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October/November 2020 | bxjmag.com

2020 NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

AVIATION & AEROSPACE

OPENING UP MORE

OPPORTUNITIES

Automotive Industry: Ready to Shift into High Gear Business Services Today Focus on Human Resources, Data Analytics EXPANSION OPPORTUNITIES ALABAMA • ARIZONA • GEORGIA ILLINOIS • NORTH DAKOTA SOUTH CAROLINA • UTAH • WYOMING


TABLE OF

CONTENTS

OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020

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FEATURES INDUSTRY OUTLOOK: A blended renaissance of aviation and aerospace opening up more opportunities

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Alan Reyes-Guerra

New ideas are coming fast and furious from NASA and independent businesses, including supersonic business jets and a permanent presence on the Moon.

areyes@bxjmag.com

By David Hodes

CONTRIBUTORS

205-862-5175

EDITORIAL David Hodes CREATIVE DIRECTOR Clint Cabiness

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INNOVATION AND STRATEGIES: Ready to shift into high gear The automotive industry is in a pause mode now, but standing by to resume operations at a faster pace. By David Hodes

clint@dialedinmediagroup.com 205-613-5910 EDITORIAL OFFICE King Publishing, Inc. 1000 Stafford Court Birmingham, Alabama 35242 Tel: 205-862-5175 ONLINE MEDIA ASSISTANT Sonia Buchanan

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INDUSTRY INSIGHT: Business services today focus on human resources, data analytics

SUBSCRIPTION CHANGES & REQUESTS 205-862-5175 or www.bxjmag.com

More companies are taking advantage of professional business services, while still seeking to reduce these sort of expenses due to economic slowdown. By David Hodes

EXPANSION O P P O R T U N I T I E S 18 SOUTH CAROLINA: Just Right for Business

27 ALABAMA: Businesses Have the

Skilled Workers Needed to Succeed

31 GEORGIA: Diverse Economy Helps Create 10,000+ Jobs

32 ILLINOIS: Winning in Key

34 36 38 40

Industries

ARIZONA: With Streamlined Regulation and Access to Major World Markets, Arizona is Thriving NORTH DAKOTA: Where Imagination Meets Possibility WYOMING: Most Business-Friendly Tax Climate UTAH: Flourishing Industry, Superior Workforce

42 2020 National Directory of Economic Developers 2 |

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King Publishing, Inc., 1000 Stafford Court, Birmingham, AL 35242; www.bxjmag.com. Advertising rates are furnished upon request. Subscriptions are free to those who qualify. Non-qualified subscriptions are $69 in the U.S.; $89 in Canada and Mexico; elsewhere outside the U.S. is $99 for 10 issues. Back issue rate is $6 when available. Payment must accompany order. The views expressed in all articles and advertisements appearing in the Business Xpansion Journal magazine are solely those of the author and advertiser, respectively. © Copyright 2020, King Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. No partof this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. POSTMASTER: Send change of address notification to Business Xpansion Journal, 1000 Stafford Court, Birmingham, AL 35242. Subscribers can make address changes by calling 205-862-5175 or by e-mail at www.bxjmag.com. 1000 Stafford Court, BIRMINGHAM, AL 35242 TEL: 205-862-5175 2001

Printed in the U.S.A.


INDUSTRY

OUTLOOK

A blended renaissance of aviation and aerospace opening up more opportunities B Y: D AV ID HO D ES

New ideas are coming fast and furious from NASA and independent businesses, including supersonic business jets and a permanent presence on the Moon

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here is a sort of re-emergence of the aviation and aerospace industry, as more developments begin to blur the line between aerospace and aviation work within the industry, along with a fast-rising renaissance of commercial space development that has been pushing the envelope of an invigorated aerospace industry especially in the United States. ............................................................................................... We live in a world where, for 20 years now, at any one time, a human, or a group of humans, have lived off the planet, 250 miles up, cruising around the Earth at five miles a second, on the International Space Station (ISS). So far, 240 humans from 19 countries have called ISS home.


Aerion and Flexjet LLC will offer travelers flights on the first commercially available supersonic business jet, the AS2. Flexjet is the inaugural fleet purchaser of the jet. The jet can travel at Mach 1.5.

A whole generation of humans are accustomed to the idea of a man living and working in space as just another occupation. But there are bigger plans. One of the biggest movers and shakers in the aerospace industry is Elon Musk and his company, SpaceX, which is on track to fulfilling a vision of making mankind an interplanetary species by traveling to and setting up a colony on Mars—a planet currently inhabited by robots sent by the U.S. Musk proposes a plan that would reduce current costs of getting humans to Mars to around $100,000-$200,000 per person—“roughly equivalent to the median price of a house in the U.S.”—and is building and testing a rocket now that would transport 100 people at a time to Mars. Fuel and other needed resources would be created on Mars.

Workforce and business development A world university academic ranking company reported that five countries claim 82 percent of the 2019 top world universities in aerospace engineering: United States, at 34 percent; China, 20 percent; United Kingdom, 14 percent; Italy, 8 percent; and Canada, 6 percent. According to the Aerospace Industries Association (AIA), at nearly 2.2 million strong in 2019, aerospace and defense (A&D) workers represented 1.4 percent of America’s total workforce, or 2.2 million workers, in 2019. This was a nearly five percent increase in the total industry workforce from 2018. Around 58 percent of industry employment was attributed to the aerospace supply chain. Of end-use A&D companies, bxjmag.com

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OUTLOOK

AEROSPACE/AVIATION

Illustration of the Gateway. Built with commercial and international partners, the Gateway is critical to sustainable lunar exploration and will serve as a model for future missions to Mars.

commercial aerospace held the largest share of employees (49 percent of that total). The A&D industry saw business growth in 49 states and the District of Columbia in 2019, including in Wyoming (21 percent), Vermont (15 percent), South Carolina (12 percent), Missouri (11 percent), and Nevada (11 percent). Washington state remained the national hub of the A&D industry, accounting for 15 percent of all U.S. A&D industry sales with $137 billion in statewide revenue. It was followed closely by California at $119 billion in A&D revenue, with Texas, Connecticut, and Arizona trailing not far behind.

Other economic development Many of the world’s largest aerospace and defense companies have a significant presence in Arlington, Virginia, including Boeing, Lockheed Martin, and Raytheon Technologies. 6 |

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But Florida is still the key state in aerospace and aviation. In fact, Boeing moved its space and launch division headquarters from Arlington to Titusville, Florida, one of the five Boeing locations in Florida, in late 2019 to be closer to the action. The company also created a $3 million scholarship program at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. The move was driven in part by Boeing’s work on NASA’s Artemis program to get astronauts back to the moon by 2024. Nearly 106,000 Floridians work in Florida’s aviation and aerospace industries, including rocket scientists, machinists, pilots, engineers, and other advanced technology workers. There are over 540 aerospace companies, 1,780 aviation companies, 20 commercial service airports, two space ports, and 130 public use airports in the state. In addition to Boeing in Florida are Embraer’s North


America headquarters in Fort Lauderdale, which just expanded its business jet service center there; Piper Aircraft, headquartered in Vero Beach, Florida; the 110,000 square foot Airbus Training Center in Miami; Lockheed Martin; GE Aviation; plus both the Elon Musk aerospace company SpaceX and the Jeff Bezos aerospace company, Blue Origin. United Launch Alliance, which has had a record of 135 consecutive launches since 2006, is also based in Florida.

The design renaissance What is particularly exciting about aviation working in aerospace is a new line of commercial supersonic jets being developed to create a new era of supersonic travel (the supersonic commercial jet, the Concorde, was retired in 2003 in part because of sonic booms causing environmental damage). A new supersonic business jet is being developed now at Aerion Corporation, headquartered in Reno, Nevada with a new global headquarters in Melbourne, Florida. Aerion’s new supersonic business jet, the AS2, will be manufactured in 2023 and take flight in 2025. The AS2 is the first supersonic aircraft designed to be powered by 100 percent synthetic fuel and reach supersonic

speeds without the need for an afterburner. The 8-10 passenger business jet has a maximum speed of Mach 1.4—or approximately 1,000 miles per hour—flying at 57,000 feet. An order for the manufacture of 300 AS2s has already been placed by various aviation companies. One of those companies, FlexJet, a private jet ownership and leasing company, put in a firm order for 20 AS2s in November, 2015. The AS2 will be the first aircraft to be assembled at the Aerion’s new global headquarters in Melbourne. The company is working with partners Lockheed Martin, GE Aviation, and Honeywell. One of the reasons supersonic jets are making a comeback is because of new technologies designed to reduce the effect of the sonic boom. Sonic booms from jets flying over land were common during the height of the cold war in the early 1960s, rattling windows and shaking glasses in cabinets. The space shuttle generated a sonic boom on its way down for a landing. Tim Etherington, a pilot and flight deck design engineer at Rockwell Collins for 30 years now working at NASA Langley in Virginia, says that there is a lot work going on to allow a supersonic jets to fly over a number of cities. NASA is now collecting citizen comments.

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OUTLOOK

AEROSPACE/AVIATION

ZEROe is an Airbus concept aircraft. In the blended-wing body configuration, two hybrid hydrogen turbofan engines provide thrust. The liquid hydrogen storage tanks are stored under the wings.

NASA and the FAA want to come up with a new noise regulation to allow supersonic flights over land. Etherington explains that there is a way to mitigate the sonic boom, effectively “bending” the boom sound above a certain altitude to refract it back rather than reach the ground. “That is called Mach cutoff, which is an altitude for a particular day for a particular atmosphere at a temperature, among other criteria,” he says. “If you fly above that altitude, the sonic boom will be dissipated before it reaches the ground. You can calculate that if you know all the characteristics of the atmosphere and fly at the right height.” Etherington is working on a synthetic vision display design incorporating a sonic boom carpet, using a NASA developed algorithm that includes sonic boom prediction, Mach cut-off, and sound pressure levels calculated for current and modified flights plans. The algorithm information is transformed into geo-referenced objects, presented on navigation and guidance displays, where pilots can determine whether the current 8 |

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flight plan avoids the generation of sonic booms in noise-sensitive areas. The display depiction is a sonic boom footprint which changes location as the aircraft maneuvers. These technological and regulatory developments about supersonic jets are coming even as the building of supersonic planes continues. “All of these things are happening at the same time,” Etherington says. A lot of what is happening now with supersonic jets came out of the hypersonic research, he says, with hypersonic development possibly in the lead. “It could be that supersonic is still not as economically viable as hypersonic,” he says. “It depends on who you talk to. There is still research work done to bring the cost of the hypersonic engine down.”

The search for innovations Another state with a huge presence of aerospace is Ohio, ranked second for aerospace growth by PriceWaterhouse Cooper (PwC) in 2020. Mary Lobo is the director of technology/incubation


SIDEBAR

to solve our problems for exploration and even for aviation.” NASA has awarded $3.75 billion to 15,000 research-intensive small business to get the ball rolling: “spark innovation” and “engage the brightest minds”. “It’s NASA’s way of saying, “’Hey, we know that the ideas come from a lot of places,’” Lobo says. There are serious challenges in going back to the Moon and off to Mars, she says. “There are so many things to check off to have a sustainable presence on the One of the first supersonic commercial jets, the Aerion AS2, in flight in mountains. Moon.” One of those problems NASA needs to solve is how to work on the dark-side surface of the Moon where there is no sunshine and batteries can’t be used. How are we going get power? “We are and innovation office at the NASA Glenn Research Center providing rewards to incentivize the public to try to bring us in Cleveland, Ohio. The Center’s rather grand mission is to “drive research, technology, and systems to advance aviation, those ideas,” Lobo says. X expand human presence across the solar system, enable exploration of the universe, and improve life on Earth.” NASA Glenn is overseeing contracts to develop a power and propulsion system for the Gateway platform, which will be an outpost orbiting the Moon that provides vital support for a sustainable, long-term human return to the lunar surface, as well as a staging point for deep space exploration. Canada, Japan and the European Union are assisting in developing Gateway as well. The power and propulsion element (PPE) being developed at NASA Glenn is a high-power, 60-kilowatt solar electric propulsion spacecraft that will provide power, high-rate communications, attitude control, and orbital transfer capabilities for the Gateway. “When it comes to a sustainable human presence on the Moon, allowing for the kind of return trips and going to different locations on the Moon, having a floating habitat there powered by a thruster system that gives us that high thrust and low fuel demand is critical,” Lobo says.

Searching for more innovation As the Gateway project continues to develop, NASA has accelerated its look to outside agencies and companies in recent years to find new ideas. NASA Glenn is part of that. Lobo says that the Glenn engineers and others in NASA engineering groups are focusing on how to get new ideas created inside of NASA out into the hands of the public. “This is a way of finding out how can we develop technologies using collaboration with industry and academia to solve NASA problems,” she says. “It’s a two way street, as we look bxjmag.com

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INNOVATIONS & STRATEGIES

AUTOMOTIVE

Ready to shift into high gear B Y: DAV ID HO D ES

The automotive industry is in a pause mode now, but standing by to resume operations at a faster pace

T

he automotive industry continues to weather the fluctuations of the industry, which had seen, pre-COVID, signs of life. ....................................................................................................

The Wall Street Journal reported in July that General Motors Co. and Ford Motor Co. are “continuing to struggle with keeping workers on the job as coronavirus cases surge nationwide, forcing the auto-making giants to cut shifts, hire new workers and transfer others to fill vacant roles.�

Pandemic still causing problems At the beginning of the pandemic, the scenario of a potential shutdown of 10 |

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Acura’s all new 2021 TLX, available this fall, has a 272 horse power turbo engine and a unique updated air bag system.

automobile production was promoted by the Union Auto Workers Labor Union (UAW), who advised shutting down General Motors, Ford and Chrysler for two weeks. That didn’t happen. If it had happened, the Center for Automotive Research (CAR) estimated that just a one-week shutdown would have resulted in an estimated annual loss of 94,400 total U.S. jobs and $7.3 billion in overall earnings. The effect of the pandemic affected the whole system of the automotive business.

