, and six of the state’s major wind farms. It has also been ranked in the top 10 “Least Economically Stressed Counties” in the U.S. by the Associated Press and has become a growing center for the energy and tourism industries. Dodge City and Ford County offer businesses a hardworking labor force, high quality of life in the community, and lower costs of living. Last year, the Hilmar Cheese Company (HCC) announced opening a new cutting-edge cheese and whey production facility near Dodge City. The new facility is estimated to be a $630 million capital investment, create 260 jobs at the new location, and expect to spawn several new businesses and generate an additional 750 jobs within a 50-mile radius of the main production facility. Hilmar Cheese Company, founded in 1984, is one of the world’s largest producers of high quality American-style cheese and whey products, with customers in more than 50 countries. HCC CEO & president David Ahlem called Dodge City an “ideal choice” given its central location,

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critical existing infrastructure, proximity to the growing local dairy industry, and business-friendly climate. Joann Knight, Executive Director of Dodge City/Ford County Development Corporation, stated that the economic impact to the community “will be compounded substantially by the additional dairies, transportation and services that will be required to support the processing facility once operational as well as the impact that the construction phase will have on our region.” Construction on the new facility begins in September. Dodge City and Ford County have quick access to major U.S. routes, a BNSF railway, AMTRAK and commercial air services. The city and county are located within 100 miles of I-70 and less than 150 miles of I-135 and I-35. Southwest Kansas provides air services to two major connecting International airports in the U.S. From beef processing to wind energy, and most recently, the major announcement of the addition of Hilmar Cheese, Dodge City and Ford County has an increasingly diverse industrial base. For more specific information, please contact the Dodge City/ Ford County Development Corporation at 620-227-9501 or email jknight@dodgedev.org .

KANSAS: El Dorado

Naturally Advantaged with Abundant, Pristine Water

........................................................................................

El Dorado, Kansas. Naturally Advantaged. El Dorado is an ideal location for companies looking for a rich, pristine industrial water source and abundant accessibility to transportation, land and talent. • 10 Million Gallons per DAY (MGD) of “firm or drought-resilient” water supply available for industrial use • Located mid-point on the emerging I-35 Corridor Megalopolis • Easy access to the supply chain – two interchanges with access to I-35 within two miles from industrial sites 316.321.1485 shoefgen@eldorado-inc.com developeldorado.com

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Nestled in the picturesque Flint Hills area of South-Central, Kansas – within the Wichita MSA – El Dorado is an ideal location for companies who seek to reap the rewards of a community rich in resources with abundant accessibility. El Dorado can offer companies 10 MGD of firm or drought resilient water for daily use and has access to two Class 1 railroads – BNSF Railway and Union Pacific with a transload facility within five miles of most industrial sites. With shovel-ready business and industrial parks, El Dorado has flat and even land, clear of flood plains and boasts an 800acre mega site ready for development. Land is generally priced 15-20% below U.S. prices and the City of El Dorado can provide steep discounts, incentives or may even offer FREE land, depending on capital investment. Looking for incentives? El Dorado can offer a variety of state and local incentives, aid in workforce development and can address any transportation or infrastructure improvements. El Dorado also offers a pipeline of educated, talented and technically skilled labor with more than 400,000 people in the workforce who live within a 60-mile radius. And, the community offers appealing residential quality of life factors and amenities including five new schools, a vibrant downtown, a new sports stadium and performing arts center. To learn more about El Dorado, Kansas, visit developeldorado.com.

El Dorado, Inc.: Your Go-to Team

A public-private collective committed to advancing El Dorado’s economic growth, El Dorado, Inc. is focused on attracting companies who need high volumes of reliable water. Inc. can provide confidential support for your site selection project and will help you discover El Dorado’s potential, making it easier for you to analyze and select the right El Dorado property for you or your clients.

KANSAS: Leavenworth County Designed to Deliver

...................................................................................... Leavenworth County is made up of four business-friendly communities - Leavenworth, Lansing, Tonganoxie and Basehor, Kansas. Home to a vibrant manufacturing cluster that spans across several industries including food, furniture, metal, orthotics and clothing, Leavenworth County is also considered the “Intellectual Center of the Army”. With a highly skilled workforce, training program resources and proximity to major interstates, Leavenworth County is a prime location. Situated in the heart of the global supply chain network and animal health corridor, Leavenworth County is an emerging location for companies looking to expand or relocate. Through financing and incentive programs, the community can work directly with businesses considering a new location or expansion in Leavenworth County, drawing on a range of private and public financing options. Leavenworth County also offers streamlined permitting and market-ready inventory. Learn more about Leavenworth County at lvcountyed.org.


LCDC: A Powerful Coalition

Leavenworth County Development Corporation (LCDC) is a powerful coalition that ensures access to critical partners to accelerate and maximize investment for companies to relocate or expand. LCDC has the relationships and expertise to connect businesses with workforce development, business retention and expansion and federal, state and local government financing and incentive programs.

KANSAS: SALINA

A Community Centered On Your Success

...................................................................................... Being located near the geographic center of the United States has a lot of advantages for business. Nestled at the crossroads of I-70 and I-135, Salina offers businesses easy access to a highly skilled and educated workforce of more than 213,000 and 45 million consumers within a single days’ drive. Businesses here enjoy outstanding connectivity and endless shipping options. Trucks can be on the highway in minutes from any location in Salina. Air Cargo and freight services are available at the Salina Regional Airport, and a connection to the Union Pacific main line right in town, products and raw materials can be shipped by rail anywhere in the western two-thirds of the country and elsewhere with intermodal options. Salina’s railroad connections also open up International markets to businesses

from deep water ports on the West Coast and in the Gulf of Mexico. Salina enjoys a diverse economy that includes several manufacturing interests both large and small, a strong agricultural economy that supplies local food processors and beverage makers and creates strong demand for industries such as agricultural equipment manufacturing. Kansas is also poised to become a leader in alternative energies, particularly solar and wind. Salina is ready to support new businesses in these and other sectors with a business-friendly environment and attractive incentives that offer significant cost savings. Salina also offers a safe, accessible, and connected community with a comfortable lifestyle for families and young professionals alike. The downtown area is the heart of Salina and is changing fast in support of its vibrant and growing community. Residents here enjoy a low cost of living and access to quality healthcare. Their K-12 schools provide an outstanding curriculum and with both a community college and university in town, higher educational opportunities abound. Kiplinger recently named Salina as the 9th cheapest place to live in America with populations under 50,000. For more information on Salina, please contact the Salina EDO at 785-404-3131 or visit www.salinaedo.org. X

FIRST CITY. FIRST CHOICE. MARKET-READY industrial portfolio INCENTIVES available LEAVENWORTH · LANSING · TONGANOXIE · BASEHOR

913.727.6111 • www.LVCountyED.org

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ILLINOIS: THE WORKFORCE OF THE FUTURE

I

llinois has the fundamental building blocks of a thriving, inclusive economy. It has some of the best talent and higher education institutions in the world. It is a global transportation hub, boasting the highest concentration of transportation and logistics companies in the nation. Illinois has abundant natural resources that provide the foundation for a thriving agricultural sector. Illinois companies deliver world-changing innovations in tech, life sciences, and manufacturing. Illinois’ key industries include Agribusiness & Ag Tech; Energy, 40 |

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Information Technology, Life Sciences & Healthcare, Manufacturing, and Transportation & Logistics. ........................................................................................ In Agribusiness, Illinois is making a range of investments and starting new programs that will facilitate technology adoption for small and mid-sized farms, encourage innovation among farm suppliers and processors of agricultural products, and boost connections with global markets. To address Energy challenges, Illinois will make big investments in green infrastructure, promote clean energy innovation across the state, and prepare their workforce for a green energy future. With Information Technology, major capital investments in infrastructure and broadband, and faster connections between researchers, innovators, and industry, will enable top tech talent and


companies. For Life Sciences and Healthcare, Illinois will use capital plan funding to build out infrastructure and facilities that meet the needs of life sciences companies and provide credits that spur innovation. Workforce training is provided for in-demand healthcare occupations. In Manufacturing, Illinois will provide innovation vouchers to facilitate adoption of automated technologies and revise R&D credits to make them available to start-up companies as they develop new products. For more information on statewide economic development, please visit www2.illinois.gov or call 217-299-8853.

