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2021 NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

May/June 2021 | bxjmag.com

AGRICULTURE EFFICIENT TECHNIQUES

FOOD & BEVERAGE

Begins Reworking Itself

TOURISM

Time To “Pivot, Stretch, & Adapt”

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TABLE OF

CONTENTS

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FEATURES INDUSTRY OUTLOOK: More Efficient Agriculture Techniques are Coming into the Focus

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Alan Reyes-Guerra

Seed genetics, better use of wifi, sensor technology, artificial intelligence, drones, and more all coming together to create a more connected agricultural space

areyes@bxjmag.com

By David Hodes

EDITORIAL

205-862-5175

CONTRIBUTORS David Hodes

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INNOVATION AND STRATEGIES: A Huge Industry Begins Reworking Itself

A proliferation of new brands, more reliance on social media, and new ideas for a sustainable production process drive a thriving food and beverage processing industry

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Clint Cabiness clint@dialedinmediagroup.com 205-613-5910

By David Hodes

EDITORIAL OFFICE King Publishing, Inc. 1000 Stafford Court

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INDUSTRY INSIGHT: Time To “Pivot, Stretch, And Adapt”

Hit hard by the COVID-19 pandemic, the tourism industry is finding its footing again and developing new ways to rebuild and renew By David Hodes

Birmingham, Alabama 35242 Tel: 205-862-5175 ONLINE MEDIA ASSISTANT Sonia Buchanan SUBSCRIPTION CHANGES & REQUESTS 205-862-5175 or www.bxjmag.com

EXPANSION O P P O R T U N I T I E S 18 FLORIDA: WHERE COMPANIES

33 NEW YORK: THE STATE OF THE FUTURE

EXPAND

23 MARYLAND: YOUR BEST LIFE STARTS

36 KANSAS: EMBRACING THEIR ROOTS TO PROPEL THEIR FUTURE

HERE

28 KENTUCKY: THE RIGHT PLACE TO

38 WISCONSIN: LEADING THE WAY TO A BETTER WORLD

GROW YOUR BUSINESS

King Publishing, Inc., 1000 Stafford Court, Birmingham, AL 35242; www.bxjmag.com. Advertising rates are furnished upon request. Subscriptions are free to those who qualify. Non-qualified subscriptions are $69 in the U.S.; $89 in Canada and Mexico; elsewhere outside the U.S. is $99 for 10 issues. Back issue rate is $6 when available. Payment must accompany order. The views expressed in all articles and advertisements appearing in the Business Xpansion Journal magazine are solely those of the author and advertiser, respectively. © Copyright 2021, King Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. No partof this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. POSTMASTER: Send change of address notification to Business Xpansion Journal, 1000 Stafford Court, Birmingham, AL 35242. Subscribers can make address changes by calling 205-862-5175 or by e-mail at www.bxjmag.com. 1000 Stafford Court, BIRMINGHAM, AL 35242

40 2021 National Directory of Economic Developers

TEL: 205-862-5175 2001

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More Efficient Agriculture Techniques are Coming into the Focus B Y: DAVID HO D ES

Seed genetics, better use of wifi, sensor technology, artificial intelligence, drones, and more all coming together to create a more connected agricultural space

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ver just the past 90 years, U.S. agricultural output has increased by 400 percent, and with 10 percent less land required for that result. .................................................................................................. But demand for food is growing at the same time the supply side faces constraints in land and farming inputs, according to a McKinsey and Company report from the Center for Advanced Connectivity and Agriculture Practice. The world’s population is on track to reach 9.7 billion by 2050, requiring a corresponding 70 percent increase in calories available for consumption, even as the cost of the inputs needed to generate those calories is rising, according to the report. Bottom line: Farmers need to step up their game. In recent years, many farmers have begun to consult data about essential variables like soil, crops, livestock, and weather. Yet few if any have had access to advanced digital tools that would help turn that data into valuable, actionable insights. In less-developed regions, almost all farm work is manual, involving little or no advanced connectivity or equipment.


The McKinsey report added that, in the United States, only about one-quarter of farms currently use any connected equipment or devices to access data, and that technology isn’t exactly state-of-the-art, running on 2G or 3G networks that telephone companies plan to dismantle, or on very low-band Internet-of-Things (IoT) networks that are complicated and expensive to set up. “The success and sustainability of one of the planet’s oldest industries may well depend on this technology transformation, and those that embrace it at the outset may be best positioned to thrive in agriculture’s connectivity-driven future,” the authors of the McKinsey report concluded. Clearly now is the time to aggressively bring the agriculture industry up to speed. Strategy going forward In February, 2020, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) formed the Agriculture Innovation Agenda (AIA), with a goal of increasing U.S. agricultural production by 40 percent, while cutting the environmental footprint of U.S. agriculture in half by 2050. One component of the AIA, according to the USDA, is the formulation of a U.S. agriculture innovation strategy—seeking to establish discovery goals that align with or inform both the public and private-sector research ecosystems. The USDA report identified three major topic areas and

aspirational goals for the strategy: increase agricultural production by optimizing yield and/or quality with higher input use efficiency and crop resiliency; increase production capability, by increasing agricultural production capabilities of soil, water, and air by developing and implementing sustainable farming and forestry tools and practices; and increasing market expansion and diversity, to increase market diversity and product utility of the agricultural system to expand value, reach, and resiliency. The report further elaborated on the need for low-cost, easy-to-use, broadly dispersed sensors and biosensors across all agricultural sectors, providing real time information with high spatial resolution in areas of active cultivation. Standards are needed for data collection, processing, and management to enable device designs that function seamlessly in the IoT. Broadband access to rural communities is needed to underpin the digital agricultural environment, including wireless networks with access to cloud-based computing. Digital tools and solutions should be scale-neutral, and useful for all types of farming/forestry systems and environments, according to the report. Digital tools should also collect data that quantify environmental benefits to validate conservation programs and enable ecosystem service markets and carbon sequestration markets. bxjmag.com

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technology, coupled with sensors that detect product quality and safety, are needed to ensure transparency, traceability, and safety throughout the agricultural production system. The report concluded by reminding industry management that it is “essential that all segments of the agricultural community work together to address these goals; they will not be solved by any one entity, and alignment of the public and private-sector innovators is essential for progress.”

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The ongoing data analytics issue

Automated solutions are needed that deliver precise input amounts with high temporal and spatial resolution, and/or address common issues in the agricultural production system, including worker availability and improvements in worker safety. 6 |

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Automated data collection and reporting processes could enhance existing survey methods and create a data-rich environment (with protections) for further enabling the digital agricultural environment. Blockchain or similar types of

In their science blueprint document, with discussions about the roadmap for the USDA from 2020 to 2025, the USDA promotes the proactive sharing of data to make information and research results about agriculture and nutrition available, accessible, and usable worldwide. As a founding partner of the Global Open Data for Agriculture and Nutrition (GODAN) initiative, USDA empowered open data conversations about agriculture and nutrition data all over the world. USDA’s open data vision is to provide public access to all the products of USDA-funded research while protecting the confidentiality of individual and proprietary data. They are also committed to ensuring that USDA’s public data is easy to access, interpret, and use, accelerating further scientific and public policy research. In support of this vision, USDA is developing an integrated, cloudbased platform that houses USDA’s scientific models and decision support tools. The problem today is that so much data is being generated that the farmer is playing a sort of catch up on best methods and future planning. But the data that is available is becoming more and more about expanding the future of food growing, making it a critical feature of tomorrow’s ag tech. For example, delivering corn hybrids


with innovative traits and genetics has been the focus for some of the 40,000 employees of Bayer Crop Science, a division of the global life science company Bayer. From pioneering insect-resistant traits and seeds designed to protect against disease to herbicide-tolerant products, Bayer Crop Science has developed solutions that help lower a grower’s risk while increasing yield and profit potential. According to sources at Bayer Crop Science, prescriptive, “tailored” solutions are becoming more specific than ever to a grower’s environment and geography. “(We’re) bringing not only specific products, but information to growers, so they can make the right choices for their operations,”says Trent Yantes, head of trait and pipeline delivery for Bayer Crop Science. “We’re able to take our data and our insights that we’ve learned throughout the research and development process and pass that information along to growers so that they get a full package of not only products, but the data that goes along with managing those products for optimal yield performance.” One of the new technologies Bayer Crop Science is using is the proprietary seed chipping process, in which a tiny sample, or “chip,” is taken from a corn seed. Breeders then analyze the corn DNA and screen it for beneficial traits, without the need to grow out plants in the field, which helps speed the discovery process. “One DNA chip can actually be as representative as an early stage field trial,” Tom Jury, head of North America Field Testing at Bayer, says. “This concept of precision breeding increases the probability that what we’re putting in the ground is what the marketplace needs, and increases our likelihood of success for the grower.” One way that Bayer Crop Science is working on new ideas in plants and seed genetics is in their new state-of-the-art automated greenhouse located in Marana, Arizona, which features seven acres (300,000 square feet) of greenhouses or glasshouses dedicated to develop hybrid corn. The growing space at Marana is equivalent of 190 acres of field corn production. Here, more than 100 employees from diverse backgrounds and skill sets work in the greenhouse, including agronomic research specialists, biologists, engineers, environmental specialists, and data scientists in the company’s global product design center for corn.

The promise of circular ag A report by the Dutch Ministry of Agriculture, Nature and Food Quality defines circular agriculture as an ecological concept that is based on the principle of optimizing the use of all biomass. “Circular agriculture is aimed at closing the loop of materials and substances, and reducing both resource use and discharges into the environment. Circular economy—the economic counterpart of the ecological circularity concept—stands against the linear economic model of ‘take-produce-consume-discard’ and entails three

economic activities, to be referred to as the 3Rs: reuse, recycle and reduce existing (used) materials and products. What was earlier considered as waste or surplus becomes a resource that is (re-)valorized.” Biomass and bioenergy development and use is the focus of research by Tim Conner, division director of the Office of Bioenergy with the National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA). NIFA is the USDA’s primary extramural research, education, and extension funding agency, providing leadership and funding for programs that advance agriculture-related sciences. NIFA invests in and supports initiatives that ensure the long-term viability of agriculture. NIFA applies an integrated approach to ensure that groundbreaking discoveries in agriculture-related sciences and technologies reach the people who can put them into practice. Through partnerships with the Land Grant University System, comprised of land-grant colleges or universities in every state, along with government, private, and non-profit organizations, NIFA programs can provide solutions to those who need them. “We have, over the last 10 years, really stepped up our game in how we can help the U.S. be competitive,” Conner says. “Relative to our challenges, we have been trying to develop not only just foundational science to solve problems, but also have been moving more into systems. We want to translate that foundational innovation to the systems to get closer to where our growers and companies can actually leverage that innovation, which can be done through commercialization or other means.” Systems development is about making things more efficient, and more precise, through the use of sensors that can sense what is happening in the soil of a producer’s field, for example. “Maybe it’s lower in nitrogen due to the sensor reading,” Conner says. “So that when you are applying fertilizer, it sets up a possibility of increasing automatically the amount of nitrogen in this area of the field, and backing off in another area.” Farmers tell him that the collection of all of this data is great—but it’s too much. “What NIFA has been trying to get at is coming up with other ways in which the farmer only has to make three of four critical decisions a year based on data, instead of all of these hundreds of decisions,” Conner says. “Artificial intelligence (AI) fits into that scenario. It takes all of this data coming in and synthesizes some recommendations. Or sometimes, it can even drive a certain robot to do a certain activity. You have to have AI to pull in all that agriculture input, all that crop performance data, in current real time, about how the crops are growing or aren’t growing, and bring that into reality. And that’s what AI does.” X

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A Huge Industry Begins Reworking Itself B Y: DAV ID HO D ES

A proliferation of new brands, more reliance on social media, and new ideas for a sustainable production process drive a thriving food and beverage processing industry

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he food and beverage processing industry is huge in this country—one of the stronger industries in many U.S. states. It is led by California, with 3,679 food manufacturing companies as of 2018; followed by New York with 2,034 companies; and Texas, with 1,888 companies. ....................................................................................................