Robert Forrester, CEO of Vertu Motors operating 130-plus dealerships in the United Kingdom, told researchers at McKinsey and Company that he thinks the pandemic has changed car buying slightly. “But I already see a reversing trend from what we saw at the height of the pandemic,” he said. “We sold over 3,000 cars while we were on complete lockdown.” “Fifty percent of customers were happy to take delivery without having seen the car; the other 50 percent waited for the lockdown to ease because they wanted to test-drive the car, which I think is quite interesting.”

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AUTOMOTIVE

GM opens new $65 million customer care aftersales. It is GM’s largest single investment in a warehouse and logistics facility in the U.S. in nearly 40 years.

Driving the economy The pandemic crystallized what the world already knew: the automobile industry is a major driver of economic vitality. According to CAR, General Motors—the largest automaker by U.S. market share and second-largest automaker by U.S. light vehicle production by volume (1.7 million in 2019), with 32 manufacturing facilities in the U.S.—is a significant contributor to the U.S. economy overall, plus for the economies of the nine states in which GM has manufacturing facilities. GM employs 83,850 hourly and salaried employees in the U.S., and is also among the largest investors in the U.S. automotive industry, with a total of $44.3 billion in announced investments in the country since 2000. The industry had been working to redesign models and do other consumer pro-active work on cars before the pandemic hit. An annual study from Merrill Lynch released in May, 2019, “Car Wars,” found that the accelerating boom of new model 12 |

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launches in the mid-2000s took a slight breather from model years 2009-2014, but had reaccelerated once again in model years 2015-2016 and has remained reasonably solid since then. “Product activity appears to be picking up once again in the later stages of the cycle, which we believe is indicative of competition intensifying,” the study stated. “However, on a volume weighted basis there is some relative easing.” The study also noted that OEMs were set to launch 246 new models from 2020-2023, or an average of 62 per year. “This rate is over 50 percent above the average number of models launched per year between model years 2000 and 2019, underscoring that competition is extremely hot.” That competition led all automakers to try to find ways of differentiating their product, the report continued, which has resulted in a strengthening pace of new model introductions, a search for relatively unique models, and a step up in vehicle technology. Many of those predictions now have to be framed within the confines of the fallout from the pandemic.


Emerging technologies While the industry weighs its options for recovery, the pace of innovations continue. One of those new emerging technologies is the electric car, rolled out nearly 30 years ago and now facing a growing amount of consumer acceptance as emissions from cars continue to play a large role in the effects of global warming. Electric vehicles can improve nationwide air quality and reduce petroleum consumption by 3 to 4 million barrels per day by 2050, according to the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), an industry think tank. The cost of electricity, per mile of driving, is less than one-fifth that of gasoline. A study by the EPRI found that, if 40 percent of all light-duty vehicles in six regions of the U.S. (including Austin, Texas; Kansas City, Missouri; and Sacramento, California) were electrified, driving on electric power for only 20 percent of the miles traveled, the regional fuel cost savings would be $190 to $720 million each year.

GM reportedly plans to launch 20 all-new electric vehicles by 2023 across its entire global product line. Ford has indicated that it will invest over $11 billion on development of electrified vehicles through 2022, with plans to launch 16 battery electric vehicles over that timeframe, according to the Car Wars report. In 2017, Toyota announced its targets for electrified vehicle (hybrid, plug-in hybrid, electric vehicle, and fuel cell vehicle) sales over the 2020-2030 timeframe, with the goal of selling at least 5.5 million electrified vehicles globally by 2030. Car Wars added that Toyota also plans to accelerate the launch of its fully electric vehicles starting in 2020, initially targeting China, followed by a gradual push into Japan, India, the United States, and Europe, with the aim of having at least 10 electric models available globally in the first half of the 2020s. Honda formed a joint venture in 2017 with GM to mass produce fuel cell systems. Then, in June 2018, Honda also

The GM-EVgo4. GM and EVgo plan to add more than 2,700 fast charges across the U.S. Each station will offer 100-350 kilowatt capabilities.

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INNOVATIONS & STRATEGIES

AUTOMOTIVE

GM-EVgo plan to triple the size of the nation’s largest public fast charging network as early as 2021 located in cities and suburbs. agreed to work with GM on next generation battery components for electric and fully autonomous vehicles. Honda’s ultimate goal is for two-thirds of its vehicle line-up to be powered by non-conventional internal combustion engine systems by 2030. Car Wars summarized electric vehicle production and outlook: “However, what remains very much unclear is, not only how quickly the technology will develop, but also how the technology will be commercially deployed. The general consensus is that autonomous technology/systems will first be deployed in the form of a ride-hailing or ride-sharing program before being deployed for personal consumption/ 14 |

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purchase, as the technology will remain cost prohibitive for consumers (as well as the automotive value chain) in early development phase.” Battery powered cars still face some hurdles. One of those hurdles is weight. The electric vehicles are heavier than internal combustion vehicles, due mainly from the weight of the battery. For example, the Chevrolet Bolt EV weighs 300 pounds more than the similar size Volkswagen Golf. BMW announced that the 2020 Mini EV would weigh 284 pounds more than a base Mini Cooper. These issues are forcing automakers to look for innovative ways to lightweight their vehicles other


Most manufacturers today are employing elements of the nine technologies that are considered to be the building blocks of technology as identified by the Boston Consulting Group. These building blocks include additive manufacturing, augmented reality, autonomous robots, and horizontal and vertical system integration. It’s not for lack of trying that the automobile industry seems out of step with adopting new technology—it’s been identified as more of a corporate culture issue. A 2020 Deloitte automotive insights report found that leading automotive companies already have teams experimenting with certain advanced technologies and data, but their efforts are often hampered by archaic corporate procedures. “In other words, the right approach to transformational change needs to be applied in a holistic manner to realize the maximum value of digital technologies,” according to the insights report. CAR acknowledges that the industry struggles with this and other challenges, which include finding the right skill sets for the job during an economic slowdown; and not using all of the data that is being collected from various new technologies already in place to further experiment with updated methods of manufacturing. As intelligent manufacturing machines keep collecting more data and getting smarter, automobile manufacturing factories will become more efficient and productive, and hopefully, more ecologically friendly. The industry is stepping up investments in digital factory technologies such as smart sensors, cloud computing, and artificial intelligence in a sort of win-win scenario. Cost savings using all these forms of digital technology is expected to be 30 percent by 2025.

What now?

than getting a lighter weight battery, according to research by CAR. CAR projects that future vehicle structures will be a mix of lightweight materials including high-strength steel, high-strength aluminum, some magnesium, as well as plastics and polymer composites for reinforcement.

Adopting new production ideas The automotive industry has historically been the manufacturing operation where new ideas for large scale production are first tried out—but that has not been a seamless, smooth process over the last 5-10 years.

Once the recovery from COVID kicks in, the automobile industry is expected to jump into high gear. Along with retooling the manufacturing operations, and adjusting corporate culture to make needed manufacturing changes that will save money in the long run, automakers will need to address a growing demand from consumers for more entertainment devices in their cars. Consumers also want an eco-friendly car that gets good gas mileage. Or, if it’s an electric car, they want access to an infrastructure that will support recharging easily and quickly. Innovations for sustainability with cars are picking up. For example, in September, Elon Musk announced that Tesla is in the process of redesigning the lithium-ion battery technology that they manufacture, which will result in a $25,000 fully autonomous Tesla within the next three years. The goal is to accelerate the “advent of sustainable energy,” Musk said during a livestream about the battery announcement. X

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INDUSTRY INSIGHT

Business services today focus on human resources, data analytics B Y D AV ID HO D ES

More companies are taking advantage of professional business services, while still seeking to reduce these sort of expenses due to economic slowdown.

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t’s an unusual situation to be stuck trying to make ends meet while trying to keep down the costs of services that help a business make ends meet.. .............................................................................................

Businesses are exploring options. In fact, according to Dunn and Bradstreet research, providers of business support services may actually face competition from customers or potential customers, as these services in many cases can be undertaken in-house with varying levels of success. The U.S. business services sector consists of about 400,000 establishments with combined annual sales of about $917 billion. Companies in the business services sector include office administration, hiring and placing of personnel, security services, travel arrangement, cleaning, and waste disposal, and, more recently, data analytics. The hiring and placing of personnel—“head hunters” or human resources companies—is one of the most important business services today as more people shift career objectives and seek new jobs. Companies are increasingly seeking employees with more technical skills. And they are doing that searching using analytical technologies. According to Allegis Partners, a global executive search firm, areas of focus for human resources today include programmatic advertising, social search,


conversational, artificial intelligence (AI), and automated writing analysis and optimization. Take programmatic advertising solutions. Here, management applies software to automate the buying process for job ads. Solutions leverage electronic marketplaces, where publishers list their ad space and buyers bid for that space. Using AI, programmatic solutions arrive at agreed-upon prices and place ads in optimal locations based on user data. These solutions provide several benefits, according to Allegis. First, they free up recruiter time by intelligently conducting business that previously required human effort. Second, they apply analysis to optimize buying across a broad array of publishing sources, pinpointing opportunities for yielding the most responses (about job seekers) from the given spend. These AI-driven solutions are fast, analyzing large amounts of data from multiple sources that would not be practical for humans to match. Companies providing this type of service include HireVue, a global provider of video assessment technology; Blendoor, which is an AI and people analytics provider that mitigates unconscious bias in hiring; and HackerRank, to help organizations identify software engineers and system developers early in the screening process. There are other ways to use analytics to manage the growth and development of a company beyond human resources, such as hiring a data analytics services company. Dunn and Bradstreet reminds C-suite management that analytics “is a team sport.” Decisions about which analyses to employ, what data sources to mine, and how to present the findings are matters of human judgment that more companies are willing to hire as a service. When looking for help in areas of augmented reality, artificial intelligence, data storage and management—all of which are evolving faster, all of which demand 24/7 attention—the data services company has become the go-to source for

not only managing the standard operating procedures of a company but helping them plan for the future. Examples of data analytics service companies include NTT Data Service, working in healthcare, life sciences, financial services, insurance, manufacturing and the public sector, with strategic alliances with Dell Technologies, HP, IBM, Microsoft, Oracle, and Salesforce; Accenture, with ten innovation hubs,

working with supply chain companies and others to provide growth and development strategies; ScienceSoft, to assist companies in developing software and applications; and Insights Analytics, providing small business with product pricing, promotion, placement, sales and profit analysis, along with optimization strategy, and portfolio strategy.. X

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Home to the Port of Davisville, ranked as one of the Top Ten auto importers in North America The Port of Davisville broke its annual auto imports record in 2019 for the 10th time in 11 years. The Port of Davisville has been instrumental in the development of the offshore wind industry, including the first wind farm in the United States.

To learn more visit quonset.com bxjmag.com

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EXPANSION

OPPORTUNITIES

SOUTH CAROLINA:

Just Right for Business

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outh Carolina prides itself as being a hospitable and business-friendly climate. Their reputation as a superior business location is largely due to an exceptional economic climate that helps companies hold down operating costs and increase their return on investment. In addition, South Carolina’s performance-based tax incentives reward companies for job creation and investment.

........................................................................ The state’s pro-business policies are demonstrated by the following: Several ways to potentially eliminate your entire corporate income taxes; A range of sales tax exemptions that reduce start-up costs and operating costs; Property tax incentives that can be tailored to meet your company’s needs; and Special state discretionary incentives may be used to meet specific needs. 18 |

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SOUTH CAROLINA: CAMP HALL ...................................................................... Camp Hall is the Next Generation Commerce Park designed for the modern workforce located near Charleston, South Carolina and home to Volvo Cars new North American manufacturing plant. South Carolina and Charleston are well recognized as top business-friendly manufacturing locations with a high quality of life. Totaling 6800 acres overall, Camp Hall is ready with 1300 fully developable acres remaining that has the workforce, zoning, permits and major infrastructure already in place enabling a company to start right away. Camp Hall is in a region that is adding 34 new residents every day with its workforce totaling over 500,000 and growing. Three of the region’s fastest growing planned communities closing over 1000 house annually are within less than 15 minutes. Logistics infrastructure is very strong with the Port of Charleston less than a 45-minute drive by truck, an onsite dedicated I-26 interchange for quick access, a rail line extension underway and the


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EXPANSION

OPPORTUNITIES

Charleston International Airport only a 30-minute drive. Camp Hall is attractive to and can serve a wide range and scale of industry. It can meet the needs of a large plant employing several thousand such as Volvo Cars as well as those companies needing only a small space initially to launch and grow. Our focus is on companies that can benefit from the vision of building a place that is designed to attract and retain a quality workforce in a quality environment. The Charleston, South Carolina region is already known for a high quality of life and is recognized worldwide as a destination. Camp Hall is uniquely located to be a reverse commute for most of the region’s population enabling a person many choices. Within 45 minutes a person can choose to be on the shoreline of the Atlantic Ocean, in the urban center of Charleston with its dining and entertainment options, on our two large lake known for their world class fisheries and recreation sites, in a top selling master planned community or enjoying a small town or rural environment. Camp Hall provides many choices and quality of life options. Camp Hall is part of the Charleston, South Carolina region which is blessed with a strong and growing workforce. This workforce is broad with focus on both manufacturing and logistics and already home to Boeing, Mercedes Sprinter Vans, Volvo Cars, Nucor, Bosch to mention only a few. The Port of Charleston plays a key role in attracting workforce in both the manufacturing as well as logistics sector. A detailed workforce study for Camp Hall has already been prepared to provide details and can be reviewed on our website Camphall.com under the workforce tab. South Carolina is a leader in creating customized training programs for developing and enhancing a company’s workforce. Most notable is readySC whereby South Carolina creates a customized training for each company utilizing the program. There are many options depending upon the needs, desire and capability of the company and the student. Many are described on our website Camphall.com in the workforce tab under training. For instance, in the local high schools near Camp Hall there are workforce ready certification programs so graduates are ready enter the manufacturing environment upon graduation. Trident Technical Collage has many more programs including a new facility just recently opened focused specifically on aviation and advanced manufacturing. There are numerous 4-year colleges nearby including engineering programs for bachelor as well as advanced technical degrees. The recreational activities in the Charleston region are extensive and world renowned. These include multiple options for accessing the many beaches and waterways for both salt and fresh water. Dining, entertainment and cultural options are extensive. If you like mountains they are less than 4 hours away. Camp Hall has a dedicated interchange on I-26 which is 20 |

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both 30 miles from the Port of Charleston as well as 30 miles to I-95 enabling access throughout the Southeastern US and the Eastern US. The Camp Hall Rail Line is currently being extended by Palmetto Rail to Camp Hall from its interconnect with CSX to provide rail service for Volvo Cars as well as users throughout Camp Hall. There are two major points. First is Camp Hall’s focus on people and serving the workforce which can be highlighted by our Village Center with development now underway. The Village Center will provide services in support of the workforce such as food, fuel and convenience items as well as recreation options for fitness and fun such as its multi-purpose soccer field, the fitness area and the trail hub for a central access point to the many miles of trails via foot or bicycle. The second is our focus on technology and its importance in daily life as well as workplace. Fiber is already on site with redundant and diverse options in up to 5 public rights of way. Wireless is already in place with plans for enhancing it to create a seamless network throughout Camp Hall to support strong connectivity for people and the modern workplace.