Arlington Heights also features a unique, vibrant, and awardwinning Downtown offering an enticing urban lifestyle with more than 25 shops and boutiques. Cuisine is a key ingredient to Downtown’s success, hosting a diverse collection of nearly 40 one-of-a-kind restaurants and casual eateries. And Arlington Alfresco, which features a pedestrian-friendly outdoor dining area right in the heart of Downtown, has been one of Chicagoland’s most sought-after dining destinations since 2020. With an exceptional quality of life, a wealth of amenities, and unparalleled access throughout the Chicago area, Arlington Heights is primed to continue to grow and thrive.

ILLINOIS: Arlington Heights

ILLINOIS: Litchfield

Positioned for Success

The Location for Success & Growth

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Arlington Heights continues to grow and thrive. Home to 78,000 residents with a median annual household income of nearly $100,000, Arlington Heights is also one of the largest business communities in the Chicago area, hosting over 3,000 businesses that employ over 40,000 daytime workers. Location is one of the community’s key assets, offering incomparable positioning within the Chicago region. Arlington Heights is served by two Metra commuter rail stations, connecting it to Downtown Chicago in under 45 minutes. Arlington Heights also provides immediate access to three interstate highways, and is conveniently located just 15 minutes from both O’Hare International Airport (ORD) and Chicago Executive Airport (PWK). Access and location have validated Arlington Heights as a great corporate destination. Both Amazon and Frito-Lay (a subsidiary of PepsiCo) are operating distribution facilities within the community and taking advantage of the community’s position within the Chicago metro area. Arlington Heights also continues to serve as long-time home for other significant employers such as GE Healthcare, and Paddock Publications which produces The Daily Herald. And this past spring United Airlines relocated 900 workers to their Arlington Heights operations center, adding even greater corporate investment to the region. As part of the community’s efforts to grow and support commerce and industry, Arlington Heights also offers a Zero Interest Loan program available to both new and existing businesses. Interested business or property owners can apply for an interest-free of loan of up to $20,000. Eligible expenses range from the purchase of new equipment, to technology upgrades, to improvements of existing facilities. Large industrial and commercial users may also be eligible for the Cook County Class 6/7 programs, which can abate property taxes on redeveloped sites by as much as 60%. Quality of life is exceptional in Arlington Heights, with many of its students attending some of the Chicago area’s top public elementary and high schools per U.S. News & World Report. The Arlington Heights Memorial Library is regularly ranked among the nation’s best public libraries for its size and has previously received a “Five Star” designation by Library Journal, the publication’s highest rating. The community is also served by the Arlington Heights Park District and its 50+ public parks and facilities. Health care rates highly as well thanks to Northwest Community Hospital, which continues to expand its campus and its patient services.

Litchfield is the most accessible and strategic commercial and industrial location between the St. Louis metropolitan area and Springfield, Illinois for manufacturing, distribution/ logistics, processing, retail and hospitality businesses. Interstate 55 and Illinois Route 16 intersect at the industrial parks and commercial districts, providing direct transportation access and connections to all major U.S. markets. It also provides access to a multi-modal transportation network, and their proximity to two metropolitan areas puts businesses in Litchfield within easy reach of regional markets and national connections. Recent development of a third business/industrial park for

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EXPANSION

OPPORTUNITIES

Residential – New Development

companies seeking interstate highway access and customized facilities to support their operations was constructed. Litchfield’s location, size and immediate proximity to two large metropolitan areas equates to an exceptional value for businesses. Value that is backed by a quality community. Litchfield’s new and expanding retail developments include a growing presence of national brands that continue to attract additional traffic. The municipal airport features a 4,000 feet runway with facilities to serve corporate and private aviation. Litchfield has a satellite campus of Lincoln Land Community College to help provide workforce training. The City also offers programs and incentives to support business growth and development in Litchfield. Litchfield offers new and expanding businesses the appeal of a stable community featuring regional healthcare services, quality recreational opportunities and affordable Midwestern living all while in proximity to the convenience and excitement of nearby metropolitan areas. The location is truly a crossroads of opportunity with regional influence. Litchfield offers an affordable environment for businesses that want to easily access the large number of end users, consumers, transportation links and potential visitors found in large markets. In addition, the business tax rate is highly competitive, and utilities are cost-effective compared to larger markets.

Make your dream home a reality at Eagle Ridge, a new development of 41 new waterfront and wooded lots now ready for new home construction at beautiful Lake Lou Yaeger. Whether you seek a weekend getaway or convenient year-round living, Eagle Ridge offers a variety of outstanding home sites on a 1,400-acre lake surrounded by 4,600 acres of recreational and conservation areas. Eagle Ridge residents choose their lot and then design and build their own home using the architect and builder of their choice. There are many ways for family and friends to build great memories at Eagle Ridge. Residents can enjoy boating, fishing, swimming, skiing, beach activities, picnicking and playgrounds at Lake Lou Yaeger, as well as hiking, biking, birdwatching, and relaxing at the 266-acre Shoal Creek Nature Conservation Area located on the lake. With all the retail and hospitality conveniences of Litchfield (pop. 7,000) just four miles away plus nearby golf courses and wineries, residents at Eagle Ridge have many options to enhance their lake lifestyle. Eagle Ridge is just 60 miles north of St. Louis just off I-55 and four miles from Litchfield, Illinois. It is the latest residential area to be developed along the western shore of Lake Lou Yaeger. The wooded development features gentle hills and a sloping shoreline. All residential development is on the western shore of the oval-shaped lake while the entire eastern shore of the lake remains undeveloped other than seasonal camping areas. More than 140 families call Lake Lou Yaeger home on weekends or year-round, and many residents own watercraft and take advantage of the many outdoor recreational opportunities found on the water and around the lake. The lake has two public marinas, a public swim beach and a large conservation area known for its hiking trails and bald eagles. There are special community events held at the lake each year, including a Fourth of July fireworks display and the annual 5K Freedom Fun Run. For information on industrial, commercial, or residential development, contact the Litchfield Economic Development Office at 217-324-5253, cityadmin@cityoflitchfieldil.com or www.cityoflitchfieldil.com. X

LITCHFIELD

LITCHFIELD I – 55 COMMERCE CENTER

Litchfield has direct access to Interstate 55 and Illinois Route 16; Litchfield is in close proximity to the major Interstate and Highway Network.

• Shovel Ready Sites Available Now • Flexible Lot Sizes

1,000 Miles Montreal

Minneapolis Omaha Denver

Milwaukee Des Chicago Moines

LITCHFIELD

Kansas City

Wichita

Tulsa

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Indianapolis Cincinatti

St. Louis

Memphis

4.75 Acres

Louisville

Nashville

Houston New Orleans

www.cityoflitchfieldil.com

New York

Charlotte

8.24 Acres

Atlanta Jacksonville

12.53 Acres

Phase 1 Development 80 Acres

500 Miles

Economic Development Office 120 E. Ryder Street | Litchfield, IL 62056 217-324-5253 | cityadmin@cityoflitchfieldil.com

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Winnipeg

CITY OF LITCHFIELD

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Future Development

7.17 Acres

11.37 Acres

Commerce Drive

THE LOCATION FOR SUCCESS & GROWTH

NORTH

Future Development

2.78 Acres

Future Development

2.79 Acres 2.78 Acres 2.64 Acres

2.65 Acres

1/4 mile to I-55


INDUSTRY

NEWS

SkyWater unveils plans to build $1.8 billion chip facility in Indiana

Purdue University, IN - U.S. semiconductor manufacturer SkyWater Technology Inc (SKYT.O) announced plans to invest $1.8 billion for a chip research and production facility in Indiana, in partnership with the state and Purdue University. The announcement comes a day after the U.S. Senate voted to move ahead with a slimmed-down version of a legislation, known as the CHIPS Act, to give billions of dollars in subsidies and tax credits for the semiconductor industry. read more “This endeavor to bolster our chip fabrication facilities will rely on funding from the CHIPS Act,” said Thomas Sonderman, chief executive of Bloomington, Minnesota-based SkyWater. “Federal investment will enable SkyWater to more quickly expand our efforts to address the need for strategic reshoring of semiconductor manufacturing.” SkyWater expects the ground breaking for the new facilities to happen in 2023, according to its

spokesperson, but the timing would depend on whether the chip legislation is passed. The Indiana facility will be located on the Purdue campus in West Lafayette, SkyWater said, adding that the location would help the company and its customers benefit from collaboration with the university and its pipeline of talent. “We are on the verge of passing a major investment in next generation technologies that is vital for the success of this and future projects, and that will ensure Indiana remains at the center of our high-tech national security economy,” U.S. Senator of Indiana Todd Young said in the SkyWater statement. SkyWater produces semiconductors at its Minnesota factory for customers, including automotive, aerospace, biomedical, cloud and computing firms and the U.S. government. It also has an advanced packaging facility for chips in Kissimmee, Florida which is ramping up production.