The sector slowed for a brief period in the early part of this century, but is showing robust growth today. Last year broke records again for the number of food and drink business development transactions around the world after a record 2019, with 831 registered on the Zenith Global mergers and acquisitions database, or an average of 16 each week. In many cases, changing processing plant technologies and the emergence of new-scale economies have helped accelerate this consolidation. Methods of vertical coordination are also changing, with a shift away from the use of spot markets toward greater reliance on contracting for some grain and livestock processing, according to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Economic Research Service (ERS).


Business expansion picks up steam

The USDA ERS also reports that this growing concentration in several processing industries raises questions about market power in the sale of agricultural products, and about the effects of concentration on innovation and productive efficiency. High and increasing levels of concentration in some sectors of the food industry, coupled with changing methods of vertical coordination between producers and processors, have led to concerns about reduced competition—a sort of economic thinning. To help offset those thinning effects of fewer purchases with lower trade volume, the USDA recommends more effective use of data, improving data collection and dissemination of information on prices and price mechanisms, quantities transacted, and the size and number of market participants. But that bump in the road of food and beverage processing hasn’t slowed down the pace of development across the country.

One state enjoying a surge in food and processing industry growth is Virginia, where more than 150 food and beverage processing companies chose to locate or expand over the last decade, creating over 7,300 new jobs and making capital investments totaling $2.3 billion. According to the Virginia Economic Development Partnership (VEDP), Virginia’s food and beverage processing industry employs more than 42,000 people; accounts for over 17 percent of Virginia’s total manufacturing employment; and is the state’s second-largest manufacturing sector. Food and beverage processors like to locate near major seaports, which is part of why they choose states like California and Texas, along with other states on the east coast such as Virginia. For example, in 2020, Acesur USA established its first U.S. production facility for blending, bottling, and packaging its edible oil blends in Virginia. The facility is located in Suffolk, Virginia with direct access to the Port of Virginia, enabling the import and export of over 630 TEUs (twenty-foot equivalent cargo units) importing and exporting through the port annually. But there’s more to Virginia’s food and beverage processing story. By 2024, The Port of Virginia will complete $1.5 billion in modernization and expansion projects, including terminal improvements, dredging, and technology. The port’s completion of USDA’s Southeast In-Transit Cold Treatment Program will allow Virginia to accept a broad range of imported perishable cargo, with a focus on supporting Virginia’s food and beverage industry. Cold treatment is a process of subjecting fruits and vegetables to cold temperature for a prescribed amount of time to eliminate plant pests. “The port is a big player in our food and beverage industry,” Lindsay Hurt, managing director, Products Service SectorsBusiness Development for the VEDP, says. “The port has a history with the coffee industry, and it has certifications to handle fruits that would be perishable and would have a short shelf life. Timing and all of those things are important as you import them into the U.S.” The food and beverage industry has companies in all corners of the state, Hurt says. For example, food and beverage companies in the western part of the state have grown because of relationships with farmers and the use of technology for growing and harvesting; and food and beverage companies in central Virginia do well in the processing and packaging side of the industry. She says that customers are demanding more sustainable packaging, which has created opportunities for companies such as Crown Holdings, Inc., in Henry County, building a new 355,000 square foot state of the art aluminum can manufacturing facility. The facility will use a sustainable production process to manufacture recyclable aluminum beverage cans. “There is a lot of activity around recycling, and with the demand for those products from a lot of the consumers,” Hurt says. “As these companies are growing, as they do their

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expansion, they are shifting a lot of that production to more sustainable and recyclable materials within their footprint.”

Sustainability a key Sustainability is a big focus of food and beverage processors—managing sustainability in both their manufacturing operations and their packaging design and construction. One example is Keurig-Dr. Pepper, with annual revenues of $11 billion on sales of more than 125 different brands, which is on track to meet commitments of making 100 percent of its packaging recyclable or compostable, and incorporating 30 percent post-consumer recycled content (PCR) in its packaging by 2025. The company also recently expanded the availability of recyclable Keurig K-Cup pods in the U.S., remaining on track to transition all pods to recyclable polypropylene by the end of this year; and incorporating post-consumer recycled polyethylene terephthalate (rPET) in beverage bottles, with plans to begin transitioning the company’s water portfolio and Snapple beverages to 100 percent rPET bottles in the first half of 2021. Another example is the Coca-Cola company, which aims to use 50 percent recycled polyethylene terephthalate (PET) in its plastic packaging by 2030. Coca-Cola is focusing on the 12 |

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entire packaging lifecycle—from manufacturing of bottles and cans to recycling. PET was first synthesized in the U.S. during the mid-1940s by DuPont chemists. Approximately 1.5 billion pounds of used PET bottles and containers are recovered in the U.S. each year for recycling, making it the most recycled plastic in America. On average, a U.S. household uses 45 pounds of PET plastic bottles and jars in a year. If all of them were recycled, it would yield enough recycled PET fiber to make 12 dozen men’s T-shirts, or enough carpet for a 12-by-15 foot room, according to the PET Resin Association, an industry trade association. Conagra Brands, manufacturers of over 100 brands, is also stepping up its sustainability efforts, announcing that the company will be making 100 percent of their current plastic packaging renewable, recyclable or compostable by 2025. In the summer of 2020, Conagra launched new Hungry-Man Double Meat Bowls and P.F. Chang’s Ramen single-serve meals in serving bowls made from plant-based fibers. Over the next few years, the company will work to avoid the use of an additional 33 million pounds of plastic through further development of plant-based packaging options and other packaging innovations.


Getting smarter for consumers Food and beverage products are also leaning more into using social media. Promoting new products using social media platforms was practically nonexistent before 2012. In 2019, products with social media logos increased 13 percent over 2018 and ranked eighth among all new product claims, accounting for 4.4 percent of new product launches, according to the USDA ERS. Food companies are now putting quick response (QR) codes on products so that consumers can access the company website or online services through their smart phones. Companies may use QR codes to facilitate consumer interaction with products by linking the code to product information, such as the presence of GMOs. This is part of a movement in food and beverage packaging called connected packaging, according to Signals, an industry data analytics company. Producers can create products that make consumers feel connected to a brand. At the same time, producers can improve their supply chains, ensure greater quality control during the production process, and boost product visibility in the market. There are currently three types of connected packaging on the market: active, interactive and intelligent.

The active category is designed to help producers build a relationship with consumers by helping them interact with the products they buy. This could mean providing more information on the product itself, or giving people access to promotions and loyalty programs. Interactive packaging focuses on more technologically advanced offerings. For example, take counterfeit foods and beverages. By adding a tamper-proof QR code to packaging, producers can ensure only the right products enter the market—and build the type of consumer loyalty money can’t buy. The last category—intelligent packaging—is perhaps the most exclusive. Making use of near field communications (NFC, which is a method for two devices close to each other to communicate to each other for payment), or radio frequency identification (RFID) technology, this packaging acts as a two-way radio, sending information directly to consumers while collecting data for producers. Connected packaging is more than just a passing trend, Signals reports, calling it the future of the food and beverage industry. With such potential, it should come as no surprise the market is expected to hit $46.25 billion by 2025 – rising approximately 4% from 2019. X

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Time To “Pivot, Stretch, And Adapt” B Y DAV ID HO D ES

Hit hard by the COVID-19 pandemic, the tourism industry is finding its footing again and developing new ways to rebuild and renew

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ne of the global industries that has taken the biggest economic hit over the last year is the tourism industry. Tourism made up 10 percent of global GDP in 2019 and was worth almost $9 trillion, according to McKinsey and Company tourism report, making the sector nearly three times larger than agriculture. ....................................................................................................

That number dipped to $5 trillion in 2020. Tourism spending is not likely to return to pre-crisis levels until 2024. “Our forecasts indicate that it will take four to seven years for tourism demand to return to 2019 levels,” the report concluded. But there are increasingly positive signs of recovery emerging now. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, there are now 13,117,000 people employed in leisure and hospitality jobs this March, up from 8,691,000 in April 2020 when layoffs began in earnest. According to the Washington Post, some large employers are signaling they plan to make do with fewer employees as they experiment with new business models that allow them to cut labor costs. “Due to the extraordinary levels of disruption, our


industry experienced demand declines we’ve never seen before in our 101-year history,” Hilton Worldwide Holdings, Inc. president and CEO Christopher Nassetta told investors during a meeting on February 17. He went on to say that the positive momentum in demand that happened through the summer and early fall of 2020 was disrupted in November and December by rising COVID cases, tightening travel restrictions and hotel suspensions, particularly in Europe. “As we look to the year ahead, we remain optimistic that accelerating vaccine distribution will lead to easing government restrictions and unlock pent-up travel demand,” Nassetta said in his speech. “We expect improving fundamentals heading into spring with essentially all system-wide rooms reopened by the end of the second quarter.” Conversations with large corporate customers, he said, indicates that there is “pent-up demand for business travel that should drive a recovery in corporate transient trends as the year progresses. The vast majority of our large corporate accounts agreed to extend 2020 negotiated rates into this year.” Despite the pandemic, he said, Hilton opened more than 400 hotels in 2020, or nearly 56,000 rooms, and achieved net unit growth of 5.1 percent. “We continue to see signs of optimism,” Nassetta told investors. “I’m confident that there are brighter days ahead and that we are stronger, more resilient, and better positioned than ever before.”

The reality still stings The World Travel and Tourism Council (WTTC) spotlights the harsher reality of what has happened to the industry in an industry report, “To Recovery and Beyond.” More than 121 million global travel and tourism jobs, and an estimated US $3.4 trillion in global GDP, could be lost as a result of COVID-19, according to WTTC. The organization says that the industry needs to “re-imagine the future,” following four trends: demand evolution, as traveler preferences and behaviors have shifted toward the familiar, predictable, and trusted; health and hygiene, as personal experiences, advice from experts, and concerns for distancing will guide consumer behavior in the short- to mid-term; innovation and digitization, as digital adoption and consumption are on the rise, with consumers now expecting contactless technologies, including biometrics among others, as a basic prerequisite for a safe and seamless travel experience; and finally, policy recommendations, where the consideration and implementation of diverse policies will be key to support the sector.

The recovery The WTTC report also provided recommendations for going forward. Domestic tourism will be the first segment to recover, followed by short haul regional travel, then medium haul travel between regions and, finally, international travel.

To capitalize on the initial recovery, governments, tourism boards and tourism organizations should direct their early marketing and promotional reports to incentivize domestic and regional travel and inspire residents to explore nearby destinations and attractions. “Governments, tourism boards and organizations should also prepare and provide early marketing and promotional incentives to stimulate the earliest possible regrowth and recovery of travel and tourism,” according to the report. To activate demand, governments should offer early consumer incentives for travel spending, starting with domestic travelers and expanding regionally and internationally as quickly as possible. “Consumer stimuli could include specialized insurance, subsidized holidays off from work, guarantees for medical care while traveling, as well direct cash or voucher subsidies for holidays.” The report concludes that, while the road ahead may appear uncertain, “we anticipate that the challenges along the way can and will be converted into opportunities by the travel and tourism sector. The sector will pivot, stretch, and adapt and ultimately return stronger.”