SOUTH CAROLINA: Charleston Offers a New Allure for Businesses and Talent ......................................................................

Despite COVID and its impacts, more than 28,000 new jobs are forecast to be added in the next five years in the threecounty Charleston region. Charleston’s fast-growing and diverse industry sectors – life sciences, tech, logistics, aerospace and automotive - coupled with the strength of its military, tourism, and healthcare clusters has created an influx of talent to Charleston. Ranked the #1 City in the U.S. eight years running by readers of Travel + Leisure and Condé Nast Traveler and dubbed the country’s top “Millennial Magnet” by USA Today, Charleston beckons double the college-educated and skilled young people compared to other U.S. metros. With a population growing three times the national average, Charleston is poised to reach more than one million residents by 2030. The inflow goes further than millennials. Emerging faster than cities like Austin and Atlanta, 62% of Charleston’s incoming labor pool is within the ages of 18 to 44. This economic momentum is the result of a decades-long strategic effort to diversify and transform into a technology-driven economy, and position Charleston as a globally competitive location for business, talent, and entrepreneurs.

FOREFRONT OF LIFE SCIENCES Charleston’s supportive environment for innovation includes more than 75 life science manufacturers, research laboratories


Charleston is a talent magnet With thriving industry sectors, ample career opportunities, and a desirable lifestyle, it’s not hard to understand why 30 people per day move to Charleston | SC.

Ready to join innovative businesses and executives calling Charleston home? Contact Charleston Regional Development Alliance for a seamless experience. + 1.843.259.8381 • alliance@crda.org charlestoneconomicdevelopment.com


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and service companies. Now, the community is running full steam ahead with new state-of-the-art facilities for research and discovery. WestEdge is transforming 3 million square feet on the Charleston Peninsula into innovation and living space. The innovation district is strategically located next to the Medical University of South Carolina, the College of Charleston, The Citadel, and Roper St. Francis Healthcare.

SEAMLESS GLOBAL CONNECTIONS Nearly one-third of the U.S. population resides within 500 miles of the Charleston region. Convenient access to three international airports, dual rail service, two inland ports, and multiple interstates give Charleston businesses a leg up on logistics. Charleston offers nonstop flights to London’s Heathrow and will begin nonstop service to Los Angeles in December. The deepwater Port of Charleston is the most productive and fastest-growing port in North America, making it a natural choice for thyssenkrupp, FedEx, UPS, DHL, Wal-Mart, XPO Logistics and others. The Port recently expanded its capacity to meet increased demand for refrigerated and frozen cargo, an advantage for life sciences. Already home to the deepest harbor in the south Atlantic Ocean, the harbor will achieve a 52-foot depth in 2021 to enable access for mega container ships. It already services the largest container ships that call on the East Coast and provides global access to 150+ countries.

TECH TALENT MAGNET With more than 600 tech companies including global giants like Google, Blackbaud and Boeing, Charleston’s regional tech workforce concentration is higher than the U.S. average. Between IT and STEM occupations, more than 31,000 professionals contribute to Charleston’s booming tech sector. Charleston offers access to enterprise-class data center services with secure, fully redundant, carrier-neutral co-location facilities; public, private and hybrid Cloud solutions; and managed services, including disaster recovery, managed network security, and application and web hosting.

AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY WITH TRACTION Charleston’s desirable location, lifestyle, and ability to attract top engineering and production talent are competitive advantages allowing Volvo, Mercedes-Benz Vans, Bosch, Cummins Turb Tech, and other automotive companies to keep the rubber on the road. The Charleston supply chain is growing with the addition of more automotive parts providers, precision machine shops and fabricated metal parts suppliers. And Charleston’s economic development and industry leaders are already collaborating to address supply chain disruption and transformation post COVID-19.

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GET MORE IN CHARLESTON Charleston offers a cost of living below the national average, one of the best medical hubs in the Southeast, diverse housing options and low residential property taxes, so living here means getting more bang (and square footage) for your buck. You can live and work anywhere, why not choose Charleston?

SOUTH CAROLINA: I-77 CORRIDOR STANDS READY ....................................................

Around the world, forward-looking enterprises are planning for a post-pandemic future. Communities that continued to invest in their infrastructure, workforce, and quality of life assets will be positioned to land those prospects as they decide the time is right to expand. The five South Carolina counties, comprising the corridor from Charlotte, N.C. to Columbia, S.C., is just such a community where strategic planning and partnerships will build on a long successful run of attracting corporate expansions and relocations. Serving as the economic development organization for these counties, (Richland, Fairfield, Chester, Lancaster, and York), the South Carolina I-77 Alliance does not manage projects, therefore, 100% of its efforts are focused on filling the project pipeline and supporting the counties’ efforts to create sustainable economic growth.

WHERE WE ARE, WHO WE ARE, WHAT WE DO Anywhere in the I-77 corridor, employers can tap into a massive regional civilian labor force of more than 1.2 million people, buoyed by growing metro areas to the region’s North and South. This workforce is living and working in a region boasting robust educational opportunities – particularly technical and workforce readiness education – and an attractive quality of life for those who prefer urban, suburban, or rural living. Connecting this region to the world is an unparalleled transportation network, featuring easy access to major airports (Charlotte Douglas International is one of the world’s busiest and Columbia Metropolitan is a major cargo hub for UPS and FedEx) and deep-sea shipping (Charleston Port), with multiple interstates and rail lines. While major South Carolina manufacturers such as Boeing and BMW created the opportunity for an array of suppliers to set up shop in the corridor, there’s also been organic economic expansion in other sectors. Industries thriving across the region now include precision manufacturing, advanced materials, life sciences such as medical equipment and pharmaceutical production, and corporate, finance, and professional services.


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CAMP HALL IS A NEXT GENERATION COMMERCE PARK Set in the bustling southeast region minutes from Charleston, South Carolina. Designed for thriving commerce and sustainability.

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Schedule a visit today. Contact us at 843. 761. 4070 or CampHall.com.


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OPPORTUNITIES

THE I-77 ALLIANCE DATA CENTER AND SITE SEARCH TOOLS

PREPARING NOW FOR NEW OPPORTUNITIES

As data analysis drives location decisions, the Alliance has invested in online data solutions for its website and those of the five counties. This presents a unique opportunity for site selection professionals to gather industry, workforce, or property information for multiple communities through a common, unified experience. While the I-77 Alliance Data Center provides access to current industry and economic data, the Recruit site search tool uses geographic information system (GIS) mapping technology from Esri to guide users to ideal properties while providing cutting-edge workforce and demographic analysis on thousands of data points. Invaluable tools not only for site selection, but also for local workforce development efforts, entrepreneurship and small business, and higher education.

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At a time when preliminary site visits may be limited and trade shows are canceled, the region’s collaborative economic development ecosystem continues to operate at full speed. As activity climbs back to pre-pandemic levels, our partners are prepared to have prospects see with their own eyes why so many companies are expanding and relocating here.

SOUTH CAROLINA: AEROSPACE SUPPLIERS LOCATING IN THE SOUTHERN CAROLINA REGION

.................................................... With the recent news that Boeing will move all production of the 787 Dreamliner aircraft to Charleston,

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South Carolina, many aerospace suppliers are also looking to locate operations in South Carolina. As a result, the region of South Carolina along I-95 known as “Southern Carolina,” comprised of seven counties sandwiched between the aerospace cluster surrounding Boeing in Charleston and Gulfstream in Savannah, Georgia, is becoming a location of choice for industries seeking proximity to these aerospace giants, ports, interstates and a manufacturing workforce. While South Carolina’s aerospace industry has rapidly grown to more than 400 firms and 55,000 employees since the location of Boeing in Charleston in 2009, the Southern Carolina region of the state has been home to aerospace suppliers for more than fifty years. Phoenix Specialty Manufacturing, located in the heart of the region, is one of the largest contract manufacturers of aviation parts for the aerospace industry. A family owned company that relocated from Garden City, New York in 1967 to Bamberg, South Carolina, Phoenix Specialty found that the Southern Carolina location provided the company with a competitive edge because of lower operational costs, access to interstates and ports, and a reliable workforce. Their custom parts are used “from nose to tail” of aircraft around the world—and beyond. In fact, they manufactured parts for the Apollo Moon landing vehicles and for the Mars Rover. On commercial airliners, their specialty parts are found in the turbines, the landing gear, the airframe, valves, pumps, actuators and motion controls. Other renowned aerospace leaders like Collins Aerospace and Lockheed Martin have operations in the region, employing hundreds.


The area is also home to smaller aviation companies like SafeTech, USA, which located their aviation safety component service operation in Ridgeland, South Carolina in April 2019. Jerry Baty, who served as CEO of the company at that time, said, “The support from the Ridgeland and South Carolina communities and officials has been tremendous and we have been able to recruit top quality talent to join our team.” Retired Boeing S.C. vice president and general manager of the Boeing Dreamliner facility in Charleston, Dr. Marco Cavazzoni, saw the potential of the Southern Carolina region when he established his own fully integrated aviation services company, Lowcountry Aviation, in 2018 in Walterboro, South Carolina. Located at the Lowcountry Regional Airport, the company produces Sky Arrow composite light aircraft, provides charter services and maintenance, repair station services, and engineering services. “We welcome companies like Lowcountry Aviation, and we are excited about the opportunities that the Boeing’s growing investment in South Carolina continues to bring our region,” said SouthernCarolina Alliance Vice President Kay Maxwell. “We not only have outstanding locations along I-95 and at aviation-focused industrial parks for companies to choose from, our region has a great story to tell in terms of a long manufacturing history, a loyal workforce, and beautiful, welcoming communities.” Maxwell is part of the SouthernCarolina Alliance team, recruiting aviation and other manufacturing companies to the region. To learn more about what the region has to offer, visit their website, www.SouthernCarolina.org or email kmaxwell@southerncarolina.org.

