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2021 NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

July/August 2021 | bxjmag.com

PORTS

INFRASTRUCTURE UPGRADES

FORESTS

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TABLE OF

CONTENTS

JULY/AUGUST 2021

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FEATURES INDUSTRY OUTLOOK: Ports look to infrastructure upgrades

As losses from the pandemic subside, economic recovery for ports means making them more useful for larger and larger container ships.

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Alan Reyes-Guerra areyes@bxjmag.com 205-862-5175

By David Hodes

EDITORIAL CONTRIBUTORS

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David Hodes

INNOVATION AND STRATEGIES: Automotive developments today - and the profound changes on the horizon The U.S. auto industry has flourished in part due to influence of Japanese companies here, but there are serious game-changing events underway. By David Hodes

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Clint Cabiness clint@dialedinmediagroup.com 205-613-5910 EDITORIAL OFFICE King Publishing, Inc. 1000 Stafford Court

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INDUSTRY INSIGHT: Making forests more profitable How the U.S. is using new ideas, innovative approaches to land management and efficiencies in crop production. By David Hodes

Birmingham, Alabama 35242 Tel: 205-862-5175 ONLINE MEDIA ASSISTANT Sonia Buchanan SUBSCRIPTION CHANGES & REQUESTS 205-862-5175 or www.bxjmag.com

EXPANSION O P P O R T U N I T I E S 22 ALABAMA: CENTRALLY LOCATED FOR SUCCESS

36 OKLAHOMA: THE LAND OF OPPORTUNITY

27 SOUTH CAROLINA: FOCUSED ON THE FUTURE

39 WASHINGTON STATE: BUILDING BUSINESS LEGENDS

32 MISSOURI: THE PERFECT LOCATION TO THRIVE

King Publishing, Inc., 1000 Stafford Court, Birmingham, AL 35242; www.bxjmag.com. Advertising rates are furnished upon request. Subscriptions are free to those who qualify. Non-qualified subscriptions are $69 in the U.S.; $89 in Canada and Mexico; elsewhere outside the U.S. is $99 for 10 issues. Back issue rate is $6 when available. Payment must accompany order. The views expressed in all articles and advertisements appearing in the Business Xpansion Journal magazine are solely those of the author and advertiser, respectively. © Copyright 2021, King Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. No partof this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. POSTMASTER: Send change of address notification to Business Xpansion Journal, 1000 Stafford Court, Birmingham, AL 35242. Subscribers can make address changes by calling 205-862-5175 or by e-mail at www.bxjmag.com. 1000 Stafford Court, BIRMINGHAM, AL 35242

41 2021 National Directory of Economic Developers

TEL: 205-862-5175 2001

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INDUSTRY

OUTLOOK

PORTS

$

Busy container traffic in Pier 300 Channel at the Port of Los Angeles, one of the busiest in the U.S. Traffic began stacking up in the port during 2020, forcing some ships to relocate to the Seattle port.

Ports Look to Infrastructure Upgrades B Y: DAV ID HO D ES

As losses from the pandemic subside, economic recovery for ports means making them more useful for larger and larger container ships

T

he pandemic, now showing signs of abating, effectively slowed down cargo shipping into the U.S. through 2020, especially those shipments originating in China. But things are changing fast. Almost too fast. ..................................................................................................

Now the seaports around the country are scrambling to deal with the surge of traffic, causing serious vessel congestion especially in west coast ports where some container carriers are suspending calls in ports (such as Zim, a global, asset-light container liner shipping company from Israel suspending calls to the Oakland port in June) until the congestion situations issues are resolved. But that sort of good news/bad news situation is something the seaports industry is dealing with as it takes time to plan better services for the vessels it serves, and finds creative solutions for helping fix the backlogs caused by the congestion.

U.S. ports snapshot In an annual report to Congress in 2019, the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) reported that waterborne vessels are the leading transportation mode for international freight, moving 41 percent of freight value in 2019—over $1.7 trillion. The annual report also found that the ports of Baltimore, Houston, Mobile, New Orleans, New York and New Jersey, and Virginia are in the top 25 of all U.S. ports. From 2015 to 2019, tonnage handled at the top 25 ports increased by 4.4 percent, including an increased number of twenty-foot equivalent unit containers (TEUs), up by 18.6 4 |

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CHANGE

YOUR

CHANNEL

Move cargo more efficiently. Scale operations for future growth. Big changes are happening here. Freeport Harbor Channel – already the shortest on the Texas Gulf – will soon be the deepest channel in the state. Larger vessels will be moving through our port than ever before and we’ll be ready for them with new berths and modern cranes. Best of all, we have over 500 acres of adjacent land ready for development.

See the big picture. It’s time to change your channel. Visit our website or schedule a tour today. 1.800.362.5743 PortFreeport.com


INDUSTRY

OUTLOOK

PORTS

percent. The tonnage handled by the top 25 dry bulk ports decreased by 4.9 percent. The top 25 ports handled a total of 55.5 million TEUs in 2019. The highest TEU volumes were associated with coastal container ports, such as the ports of Long Beach, Los Angeles, New York and New Jersey. These three ports accounted for about 44 percent of the total TEU handled at the top 25 container ports in 2019, according to statistics from the American Association of Port Authorities (AAPA). Data from the DOT Bureau of Transportation $ that the top 25 ports Statistics (BTS) showed handled a total of 1.82 billion tons of cargo in 2019, with 703 million tons of domestic cargo and 1.1 billion tons of foreign cargo. The highest tonnage figures were associated with the Houston, South Louisiana and similar ports that handle large quantities of both liquid bulk cargo (such as petroleum or chemicals) and dry bulk cargo (such as coal or grain).

What changed in 2020 The DOT report to Congress also noted that a record-breaking 2020 hurricane season of 30 named storms, 13 hurricanes, and six major hurricanes, was far above the average hurricane season production of 12 named storms, 6 hurricanes, and 3 major hurricanes. The 2020 Atlantic hurricane season was the most active on record, with September 2020 being the most active month. Hurricanes can cause numerous port closures and power outages, which may have a ripple effect on vessel schedules and dwell times. Then there is the effect of the pandemic. The BTS is in the process of examining the extent to which maritime trade and transportation have rebounded from the impacts of the Covid pandemic. As a result of Covid, according to the BTS, the values of U.S. vessel and container imports were down as much as 33 percent (about $33 billion) in May, 2020, compared to 23 percent (about $16 billion) in May 2019. The top 10 container ports in 2019 handled 9 and 15 percent, respectively, fewer TEUs in the 1st quarter and 2nd quarter of 2020 than in 2019. Several of these ports (Long Beach, Los Angeles, and Northwest Seaport Alliance) reported numerous blanked sailings in 2020 (also known as “void,” sailings where either a vessel skips a port or the entire service string is canceled, allowing operators to reduce the supply of vessel capacity to better match decreased vessel capacity demand). Early indications are that TEU volumes have rebounded, particularly at ports along the Pacific coast, requiring vessel operators to add capacity by utilizing larger vessels on previously scheduled voyages or providing previously unscheduled extra voyages (also known as “extra loaders”). While this rebounding unfolds, ports are looking at other things that need to be focused on—chiefly, infrastructure. 6 |

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Port infrastructure needs American seaport activity supports 26 percent of the economy, according to the AAPA, which represents more than 130 public port authorities in the U.S., Canada, the Caribbean and Latin America. The value of economic activity related to seaport is $4.6 trillion a year. The AAPA also reported that $66 billion is needed for port-related infrastructure over the next ten years, as the amount of freight moved in the U.S. is projected to grow 15 percent by 2045. The country’s trade volume is expected to quadruple after 2030, according to the AAPA. By 2037, the U.S. will export more than 52 million shipping containers through U.S. seaports each year. As a result of this surge in trade volume, deeper channels need to be dredged, and road and rail connections need to be created or updated, among other infrastructure needs. For example, approach channel depths can limit the size of vessels able to call at a port. The Pacific coast ports with their natural harbors, such as the ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles, have the deepest channels. The Mississippi River ports of Cincinnati-Northern Kentucky, Huntington, Pittsburgh, and St. Louis have the shallowest channels. Even if a port’s minimum channel depth allows for megaships—such as the 1,200 foot long, 160 foot wide, 50 foot hull depth Panamax cargo ships, or the even larger Capesize vessels—the individual marine terminals within the port vicinity may not have the minimum depth to handle them, according to the DOT annual report to Congress. “I think it’s pretty well understood that American infrastructure has challenges,” Ryan McFarland, the federal government relations manager for the Northwest Seaport Alliance, says. McFarland is also the chair of the American Association of Port Authorities’ Harbors and Navigation Committee, and vice president of the Pacific Northwest Waterways Association Executive Committee. “We have congested roads and ports. Many of our facilities are hitting the 40 year mark at a time when they are starting to need to be


INDUSTRY

OUTLOOK

PORTS

The MSC Laurence arrived at Port of Seattle’s Terminal 46 in 2018. At 13,000 TEUs,it was the largest container ship to call at $ the terminal.

rehabilitated. We want ports to be part of that infrastructure picture because we are a critical part of the system. That is our top line goal—to make sure ports are included in the infrastructure conversation.” As of June 29, 2021, there is $16 billion in federal funding included for ports and waterways in the infrastructure bill that has yet to pass in Congress as of this writing.

On the northwest shores

S I D E B A R

Under a port development authority, The Northwest Seaport Alliance (NWSA) manages the container, breakbulk, auto and some bulk terminals in Seattle and Tacoma. The port is considered a premier container cargo port on the west coast because of its naturally deep berth, wide footprint, and the availability of an on-dock rail yard, which allows

containers to be directly loaded from the ship onto rail lines. Southwest Loui The Seattle-Tacoma terminal underwent $250 million terminal improvements beginning on Pier 4 in September, for the nation and p 2016, including strengthening and realigning a plastics berth, for hundreds o according to the DOT BTS. Upgrades also included adding We supply aircraft with m eight new super-post-Panamax cranes capable of serving custom interiors, and we two 18,000-TEU container ships at the same time.and timber. Plus, we The port includes six public container terminals, and two world-class c public terminals that handle bulk, break bulk and roll-on/ roll-off cargoes. “We are going to be near half a billion dollars in total improvements at the port,” McFarland says. With a modernized Terminal 5, the NWSA’s containerized cargo is estimated to reach nearly 7 million TEUs annually in 2050, according to a recent economic analysis by the NWSA. “Without the T-5 investments, containerized cargo is

RESILIENCE…

THAT’S SOUTHWEST The Port of Lake Charles: It’s Positive Impact LOUISIANA

The Port of Lake Charles is the jewel of Southwest Port is mandated by state statue to maintain the Calcasieu Louisiana. Economists and economic development Ship Channel which is crucial to existing and future industry. When we get hit hard by weather, professionals regularly point out that the port’s location, Up to 46 cents of every dollar in Southwest Louisiana is we respond quickly to get up and running. amenities, and leadership keep the facility at the front of the generated from industry, most port related. The Port of Lake Charles, Chennault Airpark, proverbial “class,” whichand in recent years has led to historic The SWLA Alliance/Chamber supports positive initiatives Lake Charles Regional Airport are open and levels of growth and opportunity. by the Port and work in tandem to make sure area residents ready for your business. LAKE CHARLES HOUSTON 10 the overall The Port of Lake Charles is one of the most powerful and businesses reap economic rewards improving Our Southwest region has over 12 certified regional economic drivers on the local and international quality of life. For more information, contact the SWLA industrial sites ready for your company. stage. Thousands of jobs have been created at companies Economic Development Alliance at 337-433-3632 or visit housed and affiliated with port. casinos areLouisiana on port www.allianceswla.org To the hear theTwo Southwest property and generate $62.8 million in revenue monthly Resilience Update give us a call. providing $14.9 million in taxable sales monthly. Option agreements have been negotiated with several companies who will export natural gas or convert the product into other liquids. In the next few years, port officials plan to oversee $222 million in new construction and improvements. The

LA

TX

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(337) 433-3632 | www.ALLIANCESWLA.org Contact George Swift at gswift@allianceswla.org


The new cranes for the Seattle Tacoma port, one of the largest on the West Coast, aboard the Zhen Hua 28 passed by West Seattle in 2018.

expected to be 5.3 million TEUs in 2050, a difference of 1.6 million TEUs,” a report published by the NWSA stated. “This estimated reduction of total TEUs could result in reduced economic impact, including more than 6,000 fewer jobs and $2 billion in lower direct business output.” McFarland says that there has been a surge in 2021 of port traffic in the Seattle Tacoma port, much of it redirected from congested ports in Los Angeles and Long Beach, the number one and number two busiest ports in the U.S. respectively which represent a gateway to trans-Pacific trade with Asia. “Now we have some ships waiting at anchor. We have had to take some steps to address the congestion,” he says. The port has used some of their vacant properties as container storage and cargo handling yards, allowing them

to bring the cargo off the marine terminals to free up space so that more ships can be unloaded. In early 2022, Terminal 5 will be opened, adding 185 acres of terminal capacity “exactly when it is needed,” McFarland says. “Ports in general need to provide modern terminals to be more efficient and handle more cargo volume. Terminal 5 will be our top facility, which will be capable of handling the largest ships. “We are looking at finding a partnership with the federal government to increase federal investments in ports, which is key. We have a long list of things we need to do that we are struggling to do ourselves as fast as we need to. I think a lot of ports are in that boat.” X

Approximately 37,300 jobs in Maryland are generated by port activity. 15,330 are direct jobs generated by cargo and vessel activities at the Port. 16,780 are induced jobs, i.e. jobs supported by the local purchases of goods and services by direct employees. 5,190 are indirect jobs, i.e. jobs supported by the business purchases of the employers who create the direct jobs. The Port of Baltimore is a major source of personal and business revenues in the State of Maryland. The Port was responsible for $3.3 billion in personal income. The Port’s average annual salary for the direct job holder is 9.5% higher than the average annual wage for the State of Maryland (U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics). The Port generated $2.6 billion in business

revenues. Activities of the Port generated $395 million in state, county, and municipal tax revenues. Approximately 101,880 other jobs in Maryland are directly related to activities at the Port. Related jobs are those with Maryland companies that choose to import and export their cargo through the Port of Baltimore, but they have the option of shipping their products or supplies through other ports. Combining direct, induced and indirect jobs with related jobs, there are over 139,180 jobs linked to the Port. For more information on the Port of Baltimore, please visit www.mpa. maryland.gov

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S I D E B A R

The Port of Baltimore Economic Impact


INDUSTRY

OUTLOOK

PORTS

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Port Freeport, Texas Kent County, Maryland $

Freeport Harbor Channel Improvement Project Groundbreaking Ceremony held on April 8, 2021.