But.. the lingering fear... Even when the pandemic subsides, there is a growing awareness that travelers may not be as willing to travel as they once were. A new study, “Too afraid to Travel? Development of a Pandemic (COVID-19) Anxiety Travel Scale (PATS)”, describing a short and easy-to-use 5-item construct that measures the level of pandemic-induced anxiety, also examined that fear phenomenon. It is one of the first studies to examine tourism behavior and travel anxiety. That anxiety has been identified as “coronaphobia.” “The COVID-19 pandemic is one of the most impactful events of the century and has radically disrupted tourism markets and mobility on a global scale,” the report stated. “Acknowledging that human mobility is inherently tied to health risks, tourism researchers are increasingly striving to understand the effects of pandemics on travel behavior. A growing body of empirical evidence demonstrates that pandemics have a severe and enduring influence on risk perceptions and related travel decisions to disease-struck regions.” The report also finds that 21st century consumer attitudes and risk perceptions toward international travel are “fraught with health concerns,” and that “one can even argue that global travel patterns are undergoing a paradigm shift.” Carefree, adventurous and extroverted tourism practices, which characterized international travel in the late 20th century, are giving way to risk-aversive tendencies, according to the report. “Consequently, people may be deterred from traveling, in order to minimize the risk of disease contraction, or compelled to search for technologically safe substitutes.” One of the authors of the report is Sebastian Zenker, professor in the Center for Tourism and Culture Management at the Copenhagen Business School, one of the largest business schools bxjmag.com

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in Europe. “This (pandemic) has been a big game changer,” he says. “But let’s see the good things in it.’ He says that, on the supply side of tourism, there is the hope that destination tourism groups will use the crisis to change how they operate and become more sustainable. “What has happened on the supply side is that destination tour groups are desperately searching for travelers,” Zenker says. “But a lot of them have not changed for the good. So I am a little bit more realistic that this is not the game changer in terms of sustainable tourism. But it will be a pretty strong fight between companies and between destinations to say ‘We are safe. Come here. Come here.’” To win this fight, those companies will have to create some trust for traveler safety, he says. “For the traveler, there are two voices. One is the voice saying we want to go back to our earlier lives. Yes, there are some aspects that are good, like working from home. But for leisure, for traveling, for going out, I think we all desperately feel that we want back our old life. To have a short trip, or to go somewhere on a weekend, or to go to different country— that hasn’t changed. But it has induced a stronger fear.” Zenker says he is doing another study in June on tourism and how the industry is coping, looking at the way people now think about tourism in the middle of the second year of the pandemic. “There is also a larger group of people that have a sort of fear inside. This fear is growing. That is something that this pandemic has fueled. It’s the feeling that we also don’t know these other people who are traveling into our country. “People will probably choose, especially in the first years after the pandemic subsides, to go to places they perceive as more secure.” 16 |

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The places that were hit hard by the pandemic, like Brazil, will have a problem in creating that trust—and that will last for years. “The cruise industry will not recover like they were before,” he says. “But there is a large majority of people that will keep the fear and will search for more secure options. That is something we will see going forward.” He says that, as a result of the pandemic, there has been 50 percent less business travel, and that will not change after the pandemic because companies have learned that reduction in travel actually works. Hotels and restaurants need to react to that new reality. “As a hospitality company, you have to spread your risks in different target groups, so you don’t rely on one part of that travel, such as just the business traveler,” Zenker says. “You have to make a business model so that with a small number of customers, you can survive. You can scale up if needed but also scale back down in case there is some kind of outbreak. Companies need to be flexible in scaling up and scaling down to survive.” He also believes that there will be a price war coming up among tourism companies. There is a larger level of trust, he says, which is trust of the system on a governmental level. “Governments that had a pretty good crisis management reaction (to the pandemic) increased trust in that government,” he says. “But in countries like the U.S., under the Trump administration, the trust level was going down, which means the likelihood of choosing the U.S as a tourist destination was going down back then. So now it’s the thinking how can Biden re-establish the trust that the system of the U.S. works.” X


WE THINK BUSINESS

T

he City of Ontario, located in Southern California, continues to create development opportunities and urban lifestyle districts that provide sustainable places to live, work and play. Just 35 miles east of downtown Los Angeles, the City of Ontario is ideally situated as the gateway to Southern California. With 182,000 residents, Ontario is San Bernardino County’s fourth-largest city – and growing. Ontario is also home to one of the hottest housing markets in the country, and that boom will only continue as master-planned communities are slated to add nearly 50,000 new homes in the next few decades. At the center of the City is the Ontario International Airport, a full-service airport. UPS, FedEx and Amazon have hubs located at the Airport, making Ontario one of the top markets for outbound cargo shipments in the nation. Ontario is centered on a transportation corridor that extends throughout Southern California and across the continental United States and sits 45 miles from the two largest ports in the country –the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach. Ontario provides strategic access to the ports through its interconnected freeway and rail systems. The Ontario Opportunity Zone is an ideal location for opportunity fund investments, utilizing privately sourced funds into eligible economic development and community reinvestment

projects. Ontario also offers the advantage of being in the Foreign Trade Zone, which allows companies to reduce the costs associated with International Trade. The ability to increase international sales, realize greater importing and exporting opportunities, and succeed in global markets is often a deciding factor for location, relocation and expansion in Ontario. The mass of freight transport – via both rail and road – run through the City of Ontario. Three major freeways crisscross the City and the surrounding areas: Interstate-15 from San Diego to Las Vegas and beyond; Interstate-10 from west coast to east coast; as well as State Route 60 for easy regional access. Ontario’s stable environment, lifestyle amenities, modern facilities, technical amenities, efficient infrastructure and leaders that continually work to improve the City’s pro-business environment make Ontario the best place to develop your business. A talented workforce, reasonable lease rates, quality office and retail development, and over 110 million square feet of industrial, manufacturing and distribution space offers a large market for corporate headquarters, large professional firms and high technology companies. To find out more information about the advantages of doing business in Ontario, California, visit www. ontariothinksbusiness.com or call 909.395.2005. You can also follow @OntarioEDA on social media.

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OPPORTUNITIES

FLORIDA:

WHERE COMPANIES EXPAND

F

lorida can propel your company’s growth in today’s competitive global market with a talented workforce, top-ranked infrastructure, global connectivity, and the quality of life your company needs. Global players, established companies and blossoming startups have chosen to expand in Florida. ........................................................................ Florida consistently ranks among the best states for business, thanks to its pro-business state tax policies, competitive cost of doing business and streamlined regulatory environment. Florida offers a cost-efficient alternative to high-tech states with more affordable land, labor and capital than its competitors. The state’s regulatory agencies and local governments provide quicker, less costly and more predictable permitting processes for significant economic development projects without reducing environmental standards. Florida’s zero percent personal income tax also makes it easier for you to build the business of your dreams. Companies in Florida cover all major industries. It leads with aviation and aerospace, fintech, manufacturing, and life sciences among many others. Some of the biggest companies employing workers include multinational businesses that take advantage of the state’s unique position as a gateway to Latin America. Add to that a highly skilled workforce and favorable tax laws and Florida is a top pick for foreign enterprises. For more information on Florida’s business advantages, please contact Enterprise Florida at 407-956-5600 or visit their website at www.enterpriseflorida.com . 18 |

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FLORIDA: SANTA ROSA

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Whiting Aviation Park Santa Rosa’s Innovation is a One-of-a-Kind Colocation Borrowing from the parlance of pilots, Santa Rosa County is on final approach to the most unique aviation industrial park in America – one that will share space with the US Navy’s iconic Whiting Field, where generations of Navy, Marine, and Coast Guard pilots have been trained. When it’s complete, the park will offer 239 acres of industrial property that is perfect for military contractors and civilian aviation companies as well. How the park came to be speaks volumes about Santa Rosa County’s rich military heritage as well as its commitment to the aviation and aerospace sector. As far back as 2002, county and military leaders agreed that the property could be put to good use by private companies that would benefit from proximity to the naval air station. The question was how to pull together the necessary approvals to get the project off the ground and the resources to make it a reality. “The Whiting Aviation Park was breaking new ground, figuratively and literally,” said Shannon Ogletree, executive director of the Santa Rosa County Economic Development Office. “The military and Department of Defense representatives were great to work with, but there were a lot of institutional concerns that all had to be addressed thoroughly before we got approval.” For sixteen years, the county worked diligently with officials at Whiting Field and the Pentagon to secure what will now be the park’s most significant selling point: A limited-use agreement that allows private companies access to the 6,000 linear foot runway.


tion skill population aviation incentives development expediting water site selection access sonnel gas acreage ownership logistics workforce cut red tape location industry transp tricity results certification labor water distribution manufacturing zoning connection erience logistics implementation telecom liaison tax development permitting skill in ulation transportation development expediting access site selection access trained certifica Santa Rosa County hits personnel the incentive sweet eage owner water site selection access training results industry owner logistics ribution cut red tape acreage electricity aviation transportation results implementation w spot for aviation and aerospace nufacturing zoning connection certification industry locationcompanies. distribution electricity cert ults workforce manufacturing experience zoning connection site selection cut red tape transportation electricity results development access tax personnel water acreage owner Whiting Aviation Park in Santa Rosa County, FL is uniquely positioned to offer local, state, and regional benefits to help land flight-based companies.

Triumph Gulf Coast Over the next decade-plus, $1.5 billion will be directed to Northwest Florida for economic development enhancements. These funds, from a settlement related to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, represent an unprecedented opportunity for Northwest Florida. The funds can be used to provide abatement of property taxes, support infrastructure needs — such as buildings, roadways, rail spurs, utilities and more — and to develop workforce training programs.

Whiting Aviation Park Aggressive Incentives Companies in the aviation/aerospace industries can also qualify for several local programs to offset the costs of training new or existing team members, get rebates on property and ad valorem taxes, and purchase industrial property at a discount. There are also breaks on sales and use taxes for equipment and electricity.

Find out how Santa Rosa County can sweeten your bottom line. Give us a call today.

Contact Shannon Ogletree today. (850) 623-0174 • shannon@santarosa.fl.gov or visit SantaRosaEDO.com

Space Florida Space Florida is uniquely empowered by the State of Florida with robust tools to aid companies in aerospace and related industries, including facility and equipment financing and utilization of statutory tax efficiencies to reduce short- and long-term capital costs.


EXPANSION

OPPORTUNITIES

The next challenge was to secure funding for the engineering and infrastructure necessary to support the various tenants Santa Rosa County plans on bringing to the site. For that effort, county leaders sought help from Triumph Gulf Coast, the $1.5-billion economic development fund set up to offset the impacts of the 2010 BP oil spill. Triumph agreed to put $8.5 million toward the cost of the park. Space Florida, the official state agency for aerospace-related economic development, is also involved with the project. That organization has the ability to construct and own hangars and other facilities and lease them out at below-market rates to qualified companies. According to Ogletree, it didn’t take long to build interest in the new park, as Leonardo Helicopters has announced plans to move into a new facility on the site as soon as it’s ready. “We’re in the enviable position of having a tenant committed to the park before the park is even ready for tenants,” he said. “That proves the park is a great investment for everyone involved, and it shows that our years of effort were well worthwhile.” Construction on phase I of the park is underway now and is expected to be ready this year. Parcels from 2 to 239 acres will be available and Santa Rosa County has access to numerous state and local incentives to help offset the costs of moving in. To learn more visit WhitingAviationPark.com.

FLORIDA: TITUSVILLE

..........................................................................................

Say YES to TITUSVILLE, Florida https://www.YEStitusvilleFL.com/

Nestled along the scenic Indian River Lagoon at the northern end of Florida’s “Space Coast,” the City of Titusville is a full-service community that provides its nearly 50,000 residents with a comprehensive array of public amenities and conveniences. With a moniker derived from the awe-inspiring launches that depart from NASA’s John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC), the Space Coast encompasses more than 72 miles of captivating shoreline and the 20 |

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communities of Brevard County on Florida’s central east coast.

Because of the increasing number of private-sector companies that continue to emerge in the aerospace industry, Titusville is experiencing an unparalleled resurgence, not only because of its storied past with the space program and its space-related infrastructure, but also its aesthetic character and historic charm. In close proximity to pristine beaches and myriad activities, life in Titusville is balanced and well-rounded for individuals and families alike. Renowned for its numerous recreational opportunities, such as hiking, fishing, and shrimping, Titusville’s historic downtown now also serves as the central junction of three major multi-purpose trails, including the St. Johns River 2 Sea Loop, the Coast To Coast Trail, and the East Coast Greenway. And, in 2018, Titusville was the second-only city in Florida to be designated as a “Trail Town” by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection’s Greenways and Trails Council.