SOUTH CAROLINA: UNION COUNTY

.................................................... Existing and emerging industry clusters, a presence of interconnected companies, and support from organizations and institutions continues to strengthen Union County, SC’s competitive advantage in attracting

its target industry sectors -advanced manufacturing, warehousing, and logistics. There are products manufactured by industries in this rural community and shipped out of the County’s Warehousing, Logistics and E-Commerce Centers each day which are used by consumers all over the world. For example, Standard

THE CAROLINAS #1 WORKFORCE

With more than 100 people moving to the area every day and a regional labor force of 1.2 million people, the S.C. I-77 region, spanning from Charlotte to Columbia, has one of the largest and fastest growing workforces in the Carolinas.

www.i77alliance.com

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Textile’s terry cloth products, carried at Marriott properties worldwide, Carlisle Finishing camouflage, which outfits American armed forces at home and abroad, Timken bearings used on rigs, wind turbines, aircraft and even the space shuttled, Haemonetics’ blood management devices and consumables used in hospitals emergency rooms, and surgical centers worldwide, Gestamp, an international manufacturer of metal automotive components that will enable the company to serve both BMW and the Volvo Cars production facility in Berkeley County, and Union County’s newest industry, Kemper Corporation, one of the leading manufacturers of cargo straps and securement products worldwide. Because of its utility friendly environment, Union County will continue to target advanced manufacturing projects in addition to emerging sectors requiring significant utility infrastructure such as agribusiness, information technologies, and research and development-based projects. Union County industries are thriving and hiring highly skilled and highly trained workers in addition to offering competitive wages. Known as the “front porch of Upstate South Carolina,” Union County is very fortunate to be part of a strong regional labor shed which has experienced a growth rate of 30% within the past 10 yrs. Over 700,000 highly skilled and highly trained workers contribute to this area which is known for a variety of innovative and dynamic workforce development initiatives. The County is well positioned to recruit workers not only from the Upstate region but from Counties to the east and west of its borders which is the basis for the County’s approach to a regional workforce development plan -a coordinated a pathway between educators, workforce 26 |

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organizations, employers, and government. This approach ensures access to a variety of industry focused educational and training opportunities designed to support the needs of the local business community. As a result, Union County continues to maintain designation as a SC Work Ready Community indicating a commitment to develop and maintain a highly skilled and well-trained workforce that is productive and globally competitive. The fundamental component of the plan is to utilize the County’s local and regional workforce partners to align training and skill building programs with real work opportunities. Educational and incumbent worker training programs, apprenticeships, on boarding, and dual credit opportunities have contributed to creating a pipeline of workers for Union County industries. Union County is located within proximity to larger cities in the State and is less than a day’s drive away from nearly every major metropolitan city in the eastern Union States. Therefore, the County is part of a thriving region offering something for everyone-from the solitude of nature, cultural and recreational activities, to the excitement of sporting events. History buffs will enjoy a quiet walk down streets lined with homes from centuries past and cultural connoisseurs can spend time browsing through unique galleries, shops, and studios. From spending the day touring historic downtown Union, exploring the County’s historical trails, visiting the rivers and lakes to cheering from the stands at local sporting events, Union County has a character and charm that is hard to find in most places. Union County offers a healthy and diverse transportation network with excellent regional access. The County

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is geographically located between Greenville/Spartanburg SC, Columbia, SC and Charlotte NC offering excellent proximity to major markets and suppliers. Union County’s four industrial parks are under a 30-minute drive time to major interstates such as I-85 and I26, and close by to I-20 and -I40. Two major highway routes serve Union County-US Highway 176, a four-lane highway known as the area’s growth corridor, and Highway 49 which is part of a three-state highway system which runs from SC to Virginia. The County is within an hour drive to 3 major airports-Greenville Spartanburg International, Charlotte Douglas International and Columbia Metropolitan. The Inland Port in Greer is less than an hour away and the County’s industrial parks are served by rail carriers-Norfolk Southern and CSX. Union County is known for its international diversity, access to excellent healthcare and a strong network of schools, colleges and universities -all amenities are within an area where the cost of living is affordable and lower than the national average. Utility infrastructure is another asset the County offers to new and expanding industries. This “utility friendly” community is served by five electric power companies offering excellent capacity, redundancy, and strategies in place to add or upgrade facilities based on industry need. The City of Union is not only one of the County’s electric power providers but also supplies water, sewer, and natural gas with ample capacity and excess for future growth. Charter and AT&T provide telecommunication services including advanced technical options and fiber optic cable. X


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In May 2020, Airbus officially launched production of A220 aircraft at its newly constructed Final Assembly Line hangar in Mobile, Alabama. (Image: Airbus)

ALABAMA:

Businesses Have the Skilled Workers Needed to Succeed

A

labama’s overall economic development effort focuses on creating 21st Century jobs that provide meaningful opportunities for citizens across the state. The Alabama Department of Commerce is the state’s primary economic development agency, coordinating and supporting the strategic efforts of its partners and allies across the state to secure new investment and jobs. Under the direction of Secretary Greg Canfield, Commerce’s project managers share a global outlook as they build relationships and pursue economic development projects that can make a difference to families and communities across Alabama. Commerce also plays a key role in the state’s workforce development efforts, which ensure that businesses operating in Alabama have the skilled workers they need to succeed. .......................................................................... Commerce and the Alabama economic development team have a long track record of winning game-changing projects that add important new dimensions to the state’s economy. In recent years, this team has worked with an expansive roster of global leaders in a wide range of industries, including Airbus, Mercedes-Benz, Honda,

Byungjin Jin, president and CEO of Hyundai Alabama, announces the automaker’s plans to build the Santa Cruz compact utility vehicle at its Montgomery plant during a Nov. 13, 2019 event. Hyundai will invest $410 million and create 200 new jobs.

Hyundai, and Toyota, among others. Most recently, the Alabama team worked to secure the $2 billion-plus Mazda-Toyota joint venture manufacturing facility, which will create 4,000 direct jobs and thousands more in the supply chain. Between 2017 and 2019, economic development activity in Alabama has attracted more than $20 billion in new capital investment and over 45,000 jobs. Alabama’s strategic economic development growth plan, called Accelerate Alabama, has been updated to reflect a more robust focus on recruiting knowledge-based jobs in activities such as R&D, engineering and design, as well as a greater alignment with the state’s research universities. Accelerate Alabama 2.0 identifies bxjmag.com

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is a life science business campus accelerating new therapeutics, medical devices, diagnostics and other innovations to patients by co-locating genomic R&D, workforce training, startups and established bioscience enterprises.

Find a building site along the double helix park on the 152-acre biotech campus Lease premier lab and office space with flexibility for growth Access leading-edge research talent, sequencing team and a skilled life sciences workforce

Learn more about the advantages of locating your bioscience company to the HudsonAlpha campus by scheduling a visit to Huntsville – a top 10 tech town, visit hudsonalpha.org/innovate or call our Economic Development team at 256.327.9591.


Companies on Huntsville’s

HudsonAlpha campus combating COVID-19

Cutting Edge

While the world continues its fight against novel coronavirus, researchers and private industry have banded together in order to slow the spread of the virus and develop new tests and treatments for COVID-19. Now, more than ever, it is evident that collaboration is necessary to overcome current challenges and nowhere is as uniquely qualified to help foster these collaborations than Huntsville’s HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology. At the outset of the COVID-19 pandemic, the companies residing on HudsonAlpha’s biotech campus have increased laboratory testing capacity, launched point-of-care testing diagnostics, advanced early stage antibody treatments for immune response, provided researchers with critical reagents for COVID-19 projects and researched personal protective equipment sterilization methods for the reuse of PPE equipment. Much of this progress can be attributed to the HudsonAlpha ecosystem that promotes collaboration on solving some of the world’s most challenging problems. Diatherix-Eurofins, a diagnostic testing laboratory, released it’s COVID-19 panel in mid-March and immediately began working with physicians and hospitals to test symptomatic patients. Since launching, Diatherix has increased its testing capacity by more than 50% by adding to their workforce and expanding into and repurposing lab and office space at HudsonAlpha. Diatherix-Eurofins recently Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) for it’s COVID-19 panel and have provided diagnostic test results to more than 70,000 people nationwide. We appreciate that HudsonAlpha removed many obstacles that have allowed Diatherix to scale up capacity for large volumes of COVID-19 testing, said Jen Cart, CEO of Diatherix Eurofins. Their swift accommodation of our needs demonstrated the incredible support and true purpose of the HudsonAlpha’s mission for collaboration and connectivity. HudsonAlpha has additionally rolled out an FDA Advisory panel to help companies navigate the EUA and approval process for COVID-19 related devices, diagnostics and therapies. A one-of-its-kind advisory panel of associate company executives is working with companies across the state that need guidance and direction on navigating the regulatory pathways for approval. HudsonAlpha has utilized its purchasing power to procure PPE, reagents and critical cleaning supplies for employees, the associate companies and community first-responders. The Institute acquired more than 7,000 disposable face masks and made

them immediately available to companies on campus. When lack of high demand equipment threatened the procurement of reagents, HudsonAlpha stepped in to work with all the companies and labs on campus to overcome the barriers of a strained supply chain. HudsonAlpha has advocated for the associate companies throughout this crisis and as local, state and federal policies are updated, many within the Institute work working daily with the associate companies on funding options, best practices on workplace safety and on return-to-work planning.

More than 10 companies are working on COVID-19 related projects at HudsonAlpha 

 

  

Acclinate Genetics is working with clinical trial sponsors to ensure diverse representation in therapeutic testing. CFD Research’s Computational Medicine and Biology team is working on various aspects of COVID-19 respiratory viral infection, transmission, protection and treatment. Diatherix-Eurofins a diagnostic testing laboratory, is providing testing for COVID-19. Discovery Life Sciences is continuing to support the advancement of COVID-19 diagnostic testing and vaccine development by providing expert biospecimen solutions, genomic, immunohistochemistry (IHC) and flow cytometry services. iCubate is providing Alabama hospitals and health care organizations the recently launched “iC-COVID19 Assay”, which enables large cities and small towns the ability to offer an on-site, localized coronavirus test. iRepertoire has developed a technology that could collect the antibodies from patients who have recovered from COVID-19 and produce them in large quantities. Microarrays is manufacturing Covid 19 diagnostic products. Prozone Water Products is researching and developing a device for PPE sanitation for healthcare providers. TransOMIC Technologies is currently supplying reagents and test kits for COVID-19 research.

To learn more about COVID-19 efforts on the HudsonAlpha campus, visit hudsonalpha.org/ hudsonalpha-updates-on-covid-19.


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seven key industry target sectors whose growth prospects make them appropriate targets for economic development efforts. These are aerospace/aviation, automotive, agricultural/food products, chemicals, forest products, primary metals/advanced materials, and bioscience. Automotive manufacturing has been a major driver of economic growth in Alabama. Assembly plants operated by Mercedes-Benz, Honda and Hyundai combine to produce around 1 million vehicles annually, earning the state a No. 5 ranking in the U.S. for the production of cars and light trucks. The Mazda-Toyota facility will add another 300,000 vehicles to that annual tally. In 2019, companies in the automobile manufacturing sector announced plans to invest over $2.4 billion in Alabama projects, creating more than 5,000 jobs. That followed strong growth in 2018, when auto companies announced plans for almost $3.3 billion in new investment and 5,500 job commitments. Alabama’s aerospace industry is another major growth engine. The sector is broad and vast, with activities in virtually every segment of the industry. Over 300 aerospace companies from 30 different countries operate in Alabama, including Boeing, Lockheed Martin, United Launch Alliance, GE Aviation, Raytheon, Collins Aerospace, GKN and Blue Origin. Airbus produces A320 aircraft in Alabama and is constructing a new assembly line for A220 aircraft. Huntsville is home to Redstone Arsenal and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, as well as a large cluster of aerospace and defense firms.

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ALABAMA: ELMORE COUNTY

................................................................................ The Elmore County Economic Development Authority is committed to improving the economic well-being of the business community and enhancing quality of life through the creation and preservation of jobs and wealth in Elmore County. Located in the heart of the River Region, Elmore County has a strong transportation infrastructure, a skilled and ready workforce, and an abundance of recreational opportunities. Elmore County has a strong and supportive business climate that attracts new business and industry to complement and enhance a vital and growing existing business community. Boasting dynamic schools, unified leadership, extraordinary natural beauty and a superior quality of life, Elmore County Alabama has a rich history of being a predominantly agricultural area, but in recent years, it has started to make the transformation to the one of the fastest-growing counties in the state. The county offers the best of both worlds to individuals settling here: small towns with high-quality education, low-crime rates, and low-cost of living, next to a major metropolis in Montgomery. Elmore County is defined by lush forests, flowing rivers, wide welcoming lakes and a population of hard-working citizens who honor their heritage, whether it is Native American, European, or African. Northern Elmore County lies home to two fresh water lakes with access to more than 70 square miles of recreational waterways. With distinctive lake homes lining its shores, Lake Martin is becoming known world¬wide for its sparkling waters and for wise land-use developments that honor the land and its waters. Lake Jordan boasts some of the best bass and crappie fishing in the South. Throughout Elmore County there are cities and towns that welcome all who visit… and those who find reason to put down roots and join the gentle Southern way of life that are the envy of all who travel to the county. Companies moving to Elmore County can be sure they will find a capable, experienced workforce to meet their needs, while individuals know they will find a place they can belong. It is no surprise that businesses world-wide are considering Elmore County for their base of operations or their next expansion. With the leadership of the Elmore County Economic Development Authority, and a spirited cooperation from municipal leaders, the county is poised to continue its development. The low tax rates and attractive climate that yields moderate winter temperatures and little to no snow each year make Elmore Count appealing to many executives. The days are beautiful with typically 214 sunny days per year and an average July high temperatures reaching about 92 degrees. Centrally located with two major Interstates, I-85 and I-65, passing through and bordering portions of the county, transportation routes for commerce and travel are abundant. Elmore County Alabama - where business meets pleasure X


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GEORGIA:

Diverse Economy Helps Create 10,000+ Jobs

D

uring the first quarter of fiscal year 2021, more than 10,000 jobs were created across all regions of the State of Georgia through its economic development efforts, an 85% increase in new investments compared to the same quarter in the previous fiscal year.