PepsiCo to Build its Biggest US Factory in Denver

PepsiCo North America is building a huge new factory. The food and beverage giant announced plans to build its biggest-yet U.S. factory in Denver, Colorado, to produce Pepsi, Pepsi Zero, Gatorade, and other PepsiCo beverages. According to a company press release, the High Point facility will be 1.2 million square feet and sit on almost 152 acres of land near Denver International Airport. PepsiCo did not disclose a dollar value for the plant or how many new employees it expects to hire, but the High Point factory is expected to replace its existing Denver facility and triple its capacity. According to The Denver Post, PepsiCo currently employs about 1,200 employees in the state. Denver Mayor Michael Hancock, in a statement, praised the company for its long-term presence in the city and predicted it would “create more quality jobs” and “supports my administration’s climate action efforts.” Johannes Evenblij, chief of the West Division of PepsiCo Beverages North America, said in a statement that the plant will “serve as a model for the future of PBNA’s supply chain” and will also be the company’s most sustainable plant yet. The company says the High Point factory will feature 100% renewable energy sources, “best-in-class water efficiency” and reduced plastic use.

Workers work inside the clean room of U.S. semiconductor manufacturer SkyWater Technology Inc where computer chips are made, in Bloomington, Minnesota, U.S., April, 2022 in this handout picture acquired by Reuters on July 19, 2022. SkyWater Technology/Handout via REUTERS

The LEGO Group to build $1 billion, carbon-neutral run factory in Virginia, USA

Richmond, VA — The LEGO Group announced plans to invest more than $1 billion to build a new factory in Chesterfield County, Virginia. Once completed, the 1.7 million square foot (160,000m2 ) facility will employ more than 1,760 people. The factory will be designed to operate as a carbon-neutral facility. 100 percent of its day-to-day energy needs will be matched by renewable energy generated by an onsite solar park. The site will also be designed to minimise energy consumption and use of non-renewable resources. Niels B. Christiansen, CEO, the LEGO Group said: “This is an exciting step for the LEGO Group. More and more families are falling in love with LEGO® building and we are looking forward to making LEGO bricks in the US, one of our largest markets. The location in Virginia allows us to build a solar park which supports our sustainability ambitions and provides easy links to country-wide transportation networks. We are also looking forward to creating fantastic employment opportunities for the people of Virginia.” Construction will commence in fall 2022 with production projected to start in the second half of 2025. A temporary packaging site will open in an existing building nearby in early 2024 and create up to 500 jobs. The Virginia factory will be the LEGO Group’s seventh factory globally and the second in the Americas. The company’s manufacturing site in Monterrey, Mexico primarily supplies the US market and will be expanded and upgraded to meet growing demand for LEGO products. Carsten Rasmussen, Chief Operations Officer, the LEGO Group said: “Our factories are located close to our biggest markets which shortens the distance our products have to travel. This allows us to rapidly respond to changing consumer demand and helps manage our carbon footprint. Our new factory in the US and expanded capacity at our existing site in Mexico means we will be able to best support long-term growth in the Americas. We are fortunate to find a location where we can begin construction quickly and create temporary capacity in under two years.” The new factory in Virginia, like all LEGO facilities, will use state-of-the-art technology to mould, process and pack LEGO products and ensure they meet the company’s rigorous safety and quality requirements. “Our bricks are made to last for generations, so we need skilled employees trained to work with precision moulding technology. We look forward to working with the Virginia Talent Accelerator programme to help build a great team who are motivated by our mission to inspire and develop the builders of tomorrow,” said Mr Rasmussen. bxjmag.com

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NEWS

BASF COMMITS $780 MILLION TO COMPLETE GEISMAR CHEMICAL PLANT EXPANSION

Third and final phase of 7-year, $1 billion project expected to be complete in 2025 GEISMAR, LA. – BASF announced a final investment decision on a $780 million project to double production capacity at its chemical manufacturing complex in Ascension Parish, marking the launch of the third and final phase of an expansion plan announced in 2018. Counting all three expansion phases and other site investments, BASF will retain more than 1,000 existing jobs and add 37 new direct jobs with average annual salaries from $86,600 to $105,600 per year, plus benefits. LED estimates that the total project plan will result in 147 new indirect jobs, for a total of 184 new jobs in the Capital Region. Upon completion, BASF’s Geismar Verbund site – signifying the physical integration of production, market platforms and technologies that tie the business together – will be able to produce 600,000 metric tons per year of methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI). MDI is an important component for polyurethanes, a versatile, lightweight plastics material used for insulation and a variety of other industrial and consumer products. “BASF is one of the largest chemical companies in the world, and this substantial reinvestment in its Geismar complex speaks volumes about the strength of Louisiana’s advanced manufacturing sector,” Gov. John Bel Edwards said. “By increasing production of a material vital to the creation of energy-efficient products, BASF

Ports of Indiana-Jeffersonville completes $24 million in new infrastructure projects

JEFFERSONVILLE, IND.– The Ports of Indiana-Jeffersonville is celebrating the completion of $24 million in infrastructure enhancement projects. The Port received a $10 million Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) grant in 2015 initiating big changes in Jeffersonville. All projects were completed in 2022. The grant provided partial funding for $24 million in infrastructure enhancements that has added four miles to the port’s existing 11-mile rail network. The projects have enhanced and overhauled the railroad infrastructure and intermodal capabilities throughout the entire port. The projects included: • Four miles of additional rail track to accommodate unit train delivery to and from the port, along with two new rail loops connected to the waterfront facility. • Railyard can now accommodate 200 rail cars. • Enhanced unit train handling; new capacity and improved velocity. • Waterfront intermodal facility that more than doubles the capacity of bulk commodities transferred from rail cars or trucks to barges. • The new conveyor belt can run more than 2,000 tons in one hour or one rail car to barge in less than 3 minutes. • Three-acre transload facility that allows cargo to be transferred between trucks and rail cars. Through a taped video, Governor Eric Holcomb said (in part), “We couldn’t be prouder to welcome (barges) from all over the world carrying millions of tons of cargo every year, supporting

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has positioned our state as an important contributor to the global sustainability supply chain. That is a win for workers and their families in the Capital Region, and for the state’s economy as a whole.” The company said in its announcement that the seven-year expansion project – representing more than $1 billion in combined capital investment – will allow it to meet growing North American demand for its products in construction, appliance, transportation, automotive and other sectors. “Thanks to our strategic location and infrastructure, access to competitive raw materials, highly-skilled workforce and strong government support, BASF has now invested more than $2 billion in new projects and improvements at the Geismar site since 2009,” said Jerry Lebold, BASF’s Senior Vice President and General Manager at the Geismar site. “This continued investment demonstrates our commitment to our employees, our community and our presence in Louisiana which is more than 60 years strong.” Construction will begin this year and is expected to be complete by mid-2025. The expanded facility will utilize leading-edge technology that combines the highest safety standards with advanced digitalization in its operations, the company said. To secure the final phase of the BASF expansion project, the State of Louisiana offered a competitive incentive package that includes a $1 million Retention and Modernization Tax Credit, to be claimed in equal installments over five years. BASF also is expected to utilize Louisiana’s Industrial Tax Exemption and Quality Jobs programs.