Strategically situated in the vicinity of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, the Canaveral National Seashore, and the Kennedy Space Center, Titusville also boasts some of the best bird-watching venues on the eastern seaboard. Moreover, a mere 45-minute jaunt to the west will transport inhabitants and their guests to Orlando and all of its legendary theme parks and attractions. With an ample pre-existing supply of available housing, the City of Titusville continues to incorporate additional residential units, both of the single- and multi-family varieties. For site-selection practitioners, housing starts are a useful indicator of community viability and vitality when determining locations for new retail and commercial venues. As a veritable transportation gateway, Titusville is served by three international airports, Orlando International (MCO), Orlando-Sanford (SFB), and OrlandoMelbourne (MLB), which are each within one hour of Titusville; and, within minutes of the city, the Space Coast Regional Airport (TIX) welcomes private and corporate aircraft. Interstate 95, U.S. Highway 1, and the Florida East Coast (FEC) Railway traverse directly through the city, and Port Canaveral features the numerous advantages of Foreign Trade Zone (FTZ) 136 for businesses engaged in international trade. Statewide, business owners contemplating the

Sunshine State for location or expansion will find Florida’s business climate to be much like its weather – quite favorable. Some advantages that prospective entrepreneurs can expect include scant obstacles to becoming established, thanks to streamlined and minimal business regulations, coupled with a very businessfriendly, cost-competitive tax structure. Since the majority of startups are S corporations, limited liability companies, partnerships, or sole proprietorships, they will not incur state income taxes, nor is state income tax imposed on individuals. The talent pipeline in the state is continually ranked among the greatest in the country due, in part, to 12 public universities, six prestigious medical schools and numerous private institutions of higher learning. In Titusville, new hires are often recruited from nearby Florida Institute of Technology, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, and the University of Central Florida. In a word, Titusville is resilient. Not only has it survived the cessation of two United States space programs, but, as a result of steadfast elected leaders and dedicated administrators, the city has managed to emerge stronger and better positioned each time. So, come and join them; together they will continue to reach new heights.

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OPPORTUNITIES

FLORIDA: INDIAN RIVER COUNTY

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Central to Where Your Business Needs to Be Indian River County – Vero Beach, Sebastian, Fellsmere - strikes a perfect balance between business and pleasure. Those who live, work or visit the area find that the local communities are safe and loaded with ecological, cultural, educational and technological amenities. Many corporate-level executives have located their companies to the area because of the executive’s positive vacation experience, or perhaps they own a winter home on Vero’s barrier island. Located on Florida’s east coast, midway between West Palm Beach and Cape Canaveral, Indian River County is within three hours of over 17 million consumers, or 90% of Florida’s population. It has easy access to markets but is far from urban sprawl, traffic and congestion. Visitors from other parts of Florida are amazed, and pleasantly surprised, at the county’s lack of traffic. The area is rich in history and natural resources, with 26 miles of unspoiled beaches and scenic lakes, plus some of the best bass fishing available in Blue Cypress Lake. It is also the center of the world-famous Indian River Citrus District. Indian River County is a cost-competitive location for new or expanding businesses. It has hundreds of acres of low-cost land available for development, much of it located near I-95, a major north-south transportation route along the east coast. The county

offers competitive property tax rates, and Florida has no state income tax. The Opportunity Zone initiative offers investors an even greater reason to consider Indian River County, FL. All properties west of I-95 in Indian River County are designated as an Opportunity Zone and zoned for industrial use, including two shovel-ready industrial parks. State and local incentives are also available to relocating and expanding companies, including property tax abatement, tax refunds, and job training grants. An available and trainable workforce of approximately 638,000 within an hour’s drive time adds to the county’s appeal as a desirable location. Indian River State College (IRSC) has five campuses located throughout the region, offering 2-year and 4-year degrees as well as several industrial and technical certifications. IRSC is very successful in securing training grants for local employers. They can develop specially-designed training programs in a matter of weeks rather than months. Because location is central to success, Indian River County isn’t just where you want to be – it’s central to where your business ought to be. It has the perfect blend of everything the Sunshine State has to offer. For more information on locating your company to Indian River County, Florida, contact Helene Caseltine, Economic Development Director with the Indian River Chamber of Commerce, at 772-567-3491 or helenec@indianrivered.com. Or, visit their website at www.indianrivered.com. X

INDIAN RIVER COUNTY IS EMERGING AS THE FLORIDA HUB, A LOCATION THAT’S SEAMLESSLY BLENDED THE BEST OF EVERYTHING THAT FLORIDA HAS TO OFFER

Because location is central to success •

Within 3 hours of 90% of Florida’s population

• •

Skilled pool of available workers

Vibrant cultural mix including Florida’s largest teaching museum

North-south and east-west transportation connections

Sebastian

Indian River County Vero Beach West Palm Beach

Miami

Central to where your business needs to be. Visit: IndianRiverED.com Call: 772.567.3491 or email: helenec@indianrivered.com 22 |

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OPPORTUNITIES

MARYLAND:

YOUR BEST LIFE STARTS HERE

R

eady to build your career designing high-tech solutions to the world’s greatest challenges? Look to Maryland, a high-tech hub that’s anchored by two blooming metropolitan areas (Baltimore and Washington D.C.) with tech-centered suburbs in between. Whether your want to fight our nation’s enemies working in national security; develop life-saving vaccines; or help tech startups make it big, Maryland is the place to do it.

amphitheater nestled in the center of Columbia’s growing business and entertainment district. For more information, please call the Maryland Department of Commerce at 888-246-6736 or visit www.commerce.maryland.gov .

MARYLAND: CECIL COUNTY

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................................................................................... Diversity and equal opportunity is something you’ll find across Maryland communities. Their population isn’t just diverse, it’s educated. Nearly 40 percent of Marylanders hold a Bachelor’s degree or higher, putting the state among the top three most educated states. Hike Maryland mountains one weekend, and surf Ocean City’s waves the next. If you still have the energy the following weekend, New York City is just a two-hour train ride away. On more lowkey weekends, explore Maryland’s evolving craft brewing scene or explore Baltimore’s eclectic food options. Catch some of music’s biggest names at Merriweather Post Pavilion, an outdoor

From its location along I-95 in the heart of the Mid-Atlantic featuring access to deep water ports, rail, and major airports to its bucolic landscape, vibrant towns, recreational opportunities, bxjmag.com

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water access, and thriving local food options, it is no surprise businesses and visitors alike are flocking to Cecil County. Cecil County is a tapestry of business innovation and development woven with the flourishing industries of agriculture and tourism. The Cecil County Office of Economic Development has long recognized the importance of agriculture and tourism to the local economy and has staff dedicated solely to these business sectors. Farms in Cecil County offer year-round access to healthy, safe, local foods. There are dozens of roadside produce stands, on-farm stores, CSAs, and farmer’s markets where a wide variety of locally produced offerings, such as, fruit, vegetables, meats, cheese, fresh milk, honey, and microgreens, can be found. Agriculture and tourism often inter-connect and it is certainly true in Cecil County where agri-tourism is strong and includes homemade ice cream on the farm, local breweries and wineries, U-pick adventures, corn mazes, hayrides, horseback riding, and several farm and outdoor wedding venues.

by hikers, bikers, horseback trail riders, birders, paddlers, and boaters. Cecil’s ag and tourism industries are growing too with a 700room Great Wolf Lodge breaking ground this year (opening 2023), which will attract 500,000 visitors annually, and the Maryland 5 Star at Fair Hill, one of two in the U.S. and seven in the world, kicking off its inaugural event in October. The prestigious 5 Star designation is the pinnacle of the sport of Eventing, best described as an equestrian triathlon. Cecil County, it is where businesses need to be and where their employees want to be. The Cecil County Office of Economic Development assists new and existing businesses in the areas of site location, incentives, fast-track permitting, as well as other services. For general information and staff contacts visit cecilbusiness.org. Follow us on social media @cecilcountyag; @cecilcountytourism; @ cecilcountyeconomicdevelopment for the latest happenings.

MARYLAND: KENT COUNTY

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Being situated midway between Baltimore and Philadelphia (a one-hour drive from each) and Washington DC and New York (a two-hour drive from each), makes Cecil County an easily accessible destination. With five rivers, the C&D Canal, and the Chesapeake Bay, Cecil County boasts 200 miles of shoreline. Waterfront loving visitors will find ample opportunities to rent kayaks or SUPs, charter a pontoon boat or yacht, or simply enjoy a spectacular sunset from one of the many waterside eateries. A visit to historic Chesapeake City where you can see commercial ships from around the globe pass through the C&D Canal and under the iconic bridge is another must. Annually, more than a million people come to Cecil County to enjoy the beautiful scenery, recreational opportunities, farm attractions, bustling small towns, specialty shops, rich history, and local flavor of authentic Chesapeake Bay inspired cuisine. On weekends, youth tournaments are a hubbub of activity at area sports complexes and local trails and waterways are frequented 24 |

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Kent County is a scenic peninsula on Maryland’s Upper Eastern Shore of the Chesapeake Bay, ideally situated less than a two-hour drive from Philadelphia, Washington D.C., Annapolis, Dover and Northern Virginia. It is home to two designated Main Streets, an Arts & Entertainment District, historic Washington College, and one of the largest marina communities in Maryland. Kent County is Open for Business Kent - County is actively providing incentives and workforce development tools to help businesses grow. The County is developing broadband infrastructure and has implemented a 110-mile fiber optic broadband network for high-speed gigabit connectivity. Portions of the County are located within Commerce Zones, an Opportunity Zone, an Enterprise Zone, and a HUBZone. The Department of Economic & Tourism Development works with businesses to identify the tax credits they are entitled to for locating to, and growing within, those designated zones. In addition, the County offers access to programs including the Maryland Commercial Property Assessed Clean Energy (MD-PACE) Program, the Maryland Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MD MEP), and the ExportMD Program. Business Overview - Kent County is home to a wide variety of businesses in industries including manufacturing, healthcare, education, maritime, aquaculture, agriculture, culinary and professional services. Several of the major employers are world-wide manufacturers. The region has access to a workforce close to 300,000 within a 30-minute drive and the unemployment rate continues to be below the national average. County businesses benefit from no county personal property tax and a variety of tax credits making it a profitable place to do business.


EXPANSION

OPPORTUNITIES

Chestertown Business Campus - The Chestertown Business Campus is one of the largest economic development projects in many years. The 80-acre site is home to Dixon Valve & Coupling’s new distribution facility, new corporate headquarters, a new manufacturing facility, and a new facility for the growing YMCA, currently under construction. A Gigabit County - Kent County has completed the backbone implementation of a 110-mile fiber optic backbone throughout the county. The county has entered into a public-private partnership with Kent Fiber Optic Systems to provide public institutions with high-speed reliable internet access. KentFOS’ open access network allows Internet Services Providers the ability to offer 1G service to businesses and residences. The primary goal was to enhance the infrastructure needed to support new and existing businesses and organizations in Kent County, particularly with affordable, robust, and high capacity internet access. By taking this action, the county is expanding the competitive capability of local businesses and organizations and providing more opportunities. Data Center Attraction - Kent County led the efforts to pass a state-wide Sales and Use and Personal Property Tax Exemption for Data Center to locate in Maryland. Low land cost, wide open spaces, access to fiber and access to 17 million people within 100 miles make Kent County an ideal place for data centers to locate. Visit www.kentcounty.com/business/resources/datacenterlocations for more information. If you could work from anywhere… you would live here.

MARYLAND: DORCHESTER COUNTY

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work and play. Inspired by our rich maritime history, abundant natural beauty and tranquil waterfront setting, millennials, entrepreneurs and retirees are discovering their authentic Eastern Shore community. Dorchester is ideally situated on the central Atlantic seaboard, allowing overnight truck access to one-third of the U.S. population. New York, Philadelphia and Richmond are within a 200-mile radius. Their close proximity to Baltimore and Washington – less than 90 miles from each city – attracts large and small businesses and entrepreneurs due to cost advantages, business assets, and unrivaled quality of life. From endurance athletes and waterfowl sportsmen to boating enthusiasts and history lovers, Dorchester’s unparalleled natural beauty and signature waterfront attracts people who want to live, work and play in the heart of Chesapeake country. With more than 700 businesses employing 8,800 people, Dorchester has a strong and diversified mix of sectors in the heart of Maryland’s Eastern Shore. Historically, manufacturing, food processing, fishing and agriculture were dominant industries. Today, tourism, business services and fulfillment operations have created new economic and employment opportunities. Coupled with a thriving entrepreneurial community, Dorchester is a county on the move. As a federally designated HUBZone, a Dorchester location provides federal contracting opportunities for qualified small businesses located here. The County has two Maryland State designated Enterprise Zones at the Dorchester Regional Technology and Hurlock Industrial parks. For more information on Dorchester County, please call 410-228-0155 or visit www.choosedorchester.org .