Port Freeport currently ranks 15th among U.S. ports in total foreign waterborne tonnage handled. Port Freeport is a deep-water port strategically situated in the industrial hub of Brazoria County, Texas only 3 miles from the open waters of the Gulf of Mexico. With an abundance of land available for development, accessibility through road and railway, and the shortest - and soon to be deepest - channel on the Texas Coast with more than 500 acres mitigated and shovel ready. Over the years, Port Freeport has experienced exponential growth and is undertaking strategic initiatives to maintain the expansion and provide the surrounding community with jobs and economic benefits. One of these initiatives includes the Freeport Harbor Channel Improvement Project which will deepen and partially widen the channel from its current 46 feet to depths ranging from 51 to 56 feet mean lower low water. Dredging began in April 2021 and the project will take roughly 5 years to complete. Port Freeport serves its customers and stakeholders through state-of-the-art infrastructure, OEM processing and multimodal terminal services, and competitive expansion options while creating jobs as a leading economic catalyst for the region and state. A new container terminal was completed in 2014 and marked with the installation of two post-Panamax gantry cranes. Expansion of the terminal is scheduled for completion in 2022 and features an additional 928 feet of berth and will accommodate additional post-Panamax gantry cranes. In 2015, a vehicle storage and processing terminal was developed, and an expansion area was completed in 2020. The Port’s project cargo terminal has continuously served the petrochemical industry

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through construction and expansions in the surrounding areas. In 2019, Port Freeport completed the initial phase of rail development to serve a future multimodal industrial park. These terminals, combined with a state highway system, railroad connectivity and the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, allow users of Port Freeport seamless connectivity between various modes of transportation for their supply chain. Port Freeport is proud to be a fast-growing Texas port. As of 2015, more than $31 billion dollars of new projects have been or are being constructed in Brazoria County, and $18.5 billion dollars of those projects are along the Freeport Harbor Channel. Port Freeport envisions a bright future and will continue to invest in infrastructure and the surrounding community through job creation. For more information about Port Freeport, please visit www.portfreeport.com or call them at 800-362-5743.


The Ports of Indiana – Big Things Happen Here services, as well as special synergies that allow each company to operate at a competitive advantage to their peers. The availability of infrastructure, built to the highest of standards, allows each company located on Port property to expand their raw material sourcing and finished good markets from a local to global playing field.” The ports at Jeffersonville, Burns Harbor and Mount Vernon handle on an annual basis: • 2 million tons of steel • 100 ocean going ships • 200 Great Lakes vessels • 5,000 US inland river barges • 65,000 railcars • 710,000 trucks More than half of Indiana’s border is water, 400 miles of which is navigable by cargo vessels. The Ports of Indiana also serves as a Foreign Trade Zone authority for the State of Indiana, maintaining foreign trade zones at each of the ports. POI is the first statewide port authority to achieve the Green Marine certification to advance sustainable initiatives. To learn more, visit www.portsofindiana.com and follow www.twitter.com/portsofindiana

S I D E B A R

The Ports of Indiana (POI) is a statewide port authority operating three ports, two on the Ohio River and one on Lake Michigan (with access to the St. Lawrence seaway). Ideally situated on two major North American freight transportation arteries – the Great Lakes and the Inland Waterway System – the state’s three-port system serves the world’s most productive industrial and agricultural regions. POI serves the steel, manufacturing, energy and agricultural sectors. Indiana’s ports offer a unique value proposition for companies because of their infrastructure, transportation connections, proximity to the country’s largest steel producing region and access to ocean shipments in the U.S. Midwest. The Ports of Indiana’s locations, innovative business model and management vision has allowed Indiana’s ports to flourish without the need for ongoing financial support from state tax dollars. This is unique in the industry as many ports require large public subsidies from state or local taxes to maintain their facilities. POI conducts business to generate economic growth, employment and tax dollars for state and local governments. The three ports contribute $8.2 billion annually to the state economy and support more than 50,000 jobs. POI is dedicated to growing Indiana’s local and statewide economy. According to Vanta E. Coda II, chief executive officer, “The Ports of Indiana provides real estate, multimodal infrastructure and

▶ Central Inland Waterway Access ▶ Best Global Access to the Midwest

Burns Harbor Mount Vernon

▶ Unmatched Access to Big Industry ▶ Ocean, River, Road & Rail Connections

Jeffersonville

▶ Shovel-Ready Land Leases in Each Port ▶ Maintained Infrastructure

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INDUSTRY

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S I D E B A R

Quonset Business Park: Small State, Big Impact. Since its creation in 2005, Quonset Development Corporation has created an environment for businesses to succeed. Once home to a naval base, the park has been transformed into the leading engine of economic development in Rhode Island that supports over 200 companies and 12,200 jobs. The Park has been a leader in job creation and economic growth in the state, attracting over $2 billion in private investment. The Park is also home to 17% of the manufacturing jobs in $ Rhode Island. So what is it about Quonset that creates a climate for success? Growth Mindset: The remaining available land at Quonset can accommodate up to 3.6 million square feet of new construction, and it is easy to become Quonset’s newest company. Quonset’s “Site Readiness” program makes pre-permitted and pre-engineered parcels available that allow businesses to get shovels in the ground within 90 days of site control. World Class Infrastructure: Quonset’s greatest strength has always been in the variety of facilities and world-class infrastructure available to companies. The industrial spaces have the capacity to support large, high-tech operations like Electric

Boat and Toray Plastics while the Commerce Park section accommodates some of the state’s most successful corporations like Ocean State Job Lot. Quonset’s state-of-the-art Flex Industrial Campus gives new and expanding companies room to grow in a move-in ready and affordable space, adaptable to the needs of their business. This includes flexible manufacturing, or warehouse space between 10,000 and 40,000 s/f. These are equipped with office spaces, restroom facilities, and high bay space for manufacturing, assembly or warehouse use, with ceilings up to 24 feet. Quonset also offers modern, customizable, state-of-the-art office space for start-ups, small businesses and professional service companies in the Gateway Office Complex. With the four existing office buildings fully leased, the fifth building is now accepting new tenants. The Gateway Offices provide companies with affordable rates and the option of flexible shorter-term leases. Each facility includes wireless high-speed Internet, a shared kitchen and break areas (including an outdoor courtyard), a conference room, and an abundance of natural light, and multiple restrooms. Location: Quonset’s location in North

OUR CONNECTIONS LAND • SEA RAIL • AIR PROPEL YOUR SUCCESS

NORTH KINGSTOWN, RHODE ISLAND Centrally located in the Southern New England business region

Over 200 companies, employing 12,200 people across 3,200 acres

Quonset was ranked as a Top Ten industrial park in the United States in 2020 Home to the Port of Davisville, ranked as one of the Top Ten auto importers in North America The Port of Davisville has been instrumental in including the first wind farm in the United States.

To learn more visit quonset.com 12 |

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Kingstown, Rhode Island places businesses in the heart of the Northeast, giving them broad access to the East Coast’s largest customer markets. Situated halfway between Boston and New York, companies can have a stake in both of the region’s densest population centers. The Business Park is also minutes from major highways such as I-95; manages the Port of Davisville, Rhode Island’s only public port; and is adjacent to Amtrak’s New England Connector. Transportation: Quonset’s location places companies at the heart of major shipping and travel routes in the region. The onsite Port of Davisville provides public access to a world-class port facility. Quonset also affords access to 14 miles of freight rail lines through the Park and both RI Rte. 4 and I-95 highways. With additional proximity to three airports – T.F. Green (RI), Logan International (MA), and Bradley International (CT) and train routes like the MBTA and Amtrak, businesses and employees alike have the options they need to access new markets. Superb Public Amenities: To attract the best talent, it’s essential to be a place where people want to work. The Park is home to an 18-hole golf course, four public beaches, a bike path, a daycare facility and a free express bus shuttle service that connects to Providence in partnership with the Rhode Island Public Transit Authority. The Gateway Plaza also includes shopping options like Dave’s Marketplace grocery store and Kohls. These amenities create an environment for success for employees and are a benefit to Quonset’s neighbors, as well. Cleaner and Greener: Access to the Port of Davisville has made Quonset a magnet for clean energy development. The park has hosted the construction of some of the nation’s most ambitious wind energy projects, including the nation’s first offshore wind farm off the coast of Block Island. Quonset Business Park looks forward to serving as a hub for the growing industry. The Quonset Development Corporation’s offices are also run 100% on clean energy generated by solar power. Quonset Business Park is the premium location for businesses of all sizes and stages of development. The top-notch facilities, centralized location, and institutional support not only gives businesses at Quonset an edge in the competitive Northeastern markets but also the resources they need to grow. For more information about starting your next venture at Quonset, visit them at http://www.quonset.com.


INNOVATIONS & STRATEGIES

AUTOMOTIVE

An example of a fully autonomous electric vehicle is Toyota’s e-Pallette concept, an alliance with Amazon, Mazda and Pizza Hut.

Automotive Developments Today - and the Profound Changes on the Horizon B Y: DAVID HO D ES

The U.S. auto industry has flourished in part due to influence of Japanese companies here, but there are serious game-changing events underway.

T

he automotive industry became a key growth industry in the U.S., especially after World War II, helping the U.S. solidify its position as a world economic power. But there was change to come years later—a correction at first, and then a surge. ....................................................................................................

As noted in the history of automobiles from A&E’s History program, after peaking at a record 12.87 million units in 1978, sales of American-made cars fell to 6.95 million in 1982, as imports increased their share of the U.S. market from 17.7 percent to 27.9 percent. By 1980s, the automobile industry transitioned into becoming a shared global enterprise with the rise of Japan’s influence as the leading automaker, eventually leading to partnerships in the U.S. that grew throughout the 80s and continue to drive the industry today.

The Japanese component The Center for Automotive Research (CAR), an independent research organization, reports that the first Japanese automaker design, research and development facilities opened in the United States in the early 1970s, and the related surge in automobile manufacturing began in 1982. Today, Japanese automaker production comprises one-third of all cars and trucks built in the United States, according to the CAR report. Now Japanese automakers develop and build a range of compact cars, sedans, pickup trucks, SUVs, and commercial trucks in U.S. facilities. The auto industry accounts for nearly 3.5 percent of overall U.S. GDP, meaning Japanese automakers provide roughly $250 bxjmag.com

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INNOVATIONS & STRATEGIES

AUTOMOTIVE Honda’s $124 million wind tunnel in East Liberty, Ohio, uses an interchangeable belt system capable of testing both production vehicles and racecars. Wind speeds of up to 192 mph can be produced in the tunnel.

Lightweight metals and fuel efficiency

billion in added value to the American economy every year. According to the research report, Japanese automakers have continually deepened their commitment to the U.S. auto manufacturing sector, with a $53.3 billion in direct manufacturing investment through 2019. Currently six Japan-based companies have U.S. production facilities. That count will increase to seven with the completion of the Mazda-Toyota jointventure plant in Huntsville, Alabama, scheduled to open in 2021. Total funding for the development of that state-ofthe-art facility is $2.311 billion. Japanese automakers now operate 24 manufacturing plants across the country in traditional auto manufacturing states like Indiana, Missouri, Ohio, Tennessee, and Texas. Japanese automakers have also supported the creation of newer vehicle production ecosystems in 14 |

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states like Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, and West Virginia. Through significant investments in manufacturing, research and development, headquarters, distribution, and other facilities, the presence of these firms has grown to support 1.6 million jobs in the U.S. economy. Recent examples of Japan’s direct foreign investments include Honda’s 2017 $124 million investment in East Liberty, Ohio, to establish a multifunctional aero-acoustic wind tunnel facility at the Transportation Research Center; and Toyota’s 2015 commitment to investing $1 billion over five years in Palo Alto, California and Cambridge, Massachusetts, to establish the company’s research and development enterprise, Toyota Research Institute Inc. Today, innovation in automobile design and new ideas in materials used to build cars is taking center stage.

Lightweight materials allow cars— particularly electric vehicles—to carry advanced emission control systems, safety devices and electronic systems without increasing their weight. The CAR report indicated that today’s light vehicles are more advanced than ever, and automakers are transitioning to focus on such things as mobility, enhancing vehicle safety, improving traffic congestion, reducing pollution, and other technological innovations in car design. New materials with better performance characteristics are being added into light vehicle production to help minimize noise and vibration, lower overall cost, improve fuel economy and create less greenhouse gas emissions. Between 2010 and 2040, CAR projects the automotive industry will increase use of advanced high strength steels, aluminum, magnesium, carbon fiber reinforced plastics and composites. The automotive industry will simultaneously reduce dependence on mild steels and high strength low alloy steel, according to CAR. High strength steel use is expected to peak at around 15 percent of total vehicle weight composition in 2020, and then fall to roughly 5 percent usage by 2040 as other lightweight materials gain share. A blog published by the U.S. Department of Energy found that if just one quarter of the light-duty vehicles in the U.S. used light­weight components and high-efficiency engines, the U.S. could save more than 5 billion gallons of fuel annually by 2030. They predict lightweight vehicles could increase fuel efficiency to enable cars to travel 54 miles per gallon…and further. One example: When Ford introduced the all-aluminum F-150 pick-up in 2015,


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Prepared to do business.... Middlesex County offers a rich rural-urban landscape in the heart of Southwestern Ontario. Complete with all the must haves for multi-nationals or local businesses looking to expand or upgrade facilities, Middlesex offers prime location, affordable land prices, educated workforce, multilevel government support, and desirable quality of life. Our 401 and 402 series highways are vital in transporting goods to destinations across the globe. Rail and air transport are locally available with both Canadian National and Canadian Pacific traveling through the County and the London International Airport offering a central location for both cargo and people. Also located about an hour from here is port access to the Great Lakes’ shipping channels. The municipality’s ‘prepared-to-do business’ approach is credited as one of the many reasons why renowned companies such as Bonduelle North America, Gray Ridge Eggs, Catalent Pharma Solutions (Molnar Park), Armatec Survivability (DaVinci Park), Ideal Pipe and Algonquin Bridge (Thorndale Park) call Middlesex County ‘home.’ Companies prospecting for the optimum mix of location, (including attractive property priving) and additional amenities, really strike it rich in Middlesex. With a population of 425,683, the City of London is Canada’s 11th largest city, which serves as an advantage to Middlesex given the access to established economic sectors, and the many graduates from Western University and Fanshawe College. Both education institutions rank high as leaders in research and public/private partnerships so it’s no wonder why Stats Canada (2016) identified Middlesex County residents as possessing an education level higher than the national average. The quality of life in Middlesex is enhanced by the celebration of arts and culture and the vibrant shopping and entertainment options. As well, short commutes, traffic that moves, fresh air, safe spaces, and active living options can all be accessed by families in our intimate communities. This is a place where front porches are used, street hockey is played, and children walk to school. Come see for yourself why businesses call Middlesex County ‘home.’

www.investinmiddlesex.ca


INNOVATIONS & STRATEGIES

AUTOMOTIVE

the vehicle proved to be significantly lighter than steel counterparts on the market, giving the truck best-in-class fuel economy.