tens of thousands of careers and billions of dollars of economic impact. It’s truly what propels our progress. Thank you for your continued commitment to fostering economic vitality through world-class infrastructure and keeping it all flowing so we all can keep growing.” See full video from Gov. Holcomb. The new infrastructure improvements will increase maritime commerce through domestic barge service. Combined with the two new Ohio River interstate bridges and new heavy haul transportation corridor leading into the port, the region can further attract new cargoes and large-scale industrial projects that require multimodal transportation connections. “The completion of the TIGER project is the result of the commitment that the Ports of Indiana has to best-in-class infrastructure and making our Indiana network bigger, better, faster,” said Vanta E. Coda II, Ports of Indiana chief executive officer. “This infrastructure will allow our current and future customers to grow for the next 50 years.” Indiana’s three ports contribute more than $8.2 billion per year to the state economy and support 50,000 Hoosier jobs. Jeffersonville alone contributes $1.8 billion yearly in economic impact and supports 12,137 jobs. The Ports of Indiana-Jeffersonville set a shipping record in 2021, handling 3.22 million tons, up 21.6% compared to 2020. This is the highest annual shipment total since it began operation in 1985. (The second-highest year was in 2015.) $24 million investment breakdown: $10 million federal TIGER grant; $3 million private-sector; $11 million Ports of Indiana


Carolina Precision Foods, LLC establishing operations in Florence County

Carolina Precision Foods, LLC – a joint venture of Carolina Fresh Foods and owners of Lake Foods – announced plans to establish operations in Florence County. The company’s $10 million investment will create 402 new jobs. Carolina Precision Foods, LLC is a poultry further processing company that specializes in deboning, portioning, marination, custom further processing and mechanically separating food. Located at 2901 W. Darlington Street in Florence, Carolina Precision Foods, LLC’s new facility will partner with regional poultry processors in custom further processing of poultry products. Operations are expected to be online in August 2022. The Coordinating Council for Economic Development has approved job development credits.

Pole Star Defense Finds Business is Easy to Navigate in Pinellas County

Pinellas County, Florida has long been a desirable destination for industries in the sectors of homeland security and national defense thanks to its advantageous concentration of interconnected businesses and suppliers. With a deep labor market of skilled individuals and a culture of innovation, a new business cluster has emerged in St. Petersburg consisting of maritime and defense technology companies. Seventeen business and marine science tenants have come together under one roof to form the Maritime and Defense Technology Hub (The Hub) in the St. Pete Innovation District. The tenants operate symbiotically, out of a repurposed building originally constructed in 2009 by Pinellas County, St. Petersburg, and the federal government. The space has been renovated to include dedicated office space, shared co-working areas, and event space to encourage technical exchanges. The anchor tenant of the facility is Pole Star Defense, a company focused on developing and implementing pioneering maritime intelligence technologies to protect vessels, people, maritime domain, and reputation. Pole Star Defense was intentional in their site selection search before arriving to the conclusion that Pinellas County was the best fit. President Ben Minichino explains, “We looked at DC, Texas, the Carolinas, and Tennessee, but St. Pete won out. We weren’t coming to Florida to ask for tax benefits, but we knew we wanted to relocate to a state that has an advantageous tax structure for military veterans because our first desire is recruiting prior service military veterans. Many veterans that enlist after graduating high school have an opportunity to retire in their early 40s,

EAB to expand in Virginia, creating 206 new jobs Education firm to invest at least $6 million to relocate to a new Henrico County facility RICHMOND, VA — Gov. Glenn Youngkin announced that EAB, the leading provider of education research, technology, and marketing and enrollment solutions, will invest at least $6 million and add more than 200 jobs in Henrico County over the next five years. To facilitate that growth, the firm also plans to relocate from two locations on East Parham Road and consolidate its Richmond-based operations into a 70,000-square-foot space at the SunTrust Building on West Broad Street. Virginia successfully competed with other existing EAB locations across the country for the project. “EAB has been a committed business partner in Virginia for more than 30 years, and we are thrilled to see its continued expansion and investment in Henrico County,” said Gov. Glenn Youngkin.” The firm’s success reinforces the importance of attracting and retaining a skilled workforce that is helping fulfill EAB’s mission to improve education and

and the idea that they can come retire to Florida where their retirement income is not taxed, and start a second career in a business and tax-friendly state, is very desirable. Pinellas County and specifically St. Pete, have the ecosystem already in place for supporting small defense contractor companies like us.” Dr. Cynthia Johnson, Director of Pinellas County Economic Development, explains that defense and homeland security companies such as Pole Star Defense are in a great position because of all the resources at their disposal in Pinellas County. “Pole Star Defense and defense technology companies in Pinellas County are well-equipped for success because our region has a top-notch tech innovation ecosystem for companies critical to national security. With a deep pool of defense industry talent, proximity to academic and industry partnerships, and a robust defense industrial base, Pole Star Defense is located in a premier location.” For more information about Pole Star Defense, visit Polestardefense.com.

communities across the country.” “EAB is a valuable employer in the Commonwealth, and we are pleased to support its growth and creation of 206 new jobs in Henrico County,” said Secretary of Commerce and Trade Caren Merrick. “The Greater Richmond region’s combination of world-class talent, stable business climate, competitive operating costs, and livability provides an ideal location for EAB to thrive, and we look forward to a continuing partnership.” “EAB is deeply committed to the Richmond area, and we believe our long-term investment will serve Henrico County, the greater Richmond community, and our growing employee base for many years to come,” said EAB President, Marketing and Enrollment Solutions, Chris Marett. “We are proud to have been recognized as one of the top workplaces in Richmond for each of the past six years, and providing a more flexible, hybrid workspace will strengthen our ability to attract and retain the local talent we need to continue helping our partner institutions meet the complex challenges facing the education sector.”

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ALABAMA

Dale Greer P.O. Box 1009, Cullman, AL 35056 256-739-1891 daleg@cullmaneda.org www.cullmaneda.org .......................................................................

Etowah Economic Alliance

Shane Ellison 800 Forrest Avenue Suite 220E Gadsden, AL 35901 256-456-9938 www.littlecanoecreek.com .......................................................................

Gadsden Industrial Development Authority

David Hooks, Executive Director 1 Commerce Square Gadsden, AL 35901 256-543-9423 davidhooks@gadsdenida.org www.gadsdenida.org .......................................................................

Elmore County Economic Development

Cary Cox P.O. Box 117, Wetumka , AL 36092 334-514-5843 cary.cox@elmoreeda.com www.elmoreeda.com .......................................................................

HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology

Mary Shirley-Howell 601 Genome Way Huntsville , AL 35806 256-327-9591 mshirleyhowell@hudsonalpha.org www.hudsonalpha.org .......................................................................

Sissie Browning, Assistant Director P.O. Box 2667, Tuscaloosa, AL 35403 205-349-1414 info@tcida.com www.tcida.com .......................................................................

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Arizona Regional Economic Develoment

Mignonne Hollis, Executive Director 750 E. Bartow Drive Suite 16 Sierra Vista, AZ 85635 520-458-6948 hollism@aredf.org www.aredf.org .......................................................................

City of Flagstaff Economic Development

John Saltonstall, AZED Pro Business Retention & Expansion Manager Economic Vitality Division City of Flagstaff 211 W. Aspen Avenue Flagstaff, AZ 86001 Office 928-213-2966 Cell 928-606-9430 jsaltonstall@flagstaffaz.gov www.flagstaffaz.gov .......................................................................

Pinal Alliance for Economic Growth

Patti King, Executive Mgr. 17235 N. 75th Avenue Suite D-145 Glendale, AZ 85308 520-836-8686 pking@pinalalliance.org www.pinalalliance.org .......................................................................

Salt River Project (SRP)

Karla Moran P.O. Box 52025 Phoenix, AZ 85072-2025 602-236-2396 Karla.moran@srpnet.com www.powertogrowphx.com .......................................................................

City of Surprise

Tuscaloosa County Industrial Dev. Auth

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ARIZONA

Cullman Economic Development Agency

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Mike Hoover 16000 N Civic Center Plaza Surprise, AZ 85374 623-222-3328 Mike.hoover@surpriseaz.gov www.surpriseaz.gov .......................................................................

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ARKANSAS

Chaffee Crossing

Ivy Owen, Executive Director 7020 Taylor Avenue Fort Smith, AR 72916 479-452-4554 479-452-4566 (f) property@chaffeecrossing.com www.chaffeecrossing.com .......................................................................

Ouachita Partnership for Economic Development

James Lee Sillman Executive Director 625 Adams Aveune Camden, AR 71701 870-836-2210 870-836-8899 (f) director@teamcamden.com www.teamcamden.com .......................................................................