MARYLAND: TALBOT COUNTY

The Heart of the Chesapeake

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Home to industrious, innovative and creative individuals, Dorchester County’s landscape defines not only where – but who they are. Shaped and surrounded by water, their community reflects the character and culture of all who live, work and are lured to this place of incomparable beauty. Discover an authentic Chesapeake lifestyle on Maryland’s Eastern Shore. Dorchester County boasts attractive and affordable housing options from waterfront estates to rural developments and city condos, townhouses and apartments. Local amenities include shops, restaurants, parks, marinas, and public entertainment venues within walking or biking distance. Cambridge – Dorchester’s County seat – is an authentic seaport community on the shores of the Choptank River. The city’s rich maritime heritage and working waterfront are on display along the shores where watermen, sail makers, ship chandlers and boat captains make their living among the museums, restaurants and attractions. Surrounded and shaped by water, is it any wonder the county tag line is “water moves us.” With more than 1,700 miles of shoreline, Dorchester County is a beautiful place to live,

Talbot County has a way of making everyone feel fulfilled with their distinctive attractions, ample business opportunities, and a welcoming workforce. An are known for its entrepreneurial spirit, Talbot County is the place to pursue your passion. Not only is the rural scenery of Talbot County captivating, they’re also close to big-city amenities that bolster your business opportunities. Situated on Maryland’s iconic Eastern Shore, Talbot County lies on the eastern side of the Chesapeake Bay. Delaware and the Atlantic Ocean lie to the east and Virginia’s Eastern Shore to the south. Located less than 90 minutes from Baltimore and Washington, D.C., they’re positioned for sustainable business growth. Annual tourism revenues have grown each year from 2015-2019. Opening a retail shop, restaurant, or any other service operation an attractive business opportunity. As a scenic destination with sparkling shorelines and charming towns, this is the place to do business. X

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Opportunities Await


WE HAVE WHAT YOUR BUSINESS NEEDS TO

SUCCEED ● ●

● ●

Fiber Connectivity

Interstate Access

Business Associations

Designated Growth Areas

19 Million People Within 100 Miles ● ●

Business Resources

Access to Higher Education

● ●

Tax Incentives

5 Sustainable Communities

Educated & Trained Workforce

Access to 3 International Airports & 3 Major Seaports

Contact Us to Find Out How We Can Help Your Business Grow (410) 778-0416

www.kentcounty.com/business


EXPANSION

OPPORTUNITIES

KENTUCKY:

The Right Place to Grow Your Business

K

entucky has a variety of strengths that make it a great place to do business. From low utility costs to unmatched logistical advantages, check out a few reasons the Bluegrass State is the right place to grow your business. ................................................................................... 1. In the Middle of Everything. Within a day’s drive of twothirds of the U.S. population, Kentucky is located at the center of a 34-state distribution area in the eastern U.S. 2. Unmatched Logistics. Kentucky ranks 2nd in the nation in total air cargo shipments. Kentucky business is served by two International airports plus three global shipping hubs. Products manufactured in Kentucky can get anywhere in the world virtually overnight. 3. Effective Networking. Kentucky is served by 20 interstates and major highways, major rail networks, barge traffic on 28 |

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the Ohio and Mississippi rivers, five commercial airports and dozens of regional airports. 4. Cost of Doing Business. Kentucky ranks 1st in the nation for cost of doing business according to CNBC. 5. Electrifying Power Rates. Kentucky has the lowest cost of electricity in the industrial sector among states east of the Mississippi River, and nearly 20% lower than the national average. 6. Training the Workforce of the Future. Kentucky offers workforce recruiting and training assistance. 7. Business-Minded Educational Approach 8. Strong Support for Innovation and Entrepreneurship 9. Unsurpassed Quality of Life. Cost of living is more than 10% lower that the U.S. average. 10. Business-Friendly Attitude For more information, please contact the Kentucky Cabinet for Economic Development at 800-626-2930 or visit www.ced.ky.gov .


KENTUCKY ENTERPRISE INDUSTRIAL PARK

• The Kentucky Enterprise Industrial Park, located in Pikeville, Kentucky, is ready for occupancy • Utilites are in place and all major infrastructure projects are complete • We are ready to support your industry needs with a highly skilled workforce and university and community and technical college training programs to equip your workers with the skills they need • A full array of support services including fire, police, ambulance, public works, hospital, trauma center, hotels, restaurants, retail and more are conveniently located nearby • The City of Pikeville, which includes the Kentucky Enterprise Industrial Park, qualifies as an Opportunity Zone, which is a district where investors recieve significant federal tax breaks and deferrals for investing in a variety of economic development projects

www.whypikeville.com | 243 Main Street | Pikeville, Kentucky 41501 | 606.437.5108


EXPANSION

OPPORTUNITIES

KENTUCKY: PIKEVILLE ...................................................................................

The City of Pikeville, “The City that Moves Mountains” is located in Kentucky’s largest county, Pike County, in the far eastern region. Pikeville was incorporated in 1824 and covers 22 square miles. It is one of the few towns in the eastern region to gain residents since 2000. Pikeville serves as a regional center for health, education, retail and services for Pike County and the surrounding Kentucky, West Virginia and Virginia areas. The Pikeville Cut-Through Project is the second largest earth removal project in United States history. It has been called “the eighth wonder of the world” by the New York Times. Spearheaded by former Pikeville Mayor William C. Hambley, the Cut-Through Project officially began in November 1973 for the purpose of relieving the City of Pikeville of frequent flooding. The project is a unique engineering feat that provides a shining example of cooperation among agencies on federal, state and local levels. The cut-through was completed in four phases spanning 14 years and costing approximately $80 million. It is a marvel that visitors cannot miss. Visit the newly opened Overlook Events Center at Bob Amos Park to view the entire project. Located in the heart of Appalachia, Pikeville, and the vast majority of the city are designated Opportunity Zones. Pikeville is a town of roughly 7,000 people that boasts the University of Pikeville with its associated optometry and osteopathic medical schools, the fastest growing campus of the Big Sandy Community and Technical College, and Pikeville Medical Center, a large regional medical facility that employs roughly 3,000 people. In addition to these institutions, the city is home to the corporate offices of Community Trust Bank and is the 10th largest banking community in the state of Kentucky. Also, the Appalachian Wireless Arena is a 7,000 seat arena located in the heart of the downtown that attracts many nationally touring acts each year. The City of Pikeville believes by supporting local entrepreneurs and preserving its historic environment, it has created a downtown community that hosts a healthy mix of businesses and 30 |

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activities that are crucial for continued economic development and success. The City has developed economic incentives for downtown businesses and property owners that are administered through the Pikeville Main Street Program. The Kentucky Enterprise Industrial Park is ready for development. With 400 acres of land, utilities are in place and all major infrastructure projects are complete. Pikeville is ready to support your industry needs with a large workforce, university and community and technical college training programs to equip your workers with the skills they need, and a full array of support services including fire, police, ambulance, public works, hospital, trauma center, hotels, restaurants, retail, and much more! Pikeville’s tenacity and resilience through the years is a testament to the perseverance of its residents. The earliest settlers braved mountainous terrain and nearly absolute isolation. In recent times, these qualities have served residents well as they braved severe floods and economic vacillations in the coal industry. The City of Pikeville and its residents have met these challenges and surmounted them with creativity, fortitude and stamina, and at times, literally moving mountains. For more information on Pikeville, Kentucky and what it can offer you and your business, visit whypikeville.com.

KENTUCKY: NORTHERN KENTUCKY ...................................................................................

High-Tech Automotive Suppliers Succeed in Northern Kentucky Talent, Access to Customers and Affordability Drive Location Decisions

Northern Kentucky encompasses three counties that are an integral part of the growth and economy in the Cincinnati region. NKY is home to more than 40 leading automotive industry suppliers. Clarios, Robert Bosch Automotive Steering, Mubea and Wabco are just a few of the top tier suppliers that have found success in Northern Kentucky.


Office and Production Facilities Grow in NKY Toyota Boshoku chose NKY for its U.S.-based company headquarters – the central operation that manages more than a dozen seat and interior parts production facilities in North and South America. The premium interior systems supplier and filter manufacturer opened its offices in Erlanger in 2007 and has steadily grown. German manufacturer Mubea has steadily expanded its presence in NKY to more than 1,000 employees since opening in 1982; it is one of the top 10 largest manufacturers in the Cincinnati region by employee count. Globally, Mubea is a leader in the automotive spring industry and focused on light weighting its parts and components to drive fuel efficiency for the OEMs. In NKY, the company produces a variety of springs and tailor rolled products that travel to car production facilities throughout the U.S.

Innovation & Automation Start in NKY Many of the most innovative companies serving the digital industrial world with new technology products and services are also located in NKY. Balluff develops sensors and systems for position measurement, identification, object detection, process media monitoring and a comprehensive portfolio for industrial image processing that help manufacturers ensure quality and efficiency in their operations. Hahn Automation chose Northern Kentucky for its U.S. sales

and service provider operation more than two decades ago. It was established to support the company’s headquarters in Germany. Hahn has grown into a full-service U.S. company that focuses on automated assembly processes for the automotive Industry as well as custom automation for multiple business sectors.

Why Growth Happens in NKY Business leaders cite the talent – dedication, education and training combined with a willingness to learn – as a major asset for NKY. SmartAsset named the Cincinnati region as the #1 city for new college grads in 2021, the third year in the top spot. Gateway Community & Technical College partners with many manufacturers on training programs specific to their needs and is home to the NKY Chapter of the Kentucky Federation for Advanced Manufacturing Education (FAME), preparing the next generation with skills in robotics, welding, maintenance and repair for careers in the automotive industry. Two major international air cargo hubs at Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport and a central location on the 1-75 corridor make NKY a proven location for automotive suppliers and those serving the industry. Northern Kentucky Tri-ED is a nationally recognized economic development company providing marketing, business retention and expansion services for Boone, Campbell and Kenton counties. Visit northernkentuckyusa.com to learn more. X

NORTHERN RTHERN KENTUCKY TUCKY  A PRIME RIM LOCATION TION TO START T AND GROW W A BUSINESS Cincinnati / Northern Kentucky International Airport – Top Cargo Airport* DHL Air Hub Amazon Air Hub Home to More than 40 Automotive Industry Suppliers *Air Cargo World 2020 Air Cargo Excellence (ACE) Awards

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COME GROW WITH US & REAP THE BENEFITS! SWK BIG FOUR + :

TOBACCO, WINTER WHEAT, SOYBEAN, CORN + HEMP & AGRITECH

R U.S. CITIES ECONOMIC

$1.8B

A

$1B

IMPACT

IN AG RECEIPTS

4,700 WORKING IN THE FIELD

#1

TOBACCO

CANADA

#1

IN WHEAT PRODUCTION WITH 3,247,000 BUSHELS

#4

80 MILLION BUSHELS OF GRAIN PRODUCED

SOYBEAN

WINTER WHEAT

IN CORN PRODUCTION WITH 13,957,000 BUSHELS

CORN

IN SOYBEAN PRODUCTION WITH 4,765,000 BUSHELS

Lake $57 MILLION 14 MILLION Superior IN GROSS HEMP PRODUCT SALES

POUNDS OF TOBACCO PRODUCED

Duluth argo WE HAVE THE RAW MATERIALS, THE LABOR, AND THE LAND - COME GROW WITH US VT Lake Huron MINNESOTA Montpelier

FOOD

TA

CHEMICAL

St. Paul

MACHINERY L. Ontario

Minneapolis 28,000 PEOPLEWISCONSIN 3,400 PEOPLE

Falls

OVER

Peoria

Topeka

Frankfort

St. Louis

AS Wichita

MISSOURI

klahoma City

orth

Nashville

Greenville

MISSISSIPPI Jackson

GOLD

DELAWA

VA Richmond Roanoke

Norfolk

Durham

ALABAMA

Raleigh

Asheville NORTH CAROLINA Charlotte Greenville

Wilmington

S. CAROLINA Birmingham

Little Rock

LOUISIANA

Charleston

Memphis

ARKANSAS

Shreveport

Knoxville

TENNESSEE

Fort Smith

Dallas

WV

KENTUCKY

Tulsa

Atlantic Dover

MD

Louisville

Springfield

AHOMA

ENDLESS AGRI-TECH POSSIBILITIESTrenton Philadelphia HCC TECHNOLOGY TRAINING CENTER, MSU Harrisburg NJ MURRAY STATE ENGINEERING Pittsburgh

Washington DC

INDIANA Cincinnati

Kansas City

PENNSYLVANIA

Columbus

Indianapolis

Springfield

110 COMPANIES

Newark ARE IN THIS SECTOR WITHIN A 60 MINUTE DRIVE TIME New Y

ARE IN THIS SECTOR WITHIN A 60 MINUTE DRIVE TIME MICHIGAN

Chicago IOWA ACCESS TO R&D: Cleveland HCC TECHNOLOGY TRAININGDavenport CENTER, VANDERBILTGary SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING & MSU & BREATHITT VETERINARY CENTER ILLINIOS Des Moines OHIO Omaha UK COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Ft. Wayne

ncoln

MA NEW YORK Hartford CT

ARE EMPLOYED IN THIS SECTOR WITHIN Buffalo A 60 MINUTE DRIVE TIME

Lansing Madison Michigan L. ErieOVER 970 Waterloo COMPANIESMilwaukee OVER 80 COMPANIES Detroit

ARE IN FOOD MANUFACTURING WITHIN A 60 MINUTE DRIVE TIME

Conco

Albany 5,700 PEOPLE

ARE EMPLOYED Lake IN THIS SECTOR WITHIN A 60 MINUTE DRIVE TIME

EMPLOYED IN THIS SECTOR WITHIN A 60 MINUTE DRIVE TIME

NH

Atlanta

Columbia

Augusta

Charleston

GEORGIA #COMEGROWWITHUS

Savannah Montgomery South Western Kentucky Economic Development Council

2800 Fort Campbell AlbanyBlvd. | Hopkinsville, Kentucky 42240 270.885.1499 | www.southwesternky.com

A


EXPANSION

OPPORTUNITIES

NEW YORK:

THE STATE OF THE FUTURE

In

New York State, the future is already here – fueled by the talent and the resources that are leading companies and smart, dynamic, innovative new businesses to start here, move here, and thrive here.