The autonomous car and what’s coming Connectivity, and later autonomous technology, will increasingly allow the car to become a platform for drivers and passengers to use their time in transit to consume novel forms of media and services, or dedicate the freed-up time to other personal activities, CAR reports. The increasing speed of innovation, especially in software-based systems, will require cars to be upgradable. As shared mobility solutions with shorter life cycles become more common, consumers will be constantly aware of technological advances, which will further increase demand for upgradability in privately used cars as well. Once technological and regulatory issues have been resolved, up to 15 percent of new cars sold in 2030 could be fully autonomous, according to the CAR report. The first step in the transition to autonomous cars is the electric car, with many on the road now, and electric charging stations becoming a common sight in the U.S. But the reality of ending the era of combustion engines is a cause for great concern among manufacturers, according to Bernard Swiecki, the director of research and the director of the Automotive Communities Partnership (ACP) at CAR. “We have an incredible investment in this country in engine and transmission production that is intended for conventionally-powered vehicles,” he says. “So if you work in a supplier plant that makes fuel systems, and electric cars don’t have fuel at all, what does that say for the future of that plant? And if you make engines, and there are no engines in electric cars, what happens to that job? And so the transition is something a lot of people are worried about in terms of how fast it happens and which things translate.” For instance, if your factory makes a product that doesn’t appear on electric cars, he says, you have to step back and see what sort of equipment is in that factory. “What are the processes? Are you bending metal? Are you injection molding? Are you welding? 16 |

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And you look at the materials for an electric car and say, OK, this equipment and these capabilities and processes means maybe I can do this part or that part that goes onto an electric vehicle.” That manufacturing transition that has to happen as more electric cars are built has governments around the country very concerned, he says. “It’s not just engine and transmission plants, that are owned by the car companies. It’s also supplier-owned plants that make a million different things for fuel systems and exhaust systems and so on that are just not part of an electric vehicle.” He says that non-automotive work can be an option for those auto suppliers. “Very often a given supplier plant is dedicated to one type of product that is often completely automotive. Not all of that translates to non-automotive products,” Swiecki says. “The problem is that automotive is such a specialized industry.” One option is for auto suppliers to go into the business of building large appliances, Swiecki says, using some of their metal forming processes, for example.

The future? Fewer cars, greater mobility Overall global car sales will continue to grow, but the annual growth rate is expected to drop from the 3.6 percent over the next five years to around two percent by 2030. This drop will be largely driven by macroeconomic factors and the rise of new mobility services such as car sharing and e-hailing, according to CAR. New mobility services—from Uber to other car-sharing services, to even micro-mobility options such as electric bikes and scooters—may result in a decline of private-vehicle sales. As a result of this shift to diverse mobility solutions, up to one out of ten new cars sold in 2030 may likely be a shared vehicle, which could reduce sales of private-use vehicles. This would mean that more than 30 percent of miles driven in new cars sold could be from shared mobility. With established markets slowing, however, growth will continue to rely on emerging economies, particularly in China, while product-mix differences will explain different development of revenues.

The CAR report shows that there are already early signs that the importance of private-car ownership is declining. In the United States, for example, the share of young people (16 to 24 years) who hold a driver’s license dropped from 76 percent in 2000 to 71 percent in 2013.

What car manufacturers need to do now The certainty of all these future ideas is hard to predict. Automobile industry movers and shakers need to make strategic moves now to shape the industry’s evolution. A McKinsey report, “Automotive Revolution: Perspective Towards 2030,” recommends a four-pronged strategic approach: 1). Prepare for uncertainty. Success in 2030 will require automotive players to shift to a continuous process of anticipating new market trends, exploring alternatives and complements to the traditional business model, and exploring new mobility business models and their economic and consumer viability; 2). Leverage partnerships. The industry is transforming from competition among peers toward new competitive interactions, but also partnerships and open, scalable ecosystems. To succeed, automotive manufacturers, suppliers, and service providers need to form alliances or participate in ecosystems—for example, around infrastructure for autonomous and electrified vehicles. 3). Drive transformational change. With innovation and product value increasingly defined by software, OEMs need to align their skills and processes to address new challenges like software-enabled consumer value definition, cybersecurity, data privacy, and continuous product updates; and 4). Reshape the value proposition. Car manufacturers must further differentiate their products/services and change their value proposition from traditional car sales and maintenance to integrated mobility services. This will put them in a stronger position to retain a share of the globally growing automotive revenue and profit pool, including new business models such as online sales and mobility services, and cross-fertilizing the opportunities between the core automotive-business and new mobility-business models. X


INDUSTRY

FORESTRY

INSIGHT

Pennsylvania watershed showing the patchwork quilt of forest, farmland, and other land uses typical of watersheds in MSEA and CEAP studies

Making Forests More Profitable B Y D AV ID HO D ES

How the U.S. is using new ideas, innovative approaches to land management and efficiencies in crop production.

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he United States has the fourth largest forest estate in the world, including about eight percent of the world’s forests. ....................................................................................................

Tom Tidwell, chief of U.S. Forest Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), spelled out other details of U.S. forests in his 2016 speech, “State of Forests and Forestry in the U.S.” “We have about 304 million hectares of forest land covering about a third of our land area. These lands range from boreal forests in Alaska; to deciduous forests in the eastern United States; to pine plantations in the southern United States; to dry coniferous forests in the western United States; to temperate rainforests on the West Coast; to the tropical rainforests of Puerto Rico and in Hawaii.” He added that 56 percent of the U.S. forest lands are in private ownership. The rest are managed by local, tribal, state, and federal governments. “My agency alone


Pennsylvania watershed showing the patchwork quilt of forest farmland, and other land uses typical of watersheds in MSEA and CEAP studies.

manages about 20 percent of the forest land in the United States. The U.S. Forest Service manages about 77 million acres of federal land called national forests and national grasslands.” The U.S. Forest Service also has the country’s largest conservation research organization, he said, with 7 research stations and 81 experimental forests nationwide, representing 85 percent of the forest types in the United States. “Our research records go back for more than a hundred years,” he said. “Science is the foundation for our forest management in the United States; science gives us opportunities to meet the challenges we face.”

The rise of agroforestry America’s farmers, ranchers, and forest landowners are integrating trees with agriculture to address a variety of conservation and production goals. That is the basis for agroforestry, a relatively new innovation for land management as defined by the USDA as an approach that provides opportunities to “integrate productivity and profitability with environmental stewardship to support healthy, sustainable agriculture systems, economies, and communities.” A white paper about the economics of agroforestry further defines agroforestry as a land-use system that involves deliberate retention, introduction, or mixture of trees or other woody perennials in crop or animal production systems to take advantage of economic or ecological interactions among the components. “Agroforestry is the intersection between forestry and agriculture,” Sarah Beebout, the national program leader for Sustainable Intensification at the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) says. “It’s when you have both trees and agriculture

production in the same area of land.” Small-scale agroforestry, common in the tropics, provides multiple products for small farmers and good mixes of low-cost inputs. Medium-scale agroforestry may involve larger crop systems and focus on two or three simple tree and crop or grazing systems. Large-scale agroforestry remains uncommon so far. The USDA lists five of the most common categories of agroforestry practices in the U.S.: windbreaks (also known as shelterbelts) for fields, farmsteads, and livestock; strips of forest acting as buffers along waterways, called riparian forests; silvopasture systems, which is a deliberate integration of trees and livestock; forest farming, with edible, herbal (botanicals), medicinal, and decorative products grown under managed forest cover; and alley cropping with annual crops and high-value trees and shrubs. What agroforestry can do for the environment is protect topsoil, livestock, crops, and wildlife; increase the productivity of agricultural and horticultural crops; and reduce energy and chemical inputs. The USDA also reports that agroforestry can be designed to mitigate odor, improve pollinator habitats, and produce biomass feedstock. “Agroforestry systems provide multiple outputs, potentially reducing risk and increasing income while also purportedlyproducing more ecosystem services than conventional agriculture,” according to the economics of forestry white paper. “In a few cases where complementary production relationships occur, agroforestry is obviously superior to tree, crop or pasture monocultures.” A typical agroforestry application is when trees are used for windbreaks in areas of land where crops are exposed—on a ridge, for example. They can also be planted along a creek, where bxjmag.com

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Horticulturist Carol Schumann evaluates growth of a Chinese chestnut seedling, Castanea mollissima, in a woodland agroforestry planting. the trees are lined up between the crop fields and the creek. “That has a protective effect,” Beebout says. “It’s common for agriculture fertilizers to run off the field, or to leach down into the groundwater, and cause pollution in the creeks. The trees can pick up some of those nutrients before they reach the creeks, so there is an improvement in water quality.”

Strategic goals Adoption rates for agroforestry are low, suggesting that either the science and economic models are faulty, or that farmers are irrational. “Many people have actually been doing agroforestry for a long time without calling it that,” she says, recalling how trees were used as windbreaks for crop fields during the Dust Bowl years in the 1930s. “Many farmers already plant trees as windbreaks around their buildings. That is one type of agroforestry.” But most of the time, they are not managing trees for the production or harvest from the trees, she says. “There is now a move within agroforestry to increase the value of those systems by growing fruit or nut trees in windbreaks. That just takes more specialized knowledge. Because a lot of people who are really good at producing crops don’t have any idea where to start in terms of which trees to plant.” Agroforestry appears to be more about better land management, which is a goal of precision agriculture. But it’s not 20 |

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part of precision agriculture. “I think it should be,” Beebout says. “But there are some people who are doing research on how to use precision ag to decide where to put trees.” Precision agriculture can also be used to make sure that trees are not being damaged by herbicides that are not applied correctly to grow crops near the trees. “We can use precision agriculture and agroforestry together to make sure we are using the precision ag technology to target the application of pesticides and fertilizers and water so that they at least don’t harm the trees.” To advance more interest in and use of agroforestry, the USDA has created the Agroforestry Strategic Framework, based upon input from the eight agency members of the USDA Agroforestry Executive Steering Committee (AESC) and the USDA Interagency Agroforestry Team (IAT). The framework poses three strategic goals: 1) Ensure all landowners and communities have access to the latest tools and information that support agroforestry adoption; 2) Conduct applied and basic research to advance the science and technology that supports the use of agroforestry, and; 3) Facilitate the integration of agroforestry information, research, tools, and technologies to meet the goals and objectives of USDA agencies. This framework will be used by the USDA mission for agroforestry to “advance agroforestry knowledge, tools, and assistance for the benefit of landowners, communities, and the nation.”


The work of the ARS Agroforestry and the innovation it represents is one of the ideas being explored by the ARS, the principal in-house research agency of the USDA. ARS is one of the four component agencies of USDA’s research, education, and economics mission area. A few of the goals of the ARS are to ensure high-quality, safe food and other agricultural products; sustain a competitive agricultural economy; and provide economic opportunities for rural citizens, communities, and society as a whole. Most ARS research on agroforestry systems comes in under the Natural Resources and Sustainable Agricultural Systems program. This program supports researchers at 70 locations who are developing the technologies and strategies needed to help farmers, ranchers, and other managers. What the ARS focuses on is developing technologies that are and will be economical to use, creating and maintaining systems that support profitable production, and enhancing the country’s renewable natural resource base.

ARS projects Specific agroforestry-related projects of several ARS locations include one in Ames, Iowa, “Managing Energy and Carbon Fluxes to Optimize Agroecosystem Productivity and Resilience.” The project studies field windbreaks’ impacts on soil carbon and nitrogen cycling, plus above-ground biomass and woody residue as a bioenergy feedstock. The windbreak experiment involves a direct comparison of energy balance, biophysical properties, and productivity of rain-fed and irrigated crops with rain-fed crops protected by a windbreak at the Eastern Nebraska Research and Extension Center. The objectives of the study are to focus on components of agricultural systems to provide a suite of observations on a common set of measurements to quantify carbon and energy exchanges, which would lead to the direct comparison of water use efficiency and radiation use efficiency of these different systems. Another ARS project is underway in Davis, California, researching opportunities with grapevine rows to show the effects of intercropping grapevines with aromatic plants. The experimental field used for the experiment was a commercial steep-slope vineyard with shallow soils with coarse rock fragments. Rows were either cultivated with Riesling grapes as a monocrop, or intercropped with oregano or thyme. The results of the experimental field study showed that crop-plant diversification using aromatic plants in vineyards can be successfully established—but that it needs further study. Other ARS agroforestry-related projects are being conducted in Lubbock, Texas; Beltsville, Maryland; Raleigh, North Carolina; and University Park, Pennsylvania.

In Georgia, ecologist Richard Lowrance (left) and agricultural engineer George Vellidis pump water from a sampling well at the edge of a riparian forest buffer. They’ll test the water for contaminants to see how well the buffer is working. ARS also manages agroforestry research through collaborative pass-through funding for Mississippi State University, Oregon State University, the University of Maine, and University of Missouri Center for Agroforestry.