East Arkansas Crossroads Coalition

Mark O’Mell 1790 N. Falls Boulevard, Suite 2 Wynne, AR 72396 870-238-5300 momell@crossroadscoalition.org www.crossroadscoalition.org .......................................................................

Mississippi County Economic Development

Clif Chitwood 4701 Memorial Drive Blytheville, AR 72315 870-532-6084 clif@cottontosteel.com www.cottontosteel.com .......................................................................

CALIFORNIA

City of Eastvale

Gina Gibson-Williams Economic Development Manager 12363 Limonite Ave. Suite 910 Eastvale, CA 91752 951-703-4425 ggibson-williams@eastvaleca.gov www.eastvaleca.gov .......................................................................

City of Moreno Valley Economic Development

Mike Lee Economic Development Director 14177 Frederick Street Moreno Valley, CA 92553 951-413-3460 edteam@moval.org www.morenovalleybusiness.com .......................................................................

City of Ontario Economic Development

Jennifer McLain Hiramoto Economic Development Director 303 East B Street Ontario, CA 91764 909-395-2295 JHiramoto@ontarioca.gov www.ontariothinksbusiness.com .......................................................................

Greater Irvine Chamber

Pepper Russell 36 Executive Park Suite 100 Irvine, CA 92614 949-502-4129 prussell@irvinechamber.com www.irvinechamber.com .......................................................................

COLORADO

City of Siloam Springs

Don Clark Community Development Director P.O. Box 80 Siloam Springs , AR 72761 479-238-0930 dclark@siloamsprings.com whysiloam.com .......................................................................

City of Canon City

Rick Harrmann 128 Main Street Canon City, CO 81212 719-276-5279 rlharrmann@canoncity.org www.canoncity.org .......................................................................


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FLORIDA

City of Fountain Economic Development Commission

Kimberly A. Bailey Economic Development/ Urban Renewal Director 116 S. Main Street Fountain, CO 80817 719-322-2056 kbailey@fountaincolorado.org www.fountaincolorado.org .......................................................................

Grand Junction Economic Partnership

Robin Brown, Executive Director 122 N. 6th Street Grand Junction, CO 81501 970--245-4332 robin@gjep.org www.gjep.org .......................................................................

City of Sanford

Bob Turk Economic Development Director 300 North Park Ave. Sanford, FL 32771 407-688-5015 bob.turk@sanfordfl.gov www.sanfordfl.gov .......................................................................

City of Titusville

Lisa Nicholas 555 South Washington Avenue Titusville, FL 32796-3584 321-567-3774 lisa.nicholas@titusville.com www.YEStitusvilleFL.com .......................................................................

CONNECTICUT

Elevate Lake Economic Development Town of Berlin

Chris Edge Director 240 Kensington Road Berlin, CT 06037 860-828-7005 cedge@town.berlin.ct.us www.town.berlin.ct.us .......................................................................

DELAWARE

Kent Economic Partnership

Linda Parkowski Executive Director 555 Bay Road Dover, DE 19901 302-678-3057 info@ccede.com www.choosecentraldelaware.com .......................................................................

Wilmington Economic Development Jeff Flynn 800 N. French St., 3rd Floor Wilmington, DE 19801 302-576-2128 jflynn@wilmingtonde.gov www.wilmingtonde.gov .......................................................................

Mary Ellen Stern Interim Director 20763 US Highway 27 Groveland, FL 34736 352-343-9647 352-801-7498 (f) mstern@lakecountyfl.gov elevatelake.com .......................................................................

Greater St. Petersburg Area Economic Development Corporation

J.P. DuBuque President and CEO 100 2nd Ave N Ste 130 St. Petersburg, FL 33701 727-388-2906 jpdubuque@stpeteedc.com StPeteEDC.com/BurgBiz .......................................................................

Haines City Economic Development Council, Inc.

Cyndi Jantomaso, President Post Office Box 3845 Haines City, FL 33845-3845 863-422-2525 863-206-0007 cyndi@hainescityedc.com www.hainescityedc.com .......................................................................

Hernando County Office of Economic Development

Santa Rosa County EDO

Valerie M. Pianta Economic Development Director 15800 Flight Path Drive Brooksville, FL 34604 352--540-6400 vpianta@hernandocounty.us www.hernandobusiness.com .......................................................................

Shannon Ogletree, Executive Director 6491 Caroline Street, Suite 4 Milton, FL 32570-4592 850-623-0174 Shannon@santarosa.fl.gov www.santarosaedo.com .......................................................................

Holmes County Development Commission

Tallahassee-Leon County Office of Economic Vitality

Joe Rone, Executive Director 106 E Byrd Avenue Bonifay, FL 32425 850-547-6154 jrone@westflorida.coop hcdc1978@gmail.com www.holmescountyedc.com .......................................................................

Cristina Paredes, CEcD, Director 315 S. Calhoun Street, Suite 110 Tallahassee, FL 32301 850-219-1080 Cparedes@OEVforBusiness.org www.oevforbusiness.org .......................................................................

GEORGIA Indian River Chamber of Commerce

Helene Caseltine Economic Development Director 1216 21st Street Vero Beach, FL 32960 772-567-3491 helenec@indianrivered.com www.indianrivered.com .......................................................................

City of College Park

Artie Jones III Director of Economic Development 3667 Main Street College Park, GA 30337 404-305-2052 404-305-2057 (f) artiejones@collegeparkga.com www.collegeparkga.com/ .......................................................................

Osceola County

David Rodriguez, Economic Development Manager 1 Courthouse Square, Suite 4400 Kissimmee, FL 34741 407-742-0620 407-742-4202 (f) david.rodriguez@osceola.org www.chooseosceola.com www.osceola.org .......................................................................

City of East Point

Maceo Rogers CEcD 2757 East Point Street East Point, GA 30344 404-270-7057 jmrogers@eastpointcity.org www.eastpointcity.org .......................................................................

Forward Forsyth

Pinellas County Economic Development

Dr. Cynthia Johnson, EDFP Director 13805 58th Street North, Suite 1-200 Clearwater, FL 33760 727-464-7332 cyjohnson@pinellascounty.org www.pced.org ....................................................................... bxjmag.com

Slade Gulledge P.O. Box 1799 Cumming GA 30028 770-887-6461 770-842-1170 sgulledge@forwardforsyth.org www.forwardforsyth.org .......................................................................

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Liberty County Development Authority

NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF

ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

City of Litchfield Ecnomic Development

Ronald Tolley, CEO 425 W. Oglethorpe Highway Hinesville, GA 31313 912-977-4147 Ron.tolley@comegrow.global www.comegrow.global .......................................................................

Shelly Herman 120 E. Ryder Street Litchfield, IL 62056 217-324-8146 Sherman@cityoflitchfieldil.com www.litchfieldil-development.com .......................................................................

Charles Witherington-Perkins Director of Planning & Community Development 33 S. Arlington Heights Arlington Heights, IL 60005 847-368-5220 cperkins@vah.com www.vah.com .......................................................................

Russell County Eco Devo & CVB

Mike Parsons, Director 331 E. Witchita, Russell, KS 67665 785-483-4000 785-324-0126 rced2@russellks.org www.russellcountyks.org .......................................................................

INDIANA

Putnam Development Authority

Terry Schwindler Econmical Devleopment Director 117 Putnam Drive, Eaton, GA 31024 706-816-8099 tschwindler@putnamdevelopmentauthority.com www.putnamdevelopmentauthority. com .......................................................................

Village of Arlington Heights Business & Economic Development

City of Marshall

Nora Swalls Economic Development Director 201 S. Michigan Ave Marshall, IL 62441 217-826-2034 nswalls@marshall-il.com www.marshall-il.com .......................................................................

Huntington County Economic Development

Mark Wickersham, Executive Director 8 West Market Street Huntington, IN 46750 260-356-5688 mark@hcued.com www.hcued.com ..................................................................

Salina Economic Development Organization

D. Mitch Robinson, CEcD 120 West Ash Street Salina, KS 67401 785-404-3131 mrobinson@salinaedo.org www.salinaedo.org .......................................................................

Valdosta-Lowndes County Development Authority

Andrea Schruijer, Executive Director P.O. Box 5185 Valdosta, GA 31603-1963 229-259-9972 aschruijer@buildlowndes.com www.buildlowndes.com .......................................................................