................................................................................... From food processing and manufacturing to logistics and technology, jobs were generated in nearly every industry and for a variety of skill levels. Named the “Top State for Doing Business” for a recordbreaking seven years in a row, Georgia’s economic strength comes from its diversity. Assets including the longtime busiest and most efficient airport in the world, the No. 1 port in the nation for U.S. exports – which also helped the state secure its No. 1 ranking for Aerospace Manufacturing Attractiveness – along with the state’s top-ranked workforce training programs, have helped support this diversity and keep Georgia’s economy on the right track despite challenges presented by COVID-19. Between March 1 and September 30, the Georgia Department of Economic Development assisted in locating 176 new economic development projects, creating 19,345 jobs and $6.48 billion in investment. Even while facing a global pandemic, jobs and investment numbers in Georgia have

increased when compared to the same time period last year. Georgia Governor Brian Kemp made several major announcements during this time, including that SK Innovation, Korean multinational developer and manufacturer of lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicles, will invest another $940 million to expand their manufacturing plant in Commerce. This project comes in addition to the company’s $1.67 billion investment in developing two manufacturing facilities in the state, which will deliver 2,000 jobs to Jackson County. By strategically working to attract the entire supply chain for electric vehicles, the state continues to emerge as a leader within this sector. In July, Governor Kemp also shared that German automotive parts manufacturer GEDIA Automotive Group will build an advanced manufacturing facility that will make electric vehicle parts in in Whitfield County, generating $85 million in investment and 200 jobs. Other highlights from this time period include Papa John’s selecting metro Atlanta as a new global headquarters, The Home Depot announcing its plans to open three new warehousing facilities to support their Southeast supply chain operations, HelloFresh locating their Southeastern U.S. distribution facility in Newnan, Frito-Lay continuing to expand in Perry and many more. By leveraging the state’s strong and diverse economic framework, Georgia continues to create jobs and stimulate growth. X bxjmag.com

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ILLINOIS

Winning in Key Industries

I

llinois has a diverse and dynamic economy. They have some of the best talent and higher education institutions in the world. They are a global transportation hub, boasting the highest concentration of transportation and logistic companies in the nation. Illinois has abundant natural resources that provide the foundation for a thriving agricultural and tourism economy. Let’s look at a couple of these industries

............................................................................ Illinois farms are the number-one producer of soybeans in the country, the number-two producer of corn, and the number-four producer of pigs. Their success in agriculture has led to a growth

of associated industries including manufacturing of tractors and equipment, fertilizer and pesticide manufacturing, food processing and urban agriculture. This group of industries make up Illinois’ “agribusiness” cluster. Of all 50 states, Illinois has the highest share of employment in the transportation and warehousing industry and the third-highest share of employment in wholesale trade. Illinois is the most active rail hub in the country. O’Hare Airport is the 18th busiest airport in the world for cargo traffic and the sixth busiest for passenger traffic. With its central location and connectivity, Illinois has long been a global center of transportation, logistics, and distribution with a great potential to grow. For more information,, please visit the Illinois Department of Commerce website at www.illinois.gov or call 217-782-7500.

LITCHFIELD

LITCHFIELD I – 55 COMMERCE CENTER

Litchfield has direct access to Interstate 55 and Illinois Route 16; Litchfield is in close proximity to the major Interstate and Highway Network.

• Shovel Ready Sites Available Now • Incentives

500 Miles

Minneapolis Omaha Denver

Milwaukee Des Chicago Moines

LITCHFIELD

Kansas City

Wichita

Tulsa

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Indianapolis Cincinatti

St. Louis

Memphis

4.75 Acres

Louisville

Nashville

Houston New Orleans

www.cityoflitchfieldil.com

New York

Charlotte

8.24 Acres

Atlanta Jacksonville

12.53 Acres

Phase 1 Development 80 Acres

Montreal

Economic Development Office 120 E. Ryder Street | Litchfield, IL 62056 217-324-5253 | tflannery@cityoflitchfieldil.com

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12.51 Acres

Winnipeg

CITY OF LITCHFIELD

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1,000 Miles

7.17 Acres

11.37 Acres

Commerce Drive

THE LOCATION FOR SUCCESS & GROWTH

NORTH

Future Development

2.78 Acres

Future Development

2.79 Acres 2.78 Acres 2.64 Acres

2.65 Acres

1/4 mile to I-55


ILLINOIS: ARLINGTON HEIGHTS

................................................................................ Arlington Heights is a community approximately 76,000 residents strong, making it one of the largest municipalities in the Chicago area. As such, Arlington Heights offers all sorts of recreational opportunities, from 50-plus public parks and facilities and the Metropolis Performing Arts Centre to the Arlington International Racecourse, one of the premier horse racing tracks in the country. Arlington Heights offers businesses just as much as it offers its residents, notes Business Development Coordinator Michael Mertes. “We have over five million square feet of first floor commercial/retail space, five million square feet of office space, and five million square feet of industrial space,” he says. “That’s really something that makes our community unique and a good place to conduct business.” That’s one of the many reasons why so many major companies have a presence in Arlington Heights, like Amazon, HSBC, Northrop Grumman, Mitsuwa Marketplace, and The Daily Herald, one of the country’s 75 largest newspapers by circulation. With so many different industries calling Arlington Heights home, community leaders continue to target a diverse array of businesses and industries— especially those that could build upon its current offerings, such as retailers, restaurants, healthcare, warehousing, and manufacturing, Mertes says. To help attract new companies, Arlington Heights boasts over 50,000 workers that are highly educated and diverse and easy access to highways, railways, and airports—not to mention serious advancements in its residential, commercial, and industrial arenas. “We have approved nearly 400 new housing units, which will include 40,000 square feet of commercial space, in our thriving downtown,” says Mertes. “In addition, we have another 1,000 new housing units planned or under construction, approval of a new 60-room boutique hotel, and 140,00 square feet of recently constructed industrial spec space. It goes to show the diverse investment we have going on in our community.”

companies seeking interstate highway access and customized facilities to support their operations was constructed. Litchfield’s location, size and immediate proximity to two large metropolitan areas equates to an exceptional value for businesses. Value that is backed by a quality community and an established workforce. Our new and expanding retail developments include a growing presence of national brands that continue to attract additional traffic. Our municipal airport features a 4,000 feet runway with facilities to serve corporate and private aviation. Litchfield has a satellite campus of Lincoln Land Community College to help provide workforce training. The City also offers programs and incentives to support business growth and development in Litchfield. Litchfield offers new and expanding businesses the appeal of a stable community featuring regional healthcare services, quality recreational opportunities and affordable Midwestern living all while in proximity to the convenience and excitement of nearby metropolitan areas. The location is truly a crossroads of opportunity with regional influence. Litchfield offers an affordable environment for businesses that want to easily access the large number of end users, consumers, transportation links and potential visitors found in large markets. In addition, the business tax rate is highly competitive, and utilities are cost-effective compared to larger markets. For information on industrial, commercial or residential development, contact the Litchfield Economic Development Office at 217-324-5253, tflannery@cityoflitchfieldil.com or www. cityoflitchfieldil.com. X.

ILLINOIS: LITCHFIELD ... MORE THAN A GREAT LOCATION!

................................................................................ Litchfield is the most accessible and strategic commercial and industrial location between the St. Louis metropolitan area and Springfield, Illinois for manufacturing, distribution/logistics, processing, retail and hospitality businesses. Interstate 55 and Illinois Route 16 intersect at our industrial parks and commercial districts, providing direct transportation access and connections to all major U.S. markets. It also provides access to a multi-modal transportation network, and our proximity to two metropolitan areas puts businesses in Litchfield within easy reach of regional markets and national connections. Recent development of a third business/industrial park for bxjmag.com

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ARIZONA:

With Streamlined Regulation and Access to Major World Markets, Arizona is Thriving

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rizona is strategically located in the southwest region of the U.S., immediately accessible to three of the world’s largest economies: California (#8), Texas (#12), and Mexico (15). In fact, Arizona is the only state in the nation within a day’s drive to all the major world markets.

................................................................................... Arizona offers one of the lowest costs of doing business in the U.S., primarily because of low taxes and small state government. While the national average of per-capita income going to taxes 34 |

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is 9.9 percent, here the number is on 8.4 percent. In addition, Arizona’s taxes on property, gas, and personal income remain low compared to the rest of the country. Arizona has made a concerted effort to create a businessfriendly, minimalist regulatory environment. Fundamental changes were made in the administration of Arizona’s transaction privilege tax system. These changes streamline tax collection and eliminate the need for multiple (state and local) tax licenses, tax returns and tax audits. This is a Right-to Work state. Unions cannot require workers to pay dues as a condition of their employment. The financial impact of labor peace and business stability is


significant-and increasing. For more information on the opportunities in Arizona, please contact the Arizona Commerce Authority at 602-845-1200 or visit www.azcommerce.com .

ARIZONA: PINAL COUNTY, A LONG GAME APPROACH TO WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT

...................................................................................

Pinal County is experiencing significant growth in many traditional business sectors, but it is seeing noteworthy growth in high-tech sectors. The visionary Pinal County Board of Supervisors recently approved an Inter-Governmental Agreement (IGA) with the University of Arizona to assist the county with developing and implementing a multi-year plan called the Arizona Innovation and Technology Corridor (AITC) to develop the I-10 and I-8 Corridors, from Maricopa County to the University of Arizona Science and Technology Park. The AITC is expected to bring thousands of high-tech, high-wage jobs to Pinal County. The AITC, which could take as many as 25-30 years to be fully developed and bring billions of dollars in new high-tech companies along with their support industries, already has a foundation on which to build. In addition to many high-tech companies that already exist in Pinal County such as Hexcel, Abbot Nutrition, Frito Lay, Cargill, Bayer, Nissan and Volkswagen Test Tracks and Resolution Copper, the Corridor includes new high tech companies locating in the Corridor including Lucid Motors, Vector Launch, Nikola Motors, NACERO, Attesa, Case New Holland R&D, Florence Copper, Green Gas Partners and several other high tech companies that will be announced in the next few months. To prepare the workforce that will be needed to support the AITC, Achieve Pinal is taking a proactive approach to building a talent pipeline. An initiative of Pinal Alliance for Economic Growth, Achieve Pinal is built on a foundational goal of creating

a competitive workforce in Pinal County by ensuring 60 percent of the current workforce have a post-secondary credential by 2030. Key strategies include: • Improving the K-12 Pipeline - Increase college readiness and high school graduation rates • Increasing access - Raise awareness about options beyond high school and make them more affordable • Aligning workforce needs - Engage businesses, governments and educators to identify and close the skills gap The Achieve Pinal was recently given a huge boost when it was approved to launch the AARP Foundation’s Experience Corps, an evidence-based literacy program that improves the reading skills of students in grades K–3 and enriches the lives of volunteer tutors, nearly all of whom are over the age of 50. Achieve Pinal was inspired to become an AARP Foundation Experience Corps affiliate because third grade is a critical turning point at which children need to transition from learning to read to reading to learn. The program will launch on November 2 as a two-year pilot in Casa Grande with plans for a county-wide launch by year three.

The Experience Corps model has been implemented in 22 cities nationwide, with Casa Grande as the first rural community to host the program. Multiple university studies have found that 62% of the students in the program improve their reading by half a grade level or more. By helping young students become better readers, Experience Corps seeks to ensure a lasting legacy of strong futures, supported schools and empowered volunteers. X

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NORTH DAKOTA:

Where Imagination Meets Possibility

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ntrepreneurs are welcome here. North Dakota is one of the most innovative states in the country according to Consumer Technology Association. From launching the nation’s first operational test site for Unmanned Aircraft Systems to developing cutting-edge precision farming practices, this state is committed to policies that create an environment where innovation thrives, and new enterprises can entice and retain top talent.

................................................................................... The state’s growing manufacturing, technology-based businesses, unmanned systems, agricultural and energy industries are drawing some of the most recognized companies into North Dakota and providing expansion for some of the homegrown ones. Business incentives, 36 |

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government accessibility, and workforce performance, combined with North Dakota’s favorable position as one of the lowest cost states for operating a business, are driving top companies to establish operations in North Dakota.

NORTH DAKOTA: BISMARCK-MANDAN

................................................................................... On the surface the Bismarck-Mandan, North Dakota, community looks to be a lot like other growing midwestern communities, but as you take a deeper look you will see a community that is truly making its mark. Let’s start with the education system in BismarckMandan. Bismarck is the largest public-school system in North Dakota and this fall increased enrollment for the 16th year in a row. Mandan not to be out done has increased enrollment 11 years in a row. Bismarck is also home to the Career Academy which is a joint career and technical education center that is shared by Bismarck Public Schools and Bismarck State College.


Speaking of Bismarck State College, this past spring they announced that they are pursuing becoming Bismarck Polytechnic College and offering Bachelor of Applied Science degrees in areas like Cybersecurity and Advanced Manufacturing. Another higher education institution in Bismarck-Mandan, the University of Mary, recently graduated their first engineering student from their new College of Engineering. This continued investment in education lends itself well for companies who are looking to fill their workforce pipeline. Bismarck-Mandan and North Dakota boast a competitive tax structure with some of the lowest income and property taxes in the country. There are a number of local and state incentive programs that can assist businesses interested in Bismarck-Mandan as well. These include a scholarship/loan repayment program, for students in high-demand or skilled workforce, created to help keep our future workforce here. North Dakota also recently implemented an Automation Tax Credit that reduces a company’s tax liability as they implement automation into their processes. Bismarck-Mandan is also home to the Bank of North Dakota, the only state-owned bank in the country, which offers a number of financing programs including an interest buydown program to help offset costs of new or expanding companies. Bismarck-Mandan has seen a 20% increase in population in the last decade, and with that comes the need for exceptional quality of life amenities. Bismarck-Mandan boasts over 100 miles of walking trails, multiple recreational activities on the Missouri River, as well as nearby campgrounds, hunting and fishing opportunities. Bismarck is located at the intersection of Interstate-94 and U.S. Highway 83 which provides access to markets across the Midwest and beyond. The Bismarck Airport has seven daily flights on Delta to

Minneapolis/St Paul, four daily flights on United to Denver, two on United to Chicago O’Hare, two daily flights on American Airlines to Dallas/Fort Worth, near daily service on Allegiant to Las Vegas, Phoenix/Mesa, and Orlando, and seasonal service to Denver on Frontier Airlines. The BismarckMandan area is serviced by two class-1 railroads, BNSF and Canadian Pacific, and has ample and inexpensive

resources like water, natural gas, and power. As you can see Bismarck-Mandan is a community that has the needs of its businesses covered. The targeted industries for Bismarck-Mandan are value-added energy, food & beverage processing, and farm & construction equipment manufacturing. So let Bismarck-Mandan help your business Make Your Mark. . X

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WYOMING:

Most Business-Friendly Tax Climate

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ith the nation’s “Most Business-Friendly Tax Climate” five years running plus outstanding transportation options, top-ranked broadband connectivity, well-funded public education, safe neighborhoods, and abundant outdoor space and recreation opportunities, Wyoming businesses and people thrive. They welcome you to explore what Wyoming can offer you and your business ................................................................................... The tectonic forces that created Wyoming’s complex Rocky Mountain terrain preserved rich fossil beds from multiple geologic areas, making the state a major producer of coal, natural gas and crude oil. In fact, Wyoming has the

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smallest population in the U.S. but supplies more energy than any other state. Wyoming’s unique geological features also produce some of the best wind resources in the nation. Wyoming also straddles the Continental Divide, providing the headwaters for four major river basins in the western U.S.: the Missouri-Mississippi, Green-Colorado, SnakeColumbia and Great Salt Lake .