Agroforestry and climate change Farmers can plant crops that actually take carbon out of the air and into the soil, reducing the overall carbon footprint of agriculture which is currently contributing about nine percent to total U.S. carbon emissions. People are starting to explore the idea of paying farmers to capture carbon from the atmosphere, and agroforestry can be an important part of that, according to Beebout. “Trees are one way to get carbon in an agriculture landscape and keep it there for a long time,” she says. “If you capture the carbon in a growing tree, it can stay captured for 100 years. In the next few years, we will see that carbon market system as a driver for more people to plant more trees in agriculture landscapes.” X

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ALABAMA:

CENTRALLY LOCATED FOR SUCCESS

R

ich with history and full of excitement and innovation, people in Alabama celebrate both their past and future. They have a geography that spans all different sorts – one of the most varied in the nation. From mountains and valleys to beaches and riverbanks, there’s a wealth of natural beauty on display when you need to get away. Beyond beauty, the state offers thousands of available sites, a proven track record of success, and a pro-business attitude that allows them to develop custom incentive packages tailored to a company’s individual needs. Consider Alabama your toolbox to building a great business: they have the resources, atmosphere, workforce, and 22 |

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competitive advantages to cultivate growth and expansion in any field. ........................................................................ Alabama has 13 Metropolitan Statistical Areas that serve as home to prospering businesses, prestigious colleges and universities, nationally renowned health centers and doctors, and an affordable housing market. Alabama sits at the heart of the fastest growing region in the United States. Comprised by a network of thousands of roads, plentiful airports, inland waterways, and proximity to the 9th largest seaport in the U.S., Alabama is easy to access. Alabama’s presence in the aerospace and aviation industry is broad and vast. Aerospace manufacturing alone accounts for around 13,000 jobs while Alabama ranks among the Top 5 states for aerospace engineers. Over 300 aerospace companies from more than 30 different countries have


suppliers, have joined Alabama’s vehicle manufacturing industry. A new dimension was added when Autocar, a maker of heavy-duty work trucks, launched production in the state. Alabama is home to 780 bioscience companies, and the industry has an annual economic impact estimated at $7.3 billion. Birmingham-based Southern Research has discovered 7 FDA-approved drugs in cancer treatment. The HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology in Huntsville is a

leader on the human genome. With nearly 23 million acres of timberland, Alabama’s forests are so fertile that the growth of softwood and hardwoods consistently outpaces their removal rates. The state is home to over 100 manufacturing facilities including sawmills, paper mills, and other sites. For more information on this and other industries, please contact the Alabama Dept. of Commerce at 800-2480033 or visit www.madeinalabama.com

Honda, Hyundai, Mazda, Mercedes-Benz, and Toyota are Here. Why Aren’t You?

chosen Alabama, including industry giants such as Boeing, Lockheed Martin, GE Aviation, Raytheon, Collins Aerospace and GKN Aerospace. Another is Airbus, which produces A320 Family passenger jets at its only U.S. manufacturing facility in Mobile. Around 39,000 farms on 8.3 million acres yield a bounty of agricultural products. Alabama ranks 2nd in the states in freshwater fish production, 3rd in poultry production, 3rd in peanut production, and in the Top 10 for cotton. When Mercedes-Benz announced plans to open its only U.S. assembly plant in Alabama in 1993, an industry was launched. Since then, Honda, Hyundai and Toyota, as well as an expanding network of automotive

Our Location in Northwest Alabama Places Parts Suppliers & Distributors within 250 Miles of 12 Automotive Manufacturing Facilities.

NorthWestAlabamaEDA.org 800-399-7205

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ALABAMA: ELMORE COUNTY ...................................................... The Elmore County Economic Development Authority is committed to improving the economic well-being of the business community and enhancing quality of life through the creation and preservation of jobs and wealth in Elmore County. Located in the heart of the River Region, Elmore County has a strong transportation infrastructure, a skilled and ready workforce, and an abundance of recreational opportunities. Elmore County has a strong and supportive business climate that attracts new business and industry to complement and enhance a vital and growing existing business community. Boasting dynamic schools, unified leadership, extraordinary natural beauty and a superior quality of life, Elmore County Alabama has a rich history of being a predominantly agricultural area, but in recent years, it has started to make the transformation to the one of the fastest-growing counties in the state. The county offers the best of both worlds to individuals settling here: small towns with high-quality education, low-crime rates, and low-cost of living, next to a major metropolis in Montgomery. Elmore County is defined by lush forests, flowing rivers, wide welcoming lakes and a population of hard-working citizens who honor their heritage, whether it is Native American, European, or African. Northern Elmore County lies home to two fresh water lakes with access to more than 70 square miles of recreational

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waterways. With distinctive lake homes lining its shores, Lake Martin is becoming known world¬wide for its sparkling waters and for wise land-use developments that honor the land and its waters. Lake Jordan boasts some of the best bass and crappie fishing in the South. Throughout Elmore County there are cities and towns that welcome all who visit… and those who find reason to put down roots and join the gentle Southern way of life that are the envy of all who travel to the county. Companies moving to Elmore County can be sure they will find a capable, experienced workforce to meet their needs, while individuals know they will find a place they can belong. It is no surprise that businesses world-wide are considering Elmore County for their base of operations or their next expansion. With the leadership of the Elmore County Economic Development Authority, and a spirited cooperation from municipal leaders, the county is poised to continue its development. The low tax rates and attractive climate that yields moderate winter temperatures and little to no snow each year make Elmore Count appealing to many executives. The days are beautiful with typically 214 sunny days per year and an average July high temperatures reaching about 92 degrees. Centrally located with two major Interstates, I-85 and I-65, passing through and bordering portions of the county, transportation routes for commerce and travel are abundant. Elmore County Alabama - where business meets pleasure.


.ALABAMA: GADSDEN .............................................................................. Located strategically in the center of the Southeast automotive industry: Gadsden’s location is ideal because of its proximity to OEMs and key transportation networks. Connected by interstate, air, and rail manufacturers are in the heart of the Southeastern manufacturing environment and can service clients throughout the region. Gadsden is located in Northeast Alabama on Interstate Highway 59, and centrally between, Huntsville, Chattanooga, Birmingham, and Atlanta. Transportation, workforce, and quality of life make Gadsden the perfect industrial location for any advanced manufacturing company. Gadsden is thirty minutes away from one OEM and a morning’s drive away from eight others. Additionally, Gadsden’s workforce is second to none 100,000 people in a community located under a two-hour drive to Honda, Mercedes, Volkswagen, Toyota, Hyundai, and the just-announced MazdaToyota plant with a workforce of 401,439 persons living within a 30-mile radius of Gadsden’s airport. Gadsden is ready to work and work hard. A total of 1,346 students graduated from high school in May of 2019, in the Gadsden City, Atalla City, and Etowah County School Systems. 481 students enrolled in industrial-related technology training classes at Gadsden State Community College for the 2019 Fall Semester. These students have led to 1,141 active resumes and 4,977 Self-Registrations in the system for employment at the Gadsden Career Center office. Due to these training and workforce development initiatives, many industries have expanded their operations within the region. The area has succeeded in retaining over 1,865 jobs within the industrial corridor. The following industries have continued to be a part of the success story within Gadsden by retaining employees: MS-2, Decatur Plastics, Prince Metal Stamping, Cintas, Inteva, Tyson Foods, Koch Foods, Southern Cold Storage, and Fehrer Automotive. These companies include six tier one or tier two automobile suppliers. The automotive sector continues to expand as these suppliers move into servicing OEMs and play a critical role in the shift to electric vehicle manufacturing. This workforce training effort led to Fehrer Automotive’ s recent ribbon cutting for their new expansion at its Gadsden plant marking continued growth for one of Etowah County’s largest manufacturers. The company has invested more than $6 million in the 200,000-square foot facility expansion, giving Fehrer a total of 500,000 square feet of space in Gadsden

— quadruple the company’s footprint when it first opened a decade ago.

ALABAMA: MARENGO COUNTY .........................................................

Looking for a plant location where your stress level will drop and profits soar;look no further than MARENGO COUNTY, ALABAMA

Marengo County is located in the west central part of Alabama and is a unique and appealing place to live and do business thanks to their rich diversity of abundant natural resources, creative incentives and their opportune location and numerous amenities - all of which fit the pieces together to the puzzle that makes up your new plant location. Marengo County is industry driven and embraces a regional approach in economic development to help ensure your success. Located in the center of the breadbasket, Marengo County’s riverside location in the Blackbelt (referring to the dark soil that has contributed to the thriving agricultural industry) has two waterways offering barge access via a deep water port on the Gulf of Mexico, three rail systems, ease of access to interstate and highways offer you an outstanding transportation including the Demopolis Regional Airport adjacent to the new Airport Industrial Park; three shovel ready industrial parks - two of which are certified Alabama AdvantageSites and available buildings. Add to that our

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skilled, trained employees with a strong work ethic committed to your prosperity, make Marengo County the logical choice for your business to excel. Marengo County includes the cities of Demopolis, Linden, Thomaston, and the towns of Faunsdale, Sweet Water, Myrtlewood, Dayton, and Providence and contains some of the most beautiful historic homes and landmarks in Alabama - 28 sites are listed in the National Registry of Historic Places with 19 others listed on the Alabama Register of Landmarks and Heritage. If you’re looking to locate your plant in a community that will be inexpensive to get up and running and can lower the ongoing operating costs to operate your facility over the long term, then Marengo County is your new location. Simply contact Jo Ellen Martin for more information at 334-212-4119 or visit www. marengoeda.com

added depth to the labor pool, as drive-times are on average just over a mile per minute, with stress-free scenic commutes for those who do so. A 200-mile radius encompasses just over 15 million people, making the area desirable for distribution-logistics centers. Six Fortune 500 companies operate facilities here as well as a variety of smaller foreign, domestic and start-up “home-grown businesses.” The diversity of products and services they provide is the best testimony to the broad capabilities of the workforce and the locational advantages, as each will attest that they enjoy a business environment that encourages and fosters success.

ALABAMA: NORTHWEST ALABAMA

.............................................................................. The Northwest Alabama Counties of Fayette, Lamar and Marion have unbeatable highway infrastructure including two interstates, I-20 immediately to the south and 9 exits to the north on the nation’s newest interstate, I-22, connecting Memphis to Birmingham. Although rural, the Region is within an hour’s drive of 5 major metros, or just over 1.7 million people. Consider these residents as The following target industries have been identified as perfectly suited for the Tri-County region. In addition to Distribution/Logistics, the region is ideal for Automotive Parts and Vehicle Assembly (12 OEM’s within 250 miles), Specialty Metal Fabrication, and other vehicles, such as lawn and garden, construction-related equipment, recreation vehicles and transport trailers.

WHERE BUSINESS MEETS PLEASURE

eceda@elmoreeda.com

elmoreeda.com

One close look at the region will reveal that the location, labor force, lower-cost business environment and welcoming atmosphere result in a place where your business can thrive. X For more information on Northwest Alabama, please call 800-399-7205 or visit their website at northwestalabamaeda.org 26 |

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EXPANSION

OPPORTUNITIES

SOUTH CAROLINA:

FOCUSED ON THE FUTURE

A

revolution in the automotive industry is underway and South Carolina is helping lead the charge – literally. Sustainability initiatives and fluctuating oil prices are shifting the sector toward electric vehicles (EV) as alternatives to gas-powered combustion engines. And, that shift is accelerating within South Carolina’s borders.

................................................................................... Already known as an automotive powerhouse that boasts some of the world’s biggest names, South Carolina is now a major driver in the EV revolution – with a growing roster of automotive companies making commitments to build next-generation vehicles within their borders. Recently, Oshkosh Defense announced a new $155 million operation in Spartanburg County that will manufacture U.S. Postal Service Next Generation Delivery Vehicles. Also, Volvo Cars announced a $118 million expansion at its Berkeley County plant to produce Polestar 3 battery electric vehicles, which will join S60s and next-generation electric Volvos manufactured at the facility. Additionally, in the last 12 months: Mercedes-Benz Vans announced the company will produce its newest eSprinters at its Charleston County facility as part of the company’s electrification shift; BMW Plant Spartanburg reported production highs in 2020 for its plug-in hybrid X3 xDrive30e and the X5 xDrive45e models; and last October, global EV company Arrival announced its first U.S. micro-factory in York County to manufacture electric buses. These companies, along with others in the state that produce electric vehicles, also lead to additional capital investment and job creation through their supplier networks – with companies that specialize in EV-related products and technologies wanting to be

close by. It’s clear that South Carolina is focused on the future. They’ve worked hard for years to cultivate their reputation as a global leader in Automotive, and Team S.C. is charged with remaining on top. By building on the momentum they are gaining in the electric vehicle market, they will ensure just that. For more information on all that South Carolina can offer, please contact the S.C. Department of Commerce at 803-737-0400 or visit www.sccommerce.com

SOUTH CAROLINA: I-77 ALLIANCE

................................................................................ Around the world, forward-looking enterprises are planning for a post-pandemic future. Communities that continued to invest in their infrastructure, workforce, and quality of life assets will be positioned to land those prospects as they decide the time is right to expand. The five South Carolina counties, comprising the corridor from Charlotte, N.C. to Columbia, S.C., is just such a community where strategic planning and partnerships will build on a long successful run of attracting corporate expansions and relocations. Serving as the economic development organization for these counties, (Richland, Fairfield, Chester, Lancaster, and York), the South Carolina I-77 Alliance does not manage projects, therefore, 100% of its efforts are focused on filling the project pipeline and supporting the counties’ efforts to create sustainable economic growth.

WHERE WE ARE, WHO WE ARE, WHAT WE DO Anywhere in the I-77 corridor, employers can tap into a massive regional civilian labor force of more than 1.2 million people, bxjmag.com

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buoyed by growing metro areas to the region’s North and South. This workforce is living and working in a region boasting robust educational opportunities – particularly technical and workforce readiness education – and an attractive quality of life for those who prefer urban, suburban, or rural living. Connecting this region to the world is an unparalleled transportation network, featuring easy access to major airports (Charlotte Douglas International is one of the world’s busiest and Columbia Metropolitan is a major cargo hub for UPS and FedEx) and deep-sea shipping (Charleston Port), with multiple interstates and rail lines. While major South Carolina manufacturers such as Boeing and BMW created the opportunity for an array of suppliers to set up shop in the corridor, there’s also been organic economic expansion in other sectors. Industries thriving across the region now include precision manufacturing, advanced materials, life sciences such as medical equipment and pharmaceutical production, and corporate, finance, and professional services.

THE I-77 ALLIANCE DATA CENTER AND SITE SEARCH TOOLS As data analysis drives location decisions, the Alliance has invested in online data solutions for its website and those of the five counties. This presents a unique opportunity for site selection professionals to gather industry, workforce, or property information for multiple communities through a common, unified experience. While the I-77 Alliance Data Center provides access to current industry and economic data, the Recruit site search tool uses geographic information system (GIS) mapping technology from Esri to guide users to ideal properties while providing cutting-edge workforce and demographic analysis on thousands of data points. Invaluable tools not only for site selection, but also for local workforce development efforts, entrepreneurship and small business, and higher education.

PREPARING NOW FOR NEW OPPORTUNITIES At a time when preliminary site visits may be limited and trade shows are canceled, the region’s collaborative economic development ecosystem continues to operate at full speed. As activity climbs back to pre-pandemic levels, our partners are prepared to have prospects see with their own eyes why so many companies are expanding and relocating here.