ILLINOIS

Champaign County Economic Development Corporation

Carly McCrory-McKay, Executive Director 1817 S. Neil Street, Suite 100 Champaign, IL 61820 217-359-6261 carly@champaigncountyedc.org www.champaigncountyedc.org .......................................................................

City of Highland Economic Development

Mallord Hubbard 1115 Broadway, P.O. Box 218 Highland, IL 62249-0218 618-654-9891 618-654-4768 (f) mhubbard@highlandil.gov www.highlandil.gov .......................................................................

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City of Vandalia

Latisha Paslay 431 W. Gallatin St. Vandalia, IL 62471 618-283-1152 618-335-9510 (Mobile) vandaliaed@vandaliaillinois.com www.vandaliaillinois.com .......................................................................

Intersect Illinois

Brent Case Senior Vice President Business Development 230 W. Monroe St. Chicago, IL 60606 312-667-6013 brent.case@intersectillinois.org intersectillinois.org .......................................................................

Alliance STL | St. Louis Regional Economic Development

Steven S. Johnson. CEO One Metropolitan Square Suite 1300 St. Louis, MO 63102 314-444-1105 sjohnson@alliancestl.com alliancestl.com ....................................................................... bxjmag.com

Miami County Economic Development Auth.

Jim Tidd 1525 W. Hoosier Boulevard Peru, IN 46970 765-689-0159 jtidd@miamicountyeda.com www.miamicountyeda.com .......................................................................

KANSAS

Dodge City/Ford County Development Corporation

Joann Knight, Executive Director 101 E. Wyatt Earp Blvd. Dodge City, KS 67801 620-227-9501 620-227-2957 (f) jknight@dodgedev.org www.dodgedev.org .......................................................................

Go Topeka

Molly Howey, CEcD President 719 S Kansas Ave. Suite 100 Topeka, KS 66603 785.231.4707 mhowey@gotopeka.com www.gotopeka.com .......................................................................

Shawnee Economic Development

Ann Smith-Tate, President CEO 15100 W. 67th Street Suite 202 Shawnee, KS 66217-9344 913-631-6545 asmithtate@shawneekschamber.com www.shawnee-edc.com .......................................................................

Wyandotte Economic Development Council

Greg Kindle, President 727 Minnesota Avenue Kansas City, KS 66101 913-371-3198 gkindle@wyedc.org www.wyedc.org .......................................................................

KENTUCKY

City of Pikeville

Jill Fraley Dotson, Executive Economic Development Director 773 Hambley Boulevard Pikeville, KY 41501 606-437-5128 info@whypikeville.com www.whypikeville.com .......................................................................


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NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF

ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

MAINE Northern Kentucky Tri-ED

Kimberly Rossetti VP of Economic Development 300 Buttermilk Pike, Suite 332 Ft. Mitchell, KY 41017 888-874-3365 ksr@NorthernKentuckyUSA.com www.NorthernKentuckyUSA.com .......................................................................

Kent County Department of Economic & Tourism Development Town of Richmond Community, Economic, & Business Development Darryl Sterling, Director 26 Gardiner Street Richmond, ME 04357-0159 207-737-4305 x 331 207-737-4306 (f) director@richmondmaine.com www.richmondmaine.com .......................................................................

MARYLAND South Western Kentucky EDC

Carter Hendricks Executive Director 2800 Fort Campbell Blvd. Hopkinsville, KY 42240 270-885-1499 chendricks@southwesternky.com www.southwesternky.com .......................................................................

LOUISIANA Louisiana Economic Development

Anya G. Hudnall 1201 N. Third Street Suite 7-210 Baton Rouge, LA 70802 225-342-5396 Anya.hudnal@la.gov www.la.gov .......................................................................

Calvert County Economic Development

Julie Oberg, Director 205 Main Street Prince Frederick, MD 20678 410-535-4583 julie.oberg@calvertcountymd.gov www.ecalvert.com .......................................................................

Carroll County Economic Development

Paige Sunderland, Director 225 N. Center Street, Ste. 101 Westminster, MD 21157 410-386-2070 psunderland@carrollbiz.org www.carrollbiz.org .......................................................................

St. Mary Parish of Economic Development

Evan Boudreaux Director 500 Main Street, 5th Floor Courthouse Franklin, LA 70538 337-828-4100 ecodev@stmaryparishla.gov www.stmaryparishdevelopmant.com .......................................................................

Jamie L. Williams, CEcD, Director 400 High Street, 3rd Floor Chestertown MD 21620 410-810-2168 jlwilliams@kentgov.org www.kentcounty.com/business .......................................................................

Maryland Department of Commerce

Tom Riford 100 Community Place Crownsville, MD 21032 877-634-6361 www.maryland.gov .......................................................................

Montgomery County Economic Development

Kristin O’Keefe 1801 Rockville Pike, Ste. 320 Rockville, MD 20852 240-641-6703 kristin@thinkmoco.com www.thinkmoco.com .......................................................................

Talbot County Economic Development

Cassandra M. Vanhooser, Director 11 S. Harrison Street Easton, MD 21601 410-770-8000 Cvanhooser@talbgov.org www.talbgov.org .......................................................................

MICHIGAN

SWLA Economic Development ALLIANCE

George Swift 4310 Ryan Street Lake Charles LA 70605 337-433-3632 gswift@allianceswla.org www.allianceswla.org .......................................................................

MINNESOTA

Cecil County Economic Development

Sandra Edwards, Director 200 Chesapeake Blvd., Ste 2700 Elkton, MD 21921 410-996-8471 sedwards@ccgov.org www.ccgov.org .......................................................................

Dorchester County Economic Development

Susan Banks, Director 104 Tech Park Drive Cambridge, MD 21613 410-228-0155 sbanks@choosedorchester.org www.choosedorchester.org .......................................................................

Economic Development Alliance (EDA) of St. Clair County Dan Casey, CEO 100 McMorran Boulevard 4th Floor, Suite B Port Huron, Michigan 48060 Ph: 810.982.9511 www.edascc.com stclairhotjobs.com .......................................................................

The Right Place, Inc.

Andria Romkema 125 Ottawa Avenue, Suite 450 Grand Rapids, MI 49503 616-771-0563 romkemaa@rightplace.org www.Rightplace.org ....................................................................... bxjmag.com

City of Lakeville Community & Economic Development

David Olson Director 20195 Holyoke Avenue Lakeville, MN 55044 952-985-4421 dolson@lakevillemn.gov www.lakevillemn.gov .......................................................................

MISSOURI

Alliance STL | an initiative of Greater St. Louis, Inc. Steven S. Johnson Chief Business Attraction Officer One Metropolitan Square Suite 1300 St. Louis, MO 63102 314-444-1105 Steve@GreaterSTLinc.com www.GreaterSTLinc.com .......................................................................

Sikeston Regional Chamber & Economic Development Corp.

Mike Marshall 128 N. New Madrid Street Sikeston, MO 63801 573-471-2498 mike.marshall@sikeston.net www.sikeston.net .......................................................................

NEVADA

Las Vegas Global Ecnomic Alliance Perry Ursem Vice President, Business Retention + Expansion 6720 via Austi Parkway Suite #330 Las Vegas, NV 89119 702-791-0000 www.Ivgea.org .......................................................................

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NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF

ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

The Agency-Broome County IDA/LDC

Northeastern Nevada Regional Development Authority

Sheldon Mudd, Executive Director 1500 College Pkwy McMullen Hall #103 Elko, NV 89801 775-738-2100 775-738-7978(f) smudd@nnrda.com www.nnrda.com .......................................................................

NEW JERSEY

Stacey Duncan, Executive Director of Community & Economic Development Five South College Drive Suite 201 Binghamton, NY 13905 607-584-9000 607-584-9009 (f) smd@theagency-ny.com www.theagency-ny.com .......................................................................

Fulton County Center for Regional Growth

Gloucester County Department of Economic Development

Tom Bianco, Director 1480 Tanyard Rd., Sewell, NJ 08080 856-384-6930 tbianco@co.gloucester.nj.us www.gloucestercountynj.gov .......................................................................

New Jersey EDA

Pat J. Rose 36 West State Street Trenton, NJ 08625 609-858-6705 prose@njeda.com www.njeda.com .......................................................................