............................................................................ At a time when their taxes are at their lowest in decades and their private-sector jobs are at historic highs, they’re investing an additional $150 billion in the nation’s largest infrastructure program, reinforcing New York State’s prime business location. They’re committed to low-cost clean energy to power business and protect the environment. They’re giving students access to free college tuition and

creating innovative workforce development programs that give New Yorkers access to 21st century jobs and give companies the skilled workers they need to succeed. They’re cultivating industry-university partnerships with their top-tier educational institutions to help develop the technologies of tomorrow and to offer opportunities for New York’s college graduates to join their diverse workforce – to stay, grow and continue to innovate here. And that’s all in a state that’s home to unparalleled art, culture and natural beauty, from the Adirondack Mountains to New York City’s museums and Long Island’s world-renowned beaches. Come to New York: the state of the future. For more information, please visit Empire State Development at www. esd.ny.gov or call 212-803-3100.

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EXPANSION

OPPORTUNITIES

NEW YORK: MOHAWK VALLEY

................................................................................

With over $2 billion of projects underway, Upstate New York and the Utica – Rome MSA are buzzing and your opportunity to be a part of the revitalization is now. Like many regions across America, the Utica – Rome MSA area is seeing a resurgence in not just public, but private investment as well.

• Cree | Wolfspeed is building the world’s largest silicon carbide semiconductor manufacturing facility at Marcy Nanocenter at SUNY Polytechnic Institute; • Orgill and Tractor Supply Company built distribution centers for their northeast markets;

a great place to do business New York

to work

Ready access to a trained labor force, loyal workers, transportation, higher education, and financial assistance; incentives with a central location to Buffalo, Rochester, Syracuse, Pittsburgh, and other Northeast U.S. and Canadian markets presents a solid opportunity for business success. Allegany County is within a day’s drive to:

to live

Albany Boston Buffalo Cleveland New York City Philadelphia Pittsburgh Rochester Syracuse Toronto Washington, DC

Hours Drive

0

2

4

6

8

10

There is a well-developed network of local roadways and highways. Interstate 86, State Rte. 19.,and State Rte. 417 are considered excellent. Economic and Demographic Data Source published by Woods & Poole Economics, Inc.

www.alleganycountyny.com

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Contact Craig R. Clark, PE, PhD Executive Director Allegany County IDA Ph 607-968-0214 clarkcr@alleganyco.com

&

51% of the population of the U.S. and Canada or 130 million customers. 62% of all manufacturing in the U.S. and Canada. 59% of the value of all manufacturing shipments in the U.S. and Canada. 55% of the personal income in the U.S. and Canada. 52% of all businesses in the U.S. 49% of all skilled workers in the U.S. Source: NYS Department of Economic Development


• FAA certified UAS Test Site at Griffiss International Airport is changing the game for autonomous beyond-line-of-sight drone testing; and • Innovare Advancement Center is connecting a global ecosystem of world-class scientific, engineering, and entrepreneurial talent from universities, the Air Force Research Laboratory, government, and industry focusing on AI, Machine Learning and Quantum Computing technologies. Further investments are creating vibrant livable downtowns and this region has an exciting future ahead. Local breweries and apartment buildings are taking advantage of large mill and former industrial spaces; historic brownfields are being redeveloped; and our public spaces are being transformed to promote inclusiveness and equity. Residents enjoy higher than average purchasing power, lower than average housing costs, and shorter than average commute times. The Utica – Rome MSA’s central location makes it accessible to a wide range of lifestyle amenities that your client’s employees are looking for. With developed sites and existing facilities in high-tech business parks, downtowns, and rural settings, we have a inventory to fit your need with low costs to develop land, construct buildings or purchase existing structures:

• Herkimer County’s 188 AC Greenfield site adjacent to NYS I-90 is ready for a distribution sized facility or a campus style project. • Parcel #2 at Marcy Nanocenter is a premier shovel ready megasite, utility intensive projects are an ideal fit for the remaining “_125ac_” acreage. • Large Aviation Project? Look no further than Griffiss International Airport’s 210 AC Triangle Parcel. An educated workforce is the foundation of the Utica – Rome MSA’s thriving economy - not only does the region attract talented workers from all over the world, but also offers a robust educational system that can be tailored to specific industry needs. Workforce training has included skilled trades development (electricians, welders, HVAC), aviation maintenance, data analytics, semiconductor manufacturing, and supply chain management. Mohawk Valley EDGE staff has direct access and in-depth understanding of available incentives and our track record of success speaks for itself. Whether it is grants, loans, bonds or tax-exempt financing contact us to learn more about available programs. We work in partnership with New York State to customize incentive proposals targeted to the needs of individual businesses. For more information www.mvedge.org, or contact Nick Bruno, nbruno@mvedge.org - 315-338-0393. X

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EXPANSION

OPPORTUNITIES

KANSAS:

Embracing their Roots to Propel their Future

K

ansas has a strong agricultural tradition that predates its statehood, and agriculture continues to be as significant contributor to the state’s economic well-being. Today, Kansas is a leader in wheat, grain sorghum and beef production. The dairy sector is rapidly expanding, and other sectors of animal agriculture are growing as well.

................................................................................... Specialty food and beverage manufacturers and consumer brands have also embraced Kansas as their home for operations. Kansas is home to hundreds of food and beverage companies including Mars, Cargill, Frito-Lay, Tyson, Hostess and National Beef. Kansas Governor Kelly recently applauded the announcement from Hilmar Cheese Company, Inc. of their plan to build a major production facility in Dodge City. The new $460 million investment is slated to create 247 new full-time jobs with significant plans for further expansion in the future. Hilmar Cheese Company is one of the world’s largest producers of high-quality cheese and whey products. Hilmar is the latest prominent food manufacturer in a long line of prestigious companies within the industry investing in Kansas since 2019, along with Schwan’s Company, Pretzels LLC, Empirical Foods, and others Located in the heart of the U.S., Kansas offers companies logistical advantages that help reach customer faster and more 36 |

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efficiently. With more than 140,000 miles of roads and top-ranked interstates, you can get to the Pacific or the Atlantic in four days or less. Kansas is also served by four Class I and 11 Class III railroads on the 6th largest rail network in the nation. Kansas is home to some of the world’s leading aerospace engineers and manufacturing minds with deep roots in commercial and general aviation and a legacy of defense work that stretches back to WWII. Aviation is an important sector in the City of Salina with unmanned drone research being done at Kansas State University. Other key industries include Advanced Manufacturing, Animal Health, Bioscience, Corporate and Professional Services, and Energy and Natural Resources. For more information, please contact the Kansas Department of Commerce at 785-296-3481 or visit www.kansascommerce.gov .

KANSAS: DODGE CITY/FORD COUNTY

................................................................................... The area of Dodge City and Ford County, Kansas has had a long history of supplying the right needs for industry from the early cattle drives to today’s agricultural, energy, and manufacturing markets. Ford County currently has two of the world’s largest beef processing facilities, National Beef and Cargill Meat Solutions, and four of the state’s major wind farms. It has also been ranked in the top 10 “Least Economically Stressed Counties” in the U.S. by the Associated Press and has become a growing center for the energy and tourism industries. Dodge City and Ford County offer businesses a hardworking labor force, high quality of life in the community, and lower


costs of living. Dodge City and Ford County have quick access to major U.S. routes, a BNSF railway, AMTRAC and commercial air services. The city and county are located within 100 miles of I-70 and less than 150 miles of I-135 and I-35. Southwest Kansas provides air services to two major connecting International airports in the U.S. From beef processing to wind energy, and most recently, the major announcement of the addition of Hilmar Cheese, Dodge City and Ford County has an increasingly diverse industrial base. For more specific information, please contact the Dodge City/ Ford County Development Corporation at 620-227-9501 or email jknight@dodgedev.org .

many more economic opportunities for the area. Quality of life is also a major focus of the Salina EDO, and Robinson says the community’s leadership is working diligently to improve the quality of life especially in the city’s downtown. “The city has a very aggressive plan to improve downtown,” says Robinson. “We currently have about $150 million worth of projects going on and getting ready to start that will change the face of downtown.” X

Salina,KS

KANSAS: SALINA

The Sky is Not the Limit to Salina’s Aviation Footprint

................................................................................... Located in the geographic center of Kansas, the City of Salina is blessed with an array of advantages for launching or expanding a business. With easy access to Interstates 70 and 35 and a regional airport with over 12,000 feet of runway, this community of close to 55,000 residents is an ideal starting point to reach millions of customers throughout the nation – and beyond. The catalyst for the economic growth in Salina County is the Salina Regional Airport, owned and operated by the Salina Airport Authority. Located on the site of the former Schilling Air Force Base, the airport anchors Salina Airport Industrial Center and influences much of the community’s economic activity. “The airport authority is a major employer here,” says Mitch Robinson, Executive Director of the Salina Economic Development Organization. “Approximately 70 percent of our industrial jobs are based in the airport authority area.” As a result, aviation is an important sector in Salina. One of the newest developments underway is in unmanned drone research through Kansas State University. The airport also offers daily flights to Denver and just began daily flights to Chicago as well, opening up

The Salina Regional Airport Authority, located just west of Salina, plays a key role in Salina’s economic growth. It is also home to Kansas State Polytechnic, a major player in aviation. The Salina Regional Airport: • • • •

Boasts a primary 12,300 foot runway Is home to over 100 industrial and aviation businesses Has development ready sites (1-80 acres) available for any need 7 buildings available 8,500 sf to 64,913 sf; 8 hangars available from 4,900 sf to 125,000 sf

Kansas State Polytechnic’s Applied Aviation Research Center (AARC): • Rates 2nd in the nation for Unmanned Aircraft Systems • Flies cutting edge technology and equipment with a fleet of over 30 aircraft • Stands out as a national leader in fixed wing, helicopter and UAS operation and research

D. Mitch Robinson, Executive Director 120 West Ash, Salina, KS 67402-0586 mrobinson@salinaedo.org 785-404-3131

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EXPANSION

OPPORTUNITIES

WISCONSIN:

LEADING THE WAY TO A BETTER WORLD

W

hile Wisconsin’s proximity to fresh water and abundant natural resources fueled the state’s historic industry development, it’s their relentless hard work, passion and original thinking that helped launch globally recognized standards of excellence across a wide range of commercial endeavors. Business success has never been the destination – it’s simply the natural result of the optimism and industriousness of their people.