SOUTH CAROLINA: CAMP HALL

................................................................................ Camp Hall is the Next Generation Commerce Park designed for the modern workforce located near Charleston, S.C. and home to Volvo Cars’ new North American manufacturing plant. South Carolina and Charleston are well-recognized as top 28 |

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business-friendly manufacturing locations with an excellent quality of life. Totaling 6,800 acres overall, Camp Hall has 1,300 fully developable acres remaining with the workforce, zoning, permits and major infrastructure already in place enabling a company to start right away. Seventy-five acres have already been sold, and another 300 additional acres are currently under contract with active interest in the remaining property. Camp Hall is in a region that is adding 34 new residents every day with a workforce totaling over 500,000 and growing. Three of the region’s fastest-growing planned communities, which close over 1,000 home sales annually, are within a 15-minute drive. Logistics infrastructure is very strong with the Port of Charleston less than a 45-minute drive by truck, an onsite dedicated I-26 interchange for quick access, a rail line extension underway and the Charleston International Airport only a 30-minute drive away. Camp Hall is attractive to and can serve a wide range and scale of industry. It can meet the needs of a large plant employing several thousand such as Volvo Cars, as well as those companies needing a small space initially to launch and grow. Our focus is on companies that can benefit from the vision of building a place that is designed to attract and retain a quality workforce in a quality environment. Volvo Cars USA in 2018 established its first North American manufacturing plant at Camp Hall, where it produces its S60 luxury sedan, and recently announced its plans to produce the Polestar 3 batteryelectric SUV. Camp Hall is considered a Smart Commerce Center Campus, meaning its enhanced communication and smart grids for services and metering support innovation and embrace the technological advancements to come — 5G being one of them. The Charleston, S.C. region is already known for an excellent quality of life and is recognized worldwide as a destination. Camp Hall is uniquely located to be a reverse commute for most of the region’s population, enabling a person many choices. Within 45 minutes a person can choose to be on the shoreline of the Atlantic Ocean, in the urban center of Charleston with its dining and entertainment options, on our two large lakes known for their world-class fisheries and recreation sites, in a top-selling master planned community or enjoying a small town or rural environment. Camp Hall provides many choices and quality-of-life options. Also essential is Camp Hall’s readiness with water, power, sewer and fiber all onsite, and gas underway. In fact, the industrial park earned the Palmetto Sites designation by the South Carolina Department of Commerce. The designation signifies the property has undergone a comprehensive analysis to increase its marketability to prospective industry partners. Camp Hall is part of the Charleston, S.C. region, which has a strong and growing workforce. This workforce is broad with focus on both manufacturing and logistics and already home to Boeing, Mercedes Sprinter Vans, Volvo Cars, Nucor, and


Bosch to mention only a few. The Port of Charleston plays a key role in attracting a workforce in both the manufacturing and logistics sectors. A detailed workforce study for Camp Hall has already been prepared to provide details and can be reviewed on our website, Camphall.com, under the workforce tab. South Carolina is a leader in creating customized training programs for developing and enhancing a company’s workforce. Most notable is readySC, whereby South Carolina creates customized training for each company utilizing the program. There are many options depending upon the needs, desire and capability of the company and the student. Many are described on our website, Camphall. com, in the workforce tab under training. For instance, at the local high schools near Camp Hall there are workforce-ready certification programs so graduates are able to enter the manufacturing environment upon graduation. Trident Technical Collage has many more programs, including a new facility just recently opened focused specifically on aviation and advanced manufacturing. There are numerous four-year colleges nearby, including engineering programs and advanced technical degrees. The recreational activities in the Charleston region are extensive and world-renowned. These include multiple options for accessing the many beaches and waterways for both salt and fresh water. Dining, entertainment and cultural options are extensive. If you like mountains, they are three hours away. Camp Hall has a dedicated interchange on I-26 which is 30 miles from the Port of Charleston and 20 miles from I-95. The port provides international access. The Camp Hall Rail Line is currently being extended by Palmetto Rail to Camp Hall from its interconnect with CSX to provide rail service throughout Camp Hall. There are two major points. First

is Camp Hall’s focus on people and serving the workforce, which can be highlighted by our Village Center with development now underway. The Village Center will provide services in support of the workforce such as food, fuel and convenience items as well as recreation options for fitness and fun such as its multi-purpose soccer field, the fitness area and the trail hub for a central access point to the many

miles of trails for walking or biking. The second is our focus on technology and its importance in daily life as well as the workplace. Fiber is already on site with redundant and diverse options in up to five public rights of way. Wireless is already in place with plans for enhancing it to create a seamless network throughout Camp Hall to support strong connectivity for people and the modern workplace.

THE INVESTMENT SPEAKS FOR ITSELF E. & J. GALLO WINERY

MARK ANTHONY BREWING

$423 MILLION | 496 JOBS

$400 MILLION | 300 JOBS

CONTINENTAL TIRE THE AMERICAS, LLC

ARRIVAL

EAST COAST OPERATIONS HUB

$20 MILLION HQ FOR N.A. MANUFACTURING

EAST COAST OPERATIONS HUB

$46 MILLION | 240 JOBS WORLD’S FIRST ELECTRIC BUS MICROFACTORY

CAROLINA PANTHERS GLOBAL HQ, TRAINING FACILITY, MIXED-USE DEVELOPMENT Our central location in the booming Southeast USA with a massive labor force of 1.2+ million people are only two of the reasons why these companies selected the I-77 region for their expansions. Contact us to learn about all the other benefits.

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SOUTH CAROLINA: COLUMBIA

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Choose Columbia Columbia, SC is a vibrant city-region that prides itself as a place to do business. With an MSA population of over 850,000, a labor force of over 330,000, and 50,000 university students in attending one of their six local universities annually, they provide the skilled workforce and talent for successful and growing businesses. Workforce development programs such as readySC, their nationally recognized technical training assistance, provide one of the best labor forces in the country. Aside from workforce and talent, Columbia also offers a high degree of market accessibility while remaining cost competitive to larger metro markets. Companies focused on keeping overhead low will find quick and easy accessibility to both the Charlotte and Atlanta markets, with lower facility lease rates and competitive wages. Businesses in manufacturing, transportation, and distribution are within a quick 1.5 hour drive to the Port of Charleston with a wide variety of transportation routes via their interstate network of I-20, I-26, I-77 and I-95. I-95 in particular offers excellent East Coast accessibility traversing north and

Choose Columbia, SC When access to talent, customer markets, and affordability matters, then your business location does too. These advantages and more make Columbia a great market for business expansion opportunities. • Six local colleges with over 50,000 higher education students in market annually • Quick, easy access to the Atlanta (3 hours) and Charlotte (1.5 hours) major metro markets • Over 60% of the US population reachable within a 24-hour drive time • Located an hour and a half from the Port of Charleston, which will soon accommodate larger ship capacities at 52 feet deep • Only an hour away from I-95, and halfway between New York City and Miami on the East Coast

COLUMBIA ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 1201 Main St., Suite 250 | Columbia, SC 29201

Ph: 803-734-2700 | Email: development@columbiasc.gov

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south, and they’re located at the mid-point between New York City and Miami. Columbia Metropolitan Airport (CAE) is also home to the UPS Southeast Regional Air Hub, providing excellent air shipping access. The Port of Charleston is currently undergoing a variety of infrastructure improvement projects including dredging to 52 feet and will be able to handle even larger mega container ships in the near future. Columbia is continuously working to expand capacity in their key industry clusters, including Insurance Technology, Software and IT Services, Bio/Life Science, Transportation/Distribution/ Logistics, and Hospitality & Retail. They are also home to a rapidly growing startup community. For more information on how the City of Columbia can help you expand and grow your business, please contact Columbia Economic Development at 803-734-2700 or development@ columbiasc.gov and they will be glad to assist.

SOUTH CAROLINA: UNION COUNTY

................................................................................ Existing and emerging industry clusters, a presence of interconnected companies, and support from organizations and institutions continues to strengthen Union County, SC’s competitive advantage in attracting its target industry sectors -advanced manufacturing, warehousing, and logistics. There are products manufactured by industries in this rural community and shipped out of the County’s Warehousing, Logistics and E-Commerce Centers each day which are used by consumers all over the world. For example, Standard Textile’s terry cloth products, carried at Marriott properties worldwide, Carlisle Finishing camouflage, which outfits American armed forces at home and abroad, Timken bearings used on rigs, wind turbines, aircraft and even the space shuttled, Haemonetics’ blood management devices and consumables used in hospitals emergency rooms, and surgical centers worldwide, Gestamp, an international manufacturer of metal automotive components that will enable the company to serve both BMW and the Volvo Cars production facility in Berkeley County, and Union County’s newest industry, Kemper Corporation, one of the leading manufacturers of cargo straps and securement products worldwide. Because of its utility friendly environment, Union County will continue to target advanced manufacturing projects in addition to emerging sectors requiring significant utility infrastructure such as agribusiness, information technologies, and research and development-based projects. Union County industries are thriving and hiring highly skilled and highly trained workers in addition to offering competitive wages. Known as the “front porch of Upstate South Carolina,” Union County is very fortunate to be part of a strong regional labor shed which has experienced a growth rate of 30% within the past 10 yrs. Over 700,000 highly skilled and highly trained


workers contribute to this area which is known for a variety of innovative and dynamic workforce development initiatives. The County is well positioned to recruit workers not only from the Upstate region but from Counties to the east and west of its borders which is the basis for the County’s approach to a regional workforce development plan -a coordinated a pathway between educators, workforce organizations, employers, and government. This approach ensures access to a variety of industry focused educational and training opportunities designed to support the needs of the local business community. As a result, Union County continues to maintain designation as a SC Work Ready Community indicating a commitment to develop and maintain a highly skilled and well-trained workforce that is productive and globally competitive. The fundamental component of the plan is to utilize the County’s local and regional workforce partners to align training and skill building programs with real work opportunities. Educational and incumbent worker training programs, apprenticeships, on boarding, and dual credit opportunities have contributed to creating a pipeline of workers for Union County industries. Union County is located within proximity to larger cities in the State and is less than a day’s drive away from nearly every major metropolitan city in the eastern Union States. Therefore, the County is part of a thriving region offering something for everyone-from the solitude of nature, cultural and recreational activities, to the excitement of sporting events. History buffs will enjoy a quiet walk down streets lined with homes from centuries past and cultural connoisseurs can spend time browsing through unique galleries, shops, and studios. From spending the day touring historic downtown Union, exploring the County’s historical trails, visiting the rivers and lakes to cheering from the stands at

local sporting events, Union County has a character and charm that is hard to find in most places. Union County offers a healthy and diverse transportation network with excellent regional access. The County is geographically located between Greenville/ Spartanburg SC, Columbia, SC and Charlotte NC offering excellent proximity to major markets and suppliers. Union County’s four industrial parks are under a 30-minute drive time to major interstates such as I-85 and I26, and close by to I-20 and -I40. Two major highway routes serve Union County-US Highway 176, a four-lane highway known as the area’s growth corridor, and Highway 49 which is part of a three-state highway system which runs from SC to Virginia. The County is within an hour drive to 3 major airports-Greenville Spartanburg International, Charlotte Douglas International and Columbia Metropolitan. The Inland Port in Greer is less than an hour away and the County’s

industrial parks are served by rail carriersNorfolk Southern and CSX. Union County is known for its international diversity, access to excellent healthcare and a strong network of schools, colleges and universities -all amenities are within an area where the cost of living is affordable and lower than the national average. Utility infrastructure is another asset the County offers to new and expanding industries. This “utility friendly” community is served by five electric power companies offering excellent capacity, redundancy, and strategies in place to add or upgrade facilities based on industry need. The City of Union is not only one of the County’s electric power providers but also supplies water, sewer, and natural gas with ample capacity and excess for future growth. Charter and AT&T provide telecommunication services including advanced technical options and fiber optic cable.. X

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MISSOURI:

THE PERFECT LOCATION TO THRIVE

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rom startup firms to global corporations, Missouri’s pro-business climate continues to offer a perfect location for all industries to thrive. The Show Me State offers a low tax rate, reduced red tape and business friendly regulations. Your business in Missouri will also benefit from the low utility rates, central location and cutting-edge workforce training solutions.

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Whether you are here to grow your business, find a career, raise a family, produce a film, or take a family vacation, you will feel right at home in Missouri. Located in the heart of the country, their work ethic is second to none, their products are as diverse as the industries and customers they serve, and their culture continues to inspire and innovate. Missouri has the 4th most diverse economy in the nation. From IT to advanced manufacturing, to bioscience and everything in between, they have the tools needed to succeed. From the largest river system in the nation to 19 freight railroads and more than 99 airports, to 7th ranked highway system, Missouri


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can help you connect quickly with your customers. Their certified sites have been pre-qualified through a standardization process to meet the requirements of industry. Development and business prospects can review sites for compatibility with their development needs. Businesses locating or expanding in designated certified geographical areas may access local incentives through local real property abatement for improvements made to an existing facility or for the construction of a new facility. For more information on Missouri, please contact the Missouri Dept. of Economic Development at 573-751-4962 or visit www.ded. mo.gov .

MISSOURI: SIKESTON ...................................................................................

Where Opportunity Grows Opportunity grows in Sikeston, Missouri. Located at the northern most point of the Mississippi Delta in Southeast Missouri, Sikeston is 150 miles from Memphis or St. Louis and sits at the corner of US Highways 60 and 61. Portions of Highway 60 are federally designated as future Interstate 57. Two miles from the junction of Interstates 55 and 57, Sikeston has two certified sites with flat, shovel-ready acreage waiting for a large industrial start up or relocation. The South Industrial Park is located in a federally designated opportunity zone. “Sikeston is home to one of Unilever’s largest ice cream plants operated globally. Our strategic location makes Sikeston home to national distribution centers and manufacturers. The regional workforce holds the values that make our local employers successful. We are business 34 |

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ready.” said Mike Marshall, president and CEO, Sikeston Regional Chamber of Commerce and Area Economic Development Corporation. Serviced by rail, road, runway and river, Sikeston is primed for development on a large scale. There are two nearby Mississippi riverports, a regional airport 22 miles away with daily service to Chicago, adjacent rail served by BNSF and major transportation arteries. The Sikeston Board of Municipal Utilities operates a 235-megawatt power plant, eight deep water wells and 12 lift stations with 4.4 million gallons per day capacity. Natural gas and broadband are also available. Sikeston has national businesses and industry including Federal Express, Orgill Inc., Tetra Pak, Do It Best and Refresco. A new $62 million plant site from Carlisle Construction Materials will begin construction in 2021. Sikeston is home to regional campuses of Three Rivers Community College and Southeast Missouri State University. Job training and development is customized on the campuses to meet local needs and future planning. The local medical community is served by more than 85 physicians and a 110-bed tertiary care hospital. Sikeston is the home of the Travel Channel’s renowned Lambert’s Cafe. The area also hosts the Sikeston Jaycee Bootheel Rodeo, one of the PRCA’s premiere rodeos, which hosts more than 40,000 visitors annually. For more information on the opportunities in Sikeston, please contact Mike Marshall with the Sikeston Regional Chamber of Commerce and Area Economic Development at 573-471-2498 or email mike.marshall@sikeston.net or visit www.sikeston.net


MISSOURI: WEST PLAINS ...................................................... Tucked in the Ozark Mountains, near pristine wilderness areas and spring-fed streams, the City of West Plains attracts nature lovers, entrepreneurs, and families searching for a small-town feel with big-city conveniences. As the largest city within 100 miles of south central Missouri, West Plains provides the most options for lodging, dining, outfitting, and other services unavailable elsewhere in the area. Make It Happen Here is more than just a slogan to them. . .thousands of people enjoy the comforts of great schools, quality healthcare, higher education, and the progressive spirit of entrepreneurship to make their own lives happen here. Nestled in the “Heart of the Ozarks”, West Plains/Howell County is a Work Ready Community that offers great opportunity to the citizens and business community. They now have TWO training centers to assure your training needs will be met. Their workers have that “get it done right the first time” DNA.