NEW MEXICO

Ronald M. Peters 34 West Fulton Street Gloversville, NY 12078 518-725-7700 ext. 2 ronp@fccrg.org www.fccrg.org .......................................................................

Mohawk Valley Edge

Nick Bruno 584 Phoenix Drive Rome, NY 13441-4105 315-338-0393 nbruno@mvedge.org www.mvedge.org ..................................................................

NORTH CAROLINA

Jennifer Grassham, CEO 200 E. Broadway Street Hobbs, NM 88240 573-397-2039 jennifer@edclc.org www.edclc.org .......................................................................

Martyn Johnson, Director 705 Page Road Washington, NC 27889 252-946-3970 252-946-0849 (f) martyn.johnson@beaufortedc.com www.co.beaufort.nc.us ..................................................................

Harnett County Economic Development

Craig Clark, Executive Director CrossRoads Center 6087 State Route 19N, Suite 100 Belmont, NY 14813 585-268-7445 585-268-7473 (f) clarkcr@alleganyco.com www.acida.org ....................................................................... JULY/AUGUST 2022

Shannon Allen 1000A Ted Johnson Parkway Greensboro, NC 27409 336-665-5602 allens@gsoair.org www.landatpti.com .......................................................................

Stanly County Economic Development Commission

Candice Boyd Lowder, Director 1000 North First Street, Suite 11 Albemarle, NC 28001 704-986-3682 704-986-3685 (f) clowder@stanlyedc.com www.stanlyedc.com .......................................................................

Bismarck Mandan Chamber EDC

Nathan Schneider , CEcD-Vice President 1640 Burnt Boat Dr. Bismark, ND 58503 701-223-5660 nschneider@bmcedc.com www.bismarckmandan.com .......................................................................

OKLAHOMA

Allegany County Industrial Development Agency

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Piedmont Triad Airport Authority

NORTH DAKOTA

NEW YORK

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Preston Hunter, Executive Director 2780 Jetport Road Kinston, NC 28504 252-775-6183 252-522-1765 (f) phunter@ncdot.gov www.ncgtp.com ......................................................................

Ponca City Development Authority David Myers, Executive Director 102 S. Fifth Street Suite 3 Ponca City, OK 74601 580-765-7070 580-765-7070 (f) dmyers@goponca.com www.goponca.com .......................................................................

RHODE ISLAND

City of Cranston

Lawrence DiBoni, Director of Economic Development 869 Park Avenue Cranston, RI 02910 401-780-3166 401-780-3179 (f) ldiboni@cranstonri.org www.cranstonri.com .......................................................................

City of Warwick Department of Tourism, Culture, and Development

Elizabeth J. Dunton, Acting Director 3275 Pos t Road Warwick, RI 2886 401-921-7711 401-732-7662 elizabeth.j.dunton@warwickri.com movetowarwickri.com ..................................................................

Beaufort County Economic Development

EDC of Lea County

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North Carolina Global Transpark

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Debbie Taylor, Marketing & Business Recruitment Manager 200 Alexander Dr. or PO Box 1270 Lillington, NC 27546 910-814-6891 919-814-8298 (f) dhtaylor@harnett.org www.harnettedc.org ....................................................................... bxjmag.com

Bartlesville Development Authority

Jared Patton, Vice President 201 SW Keeler Bartlesville, OK 74003 918-337-8086 918-337-0216 (f) jpatton@bdaok.org www.bdaok.org .......................................................................

Quonset Development Corporation

Steven J. King, Managing Director 95 Cripe Street North Kingstown, RI 2852 401-295-0044 sking@quonset.com www.quonset.com .......................................................................

SOUTH CAROLINA

Charleston Regional Development Alliance Claire Gibbons 4401 Belle Oaks Drive, Suite 420 North Charleston, SC 29405 843-760-3351 cgibbons@crda.org www.crda.org .......................................................................


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Lexington County Economic Development

Sarah J. Johnson Department Director 212 South Lake Drive Lexington, SC 29072 803-785-6818 sjjohnson@lex-co.com www.LexingtonCountyUSA.com .......................................................................

South Carolina I-77 Alliance

Christopher Finn 3200 Commerce Drive, Suite D Richburg, SC 29729 803-789-3467 chris.finn@i77alliance.com www.i77alliance.com ........................................................................

SouthernCarolina Regional Alliance

Kay Maxwell 1750 Jackson Street, Suite 100 Barnwell, SC 29812 803-541-0023 kmaxwell@southerncarolina.org www.southerncarolina.org .....................................................................

TENNESSEE

NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF

ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

City of Lebanon

Sarah Haston Economic Development Director 200 North Castle Heights Ave. Lebanon, TN 37087 615-443-2839 EXT. 2120 Sarah.Haston@lebanontn.org www.lebanontn.org .......................................................................

DeSoto Economic Development

Cedar Hill Economic Development Corporation

Andy J. Buffington, CEcD, IOM 285 Uptown Boulevard, Bldg. 100 Cedar Hill, TX 75104 972-291-5132 chedc@cedarhilltx.com www.cedarhilledc.com .......................................................................

LCRA

NETWORKS – Sullivan Partnership

Clay Walker PO Box 747, Blountville, TN 37617 423-279-7681 cwalker@networkstn.com www.networkstn.com .......................................................................

TEXAS

Big Spring Economic Development Corporation Mark Willis 215 W. 3rd Street Big Spring, TX 79720 432-264-6032 markwillis@bigspringtx.com www.bigspringtx.com .......................................................................

City Development Corp of El Campo Carolyn Gibson Executive Director 707 Fahrenthold P.O. Box 706 El Campo, TX 77437 979-543-6727 979-320-7727 cell cgibson@elcampoeco.org www.elcampoeco.org .......................................................................

City of Fort Worth

Robert Sturns, Director 1150 S. Freeway Fort Worth, TX 76104 817-392-2663 Robert.Sturns@fortworthtexas.gov .......................................................................

Bowie Economic Development Corporation Blount Partnership

Bryan Daniels CEcD, CCE, IOM President and CEO 201 S. Washington Street St. Maryville, TN 37804 865-983-2247 865-984-1386 bdaniels@blountpartnership.com www.blountchamber.com .......................................................................

Matt Carlson, CEO 211 E. Pleasant Run Road DeSoto, TX 75115 Ph: 972-230-9611 mcarlson@desototexas.gov www.dedc.org .......................................................................

Janis Crawley 101 E. Pecan, Bowie, TX 76230 940-872-4193 940-531-8201(c) BEDC@BowieTexasEDC.com www.BowieTexasEDC.com .......................................................................

Karen Dickson Economic Development Manager 3700 Lake Austin Blvd. Austin, TX 78703 512-578-3291 karen.dickson@lcra.org www.lcra.org/economic-development/ pages/default.aspx .......................................................................

McKinney Economic Development Corporation

Peter Tokar III President/CEO 5900 S. Lake Forest Drive McKinney, TX 75070 972-435-6953 ptokar@mckinneyedc.com www.uniquemckinney.com .......................................................................

Mineola Economic Development Corp City of Leander

Cameron Goodman Economic Development Director 201 N Brushy Leander, TX 78641 512-528-2852 cgoodman@leandertx.gov www.leanderbusiness.com .......................................................................

Mercy Rushing, Executive Director 300 Greenville Highway Mineola, TX 75773 903-569-6183 903-245-8505 mrushing@mineola.com www.mineola.com .......................................................................

Cameron Industrial Foundation Bristol Tennessee Essential Services April Eads Business Development Manager 2470 Volunteer Parkway Bristol, TN 37620 423-793-5532 423-793-5545 (f) aeads@btes.net www.btes.net/index.php/economic-development .......................................................................

Ginger Watkins, Executive Director 102 E. First Street, Suite A Cameron, TX 76520 254-697-4970 254-482-1119 (c) gwatkins@cameronindustrialfoundation.com www.cameronindustrialfoundation. com .......................................................................

Odessa Economic Development Corporation

Conroe Economic Development Council

Danielle Scheiner, Executive Director 300 W Davis St, Ste 510 Conroe, TX 77301 USA 936-538-7118 scheiner@conroeedc.org www.conroeedc.org ....................................................................... bxjmag.com

Tom Manskey 700 N. Grant Ave. Odessa, TX 79761 432-333-7880 tom@odessaecodev.com www.odessatx.com .......................................................................