................................................................................... With a business climate that encourages and rewards production and innovation, and a skilled workforce that continues to meet and exceed industry demands, they’ve become leaders in key industries. Wisconsin’s strong agricultural tradition has evolved and expanded to produce unmatched capabilities across the food and beverage sector. They’re drawing attention for manufacturing strengths in growing markets such as advanced machinery and material sciences. Bio-health discoveries born in their state’s academic institutions including the University of Wisconsin-Madison continues to improve health and enhance quality of life throughout the world and they’ve even invested in centers of excellence in water research and 38 |

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energy technology to answer the challenges of sustainable resource management across the globe. Whatever they do, they do with intent and resolve. That’s what it means to create In Wisconsin. For more information, contact the Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation at 855-469-4249 or visit www.inwisconsin.com .

WISCONSIN: MADISON REGION

...................................................................................

Wisconsin’s Madison Region is Well-Positioned for Recovery Wisconsin’s eight-county Madison Region, consisting of Columbia, Dane, Dodge, Green, Iowa, Jefferson, Rock, and Sauk Counties, is known for their strength in advanced manufacturing, agriculture, food and beverage, bioscience, healthcare, and information communications technology. Just as important to their economy, but often overlooked, is the impact of tourism. According to the Wisconsin Department of Tourism, the tourism industry had a $22.2 billion impact on the state’s economy in 2019. “Tourism is one of Wisconsin’s top industries and destinations like Madison truly offer travelers something for everyone,” said Department of Tourism Acting Secretary Anne Sayers. “We’re grateful to be seeing positive signs of recovery throughout the state and can’t wait for more travelers to enjoy the Madison area as they look to get revenge on missed vacations and reconnect with friends and family while discovering the unexpected.”


Madison’s convention and visitors bureau, Destination Madison, is also looking forward with a plan to support the industry through reopening and a return to pre-pandemic levels of activity. “In 2019 tourism contributed $1.4 billion in visitor spending to the greater Madison area, supporting over 22,000 jobs,” said Ellie Westman Chin, President and CEO of Destination Madison. “Unfortunately, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the tourism impact has declined tremendously. Tourism recovery is economic recovery, and we have an aggressive recovery plan, working in conjunction with our partners and community stakeholders, to revitalize our destination and safely welcome back visitors to support the hospitality industry.”

Echoing those sentiments, Madison Region Economic Partnership (MadREP) President and CEO Jason M. Fields added, “as consumer confidence in travel returns, we expect cautious travelers to seek out destinations within driving distance that offer ample outdoor activities.” The Region is within easy driving distance of upper Midwest population centers like Chicago and Minneapolis and boasts numerous lakes, trails, and state parks, as well as the world-famous bluffs and waterparks of the Wisconsin Dells. “Tourism plays a critical role in Sauk County’s economy and beyond,” explained Romy Snyder, President/CEO of the Wisconsin Dells Visitor and Convention Bureau. “The Wisconsin Dells area accounts for nearly 10% of the tourism spending in the state of Wisconsin; direct visitor spending in Sauk County alone reached over $1.145 billion in 2019. We know 2020 may look a little different, but Sauk County is positioned well to recover in 2021. With the abundance of available outdoor and recreational activities, in an easy drive-to location, visitors can feel safe exploring some of the state’s most unique landscapes while supporting local businesses and the tourism recovery as a whole.” Regional leaders aren’t the only ones declaring the Madison Region is poised for a robust recovery. Moody’s Analytics, the National Association of Realtors and the Brookings Institution have all published rankings and datasets showing southcentral Wisconsin is ready to bounce. X

MADISON REGION RANKINGS

#1 TECH TALENT INFLOW/ OUTFLOW GAINS LINKEDIN, 2020

3

#

#1 TOP

25 BEST BUSINESS CLIMATE (MIDSIZED METROS) Business Facilities, 2020

#1

Most industrially diverse economy in the United States Emsi & Livability, 2018

PROMISING METROS FOR TECH GROWTH

U.S. TECH TALENT MARKETS CBRE, 2019

Brookings & ITIF, 2019

TOP 10

8TH LEADING RESEARCH UNIVERSITY IN THE U.S., 2019

BEST CITIES FOR YOUNG ENTREPRENEURS NerdWallet, 2018

608.571.0420 • info@madisonregion.org • www.madisonregion.org bxjmag.com

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2 0 2 1

NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF

ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

ALABAMA Tuscaloosa County Industrial Dev. Auth

Cullman Economic Development Agency

Dale Greer P.O. Box 1009 Cullman, AL 35056 256-739-1891 daleg@cullmaneda.org www.cullmaneda.org ...................................................................

Sissie Browning, Assistant Director P.O. Box 2667 Tuscaloosa, AL 35403 205-349-1414 info@tcida.com www.tcida.com ...................................................................

ARIZONA

Arizona Regional Economic Develoment

Etowah Economic Alliance

Marilyn Lott 800 Forrest Avenue Suite 220E Gadsden, AL 35901 256-456-9938 mlott@eeaalabama.org www.eeaalabama.org ...................................................................

Mignonne Hollis, Executive Director 750 E. Bartow Drive Suite 16 Sierra Vista, AZ 85635 520-458-6948 hollism@aredf.org www.aredf.org ...................................................................

City of Flagstaff Economic Development

Gadsden Industrial Development Authority

David Hooks, Executive Director 1 Commerce Square Gadsden, AL 35901 256-543-9423 davidhooks@gadsdenida.org www.gadsdenida.org ...................................................................

Pinal Alliance for Economic Growth

Elmore County Economic Development

Cary Cox P.O. Box 117 Wetumka , AL 36092 334-514-5843 cary.cox@elmoreeda.com www.elmoreeda.com ..................................................................

HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology

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Patti King, Executive Mgr. 17235 N. 75th Avenue Suite D-145 Glendale, AZ 85308 520-836-8686 pking@pinalalliance.org www.pinalalliance.org ...................................................................

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James Lee Sillman Executive Director 625 Adams Aveune Camden, AR 71701 870-836-2210 870-836-8899 (f) director@teamcamden.com www.teamcamden.com ...................................................................

City of Siloam Springs

Don Clark Community Development Director P.O. Box 80 Siloam Springs , AR 72761 479-238-0927 dclark@siloamsprings.com whysiloam.com ...................................................................

CALIFORNIA

City of Eastvale

Gina Gibson-Williams Economic Development Manager 12363 Limonite Ave. Suite 910 Eastvale, CA 91752 951-703-4425 ggibson-williams@eastvaleca.gov www.eastvaleca.gov ...................................................................

City of Moreno Valley Economic Development

Mike Lee Economic Development Director 14177 Frederick Street Moreno Valley, CA 92553 951-413-3460 edteam@moval.org www.morenovalleybusiness.com ...................................................................

ARKANSAS Chaffee Crossing

Kristina Keogh 601 Genome Way Huntsville , AL 35806 256-327-9591 kkeogh@hudsonalpha.org www.hudsonalpha.org ...................................................................

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John Saltonstall, AZED Pro Business Retention & Expansion Manager Economic Vitality Division City of Flagstaff 211 W. Aspen Avenue Flagstaff, AZ 86001 Office 928-213-2966 Cell 928-606-9430 jsaltonstall@flagstaffaz.gov www.flagstaffaz.gov ...................................................................

Ouachita Partnership for Economic Development

Ivy Owen, Executive Director 7020 Taylor Avenue Fort Smith, AR 72916 479-452-4554 479-452-4566 (f) property@chaffeecrossing.com www.chaffeecrossing.com ................................................................... bxjmag.com

Greater Irvine Chamber

Linda DiMario 36 Executive Park Suite 100 Irvine, CA 92614 949-502-4124 ldimario@irvinechamber.com www.irvinechamber.com ...................................................................

COLORADO

City of Fountain Economic Development Commission

Kimberly A. Bailey Economic Development/ Urban Renewal Director 116 S. Main Street Fountain, CO 80817 719-322-2056 kbailey@fountaincolorado.org www.fountaincolorado.org ...................................................................

Grand Junction Economic Partnership

Robin Brown, Executive Director 122 N. 6th Street Grand Junction, CO 81501 970--245-4332 robin@gjep.org www.gjep.org ...................................................................

DELAWARE

American Municipal Power, Inc.

Alexis A. Fitzsimmons Director of Economic & Business Development 1111 Schrock Rd. Columbus, OH 43229 614-540-0994 afitzsimmons@amppartners.org www.searchampsites.com ...................................................................

FLORIDA City of Ontario Economic Development

Jennifer McLain Hiramoto Economic Development Director 303 East B Street Ontario, CA 91764 909-395-2295 JHiramoto@ontarioca.gov www.ontariothinksbusiness.com ...................................................................

City of Kissimmee

Belinda O. Kirkegard, Economic Development Director 101 Church Street Kissimmee FL 34741 407-518-2307 BKirkegard@kissimmee.org www.Kissimmee.org ...................................................................


2 0 2 1

City of Sanford

Bob Turk Economic Development Director 300 North Park Ave. Sanford, FL 32771 407-688-5015 bob.turk@sanfordfl.gov www.sanfordfl.gov ...................................................................

NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF

ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

Haines City Economic Development Council, Inc.

Cyndi Jantomaso, President Post Office Box 3845 Haines City, FL 33845-3845 863-422-2525 863-206-0007 cyndi@hainescityedc.com www.hainescityedc.com ...................................................................

City of East Point

Pasco Economic Development Council

Maceo Rogers CEcD 2757 East Point Street East Point, GA 30344 404-270-7057 jmrogers@eastpointcity.org www.eastpointcity.org ...................................................................

Bill Cronin, President & CEO 16506 Pointe Village Drive Suite 101 Lutz, FL 33558 813-926-0827 813-926-0829 (f) bcronin@pascoedc.com pascoedc.com ...................................................................

Forward Forsyth City of St. Cloud

Antranette Forbes Economic Development & Special Projects Manager 1300 9th Street St. Cloud, FL 34769 (407)957-7234 antranette.forbes@stcloud.org www.stcloud.org/926/economic-development ...................................................................

City of Titusville

Lisa Nicholas 555 South Washington Avenue Titusville, FL 32796-3584 321-567-3774 lisa.nicholas@titusville.com www.YEStitusvilleFL.com ...................................................................

Elevate Lake Economic Development

Tracy Garcia CEcD, EcDMP Director 20763 US Highway 27 Groveland, FL 34736 352-343-9647 352-801-7498 (f) tgarcia@lakecountyfl.gov elevatelake.com ...................................................................

Greater St. Petersburg Area Economic Development Corporation

J.P. DuBuque President and CEO 100 2nd Ave N Ste 130 St. Petersburg, FL 33701 727-388-2906 jpdubuque@stpeteedc.com StPeteEDC.com/BurgBiz ...................................................................

Hernando County Office of Economic Development

Valerie M. Pianta Economic Development Director 15800 Flight Path Drive Brooksville, FL 34604 352--540-6400 vpianta@hernandocounty.us www.hernandobusiness.com ...................................................................

Holmes County Development Commission

Joe Rone, Executive Director 106 E Byrd Avenue Bonifay, FL 32425 850-547-6154 jrone@westflorida.coop hcdc1978@gmail.com www.holmescountyedc.com ...................................................................

Indian River Chamber of Commerce

Helene Caseltine Economic Development Director 1216 21st Street Vero Beach, FL 32960 772-567-3491 helenec@indianrivered.com www.indianrivered.com ...................................................................

James McCoy, President & Ceo P.O. Box 1799 Cumming GA 30028 770-887-6461 770-842-1170 jmccoy@focochamber.org www.forwardforsyth.org ...................................................................

Pinellas County Economic Development

Mike Meidel, CEcD, Director 13805 58th Street North, Suite 1-200 Clearwater, FL 33760 727-464-7332 mmeidel@pinellascounty.org www.pced.org ...................................................................

Putnam Development Authority

Terry Schwindler Econmical Devleopment Director 117 Putnam Drive, Eaton, GA 31024 706-816-8099 tschwindler@putnamdevelopmentauthority.com www.putnamdevelopmentauthority.com ...................................................................

Santa Rosa County EDO

Shannon Ogletree, Executive Director 6491 Caroline Street, Suite 4 Milton, FL 32570-4592 850-623-0174 Shannon@santarosa.fl.gov www.santarosaedo.com ...................................................................