WYOMING: CHEYENNE – WHERE BUSINESS THRIVES

................................................................................... At the northern end of the Rocky Mountain Front Range Urban Corridor, Cheyenne benefits from its position as the capital of Wyoming as well as its proximity to the Front Range cities of Colorado with their dense populations, diverse employment and educational infrastructure. At the


same time, Cheyenne enjoys a favorable tax and regulatory climate, low cost-of-doing business, and world-class communications. Cheyenne is also the home to FE Warren Air Force Base. Warren Air Force Base is a terrific source of an educated and disciplined workforce made up of current and retired military enlisted and officers. Wyoming is a right-to-work state with employer-friendly labor rates and laws. Cheyenne has invested wisely and generously in quality of life initiatives. Without the major urban reconstruction and remediation costs of larger cities, Cheyenne is able to focus its resources on improvements for the future: a $1.46 million expansion to the Greater Cheyenne Greenway, expanded parks, downtown historic districts, and new schools and community college facilities. Cheyenne is a location of choice partly because of where it is – near the geographical and time center of the North American continent. Cheyenne manages a transportation triple play with the intersection of Interstates 80 and 25, two major railroads and Denver International Airport (DIA) 90 minutes away. For more information, call Cheyenne LEADS at 800-2550742 or visit www.cheyenneleads.org .

Along with community support, innovative healthcare, quality K-12 public schools, a low cost of living, highly educated workforce, the many state and local tax incentives are a huge draw for businesses that are relocating. • Wyoming imposes no: • o.corporate or personal income tax or no state estate or inheritance tax • Business Inventory Tax • sales tax on energy consumed in the process of manufacturing • sales tax on the purchase of equipment that will be used in the manufacturing process • There are also sales tax exemptions for certain equipment purchased for data centers • Wyoming property taxes are some of the lowest in the USA. “By working with existing businesses in each sector we have identified both barriers and opportunities for growth and have made action plans to address each,” added Enzi. X .......................................................................................................... By Melissa Ross, Marketing & Membership Director of the Laramie Chamber Business Alliance

WYOMING: LARAMIE, THE HUB ZONE

................................................................................... Laramie WY is home to prime HUB (opportunity) zones for businesses who are looking to relocate. Brad Enzi, the CEO & President of the Laramie Chamber Business Alliance (LCBA) remarked, “As a community we identified three areas that we had core competence in and that were starting to grow. Businesses in Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV), boutique manufacturing, and data technology became our focus.” In 2015 HiViZ Shooting systems, a company that manufactures gun sights through metal injection molding, relocated to Laramie from Colorado and have continued to expand their operation. Global company, Underwriter Laboratories, Inc has expanded their Wyoming operations at the Cirrus Sky Technology Park. Laramie has been attracting several UAV companies with the LCBA’s and the Laramie Regional Airport’s work on testing space, low air traffic, the University of Wyoming’s top Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering school, and state and local incentives. The LCBA’s economic development team has worked hard to provide the framework for companies to relocate and expand. “As an Economic Development agency, we work with our existing employers to create opportunities and attract businesses that can grow synergistically with them. Because the University of Wyoming is our largest employer, we work to find areas that complement their research and development.”

CHEYENNE, WYOMING YOUR BUSINESS’S NEXT FRONTIER

TERABYTE CAPACITY NO INVENTORY TAX NO CORPORATE INCOME TAX NO PERSONAL INCOME TAX SHOVEL READY INDUSTRIAL SITES

www.cheyenneleads.org

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UTAH:

Flourishing Industry, Superior Workforce

T

he State of Utah enjoys a strong and diverse economy. Their success is due in part to aggressive support from state lawmakers to grow their targeted industries. With innovative programs to expand access to talent and capital, improve supply chain, share industry expertise, drive university research, and promote International trade, Utah is fertile ground for new business. These target industries include Aerospace & Defense, Financial Services, Information Technology, Life Sciences, Manufacturing & Distribution, and Outdoor Products & Recreation.

................................................................................... Utah is one of the top states in the nation for aerospace and defense with an employment base of more than 33,500 and home to companies like Boeing, Orbital ATK, Northrop Grumman, L-3 Communications, Hexcel, and many others. Just two of Utah’s efforts to align education and industry are the Utah Aerospace Pathways program, which provides 40 |

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training high school students in aerospace manufacturing, and the Advanced Composites Working Group (ACWG), which meets quarterly to address issues facing the industry. In 2000, the Department of Defense set a mandate to have one-third of its fleet unmanned or autonomous. Utah, already with a rich history in unmanned systems, has taken this mandate seriously. The state’s universities extensively research unmanned systems and related technologies and a variety of companies continue to make strides in the industry. In terms of business climate, Forbes Magazine recognized Utah as “The Best State for Business” six of the past eight years, ranking 3rd in 2018. In 2015, Utah’s post-performance tax incentives program facilitated nearly 25,000 new jobs and more than $65 million in capital investment. In 2018, the Tax Foundation ranked Utah’s “Total Tax Climate” as the 8th best in the nation. Since 2011, Utah has eliminated or modified nearly 400 business regulations to ease the burdens placed on businesses. As to workforce, Utah has high employee concentrations of aerospace engineers, materials scientists, machine operators, and many other aerospace-related occupations. Utah also has the 3rd lowest unionization rate in the country at 3.9% (2017). For more information on all the opportunities available in


Utah, please visit edcutah.org or call 1-800 574-UTAH (8824).

UTAH: EAGLE MOUNTAIN CITY

.................................................... In 1996, a City sprung up out of the desert. Now, just over 20 years later, Eagle Mountain City has exploded to 40,000 people and within one year welcomed both a case-ready facility for Tyson Fresh Meats and a Facebook data center. Located on the western edge of Utah County, halfway between Salt Lake City and Provo, Eagle Mountain City has become a powerful contributor to the rapid development along the “Silicon Slopes.” The best thing is that they are just getting started. Visionary leaders saw what roughly 53 square miles of land could become and took proactive steps to create a business-friendly atmosphere. From creating a special zoning approval process for certain businesses to working with other government entities to improve the incentive process, Eagle Mountain City has prepared. Several major steps forward for the City included acquiring the rights for around 15,000acre feet of water to support future growth and selling the municipally owned natural gas and electric utilities to Dominion Energy and Rocky Mountain Power. Each step helped to strengthen their position and primed the City for powerful economic development. Industries across many different sectors are taking notice of and more than ever before, businesses are finding their home in Eagle Mountain. In 2018, Facebook announced that they would build a 970,000 square foot data center in the far south part of the City. That announcement put Eagle Mountain on the map and many adjoining landowners are preparing their land for the future development. That project brought in over $100 million in infrastructure with excess capacity for other development projects. Quick on the heels of the

Facebook announcement, Tyson Fresh Meats announced a 400,000 square foot case-ready facility in the western portion of Eagle Mountain City. That project is bringing in over 1,000 jobs and providing the infrastructure to fuel development in another area of the City. Their retail and office sectors are rapidly growing along with industrial uses. Eagle Mountain City is excited to begin its next phase of development. They are

making investments in transportation, utilities, outdoor recreation, the arts, and in building out major park projects throughout the City. Their goal is to create a vibrant and resilient community that has space for all. There is something exciting happening in Eagle Mountain and they can’t wait to have you as a partner on this journey. Visit: eaglemountaincity.com X

LET’S TALK BUSINESS Eagle Mountain, Utah

There is something exciting happening in Eagle Mountain and we can’t wait to have you as a partner on this journey. • Home to Facebook data center and Tyson Fresh Meats • Water available; major power and fiber optic corridors run through the city; modern & robust utility infrastructure • 4,500+ acres of industrial land • Special zoning approval for data centers, clean manufacturing, and related industries • Within 45 minutes of three major universities • Easy access to I-15 & I-80 and Salt Lake City International Airport

business@emcity.org

buildeaglemountain.com

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NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF

ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

ALABAMA Tuscaloosa County Industrial Dev. Auth

Cullman Economic Development Agency

Dale Greer P.O. Box 1009 Cullman, AL 35056 256-739-1891 daleg@cullmaneda.org www.cullmaneda.org ...................................................................

Etowah Economic Alliance

Marilyn Lott 800 Forrest Avenue Suite 220E Gadsden, AL 35901 256-456-9938 mlott@eeaalabama.org www.eeaalabama.org ...................................................................

Sissie Browning, Assistant Director P.O. Box 2667 Tuscaloosa, AL 35403 205-349-1414 info@tcida.com www.tcida.com ...................................................................

ARIZONA

Arizona Regional Economic Develoment

Mignonne Hollis, Executive Director 750 E. Bartow Drive Suite 16 Sierra Vista, AZ 85635 520-458-6948 hollism@aredf.org www.aredf.org ...................................................................

City of Flagstaff Economic Development

Gadsden Industrial Development Authority

David Hooks, Executive Director 1 Commerce Square Gadsden, AL 35901 256-543-9423 davidhooks@gadsdenida.org www.gadsdenida.org ...................................................................

Elmore County Economic Development

Cary Cox P.O. Box 117 Wetumka , AL 36092 334-514-5843 cary.cox@elmoreeda.com www.elmoreeda.com ..................................................................

HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology

Amy Sturdivant 601 Genome Way Huntsville , AL 35806 256-327-9591 asturdivant@hudsonalpha.org www.hudsonalpha.org ...................................................................

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John Saltonstall, AZED Pro Business Retention & Expansion Manager Economic Vitality Division City of Flagstaff 211 W. Aspen Avenue Flagstaff, AZ 86001 Office 928-213-2966 Cell 928-606-9430 jsaltonstall@flagstaffaz.gov www.flagstaffaz.gov ...................................................................

Pinal Alliance for Economic Growth

Patti King, Executive Mgr. 17235 N. 75th Avenue Suite D-145 Glendale, AZ 85308 520-836-8686 pking@pinalalliance.org www.pinalalliance.org ...................................................................

Ouachita Partnership for Economic Development

James Lee Sillman Executive Director 625 Adams Aveune Camden, AR 71701 870-836-2210 870-836-8899 (f) director@teamcamden.com www.teamcamden.com ...................................................................

City of Siloam Springs

Don Clark Community Development Director P.O. Box 80 Siloam Springs , AR 72761 479-238-0927 dclark@siloamsprings.com whysiloam.com ...................................................................

CALIFORNIA

City of Eastvale

Kimberly Wright Economic Development Manager 12363 Limonite Ave. Suite 910 Eastvale, CA 91752 951-703-4480 kwright@eastvaleca.gov www.eastvaleca.gov ...................................................................

City of Moreno Valley Economic Development

Mike Lee Economic Development Director 14177 Frederick Street Moreno Valley, CA 92553 951-413-3460 edteam@moval.org www.morenovalleybusiness.com ...................................................................

ARKANSAS Chaffee Crossing

Ivy Owen, Executive Director 7020 Taylor Avenue Fort Smith, AR 72916 479-452-4554 479-452-4566 (f) property@chaffeecrossing.com www.chaffeecrossing.com ...................................................................

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City of Ontario Economic Development

Tanya Spiegel Executive Director Ecnomic Development 303 East B Street Ontario, CA 91764 909-395-2081 tspiegel@ontarioca.gov www.ontariothinksbusiness.com ...................................................................

Greater Irvine Chamber

Linda DiMario 36 Executive Park Suite 100 Irvine, CA 92614 949-502-4124 ldimario@irvinechamber.com www.irvinechamber.com ...................................................................

COLORADO

City of Fountain Economic Development Commission

Kimberly A. Bailey Economic Development/ Urban Renewal Director 116 S. Main Street Fountain, CO 80817 719-322-2056 kbailey@fountaincolorado.org www.fountaincolorado.org ...................................................................

Grand Junction Economic Partnership

Robin Brown, Executive Director 122 N. 6th Street Grand Junction, CO 81501 970--245-4332 robin@gjep.org www.gjep.org ...................................................................

DELAWARE

American Municipal Power, Inc.

Alexis A. Fitzsimmons Director of Economic & Business Development 1111 Schrock Rd. Columbus, OH 43229 614-540-0994 afitzsimmons@amppartners.org www.searchampsites.com ...................................................................

FLORIDA City of Kissimmee

Belinda O. Kirkegard, Economic Development Director 101 Church Street Kissimmee FL 34741 407-518-2307 BKirkegard@kissimmee.org www.Kissimmee.org ...................................................................


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City of Sanford

Bob Turk Economic Development Director 300 North Park Ave. Sanford, FL 32771 407-688-5015 bob.turk@sanfordfl.gov www.sanfordfl.gov ...................................................................

City of St. Cloud

Antranette Forbes Economic Development & Special Projects Manager 1300 9th Street St. Cloud, FL 34769 (407)957-7234 antranette.forbes@stcloud.org www.stcloud.org/926/economic-development ...................................................................

City of Titusville

Lisa Nicholas 555 South Washington Avenue Titusville, FL 32796-3584 321-567-3774 lisa.nicholas@titusville.com www.YEStitusvilleFL.com ...................................................................