They have been blessed with National and International brands such as Caterpillar (HPH), Leonardo DRS and AHF Floor here in our community, to name just a few. They also offer service, health and educational industries, with Global Medical Response, Ozark Healthcare, and the West Plains Campus of Missouri State University calling this home. A short drive from the city limits takes you the Heritage Business Park. The park has over a 100 acres of fully shovel-ready land available that is priced right and READY FOR BUSINESS! The park is adjacent to the West Plains Regional Airport with a 5,100-foot-long runway, which is great for your corporate visitors. An energetic workforce, excellent schools, very low crime, great weather, wonderful air quality and abundant resources are just a few of the many reasons businesses come to this area. The local governments are business friendly and you will find few obstacles to do business in West Plains/Howell County. Putting it very simply “They want to Make It Happen Here”! . X bxjmag.com

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OKLAHOMA:

THE LAND OF OPPORTUNITY

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rom aerospace to agribusiness and financial services to startups, Oklahoma helps businesses grow. Oklahoma has removed the barriers and streamlined the process to make it easier for companies. With living costs as much as 40% lower than the national average and world-class workforce development programs, they’re making it easier to plug into the Oklahoma business ecosystem to gain access to the people, programs, and tools that will support real-time business decisions.. ............................................................................ Oklahoma’s industries are diverse, much like its landscape. Here you’ll find the world’s largest Department of Defense Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul (MRO) facility. Head northeast and there’s the world’s largest commercial airline MRO and Google’s 2nd largest data center. Out west you’ll see wind turbines on the horizon as you head toward Goodyear’s largest tire manufacturing facility. The following are the top industry sectors in Oklahoma. Aerospace & Defense. Oklahoma is the MRO capital of 36 |

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the world. A highly skilled workforce, unrivaled incentives and the world Technik keep this industry soaring. Agribusiness. Global research centers and new technologies are keeping this ingrained industry pushing forward. Automotive. Tax credits for engineers, transferrable skillsets, low energy costs and more have Oklahoma poised among the most competitive in the country. Biosciences. World-renown research centers like the Noble Foundation and the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation and crop health. Information & Financial Services. With an abundance of water and renewable energy plus low electricity rates, it’s no surprise that data centers and back office support are investing. Manufacturing. A central location, multi-modal transportation system and impressive supply chains. Renewable Energy. 3rd in wind energy generation and 6th in solar potential. Transportation & Logistics. 3 inland ports, 3,800 miles of rail, and 12,000 miles of highway. For more information, please contact the Oklahoma Dept. of Commerce at 800-879-6552 or visit www.okcommerce.gov


NORMAN, OKLAHOMA

World Leader in Weather and Radar Research World-Class Diagnostics in Infectious Diseases World-Class Talent at the University of Oklahoma and Home to these World-Class companies too:

SHOULDN’T WE BE ON YOUR RADAR?

For information on available sites and buildings contact Lawrence McKinney, CEcD President, Norman Economic Development Coalition Lawrence@SelectNorman.com 405-573-1900


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OKLAHOMA: NORMAN ...................................................................................

When selecting a site for relocating your business, consider what makes good business sense. Norman, Oklahoma derives its value proposition from important factors such as labor quality, cost of living, quality of life, and aggressive business incentives. Norman’s quality of labor directly correlates to the community’s high level of education. Their workers are well educated and are always considered the most productive by their local employers. 43.4% of the workforce have a bachelor’s degree or better. Norman’s cost of living index measures 5.6% lower than the national average, which has induced a population growth of 19% since the year 2000. In terms of quality of life, Norman features major college sports, arts, and entertainment. Aggressive business incentives benefit employers and employees alike by providing employee training assistance and tax incentives for businesses that create quality jobs. Norman prides itself

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on its ability to meet the needs and expectations of both businesses and families by offering such a cost-efficient, healthy way of life. Norman’s location in the heart of America alleviates travel to either coast and provides Norman with connections to more than 80 million people within a 500-mile radius. Positioning on the southern edge of the Oklahoma City metropolitan area also enables Norman to access supplementary human capital from the region’s population of 1.4 million residents. Norman’s central location at the crossroads of I-35 and I-40, two major interstates, plays a dynamic role. The nearby Will Rogers World Airport services direct flights to all major cities across the country. Target industries for Norman include Aerospace, Professional Services, Information Services, Retail, Manufacturing, Weather and Radar. For more information on Norman, please contact the Norman Economic Development Coalition at 405-573-1900 or visit www. selectnorman.com X


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WASHINGTON STATE:

BUILDING BUSINESS LEGENDS

T

he birthplace of such legendary businesses as Amazon, Costco, Expedia, Microsoft, Nordstrom, PACCAR, REI and Starbucks, Washington State offers businesses, site selectors and investors a critical mass of highly skilled workers in the aerospace, agriculture, clean technology, information & communication technology (ICT), forest products, life science/ global health, military & defense and maritime sectors. Here are 10 great reasons to choose Washington.

...................................................................................

#1 – Innovative. Washington is a state of firsts. Eddie Bauer came up with the first down parkas; K2 invented the first fiberglass snow skis; the kidney dialysis machine and portable heart defibrillator were developed here; so too was the world’s first espresso cart, tree farm and Cinnabons. #2 – Clustered. The state offers investors and businesses a critical

mass in the eight previously stated sectors, providing tremendous opportunities for cross-collaboration,idea sharing, experimentation, partnership and innovation. #3 – Smart. 35.3% of the population has a Bachelor degree or higher, and the state’s universities and workforce training programs ensure a steady supply of educated and skilled workers. #4 – Connected. Washington’s transportation network includes 75 ports, 139 airports, 3,300 miles of roadways and is equidistant to European and Asian markets. #5 – Energetic. Washington leads the nation in its commitment to reducing its carbon footprint. #6 – Trendsetting #7 – Diverse #8 – Resilient #9 – Vibrant #10 – Savvy For more information on the opportunities that Washington provides, please call the Washington State Dept. of Commerce at 206-256-6100 or visit www.choosewashingtonstate.com bxjmag.com

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.WASHINGTON:

LAKEWOOD

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By Becky Newton, Economic Development Manager In Lakewood, Washington opportunity and equity abound. Here building the American Dream is not only alive, it’s more achievable. That’s because at the city’s formation in 1996 its leaders were deliberate in developing thoughtful codes and zoning to support existing business and foster future economic development. Lakewood is rich in history and has a reputation for business-friendly government. The city’s extreme natural beauty and its proximity to so many South Puget Sound attractions makes it the ideal location to call home. Here leaders embrace diversity and encourage volunteerism. Great companies thrive and family wage jobs are accessible.

Lakewood has a robust talent pool, drawing from skilled workers transitioning from military service from our neighboring Joint Base Lewis-McChord and our surrounding higher education institutions, technical colleges and the larger Seattle region as a whole.

With 2.85 million square feet of commercial space, no local B&O tax, and no development impact fees, Lakewood, WA is ready to support the growth of your business. BuildYourBetterHere.com/BXJ

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City leaders know that providing a welcoming business environment and low taxes benefits everyone in the long run. After all, small business is the backbone of the economy and working together affords great outcomes. While other parts of the Puget Sound region have seen housing prices skyrocket, your dream home is achievable in Lakewood. Homes range in price from affordable to high-end living on the lake – we have seven. With 14 parks, access to lakes, close proximity to iconic Mount Rainier, snow (and water) sports, a grub crawl-worthy International District, family-friendly events and activities and adventures you can only experience in the Pacific Northwest, Lakewood is the ideal place to call home. Whether you’re looking for a home or to build a business, Lakewood has you covered. We look forward to helping you find Your Better Here. So, dream big and explore all that Lakewood, Washington has to offer. X For more information: 253-9837738 FB: @lakewoodwa;| Instagram: @cityoflakewoodwa Twitter: @ cityoflakewood


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NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF

ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

ALABAMA Tuscaloosa County Industrial Dev. Auth

Cullman Economic Development Agency

Dale Greer P.O. Box 1009 Cullman, AL 35056 256-739-1891 daleg@cullmaneda.org www.cullmaneda.org ...................................................................

Etowah Economic Alliance

Marilyn Lott 800 Forrest Avenue Suite 220E Gadsden, AL 35901 256-456-9938 mlott@eeaalabama.org www.eeaalabama.org ...................................................................

Sissie Browning, Assistant Director P.O. Box 2667 Tuscaloosa, AL 35403 205-349-1414 info@tcida.com www.tcida.com ...................................................................

ARIZONA

Arizona Regional Economic Develoment

Mignonne Hollis, Executive Director 750 E. Bartow Drive Suite 16 Sierra Vista, AZ 85635 520-458-6948 hollism@aredf.org www.aredf.org ...................................................................

City of Flagstaff Economic Development

Gadsden Industrial Development Authority

David Hooks, Executive Director 1 Commerce Square Gadsden, AL 35901 256-543-9423 davidhooks@gadsdenida.org www.gadsdenida.org ...................................................................

Elmore County Economic Development

Cary Cox P.O. Box 117 Wetumka , AL 36092 334-514-5843 cary.cox@elmoreeda.com www.elmoreeda.com ..................................................................

HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology

Kristina Keogh 601 Genome Way Huntsville , AL 35806 256-327-9591 kkeogh@hudsonalpha.org www.hudsonalpha.org ...................................................................

John Saltonstall, AZED Pro Business Retention & Expansion Manager Economic Vitality Division City of Flagstaff 211 W. Aspen Avenue Flagstaff, AZ 86001 Office 928-213-2966 Cell 928-606-9430 jsaltonstall@flagstaffaz.gov www.flagstaffaz.gov ...................................................................

Pinal Alliance for Economic Growth

Patti King, Executive Mgr. 17235 N. 75th Avenue Suite D-145 Glendale, AZ 85308 520-836-8686 pking@pinalalliance.org www.pinalalliance.org ...................................................................

Greater Irvine Chamber

Ouachita Partnership for Economic Development

James Lee Sillman Executive Director 625 Adams Aveune Camden, AR 71701 870-836-2210 870-836-8899 (f) director@teamcamden.com www.teamcamden.com ...................................................................

City of Siloam Springs

Don Clark Community Development Director P.O. Box 80 Siloam Springs , AR 72761 479-238-0927 dclark@siloamsprings.com whysiloam.com ...................................................................

CALIFORNIA

City of Eastvale

Gina Gibson-Williams Economic Development Manager 12363 Limonite Ave. Suite 910 Eastvale, CA 91752 951-703-4425 ggibson-williams@eastvaleca.gov www.eastvaleca.gov ...................................................................

City of Moreno Valley Economic Development

Mike Lee Economic Development Director 14177 Frederick Street Moreno Valley, CA 92553 951-413-3460 edteam@moval.org www.morenovalleybusiness.com ...................................................................

ARKANSAS Chaffee Crossing

Ivy Owen, Executive Director 7020 Taylor Avenue Fort Smith, AR 72916 479-452-4554 479-452-4566 (f) property@chaffeecrossing.com www.chaffeecrossing.com ...................................................................

Linda DiMario 36 Executive Park Suite 100 Irvine, CA 92614 949-502-4124 ldimario@irvinechamber.com www.irvinechamber.com ...................................................................

COLORADO

City of Fountain Economic Development Commission

Kimberly A. Bailey Economic Development/ Urban Renewal Director 116 S. Main Street Fountain, CO 80817 719-322-2056 kbailey@fountaincolorado.org www.fountaincolorado.org ...................................................................

Grand Junction Economic Partnership

Robin Brown, Executive Director 122 N. 6th Street Grand Junction, CO 81501 970--245-4332 robin@gjep.org www.gjep.org ...................................................................

DELAWARE

American Municipal Power, Inc.

Alexis A. Fitzsimmons Director of Economic & Business Development 1111 Schrock Rd. Columbus, OH 43229 614-540-0994 afitzsimmons@amppartners.org www.searchampsites.com ...................................................................

FLORIDA City of Ontario Economic Development

Jennifer McLain Hiramoto Economic Development Director 303 East B Street Ontario, CA 91764 909-395-2295 JHiramoto@ontarioca.gov www.ontariothinksbusiness.com ................................................................... bxjmag.com

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City of Kissimmee

Belinda O. Kirkegard, Economic Development Director 101 Church Street Kissimmee FL 34741 407-518-2307 BKirkegard@kissimmee.org www.Kissimmee.org ................................................................... JULY/AUGUST 2021

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City of Sanford

NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF

ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

Haines City Economic Development Council, Inc.

Bob Turk Economic Development Director 300 North Park Ave. Sanford, FL 32771 407-688-5015 bob.turk@sanfordfl.gov www.sanfordfl.gov ...................................................................

Cyndi Jantomaso, President Post Office Box 3845 Haines City, FL 33845-3845 863-422-2525 863-206-0007 cyndi@hainescityedc.com www.hainescityedc.com ...................................................................

Pasco Economic Development Council

Bill Cronin, President & CEO 16506 Pointe Village Drive Suite 101 Lutz, FL 33558 813-926-0827 813-926-0829 (f) bcronin@pascoedc.com pascoedc.com ...................................................................

City of East Point

Maceo Rogers CEcD 2757 East Point Street East Point, GA 30344 404-270-7057 jmrogers@eastpointcity.org www.eastpointcity.org ...................................................................

Forward Forsyth City of St. Cloud

Hernando County Office of Economic Development

Antranette Forbes Economic Development & Special Projects Manager 1300 9th Street St. Cloud, FL 34769 (407)957-7234 antranette.forbes@stcloud.org www.stcloud.org/926/economic-development ...................................................................

Valerie M. Pianta Economic Development Director 15800 Flight Path Drive Brooksville, FL 34604 352--540-6400 vpianta@hernandocounty.us www.hernandobusiness.com ...................................................................

Holmes County Development Commission

City of Titusville

Joe Rone, Executive Director 106 E Byrd Avenue Bonifay, FL 32425 850-547-6154 jrone@westflorida.coop hcdc1978@gmail.com www.holmescountyedc.com ...................................................................

Lisa Nicholas 555 South Washington Avenue Titusville, FL 32796-3584 321-567-3774 lisa.nicholas@titusville.com www.YEStitusvilleFL.com ...................................................................

Elevate Lake Economic Development

Indian River Chamber of Commerce

Tracy Garcia CEcD, EcDMP Director 20763 US Highway 27 Groveland, FL 34736 352-343-9647 352-801-7498 (f) tgarcia@lakecountyfl.gov elevatelake.com ...................................................................