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Jacksboro Economic Development Corporation

Kristi Aday, Executive Director 1906 West 5th Plainview, TX 79072 806-293-8536 kaday@plainviewtx.org www.plainviewedc.org .......................................................................

TexAmericas Center

Laredo Economic Development

Gene Lindgren President & CEO P.O. Box 2682 Laredo, TX 78044 956-722-0563 glindgren@laredoedc.org www.laredoedc.org .......................................................................

Marble Falls EDC

Christian Fletcher 801 Fourth Street Marble Falls, TX 78654 830-798-7079 cfletcher@marblefallseconomy.com www.marblefallseconomy.com .......................................................................

Nathan Tafoya, Executive Director 1604 N. Jefferson Ave. Mount Pleasant, TX 75455 903-572-6602 nathan@mpedc.org www.mpedc.org .......................................................................

New Braunfels EDC

Michele Boggs Marketing/Research Director 390 S. Seguin Avenue New Braunfels, TX 78130 830-608-2811 michele@innewbraunfels.com www.newbraunfelsedc.com .......................................................................

Amy Madison 3801 Helios Way Suite 130 Pflugerville, TX 78660 512-990-3725 amym@pfdevelopment.com www.pfevelopment.com ....................................................................... JULY/AUGUST 2022

Whitesboro Economic Development Corp.

Lynda Anderson, Director P.O. Box 340 or 111 W. Main Whitesboro, TX 76273 930-564-3311 landerson@whitesborotexas.com www.whitesborotexas.com .......................................................................

Eagle Mountain Economic Development

Aaron Sanborn, City Administrator 1650 E. Stagecoach Run Eagle Mountain, UT 84005 801-789-6621 asanborn@emcity.org www.eaglemountaincity.com .......................................................................

VIRGINA

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Bedford County Office of Economic Development

Pam Bailey Director of Economic Development Bedford County 122 East Main Street, Suite 202 Bedford, Virginia 24523 540-587-5670 540-586-0406 (f) pbailey@bedfordcountyva.gov www.bedfordeconomicdevelopment. com .......................................................................

Madison Region Economic Partnership

Kathy Collins, VP Economic Development 8517 Excelsior Drive, Suite 107 Madison, WI 53717 608-571-0407 kcollins@madisonregion.org www.madisonregion.org .......................................................................

WASHINGTON

City of Lakewood Economic Development

Becky Newton, Manager 6000 Main Street SW Lakewood, WA 98499 877-421-9126 bnewton@cityoflakewood.us www.buildyourbetterhere.com .......................................................................

New North, Inc

Barb LaMue President & CEO 2740 W. Mason Street Green Bay, WI 54303 920-676-1960 barb.lamue@thenewnorth.com www.thenewnorth.com .......................................................................

City of Maple Valley

Tim Morgan Economic Development Manager P.O. Box 320 Maple Valley, WA 98038 425-413-8800 tim.morgan@maplevalleywa.gov www.maplevalleywa.gov ..................................................................

Try-City Development Council

Karl Dye, President & CEO 7130 W. Grandridge Blvd #A Kennewich, WA 99336 509-735-1000 kdye@tridec.org www.tridec.org ..................................................................

Portage County Business Council, Inc. PCB

Todd Kuckkahn Executive Director 5501 Vern Holmes Drive Stevens Point, WI 54482 715-344-1940 715-344-1940 (f) tkuckkah@portagecountybiz.com www.portagecountyconnects.com .......................................................................

WYOMING

WISCONSIN Arlington Economic Development

Pflugerville Community Development

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Eric Voyles, Executive Vice President Chief Economic Development Officer 107 Chapel Lane New Boston, TX 75570 903-306-8923 Eric.Voyles@texamericascenter.com www.texamericascenter.com .......................................................................

UTAH

Mount Pleasant EDC

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ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

Plainview Economic Development Corporation

Lynda Pack Executive Director P.O. Box 610 Jacksboro, TX 76458 940-567-3151 lyndapack@jacksboroedc.com www.jacksboroedc.com ..................................................................

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NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF

Telly Tucker, AED Director 1100 N Glebe Rd Suite 1500 Arlington, VA 22201 703-228-0808 703-228-0805 (f) ttucker@arlingtonva.us www.arlingtoneconomicdevelopment. com ....................................................................... bxjmag.com

City of Franklin Economic Development

Calli Berg, Director 9229 W. Loomis Road Franklin, WI 53132 414-427-7566 cberg@franklinwi.gov www.franklinwi.gov .......................................................................

Advance Casper

Morryah McCurdy 111 S. Durbin, Suite 200 Casper, WY 82601 307-577-7011 morryah@advancecasper.com www.advancecasper.com .......................................................................


2 0 2 2

NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF

ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

MANITOBA City of Mississauga Economic Development

Cheyenne LEADS

Betsey Hale, Chief Executive Officer One Depot Square 121 W. 15th St. Suite 304 Cheyenne, WY 82001 307-638-6000 betseyh@cheyenneleads.org cheyenneleads.org .......................................................................

The Laramie Chamber Business Alliance

Josh Boudreau, VP Economic Development 528 South Adams Street Laramie, WY 82070 307-745-7339 jboudreau@laramie.org www.laramie.org .......................................................................

CANADA ALBERTA

Calgary Economic Development

500 Centre Street S, 32nd Floor Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2G 1A6 403-221-7831 info@calgaryeconomicdevelopment.com www.calgaryeconomicdevelopment.com .......................................................................

County of Elgin City of Brandon

Dan Fontaine Business Development Specialist Main Floor, 410 9th Street Brandon, Manitoba, Canada R7A 6A2 204-729-2133 d.fontaine@brandon.ca www.economicdevelomentbrandon.com .......................................................................

ONTARIO

Kate Burns-Gallagher Manager Economic Development And Tourism 450 Sunset Drive St. Thomas, Ontario, Canada N5R 5V1 519-631-1460 ext. 137 kburns@elgin.ca www.progressivebynature.com .......................................................................

City of Guelph

Christine Chapman 1 Carden Street Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1H 3A1 519--822-1260 ext. 2823 Christine.chapman@guelph.ca www.guelph.ca/business .......................................................................

Town of Ajax

Samuel Twumasi Manager, Economic Development & Tourism 65 Harwood Avenue South Ajax, Ontario, Canada L1S 2H9 905-619-2529 ext. 3281 samuel.twumasi@ajax.ca www.ajax.ca .......................................................................

Bonnie Brown Mississauga City Hall 300 City Centre Drive, 3rd Floor Mississauga, ON L5B 3C1 Canada 800-456-2181 905-896-5931 bonnie.brown@mississauga.ca www.TheFuturelsUnlimited.ca .......................................................................

Vaughan Economic and Cultural Development

Raphael Costa Vaughan City Hall, Level 200 2141 Major Mackenzie Drive Vaughan, Ontario, Canada L6A 1T1 905-832-8526 ext. 8891 raphael.costa@vaughan.ca www.vaughan.ca/Business .......................................................................

NEW BRUNSWICK

Middlesex County

Cara A. Finn, BBA, M. Ad.Ed. Director of Economic Development 399 Ridout St. North London, ON N6A 2P1 519-434-7321 cfinn@middlesex.ca www.investinmiddlesex.ca .......................................................................

Ignite Fredericton

Paula Lehr 40 Crowther Lane, Ste. 100 Fredericton, NB E3C 0J1 506-282-0624 paula.lehr@ignitefredericton.com www.ignitefredericton.com .......................................................................

ADVERTISER & EDIT INDEX Advertiser

INDIANA

Ports of Indiana

ILLINOIS

Arlington Heights Litchfield

KANSAS

Dodge City/Ford County El Dorado Leavenworth County Salina

LOUISIANA

Southwest Louisiana

MARYLAND Kent County

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BC

11

41 42

41 42

Advertiser

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Port of Baltimore Queen Anne’s County St. Mary’s County

7 33 35

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NORTH CAROLINA

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3

RHODE ISLAND 37 38 39 39

37 38 38 39

Quonset Business Park

5

10

ONTARIO, CANADA

1

32

NEW BRUNSWICK, CANADA Chaleur Region Dieppe Fredericton

Middlesex County IEDC CONFERENCE

bxjmag.com

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10

31 29 27

30 29 28

16 IFC

17

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