Elevate Lake Economic Development

Tracy Garcia CEcD, EcDMP Director 20763 US Highway 27 Groveland, FL 34736 352-343-9647 352-801-7498 (f) tgarcia@lakecountyfl.gov elevatelake.com ...................................................................

Greater St. Petersburg Area Economic Development Corporation

J.P. DuBuque President and CEO 100 2nd Ave N Ste 130 St. Petersburg, FL 33701 727-388-2906 jpdubuque@stpeteedc.com StPeteEDC.com/BurgBiz ...................................................................

NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF

ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

Haines City Economic Development Council, Inc.

Cyndi Jantomaso, President Post Office Box 3845 Haines City, FL 33845-3845 863-422-2525 863-206-0007 cyndi@hainescityedc.com www.hainescityedc.com ...................................................................

Hernando County Offfice of Business Development

Valerie M. Pianta Economic Development Director 15800 Flight Path Diver Brooksville, FL 34604 352--540-6400 vpianta@hernandocounty.us www.holmescountyedc.com ...................................................................

Holmes County Development Commission

Joe Rone, Executive Director 106 E Byrd Avenue Bonifay, FL 32425 850-547-6154 jrone@westflorida.coop hcdc1978@gmail.com www.holmescountyedc.com ...................................................................

Indian River Chamber of Commerce

Helene Caseltine Economic Development Director 1216 21st Street Vero Beach, FL 32960 772-567-3491 helenec@indianrivered.com www.indianrivered.com ...................................................................

Osceola County

David Rodriguez, Economic Development Manager 3 Courthouse Square, 2nd Floor Kissimmee, FL 34741 407-742-0620 407-742-4202 (f) david.rodriguez@osceola.org www.greaterosceola.org ...................................................................

Forward Forsyth

Pasco Economic Development Council

Bill Cronin, President & CEO 16506 Pointe Village Drive Suite 101 Lutz, FL 33558 813-926-0827 813-926-0829 (f) bcronin@pascoedc.com pascoedc.com ...................................................................

James McCoy, President & Ceo P.O. Box 1799 Cumming GA 30028 770-887-6461 770-842-1170 jmccoy@focochamber.org www.forwardforsyth.org ...................................................................

Putnam Development Authority Pinellas County Economic Development

Mike Meidel, CEcD, Director 13805 58th Street North, Suite 1-200 Clearwater, FL 33760 727-464-7332 mmeidel@pinellascounty.org www.pced.org ...................................................................

Tallahassee-Leon County Office of Economic Vitality

Cristina Paredes, Director, OEV 315 S. Calhoun Street, Suite 450 Tallahassee, FL 32301 850-300-7559 Cparedes@OEVforBusiness.org www.oevforbusiness.org ...................................................................

GEORGIA City of College Park

Artie Jones III Director of Economic Development 3667 Main Street College Park, GA 30337 404-305-2052 404-305-2057 (f) artiejones@collegeparkga.com www.collegeparkga.com/ ...................................................................

City of East Point

Maceo Rogers CECD 1526 East Forrest Avenue Suite 400 East Point, GA 30344 404-270-7057 jmrogers@eastpointcity.org www.eastpointcity.org ...................................................................

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Terry Schwindler Econmical Devleopment Director 117 Putnam Drive, Eaton, GA 31024 706-816-8099 tschwindler@putnamdevelopmentauthority.com www.putnamdevelopmentauthority.com ...................................................................

ILLINOIS

Champaign County Economic Development Corporation

Carly McCroy, Executive Director 1817 S. Neil Street, Suite 100 Champaign, IL 61820 217-359-6261 carly@champaigncountyedc.org www.champaigncountyedc.org ...................................................................

City of Highland Economic Development

Mallord Hubbard 1115 Broadway, P.O. Box 218 Highland, IL 62249-0218 618-654-9891 618-654-4768 (f) mhubbard@highlandil.gov www.highlandil.gov ...................................................................

City of Litchfield Ecnomic Development

Shelly Herman 120 E. Ryder Street Litchfield, IL 62056 217-324-8146 Sherman@cityoflitchfieldil.com www.litchfieldil-development.com ...................................................................

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NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF

ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

INDIANA City of Marshall

Jennifer Bishop Economic Development Director 201 S. Michigan Ave Marshall, IL 62441 217-826-2034 jbishop@marshall-il.com www.marshall-il.com ...................................................................

American Municipal Power, Inc.

Dodge City/Ford County Development Corporation

Joann Knight, Executive Director Alexis A. Fitzsimmons 101 E. Wyatt Earp Blvd. Director of Economic & Business Dodge City, KS 67801 Development 620-227-9501 1111 Schrock Rd. 620-227-2957 (f) Columbus, OH 43229 jknight@dodgedev.org 614-540-0994 www.dodgedev.org afitzsimmons@amppartners.org ................................................................... www.searchampsites.com ...................................................................

City of Vandalia

Amber E. Daulbaugh, Director of Economic Development 431 W. Gallatin St. Vandalia, IL 62471 618-283-1152 618-335-9510 (Mobile) vandaliaed@vandaliaillinois.com www.vandaliaillinois.com ...................................................................

KENTUCKY

Alliance STL | St. Louis Regional Economic Development

Steven S. Johnson. CEO One Metropolitan Square Suite 1300 St. Louis, MO 63102 314-444-1105 sjohnson@alliancestl.com alliancestl.com ...................................................................

Village of Arlington Heights Business & Economic Development

Charles Witherington-Perkins Director of Planning & Community Development 33 S. Arlington Heights Arlington Heights, IL 60005 847-368-5220 cperkins@vah.com www.vah.com ...................................................................

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Jill Fraley Dotson, Executive Economic Development Director 773 Hambley Boulevard Pikeville, KY 41501 606-437-5128 info@whypikeville.com www.whypikeville.com ...................................................................

Greater Topeka Partnership Huntington County Economic Development

Mark Wickersham Executive Driector 8 West Market Street Huntington, IN 46750 260-356-5688 mark@hcued.com www.hcued.com ..................................................................

Molly Howey, CEcD 120 SW 6th Ave. Topeka, KS 66603 785-231-6040 mhowey@gotopeka.com www.gotopeka.com ...................................................................

Miami County Economic Development Auth.

Jim Tidd 1525 W. Hoosier Boulevard Peru, IN 46970 765-689-0159 jtidd@miamicountyeda.com www.miamicountyeda.com ...................................................................

Russell County Eco Devo & CVB

Mike Parsons, Director 331 E. Witchita, Russell, KS 67665 785-483-4000 785-324-0126 rced2@russellks.org www.russellcountyks.org ...................................................................

KANSAS

City of Parsons Economic Development

Jim Zaleski Economic Development Director 112 S. 17th Street Parsons, KS 67357 620-421-7030 jzaleski@parsonsks.com www.growparsons.com ...................................................................

Coffey County Economic Development

Ronda Truelove, Interim Director 110 S. 6th St., Room #5 Burlington KS 66839 620-364-8780 620-364-3608 rtruelove@coffeycountyks.org www.coffeycountyks.org ...................................................................

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South Western Kentucky EDC

Carter Hendricks, Executive Director 2800 Fort Campbell Blvd. Hopkinsville, KY 42240 270-885-1499 chendricks@southwesternky.com www.southwesternky.com ...................................................................

LOUISIANA

Intersect Illinois

Brent Case Senior Vice President Business Development 230 W. Monroe St. Chicago, IL 60606 312-667-6013 brent.case@intersectillinois.org intersectillinois.org ...................................................................

City of Pikeville

Shawnee Economic Development

Ann Smith-Tate, President CEO 15100 W. 67th Street Suite 202 Shawnee, KS 66217-9344 913-631-6545 asmithtate@shawneekschamber.com www.shawnee-edc.com ...................................................................

Wyandotte Economic Development Council

Greg Kindle, President 727 Minnesota Avenue Kansas City, KS 66101 913-371-3198 gkindle@wyedc.org www.wyedc.org ...................................................................

Louisiana Economic Development

Anya G. Hudnall 1201 N. Third Street Suite 7-210 Baton Rouge, LA 70802 225-342-5396 Anya.hudnal@la.gov www.la.gov ...................................................................

SWLA Economic Development ALLIANCE

George Swift 4310 Ryan Street Lake Charles LA 70605 337-433-3632 gswift@allianceswla.org www.allianceswla.org ...................................................................

St. Mary Parish of Economic Development

Frank Fink, Director 500 Main Street, 5th Floor Courthouse Franklin, LA 70538 337-828-4100 ffink@stmaryparishla.gov www.stmaryparishdevelopmant.com ...................................................................


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NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF

ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

MAINE

Town of Richmond Community, Economic, & Business Development

Darryl Sterling, Director 26 Gardiner Street Richmond, ME 04357-0159 207-737-4305 x 331 207-737-4306 (f) director@richmondmaine.com www.richmondmaine.com ...................................................................

MARYLAND

Calvert County Economic Development

Kelly Robertson-Slagle, Director 205 Main Street Prince Frederick, MD 20678 410-535-4583 kelly.slagle@calvertcountymd.gov www.ecalvert.com ...................................................................

Carroll County Economic Development

Paige Sunderland, Director 225 N. Center Street, Ste. 101 Westminster, MD 21157 410-386-2070 psunderland@carrollbiz.org www.carrollbiz.org ...................................................................

Cecil County Economic Development

Chris Moyer, Director 200 Chesapeake Blvd., Ste 2700 Elkton, MD 21921 410-996-8465 cmoyer@ccgov.org www.ccgov.org ...................................................................

Dorchester County Economic Development

Susan Banks, Director 104 Tech Park Drive Cambridge, MD 21613 410-228-0155 sbanks@choosedorchester.org www.choosedorchester.org ...................................................................

MISSOURI Kent County Economic Development

Jamie L. Williams, CEcD, Director 400 High Street, 3rd Floor Chestertown MD 21620 410-810-2168 jlwilliams@kentgov.org https://www.kentcounty.com/ business ...................................................................

Maryland Department of Commerce

Tom Riford 100 Community Place Crownsville, MD 21032 877-634-6361 www.maryland.gov ...................................................................

Montgomery County Economic Development

Kristin O’Keefe 1801 Rockville Pike, Ste. 320 Rockville, MD 20852 240-641-6703 kristin@thinkmoco.com www.thinkmoco.com ...................................................................

Alliance STL | St. Louis Regional Economic Development

Steven S. Johnson, CEO One Metropolitan Square Suite 1300 St. Louis, MO 63102 314-444-1105 sjohnson@alliancestl.com alliancestl.com ...................................................................

Taney County Partnership

Jonas Arjes Executive Director 269 State Highway 248 Branson, MO 65616 417-334-4084 jarjes@taneycountypartnership.com www.taneycountypartnership.com ...................................................................

NEVADA

City of Henderson Economic Development

Development Corporation

The Right Place, Inc.

Andria Romkema 125 Ottawa Avenue, Suite 450 Grand Rapids, MI 49503 616-771-0563 romkemaa@rightplace.org www.Rightplace.org ...................................................................

Gloucester County Department of Economic Development

Tom Bianco, Director 1480 Tanyard Rd., Sewell, NJ 08080 856-384-6930 tbianco@co.gloucester.nj.us www.gloucestercountynj.gov ...................................................................

NEW YORK

Ken Chapa, Acting Director Alexis A. Fitzsimmons, Director of City Hall Annex Economic & Business Development 280 Water Street MSC 512 1111 Schrock Rd. P.O. Box 95050 Columbus, OH 43229 Henderson, NV 89009-5050 614-540-0994 702-267-1650 afitzsimmons@amppartners.org 702-267-1651 (f) www.searchampsites.com ................................................................... Ken.Chapa@cityofhenderson.com www.hendersonnow.com Michigan Economic ................................................................... Doug Kulper, SVP Business Marketing & Communication Director 300 North Washington Square Lansing, MI 48913 www.michiganadvantage.org ...................................................................

Sheldon Mudd, Executive Director 1500 College Pkwy McMullen Hall #103 Elko, NV 89801 775-738-2100 775-738-7978(f) smudd@nnrda.com www.nnrda.com ...................................................................

NEW JERSEY

MICHIGAN

American Municipal Power, Inc.

Northeastern Nevada Regional Development Authority

Las Vegas Global Ecnomic Alliance

Perry Ursem Vice President, Business Retention + Expansion 6720 via Austi Parkway Suite #330 Las Vegas, NV 89119 702-791-0000 www.Ivgea.org ...................................................................

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Allegany County Industrial Development Agency

Craig Clark, Executive Director CrossRoads Center 6087 State Route 19N Suite 100 Belmont, NY 14813 585-268-7445 585-268-7473 (f) clarkcr@alleganyco.com www.acida.org ...................................................................

The Agency-Broome County IDA/LDC

Stacey Duncan, Deputy Director of Community & Economic Development Five South College Drive Suite 201 Binghamton, NY 13905 607-584-9000 607-584-9009 (f) smd@theagency-ny.com www.theagency-ny.com ...................................................................

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NORTH CAROLINA

NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF

ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

NORTH DAKOTA

PENNSYLVANIA

TENNESSEE Blount Partnership

Beaufort County Economic Development

Martyn Johnson, Director 705 Page Road Washington, NC 27889 252-946-3970 252-946-0849 (f) martyn.johnson@beaufortedc.com www.co.beaufort.nc.us ..................................................................

Bismarck Mandan Chamber EDC

Nathan Schneider CEcD-Vice President 1640 Burnt Boat Dr. Bismark, ND 58503 701-223-5660 nschneider@bmcedc.com www.bismarckmandan.com .................................................................

OHIO

Harnett County Economic Development

Debbie Taylor, Marketing & Business Recruitment Manager 200 Alexander Dr. or PO Box 1270 Lillington, NC 27546 910-814-6891 919-814-8298 (f) dhtaylor@harnett.org www.harnettedc.org ...................................................................