Helene Caseltine Economic Development Director 1216 21st Street Vero Beach, FL 32960 772-567-3491 helenec@indianrivered.com www.indianrivered.com ...................................................................

Osceola County

David Rodriguez, Economic Development Manager 3 Courthouse Square, 2nd Floor Kissimmee, FL 34741 407-742-0620 407-742-4202 (f) david.rodriguez@osceola.org www.greaterosceola.org ...................................................................

J.P. DuBuque President and CEO 100 2nd Ave N Ste 130 St. Petersburg, FL 33701 727-388-2906 jpdubuque@stpeteedc.com StPeteEDC.com/BurgBiz ................................................................... |

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Mike Meidel, CEcD, Director 13805 58th Street North, Suite 1-200 Clearwater, FL 33760 727-464-7332 mmeidel@pinellascounty.org www.pced.org ...................................................................

Santa Rosa County EDO

Shannon Ogletree, Executive Director 6491 Caroline Street, Suite 4 Milton, FL 32570-4592 850-623-0174 Shannon@santarosa.fl.gov www.santarosaedo.com ...................................................................

Tallahassee-Leon County Office of Economic Vitality

Cristina Paredes, Director, OEV 315 S. Calhoun Street, Suite 450 Tallahassee, FL 32301 850-300-7559 Cparedes@OEVforBusiness.org www.oevforbusiness.org ...................................................................

Putnam Development Authority

Terry Schwindler Econmical Devleopment Director 117 Putnam Drive, Eaton, GA 31024 706-816-8099 tschwindler@putnamdevelopmentauthority.com www.putnamdevelopmentauthority.com ...................................................................

ILLINOIS

Champaign County Economic Development Corporation

Carly McCrory-McKay, Executive Director 1817 S. Neil Street, Suite 100 Champaign, IL 61820 217-359-6261 carly@champaigncountyedc.org www.champaigncountyedc.org ...................................................................

GEORGIA City of Highland Economic Development

Greater St. Petersburg Area Economic Development Corporation

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Pinellas County Economic Development

James McCoy, President & Ceo P.O. Box 1799 Cumming GA 30028 770-887-6461 770-842-1170 jmccoy@focochamber.org www.forwardforsyth.org ...................................................................

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City of College Park

Artie Jones III Director of Economic Development 3667 Main Street College Park, GA 30337 404-305-2052 404-305-2057 (f) artiejones@collegeparkga.com www.collegeparkga.com/ ...................................................................

Mallord Hubbard 1115 Broadway, P.O. Box 218 Highland, IL 62249-0218 618-654-9891 618-654-4768 (f) mhubbard@highlandil.gov www.highlandil.gov ...................................................................


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City of Litchfield Ecnomic Development

Shelly Herman 120 E. Ryder Street Litchfield, IL 62056 217-324-8146 Sherman@cityoflitchfieldil.com www.litchfieldil-development.com ...................................................................

City of Marshall

Jennifer Bishop Economic Development Director 201 S. Michigan Ave Marshall, IL 62441 217-826-2034 jbishop@marshall-il.com www.marshall-il.com ...................................................................

City of Vandalia

Amber E. Daulbaugh, Director of Economic Development 431 W. Gallatin St. Vandalia, IL 62471 618-283-1152 618-335-9510 (Mobile) vandaliaed@vandaliaillinois.com www.vandaliaillinois.com ...................................................................

Intersect Illinois

Brent Case Senior Vice President Business Development 230 W. Monroe St. Chicago, IL 60606 312-667-6013 brent.case@intersectillinois.org intersectillinois.org ...................................................................

Alliance STL | St. Louis Regional Economic Development

Steven S. Johnson. CEO One Metropolitan Square Suite 1300 St. Louis, MO 63102 314-444-1105 sjohnson@alliancestl.com alliancestl.com ...................................................................

NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF

ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

Coffey County Economic Development Village of Arlington Heights Business & Economic Development

Charles Witherington-Perkins Director of Planning & Community Development 33 S. Arlington Heights Arlington Heights, IL 60005 847-368-5220 cperkins@vah.com www.vah.com ...................................................................

INDIANA

Huntington County Economic Development

Mark Wickersham Executive Driector 8 West Market Street Huntington, IN 46750 260-356-5688 mark@hcued.com www.hcued.com ..................................................................

Bobby Skipper, Director 110 S. 6th St., Room #5 Burlington KS 66839 620-364-8780 620-364-3608 bskipper@coffeycountyks.org www.coffeycountyks.org ...................................................................

Dodge City/Ford County Development Corporation

Joann Knight, Executive Director 101 E. Wyatt Earp Blvd. Dodge City, KS 67801 620-227-9501 620-227-2957 (f) jknight@dodgedev.org www.dodgedev.org ...................................................................

KANSAS

Wyandotte Economic Development Council

Greg Kindle, President 727 Minnesota Avenue Kansas City, KS 66101 913-371-3198 gkindle@wyedc.org www.wyedc.org ...................................................................

Go Topeka

Molly Howey, CEcD President 719 S Kansas Ave. Suite 100 Topeka, KS 66603 785.231.4707 mhowey@gotopeka.com www.gotopeka.com ...................................................................

Russell County Eco Devo & CVB

Mike Parsons, Director 331 E. Witchita, Russell, KS 67665 785-483-4000 785-324-0126 rced2@russellks.org www.russellcountyks.org ...................................................................

City of Parsons Economic Development

Jim Zaleski Economic Development Director 112 S. 17th Street Parsons, KS 67357 620-421-7030 jzaleski@parsonsks.com www.growparsons.com ...................................................................

Ann Smith-Tate, President CEO 15100 W. 67th Street Suite 202 Shawnee, KS 66217-9344 913-631-6545 asmithtate@shawneekschamber.com www.shawnee-edc.com ...................................................................

KENTUCKY

Miami County Economic Development Auth.

Jim Tidd 1525 W. Hoosier Boulevard Peru, IN 46970 765-689-0159 jtidd@miamicountyeda.com www.miamicountyeda.com ...................................................................

Shawnee Economic Development

Salina Economic Development Organization D. Mitch Robinson, CEcD 120 West Ash Street Salina, KS 67401 785-404-3131 mrobinson@salinaedo.org www.salinaedo.org ................................................................... bxjmag.com

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City of Pikeville

Jill Fraley Dotson, Executive Economic Development Director 773 Hambley Boulevard Pikeville, KY 41501 606-437-5128 info@whypikeville.com www.whypikeville.com ...................................................................

Northern Kentucky Tri-ED

Kimberly Rossetti VP of Economic Development 300 Buttermilk Pike, Suite 332 Ft. Mitchell, KY 41017 888-874-3365 ksr@NorthernKentuckyUSA.com www.NorthernKentuckyUSA.com ...................................................................

South Western Kentucky EDC

Carter Hendricks, Executive Director 2800 Fort Campbell Blvd. Hopkinsville, KY 42240 270-885-1499 chendricks@southwesternky.com www.southwesternky.com ...................................................................

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ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

LOUISIANA Carroll County Economic Development

Louisiana Economic Development

Paige Sunderland, Director 225 N. Center Street, Ste. 101 Westminster, MD 21157 410-386-2070 psunderland@carrollbiz.org www.carrollbiz.org ...................................................................

Anya G. Hudnall 1201 N. Third Street Suite 7-210 Baton Rouge, LA 70802 225-342-5396 Anya.hudnal@la.gov www.la.gov ...................................................................

Cecil County Economic Development

SWLA Economic Development ALLIANCE

George Swift 4310 Ryan Street Lake Charles LA 70605 337-433-3632 gswift@allianceswla.org www.allianceswla.org ...................................................................

St. Mary Parish of Economic Development

Talbot County Economic Development

Cassandra M. Vanhooser, Director 11 S. Harrison Street Easton, MD 21601 410-770-8000 Cvanhooser@talbgov.org www.talbgov.org ...................................................................

Michigan Economic Development Corporation

Dorchester County Economic Development

The Right Place, Inc.

Doug Kulper, SVP Business Marketing & Communication Director 300 North Washington Square Lansing, MI 48913 www.michiganadvantage.org ...................................................................

Andria Romkema 125 Ottawa Avenue, Suite 450 Grand Rapids, MI 49503 616-771-0563 romkemaa@rightplace.org www.Rightplace.org ...................................................................

MINNESOTA

MAINE Kent County Department of Economic & Tourism Development Jamie L. Williams, CEcD, Director 400 High Street, 3rd Floor Chestertown MD 21620 410-810-2168 jlwilliams@kentgov.org www.kentcounty.com/business ...................................................................

Town of Richmond Community, Economic, & Business Development

Darryl Sterling, Director 26 Gardiner Street Richmond, ME 04357-0159 207-737-4305 x 331 207-737-4306 (f) director@richmondmaine.com www.richmondmaine.com ...................................................................

Maryland Department of Commerce

Tom Riford 100 Community Place Crownsville, MD 21032 877-634-6361 www.maryland.gov ...................................................................

MARYLAND

Calvert County Economic Development

Kelly Robertson-Slagle, Director 205 Main Street Prince Frederick, MD 20678 410-535-4583 kelly.slagle@calvertcountymd.gov www.ecalvert.com ...................................................................

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Montgomery County Economic Development Kristin O’Keefe 1801 Rockville Pike, Ste. 320 Rockville, MD 20852 240-641-6703 |

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Sikeston Regional Chamber & Economic Development Corp.

Mike Marshall 128 N. New Madrid Street Sikeston, MO 63801 573-471-2498 mike.marshall@sikeston.net www.sikeston.net ...................................................................

MICHIGAN

Steven Overbay, Director 200 Chesapeake Blvd., Ste 2700 Elkton, MD 21921 410-996-8471 cmoyer@ccgov.org www.ccgov.org ...................................................................

Susan Banks, Director 104 Tech Park Drive Cambridge, MD 21613 410-228-0155 sbanks@choosedorchester.org www.choosedorchester.org ...................................................................

Frank Fink, Director 500 Main Street, 5th Floor Courthouse Franklin, LA 70538 337-828-4100 ffink@stmaryparishla.gov www.stmaryparishdevelopmant.com ...................................................................

kristin@thinkmoco.com www.thinkmoco.com ...................................................................

City of Lakeville Community & Economic Development

David Olson, Director 20195 Holyoke Avenue Lakeville, MN 55044 952-985-4421 dolson@lakevillemn.gov www.lakevillemn.gov ...................................................................

MISSOURI

Alliance STL | St. Louis Regional Economic Development

Steven S. Johnson, CEO One Metropolitan Square Suite 1300 St. Louis, MO 63102 314-444-1105 sjohnson@alliancestl.com alliancestl.com ...................................................................

Taney County Partnership

Jonas Arjes Executive Director 269 State Highway 248 Branson, MO 65616 417-334-4084 jarjes@taneycountypartnership.com www.taneycountypartnership.com ...................................................................

NEVADA

City of Henderson Economic Development

Derek Armstrong, Director City Hall Annex 280 Water Street MSC 512 P.O. Box 95050 Henderson, NV 89009-5050 702-267-1650 702-267-1651 (f) derek.armstrong@cityofhenderson. com www.hendersonnow.com ...................................................................

Las Vegas Global Ecnomic Alliance

Perry Ursem Vice President, Business Retention + Expansion 6720 via Austi Parkway Suite #330 Las Vegas, NV 89119 702-791-0000 www.Ivgea.org ...................................................................


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Northeastern Nevada Regional Development Authority

Sheldon Mudd, Executive Director 1500 College Pkwy McMullen Hall #103 Elko, NV 89801 775-738-2100 775-738-7978(f) smudd@nnrda.com www.nnrda.com ...................................................................

NEW JERSEY

Gloucester County Department of Economic Development

Tom Bianco, Director 1480 Tanyard Rd., Sewell, NJ 08080 856-384-6930 tbianco@co.gloucester.nj.us www.gloucestercountynj.gov ...................................................................

NEW YORK

Allegany County Industrial Development Agency

Craig Clark, Executive Director CrossRoads Center 6087 State Route 19N Suite 100 Belmont, NY 14813 585-268-7445 585-268-7473 (f) clarkcr@alleganyco.com www.acida.org ...................................................................

The Agency-Broome County IDA/LDC

Stacey Duncan, Deputy Director of Community & Economic Development Five South College Drive Suite 201 Binghamton, NY 13905 607-584-9000 607-584-9009 (f) smd@theagency-ny.com www.theagency-ny.com ...................................................................

NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF

ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

Fulton County Center for Regional Growth

Ronald M. Peters 34 West Fulton Street Gloversville, NY 12078 518-725-7700 ext. 2 ronp@fccrg.org www.fccrg.org ...................................................................

Mohawk Valley Edge

Nick Bruno 584 Phoenix Drive Rome, NY 13441-4105 315-338-0393 nbruno@mvedge.org www.mvedge.org ..................................................................

Stanly County Economic Development Commission

Candice Boyd Lowder, Director 704-986-3682 704-986-3685 (f) clowder@stanlyedc.com 1000 North First Street, Suite 11 Albemarle, NC 28001 www.stanlyedc.com ...................................................................

NORTH DAKOTA

American Municipal Power, Inc.

Bismarck Mandan Chamber EDC

Martyn Johnson, Director 705 Page Road Washington, NC 27889 252-946-3970 252-946-0849 (f) martyn.johnson@beaufortedc.com www.co.beaufort.nc.us ..................................................................

Harnett County Economic Development

Debbie Taylor, Marketing & Business Recruitment Manager 200 Alexander Dr. or PO Box 1270 Lillington, NC 27546 910-814-6891 919-814-8298 (f) dhtaylor@harnett.org www.harnettedc.org ...................................................................

David Myers, Executive Director 102 S. Fifth Street Suite 3 Ponca City, OK 74601 580-765-7070 580-765-7070 (f) dmyers@goponca.com www.goponca.com ...................................................................

PENNSYLVANIA

NORTH CAROLINA

Beaufort County Economic Development

Ponca City Development Authority

Nathan Schneider CEcD-Vice President 1640 Burnt Boat Dr. Bismark, ND 58503 701-223-5660 nschneider@bmcedc.com www.bismarckmandan.com .................................................................

OHIO

Alexis A. Fitzsimmons, Director of Economic & Business Development 1111 Schrock Rd. Columbus, OH 43229 614-540-0994 afitzsimmons@amppartners.org www.searchampsites.com ...................................................................

RHODE ISLAND

City of Cranston

Lawrence DiBoni, Director of Economic Development 869 Park Avenue American Municipal Power, Inc. Cranston, RI 02910 401-780-3166 Alexis A. Fitzsimmons, Director of 401-780-3179 (f) Economic & Business Development ldiboni@cranstonri.org 1111 Schrock Rd. www.cranstonri.com Columbus, OH 43229 ................................................................... 614-540-0994 City of Warwick afitzsimmons@amppartners.org Department of Tourism, www.searchampsites.com Culture, and Development ................................................................... Elizabeth J. Dunton, Acting Director 3275 Pos t Road OKLAHOMA Warwick, RI 2886 401-921-7711 401-732-7662 elizabeth.j.dunton@warwickri.com movetowarwickri.com Bartlesville Development ..................................................................

Authority North Carolina Global Transpark

John W. Rouse, Executive Director 2780 Jetport Road Kinston, NC 28504 252-775-6183 252-522-1765 (f) jwrouse@ncdot.gov www.ncgtp.com .................................................................

Jared Patton, Vice President 201 SW Keeler Bartlesville, OK 74003 918-337-8086 918-337-0216 (f) jpatton@bdaok.org www.bdaok.org ...................................................................

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Quonset Development Corporation

Steven J. King, Managing Director 95 Cripe Street North Kingstown, RI 2852 401-295-0044 sking@quonset.com www.quonset.com ................................................................... JULY/AUGUST 2021

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SOUTH CAROLINA

Big Spring Economic Development Corporation

Mark Willis 215 W. 3rd Street Big Spring, TX 79720 432-264-6032 markwillis@bigspringtx.com www.bigspringtx.com ...................................................................

Sarah J. Johnson Department Director 212 South Lake Drive Lexington, SC 29072 803-785-6818 sjjohnson@lex-co.com www.LexingtonCountyUSA.com ...................................................................

TENNESSEE

Ginger Watkins, Executive Director 102 E. First Street, Suite A Cameron, TX 76520 254-697-4970 254-482-1119 (c) gwatkins@cameronindustrialfoundation.com www.cameronindustrialfoundation.com ...................................................................

Bryan Daniels CEcD, CCE, IOM President and CEO 201 S. Washington Street St. Maryville, TN 37804 865-983-2247 865-984-1386 bdaniels@blountpartnership.com www.blountchamber.com ...................................................................

Cedar Hill Economic Development

Bristol Tennessee Essential Services

Kim M. Buttram, CEcD 285 Uptown Boulevard, Bldg. 100 Cedar Hill, TX 75104 972-291-5132 chedc@cedarhilltx.com www.cedarhilledc.com ...................................................................

April Eads Business Development Manager 2470 Volunteer Parkway Bristol, TN 37620 423-793-5532 423-793-5545 (f) aeads@btes.net www.btes.net/index.php/economic-development ...................................................................

City Development Corporation of El Campo

Carolyn Gibson Executive Director 707 Fahrenthold El Campo, TX 77437 979-543-6727 979-320-7727 cell cgibson@elcampoeco.org www.elcampoeco.org ...................................................................

City of Lebanon

Sarah Haston Economic Development Director 200 North Castle Heights Ave. Lebanon, TN 37087 615-443-2839 EXT. 2120 Sarah.Haston@lebanontn.org www.lebanontn.org ...................................................................

City of Fort Worth

NETWORKS – Sullivan Partnership

Robert Sturns, Director 1150 S. Freeway Fort Worth, TX 76104 817-392-2663 Robert.Sturns@fortworthtexas.gov ...................................................................

Clay Walker PO Box 747 Blountville, TN 37617 423-279-7681 cwalker@networkstn.com www.networkstn.com ................................................................... BXJ JULY/AUGUST 2021

Odessa Economic Development Corporation City of Leander

Evan Milliorn Economic Development Director 201 N Brushy Leander, TX 78641 512-528-2852 emilliorn@leandertx.gov www.leanderbusiness.com ...................................................................

Cameron Industrial Foundation

Blount Partnership

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ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

TEXAS

Lexington County Economic Development

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Conroe Economic Development Council

Danielle Scheiner, Executive Director 505 West Davis Street Conroe, TX 77301 USA 936-538-7118 scheiner@conroeedc.org www.conroeedc.org ...................................................................

Wesley Burnett 700 N. Grant Ave. Odessa, TX 79761 432-333-7880 wburnett@odessaecodev.com www.odessatx.com ...................................................................

Gainesville Economic Development Corp

Audrey Schroyer 311 S. Weaver Street Gainsville, TX 76240 940-665-5241 aschroyer@cogtx.org www.gainesvilleedc.com ...................................................................

Jacksboro Economic Development Corporation

DeSoto Economic Development

Lynda Pack Executive Director P.O. Box 610 Jacksboro, TX 76458 940-567-3151 lyndapack@jacksboroedc.com www.jacksboroedc.com ..................................................................

LCRA

Olivia Varela, President & CEO P.O. Box 2682 Laredo, TX 78044 956-722-0563 ovarela@laredoedc.org www.laredoedc.org ...................................................................

Joe Newman, CEO 211 E. Pleasant Run Road DeSoto, TX 75115 Ph: 972-230-9611 jnewman@dedc.org www.dedc.org ...................................................................

Karen Dickson Economic Development Manager 3700 Lake Austin Blvd. Austin, TX 78703 512-578-3291 karen.dickson@lcra.org www.lcra.org/economic-development/pages/default.aspx ...................................................................

McKinney Economic Development Corporation

Peter Tokar III, President/CEO 5900 S. Lake Forest Drive McKinney, TX 75070 972-435-6953 ptokar@mckinneyedc.com www.uniquemckinney.com ...................................................................

Laredo Economic Development

Mansfield Economic Development Corporation

301 S. Main Street Mansfield, TX 76063 817-728-3652 www.mansfield-texas.com ...................................................................

Marble Falls EDC

Christian Fletcher 801 Fourth Street Marble Falls, TX 78654 830-798-7079 cfletcher@marblefallseconomy.com www.marblefallseconomy.com ...................................................................


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NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF

ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

WEST VIRGINIA Mount Pleasant EDC

Nathan Tafoya, Executive Director 1604 N. Jefferson Ave. Mount Pleasant, TX 75455 903-572-6602 nathan@mpedc.org www.mpedc.org ...................................................................

New Braunfels EDC

Chester Jenke 390 S. Seguin Avenue New Braunfels, TX 78130 830-608-2811 holly@innewbraunfels.com www.newbraunfelsedc.com ...................................................................

Pflugerville Community Development

Veronica Ramirez 3801 Helios Way Suite 130 Pflugerville, TX 78660 512-990-3725 veronicar@pfdevelopment.com www.pfevelopment.com ..................................................................

Whitesboro Economic Development Corp.

Lynda Anderson Director P.O. Box 340 or 111 W. Main Whitesboro, TX 76273 930-564-3311 landerson@whitesborotexas.com www.whitesborotexas.com ...................................................................

UTAH

Michael Fox, Executive Director 1906 West 5th Plainview, TX 79072 806-293-8536 michael.fox@plainviewedc.org www.plainviewedc.org ...................................................................

TexAmericas Center

Ruth Jackson Customer Eng. Specialist 107 Chapel Lane New Boston, TX 75570 903-223-9841 ruth.jackson@texamericascenter. com www.texamericascenter.com ...................................................................

Traci Blido Economic Development Director 122 E. Main St. Suite 202 Bedford, VA 24523 540-587-5670 540-586-0406 (f) tblido@bedfordcountyva.gov www.bedfordeconomicdevelopment.com ...................................................................

Eagle Mountain Economic Development

Aaron Sanborn, City Administrator 1650 E. Stagecoach Run Eagle Mountain, UT 84005 801-789-6621 asanborn@emcity.org www.eaglemountaincity.com ...................................................................

Sherry A. Spring Director of Economic Development 6489 Main Street Gloucester, VA 23061 804-693-1414 sspring@gloucesterva.info www.gloucesterva.info ..................................................................

WASHINGTON

VIRGINA

Arlington Economic Development

Telly Tucker, AED Director 1100 N Glebe Rd Suite 1500 Arlington, VA 22201 703-228-0808 703-228-0805 (f) ttucker@arlingtonva.us www.arlingtoneconomicdevelopment.com ...................................................................

Alexis A. Fitzsimmons, Director of Economic & Business Development 1111 Schrock Rd. Columbus, OH 43229 614-540-0994 afitzsimmons@amppartners.org www.searchampsites.com ...................................................................

Leasha Johnson, Executive Director 1657 East Fourth Avenue Williamson, WV 25661 304-235-0042 304-235-0043 (f) ljohnson.mcra@suddenlinkmail.com www.developmingo.com ...................................................................

WISCONSIN

Madison Region Economic Partnership

City of Lakewood Economic Development

Adrianne Griffith Marketing & Communications 625 North Washington St. Suite 400 Alexandria, VA 22314 703-739-3820 730-739-1384 (f) griffith@alexecon.org www.growALX.com ...................................................................

American Municipal Power, Inc.

Mingo County Redevelopment Authority

County of Gloucester

Alexandria Economic Development Partnership Plainview Economic Development Corporation

Bedford County Office of Economic Development

Becky Newton, Manager 6000 Main Street SW Lakewood, WA 98499 877-421-9126 bnewton@cityoflakewood.us www.buildyourbetterhere.com ...................................................................

Kathy Collins, VP Economic Development 455 Science Drive, Suite 160 Madison, WI 53711 608-571-0407 kcollins@madisonregion.org www.madisonregion.org ...................................................................

New North, Inc City of Maple Valley

Tim Morgan Economic Development Manager P.O. Box 320 Maple Valley, WA 98038 425-413-8800 tim.morgan@maplevalleywa.gov www.maplevalleywa.gov ..................................................................

Portage County Business Council, Inc. PCB

Try-City Development Council

Carl Adrian, President & CEO 7130 W. Grandridge Blvd #A Kennewich, WA 99336 509-735-1000 cadrian@tridec.org www.tridec.org .................................................................. bxjmag.com

Barb LaMue, President & CEO 2740 W. Mason Street Green Bay, WI 54303 920-676-1960 barb.lamue@thenewnorth.com www.thenewnorth.com ...................................................................

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Todd Kuckkahn, Executive Director 5501 Vern Holmes Drive Stevens Point, WI 54482 715-344-1940 715-344-1940 (f) tkuckkah@portagecountybiz.com www.portagecountyconnects.com ................................................................... JULY/AUGUST 2021

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ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

WYOMING City of Brandon

City of Guelph

Middlesex County

City of Mississauga Economic Development

County of Elgin

Vaughan Economic and Cultural Development

Sandy Trudel Director of Eocnomic Development Main Floor, 410 9th Street Brandon, Manitoba, Canada R7A 6A2 204-729-2131 s.trudel@brandon.ca www.economicdevelopmentbrandon.com ...................................................................

Cheyenne LEADS

Betsey Hale, Chief Executive Officer One Depot Square 121 W. 15th St. Suite 304 Cheyenne, WY 82001 307-638-6000 betseyh@cheyenneleads.org cheyenneleads.org ...................................................................

CANADA

Town of Ajax

Bonnie Brown Mississauga City Hall 300 City Centre Drive, 3rd Floor Mississauga, ON L5B 3C1 Canada 800-456-2181 905-896-5931 bonnie.brown@mississauga.ca www.TheFuturelsUnlimited.ca ...................................................................

Don Terry Manager, Economic Development & Tourism 65 Harwood Avenue South Ajax, Ontario, Canada L1S 2H9 905-619-2529 ext. 3252 don.terry@ajax.ca www.ajaxfirstforbusiness.com ...................................................................

Cara A. Finn, BBA, M. Ad.Ed. Director of Economic Development 399 Ridout St. North London, ON N6A 2P1 519-434-7321 cfinn@middlesex.ca www.investinmiddlesex.ca ...................................................................

Christine Chapman 1 Carden Street Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1H 3A1 519--822-1260 ext. 2823 Christine.chapman@guelph.ca www.guelph.ca/business ...................................................................

Dennis Cutajar Vaughan City Hall, Level 200 2141 Major Mackenzie Drive Vaughan, Ontario, Canada L6A 1T1 905-832-8526 ext. 8274 dennis.cutajar@vaughan.ca www.vaughan.ca ...................................................................

Alan Smith, General Manager, Economic Development 450 Sunset Drive St. Thomas, Ontario, Canada N5R 5V1 519-631-1460 ext. 137 asmith@elgin.ca www.progressivebynature.com ...................................................................

ADVERTISER & EDIT INDEX Advertiser

ALABAMA

Elmore County Gadsden-Etowah HudsonAlpha Institute Marengo County Northwest Alabama

INDIANA

Ports of Indiana

26 24 25 23

11

BC

8

1 7

9

35 33

34 35

37

38

Southwest Louisiana

MARYLAND Kent County Port of Baltimore Sikeston West Plains

OKLAHOMA Norman

48

|

BXJ JULY/AUGUST 2021

24 25 IBC 25 26

11

LOUISIANA

MISSOURI

AD Edit

|

bxjmag.com

Advertiser

AD Edit

RHODE ISLAND Quonset Business Park SOUTH CAROLINA

Camp Hall Columbia I-77 Alliance Union County

TENNESSEE Blount County

ONTARIO, CANADA Middlesex County

IFC 30 29 31

28 30 27 30

17

5

10

40

40

15

15

Port Freeport

WASHINGTON

12

TEXAS

Lakewood

12


is a life science business campus accelerating new therapeutics, medical devices, diagnostics and other innovations to patients by co-locating genomic R&D, workforce training, startups and established bioscience enterprises.

Find a building site along the double helix park on the 152-acre biotech campus Lease premier lab and office space with flexibility for growth Access leading-edge research talent, sequencing team and a skilled life sciences workforce

Learn more about the advantages of locating your bioscience company to the HudsonAlpha campus by scheduling a visit to Huntsville – a top 10 tech town, visit hudsonalpha.org/innovate or call our Economic Development team at 256.327.9591.


Southwest Louisiana produces energy for the nation and provides chemicals and plastics for hundreds of products worldwide. We supply aircraft with maintenance, repair, and custom interiors, and we propagate agriculture and timber. Plus, we are a destination with world-class casino resorts and golf.

RESILIENCE…

THAT’S SOUTHWEST LOUISIANA When we get hit hard by weather, we respond quickly to get up and running. The Port of Lake Charles, Chennault Airpark, and Lake Charles Regional Airport are open and ready for your business. Our Southwest region has over 12 certified industrial sites ready for your company.

LA 49

TX HOUSTON

BATON ROUGE 10

LAKE CHARLES 10

To hear the Southwest Louisiana Resilience Update give us a call.

(337) 433-3632 | www.ALLIANCESWLA.org Contact George Swift at gswift@allianceswla.org

LAFAYETTE

10

NEW ORLEAN

Profile for BusinessXpansionJournal

July/August 2021 Digital Issue  

July/August 2021 Digital Issue  

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