North Carolina Global Transpark

John W. Rouse Executive Director 2780 Jetport Road Kinston, NC 28504 252-775-6183 252-522-1765 (f) jwrouse@ncdot.gov www.ncgtp.com .................................................................

Bryan Daniels CEcD, CCE, IOM President and CEO Alexis A. Fitzsimmons, Director of 201 S. Washington Street Economic & Business Development St. Maryville, TN 37804 1111 Schrock Rd. 865-983-2247 Columbus, OH 43229 865-984-1386 614-540-0994 bdaniels@blountpartnership.com afitzsimmons@amppartners.org www.blountchamber.com www.searchampsites.com ................................................................... ...................................................................

American Municipal Power, Inc.

American Municipal Power, Inc.

RHODE ISLAND

City of Cranston

Lawrence DiBoni, Director of Economic Development 869 Park Avenue Cranston, RI 02910 401-780-3166 401-780-3179 (f) ldiboni@cranstonri.org www.cranstonri.com ...................................................................

Alexis A. Fitzsimmons, Director of Economic & Business Development 1111 Schrock Rd. Columbus, OH 43229 City of Warwick 614-540-0994 Department of Tourism, afitzsimmons@amppartners.org Culture, and Development www.searchampsites.com ................................................................... Karen Jedson, Economic Dev. Director 3275 Pos t Road OKLAHOMA Warwick, RI 2886 401-921-9712 401-732-7662 Karen.Jedson@warwickri.com movetowarwickri.com .................................................................. Bartlesville Development

Authority

Jared Patton, Vice President 201 SW Keeler Bartlesville, OK 74003 918-337-8086 918-337-0216 (f) jpatton@bdaok.org www.bdaok.org ...................................................................

Quonset Development Corporation

Steven J. King, Managing Director 95 Cripe Street North Kingstown, RI 2852 401-295-0044 sking@quonset.com www.quonset.com ...................................................................

SOUTH CAROLINA

Stanly County Economic Development Commission

Candice Boyd Lowder, Director 704-986-3682 704-986-3685 (f) clowder@stanlyedc.com 1000 North First Street, Suite 11 Albemarle, NC 28001 www.stanlyedc.com ...................................................................

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Ponca City Development Authority

David Myers, Executive Director 102 S. Fifth Street Suite 3 Ponca City, OK 74601 580-765-7070 580-765-7070 (f) dmyers@goponca.com www.goponca.com ...................................................................

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Lexington County Economic Development

Sarah J. Johnson Department Director 212 South Lake Drive Lexington, SC 29072 803-785-6818 sjjohnson@lex-co.com www.LexingtonCountyUSA.com ...................................................................

Bristol Tennessee Essential Services

April Eads Business Development Manager 2470 Volunteer Parkway Bristol, TN 37620 423-793-5532 423-793-5545 (f) aeads@btes.net www.btes.net/index.php/economic-development ...................................................................

City of Lebanon

Sarah Haston Economic Development Director 200 North Castle Heights Ave. Lebanon, TN 37087 615-443-2839 EXT. 2120 Sarah.Haston@lebanontn.org www.lebanontn.org ...................................................................

NETWORKS – Sullivan Partnership

Clay Walker PO Box 747 Blountville, TN 37617 (423) 279-7681 cwalker@networkstn.com www.networkstn.com ...................................................................

TEXAS

Cedar Hill Economic Development

Kim M. Buttran, CEcD Marketing and Research Manager 285 Uptown Boulevard, Bldg. 100 Cedar Hill, TX 75104 972-291-5132 chedc@cedarhilltx.com www.cedarhilledc.com ...................................................................


2 0 2 0

City of Development Corporation of El Campo

Carolyn Gibson Executive Director 707 Fahrenthold El Campo, TX 77437 979-543-6727 979-320-7727 (f) cgibson@elcampoeco.org www.elcampoeco.org ...................................................................

NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF

ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

LCRA

Mark Willis Economic Development Manager 3700 Lake Austin Blvd. Austin, TX 78703 512-578-3291 mark.willis@lcra.org www.lcra.org/economic-development/pages/default.aspx ...................................................................

Laredo Economic Development

Olivia Varela, President & CEO P.O. Box 2682 Laredo, TX 78044 956-722-0563 ovarela@laredoedc.org www.laredoedc.org ...................................................................

Mansfield Economic Development Corporation City of Fort Worth

Robert Sturns, Director 1150 S. Freeway Fort Worth, TX 76104 817-392-2663 Robert.Sturns@fortworthtexas.gov ...................................................................

City of Leander

Evan Milliorn Economic Development Director 201 N Brushy Leander, TX 78641 512-528-2852 emilliorn@leandertx.gov www.leanderbusiness.com ...................................................................

Conroe Economic Development Council

Danielle Scheiner, Executive Director 505 West Davis Conroe, TX 77301 936-538-7118 scheiner@conroeedc.org www.conroeedc.org ...................................................................

DeSoto Economic Development

Joe Newman, CEO 211 E. Pleasant Run Road DeSoto, TX 75115 Ph: 972-230-9611 jnewman@dedc.org www.dedc.org ...................................................................

McKinney Economic Development Corporation

Peter Tokar III, President/CEO 5900 S. Lake Forest Drive McKinney, TX 75070 972-435-6953 ptokar@mckinneyedc.com www.uniquemckinney.com ...................................................................

Odessa Economic Development Corporation

301 S. Main Street Mansfield, TX 76063 817-728-3652 www.mansfield-texas.com ...................................................................

Marble Falls EDC

Christian Fletcher 801 Fourth Street Marble Falls, TX 78654 830-798-7079 cfletcher@marblefallseconomy.com www.marblefallseconomy.com ...................................................................

Wesley Burnett 700 N. Grant Ave. Odessa, TX 79761 432-333-7880 wburnett@odessaecodev.com www.odessatx.com ...................................................................

Mount Pleasant EDC

Gainesville Economic Development Corp

New Braunfels EDC

Audrey Schroyer 311 S. Weaver Street Gainsville, TX 76240 940-665-5241 aschroyer@cogtx.org www.gainesvilleedc.com ...................................................................

Jacksboro Economic Development Corporation

Lynda Pack Executive Director P.O. Box 610 Jacksboro, TX 76458 940-567-3151 lyndapack@jacksboroedc.com www.jacksboroedc.com ..................................................................

Nathan Tafoya, Executive Director 1604 N. Jefferson Ave. Mount Pleasant, TX 75455 903-572-6602 nathan@mpedc.org www.mpedc.org ...................................................................

Chester Jenke 390 S. Seguin Avenue New Braunfels, TX 78130 830-608-2811 holly@innewbraunfels.com www.newbraunfelsedc.com ...................................................................

Pflugerville Community Development

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Ruth Jackson Customer Eng. Specialist 107 Chapel Lane New Boston, TX 75570 903-223-9841 ruth.jackson@texamericascenter. com www.texamericascenter.com ...................................................................

Whitesboro Economic Development Corp.

Lynda Anderson Director P.O. Box 340 or 111 W. Main Whitesboro, TX 76273 930-564-3311 landerson@whitesborotexas.com www.whitesborotexas.com ...................................................................

UTAH

Eagle Mountain Economic Development

Aaron Sanborn City Administrator 1650 E. Stagecoach Run Eagle Mountain, UT 84005 801-789-6621 asanborn@emcity.org www.eaglemountaincity.com ...................................................................

VIRGINA

Alexandria Economic Development Partnership

Veronica Ramirez 3801 Helios Way Suite 130 Pflugerville, TX 78660 512-990-3725 veronicar@pfdevelopment.com www.pfevelopment.com ..................................................................

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TexAmericas Center

Adrianne Griffith Marketing & Communications 625 North Washington St. Suite 400 Alexandria, VA 22314 703-739-3820 730-739-1384 (f) griffith@alexecon.org www.growALX.com ...................................................................

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2 0 2 0

NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF

ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

WASHINGTON Mingo County Redevelopment Authority

American Municipal Power, Inc.

Alexis A. Fitzsimmons, Director of Economic & Business Development City of Lakewood Economic 1111 Schrock Rd. Development Columbus, OH 43229 Becky Newton, 614-540-0994 Manager afitzsimmons@amppartners.org 6000 Main Street SW www.searchampsites.com Lakewood, WA 98499 ................................................................... 877-421-9126 bnewton@cityoflakewood.us www.buildyourbetterhere.com ...................................................................

Arlington Economic Development

Telly Tucker, AED Director 1100 N Glebe Rd Suite 1500 Arlington, VA 22201 703-228-0808 703-228-0805 (f) ttucker@arlingtonva.us www.arlingtoneconomicdevelopment.com ...................................................................

Bedford County Office of Economic Development

Traci Blido Economic Development Director 122 E. Main St. Suite 202 Bedford, VA 24523 540-587-5670 540-586-0406 (f) tblido@bedfordcountyva.gov www.bedfordeconomicdevelopment.com ...................................................................

City of Maple Valley

Tim Morgan Economic Development Manager P.O. Box 320 Maple Valley, WA 98038 425-413-8800 tim.morgan@maplevalleywa.gov www.maplevalleywa.gov ..................................................................

Try-City Development Council

Carl Adrian President & CEO 7130 W. Grandridge Blvd #A Kennewich, WA 99336 509-735-1000 cadrian@tridec.org www.tridec.org ..................................................................

WEST VIRGINIA

American Municipal |Power, Inc. County of Gloucester

Sherry A. Spring Director of Economic Development 6489 Main Street Gloucester, VA 23061 804-693-1414 sspring@gloucesterva.info www.gloucesterva.info ..................................................................

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Leasha Johnson, Executive Director 1657 East Fourth Avenue Williamson, WV 25661 304-235-0042 304-235-0043 (f) ljohnson.mcra@suddenlinkmail.com www.developmingo.com ...................................................................

WISCONSIN

New North, Inc

Barb LaMue, Executive Director 600 N. Adams Street Green Bay, WI 54115 920-336-3860 barb.lamue@thenewnorth.com www.thenewnorth.com ...................................................................

Portage County Business Council, Inc. PCB

Todd Kuckkahn, Executive Director 5501 Vern Holmes Drive Stevens Point, WI 54482 715-344-1940 715-344-1940 (f) tkuckkah@portagecountybiz.com www.portagecountyconnects.com ...................................................................

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Sandy Trudel Director of Eocnomic Development Main Floor, 410 9th Street Brandon, Manitoba, Canada R7A 6A2 204-729-2131 s.trudel@brandon.ca www.economicdevelopmentbrandon.com ...................................................................

City of Mississauga Economic Development

Bonnie Brown Mississauga City Hall 300 City Centre Drive, 3rd Floor Mississauga, ON L5B 3C1 Canada 800-456-2181 905-896-5931 bonnie.brown@mississauga.ca www.TheFuturelsUnlimited.ca ...................................................................

City of Guelph

Christine Chapman 1 Carden Street Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1H 3A1 519--822-1260 ext. 2823 Christine.chapman@guelph.ca www.guelph.ca/business ...................................................................

WYOMING County of Elgin Cheyenne LEADS

Betsey Hale, Chief Executive Officer One Depot Square 121 W. 15th St. Suite 304 Cheyenne, WY 82001 307-638-6000 betseyh@cheyenneleads.org cheyenneleads.org ...................................................................

Alan Smith, General Manager, Economic Development 450 Sunset Drive St. Thomas, Ontario, Canada N5R 5V1 519-631-1460 ext. 137 asmith@elgin.ca www.progressivebynature.com ...................................................................

CANADA

Alexis A. Fitzsimmons, Director of Economic & Town of Ajax Business Development Don Terry 1111 Schrock Rd. Manager, Economic Development Columbus, OH 43229 & Tourism 614-540-0994 65 Harwood Avenue South Ajax, Ontario, Canada L1S 2H9 afitzsimmons@amppartners.org 905-619-2529 ext. 3252 www.searchampsites.com ................................................................... don.terry@ajax.ca www.ajaxfirstforbusiness.com ...................................................................

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City of Brandon

Vaughan Economic and Cultural Development

Dennis Cutajar Vaughan City Hall, Level 200 2141 Major Mackenzie Drive Vaughan, Ontario, Canada L6A 1T1 905-832-8526 ext. 8274 dennis.cutajar@vaughan.ca www.vaughan.ca ...................................................................


ADVERTISER & EDIT INDEX Advertiser

Alabama

Elmore County HudsonAlpha

Arizona

Pinal Alliance

California Greater Irvine

Florida

Indian River County

AD Edit

Advertiser

30 30 28 29

North Dakota

1

35

IBC 7

Kansas

Salina 9

Illinois

Arlington Heights Litchfield

Maryland

Kent County Port of Baltimore

33 33 32 33 IFC BC

AD Edit

Bismarck-Mandan

37 36

Rhode Island

Quonset Business Park

17

South Carolina

Southern Carolina Charleston Regional Camp Hall Union County I-77 Alliance

19 21 23 24 25

Tennessee Blount County

24 20 18 25 22

3

Utah

Eagle Mountain City

41

Wyoming

Cheyenne

41

39 38

Sometimes the address says it all.

Irvine was master planned to be an economic powerhouse. Strategic location. Strong Life Sciences, IT and Advanced Manufacturing industry clusters. High quality of life. Dynamic, educated workforce. Inspiring diversity. Business oriented governance. 21st century university and college connections.

12TH CONSECUTIVE YEAR:

SAFEST CITY IN AMERICA (population over 100,000) - Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)

Irvine businesses are thriving. Grow with us. 36 Executive Park Suite 100, Irvine, CA. 96214

949.660.9112 • irvinechambereconomicdevelopment.com

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Profile for BusinessXpansionJournal

October/November 2020