ILLINOIS

Champaign County Economic Development Corporation

Tallahassee-Leon County Office of Economic Vitality

Carly McCrory-McKay, Executive Director 1817 S. Neil Street, Suite 100 Champaign, IL 61820 217-359-6261 carly@champaigncountyedc.org www.champaigncountyedc.org ...................................................................

Cristina Paredes, Director, OEV 315 S. Calhoun Street, Suite 450 Tallahassee, FL 32301 850-300-7559 Cparedes@OEVforBusiness.org www.oevforbusiness.org ...................................................................

GEORGIA City of Highland Economic Development

Osceola County

David Rodriguez, Economic Development Manager 3 Courthouse Square, 2nd Floor Kissimmee, FL 34741 407-742-0620 407-742-4202 (f) david.rodriguez@osceola.org www.greaterosceola.org ...................................................................

Mallord Hubbard 1115 Broadway, P.O. Box 218 Highland, IL 62249-0218 618-654-9891 618-654-4768 (f) mhubbard@highlandil.gov www.highlandil.gov ...................................................................

City of College Park

Artie Jones III Director of Economic Development 3667 Main Street College Park, GA 30337 404-305-2052 404-305-2057 (f) artiejones@collegeparkga.com www.collegeparkga.com/ ................................................................... bxjmag.com

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Shelly Herman 120 E. Ryder Street Litchfield, IL 62056 217-324-8146 Sherman@cityoflitchfieldil.com www.litchfieldil-development.com ...................................................................

City of Marshall

Jennifer Bishop Economic Development Director 201 S. Michigan Ave Marshall, IL 62441 217-826-2034 jbishop@marshall-il.com www.marshall-il.com ...................................................................

City of Vandalia

Amber E. Daulbaugh, Director of Economic Development 431 W. Gallatin St. Vandalia, IL 62471 618-283-1152 618-335-9510 (Mobile) vandaliaed@vandaliaillinois.com www.vandaliaillinois.com ...................................................................

Intersect Illinois

Brent Case Senior Vice President Business Development 230 W. Monroe St. Chicago, IL 60606 312-667-6013 brent.case@intersectillinois.org intersectillinois.org ...................................................................

Alliance STL | St. Louis Regional Economic Development

Steven S. Johnson. CEO One Metropolitan Square Suite 1300 St. Louis, MO 63102 314-444-1105 sjohnson@alliancestl.com alliancestl.com ...................................................................

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Coffey County Economic Development

City of Litchfield Ecnomic Development

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NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF

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Village of Arlington Heights Business & Economic Development

Charles Witherington-Perkins Director of Planning & Community Development 33 S. Arlington Heights Arlington Heights, IL 60005 847-368-5220 cperkins@vah.com www.vah.com ...................................................................

INDIANA

Huntington County Economic Development

Mark Wickersham Executive Driector 8 West Market Street Huntington, IN 46750 260-356-5688 mark@hcued.com www.hcued.com ..................................................................

Bobby Skipper, Director 110 S. 6th St., Room #5 Burlington KS 66839 620-364-8780 620-364-3608 bskipper@coffeycountyks.org www.coffeycountyks.org ...................................................................

Dodge City/Ford County Development Corporation

Joann Knight, Executive Director 101 E. Wyatt Earp Blvd. Dodge City, KS 67801 620-227-9501 620-227-2957 (f) jknight@dodgedev.org www.dodgedev.org ...................................................................

KANSAS

bxjmag.com

Wyandotte Economic Development Council

Greg Kindle, President 727 Minnesota Avenue Kansas City, KS 66101 913-371-3198 gkindle@wyedc.org www.wyedc.org ...................................................................

Go Topeka

Molly Howey, CEcD President 719 S Kansas Ave. Suite 100 Topeka, KS 66603 785.231.4707 mhowey@gotopeka.com www.gotopeka.com ...................................................................

Russell County Eco Devo & CVB

Mike Parsons, Director 331 E. Witchita, Russell, KS 67665 785-483-4000 785-324-0126 rced2@russellks.org www.russellcountyks.org ...................................................................

City of Parsons Economic Development

Jim Zaleski Economic Development Director 112 S. 17th Street Parsons, KS 67357 620-421-7030 jzaleski@parsonsks.com www.growparsons.com ...................................................................

Ann Smith-Tate, President CEO 15100 W. 67th Street Suite 202 Shawnee, KS 66217-9344 913-631-6545 asmithtate@shawneekschamber.com www.shawnee-edc.com ...................................................................

KENTUCKY

Miami County Economic Development Auth.

Jim Tidd 1525 W. Hoosier Boulevard Peru, IN 46970 765-689-0159 jtidd@miamicountyeda.com www.miamicountyeda.com ...................................................................

Shawnee Economic Development

Salina Economic Development Organization D. Mitch Robinson, CEcD 120 West Ash Street Salina, KS 67401 785-404-3131 mrobinson@salinaedo.org www.salinaedo.org ...................................................................

City of Pikeville

Jill Fraley Dotson, Executive Economic Development Director 773 Hambley Boulevard Pikeville, KY 41501 606-437-5128 info@whypikeville.com www.whypikeville.com ...................................................................

Northern Kentucky Tri-ED

Kimberly Rossetti VP of Economic Development 300 Buttermilk Pike, Suite 332 Ft. Mitchell, KY 41017 888-874-3365 ksr@NorthernKentuckyUSA.com www.NorthernKentuckyUSA.com ...................................................................

South Western Kentucky EDC

Carter Hendricks, Executive Director 2800 Fort Campbell Blvd. Hopkinsville, KY 42240 270-885-1499 chendricks@southwesternky.com www.southwesternky.com ...................................................................


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NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF

ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

LOUISIANA Louisiana Economic Development

Anya G. Hudnall 1201 N. Third Street Suite 7-210 Baton Rouge, LA 70802 225-342-5396 Anya.hudnal@la.gov www.la.gov ...................................................................

SWLA Economic Development ALLIANCE

George Swift 4310 Ryan Street Lake Charles LA 70605 337-433-3632 gswift@allianceswla.org www.allianceswla.org ...................................................................

St. Mary Parish of Economic Development

Frank Fink, Director 500 Main Street, 5th Floor Courthouse Franklin, LA 70538 337-828-4100 ffink@stmaryparishla.gov www.stmaryparishdevelopmant.com ...................................................................

Carroll County Economic Development

Paige Sunderland, Director 225 N. Center Street, Ste. 101 Westminster, MD 21157 410-386-2070 psunderland@carrollbiz.org www.carrollbiz.org ...................................................................

Cecil County Economic Development

kristin@thinkmoco.com www.thinkmoco.com ...................................................................

Talbot County Economic Development

Jonas Arjes Executive Director 269 State Highway 248 Branson, MO 65616 417-334-4084 jarjes@taneycountypartnership.com www.taneycountypartnership.com ...................................................................

MICHIGAN

Steven Overbay, Director 200 Chesapeake Blvd., Ste 2700 Elkton, MD 21921 410-996-8471 cmoyer@ccgov.org www.ccgov.org ...................................................................

Michigan Economic Development Corporation

Dorchester County Economic Development

The Right Place, Inc.

Susan Banks, Director 104 Tech Park Drive Cambridge, MD 21613 410-228-0155 sbanks@choosedorchester.org www.choosedorchester.org ...................................................................

Taney County Partnership

Cassandra M. Vanhooser, Director 11 S. Harrison Street Easton, MD 21601 410-770-8000 Cvanhooser@talbgov.org www.talbgov.org ...................................................................

NEVADA

Doug Kulper, SVP Business Marketing & Communication Director 300 North Washington Square Lansing, MI 48913 www.michiganadvantage.org ...................................................................

City of Henderson Economic Development

Derek Armstrong, Director City Hall Annex 280 Water Street MSC 512 P.O. Box 95050 Henderson, NV 89009-5050 702-267-1650 702-267-1651 (f) derek.armstrong@cityofhenderson. com www.hendersonnow.com ...................................................................

Andria Romkema 125 Ottawa Avenue, Suite 450 Grand Rapids, MI 49503 616-771-0563 romkemaa@rightplace.org www.Rightplace.org ...................................................................

MINNESOTA

MAINE Kent County Department of Economic & Tourism Development Town of Richmond Community, Economic, & Business Development

Darryl Sterling, Director 26 Gardiner Street Richmond, ME 04357-0159 207-737-4305 x 331 207-737-4306 (f) director@richmondmaine.com www.richmondmaine.com ...................................................................

MARYLAND

Calvert County Economic Development

Kelly Robertson-Slagle, Director 205 Main Street Prince Frederick, MD 20678 410-535-4583 kelly.slagle@calvertcountymd.gov www.ecalvert.com ...................................................................

Jamie L. Williams, CEcD, Director 400 High Street, 3rd Floor Chestertown MD 21620 410-810-2168 jlwilliams@kentgov.org www.kentcounty.com/business ...................................................................

Maryland Department of Commerce

Tom Riford 100 Community Place Crownsville, MD 21032 877-634-6361 www.maryland.gov ...................................................................

Montgomery County Economic Development Kristin O’Keefe 1801 Rockville Pike, Ste. 320 Rockville, MD 20852 240-641-6703

Las Vegas Global Ecnomic Alliance

City of Lakeville Community & Economic Development

Perry Ursem Vice President, Business Retention + Expansion 6720 via Austi Parkway Suite #330 Las Vegas, NV 89119 702-791-0000 www.Ivgea.org ...................................................................

David Olson, Director 20195 Holyoke Avenue Lakeville, MN 55044 952-985-4421 dolson@lakevillemn.gov www.lakevillemn.gov ...................................................................

MISSOURI

Northeastern Nevada Regional Development Authority

Alliance STL | St. Louis Regional Economic Development

Sheldon Mudd, Executive Director 1500 College Pkwy McMullen Hall #103 Elko, NV 89801 775-738-2100 775-738-7978(f) smudd@nnrda.com www.nnrda.com ...................................................................

Steven S. Johnson, CEO One Metropolitan Square Suite 1300 St. Louis, MO 63102 314-444-1105 sjohnson@alliancestl.com alliancestl.com ...................................................................

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NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF

ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

NEW JERSEY Mohawk Valley Edge Gloucester County Department of Economic Development

Tom Bianco, Director 1480 Tanyard Rd., Sewell, NJ 08080 856-384-6930 tbianco@co.gloucester.nj.us www.gloucestercountynj.gov ...................................................................

Nick Bruno 584 Phoenix Drive Rome, NY 13441-4105 315-338-0393 nbruno@mvedge.org www.mvedge.org ..................................................................

NORTH CAROLINA

Stanly County Economic Development Commission

Candice Boyd Lowder, Director 704-986-3682 704-986-3685 (f) clowder@stanlyedc.com 1000 North First Street, Suite 11 Albemarle, NC 28001 www.stanlyedc.com ...................................................................

NORTH DAKOTA

NEW YORK

Ponca City Development Authority

David Myers, Executive Director 102 S. Fifth Street Suite 3 Ponca City, OK 74601 580-765-7070 580-765-7070 (f) dmyers@goponca.com www.goponca.com ...................................................................

PENNSYLVANIA

Beaufort County Economic Development Allegany County Industrial Development Agency

Craig Clark, Executive Director CrossRoads Center 6087 State Route 19N Suite 100 Belmont, NY 14813 585-268-7445 585-268-7473 (f) clarkcr@alleganyco.com www.acida.org ...................................................................

The Agency-Broome County IDA/LDC

Stacey Duncan, Deputy Director of Community & Economic Development Five South College Drive Suite 201 Binghamton, NY 13905 607-584-9000 607-584-9009 (f) smd@theagency-ny.com www.theagency-ny.com ...................................................................

Fulton County Center for Regional Growth

Ronald M. Peters 34 West Fulton Street Gloversville, NY 12078 518-725-7700 ext. 2 ronp@fccrg.org www.fccrg.org ...................................................................

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Martyn Johnson, Director 705 Page Road Washington, NC 27889 252-946-3970 252-946-0849 (f) martyn.johnson@beaufortedc.com www.co.beaufort.nc.us ..................................................................

Bismarck Mandan Chamber EDC

Nathan Schneider CEcD-Vice President 1640 Burnt Boat Dr. Bismark, ND 58503 701-223-5660 nschneider@bmcedc.com www.bismarckmandan.com .................................................................

OHIO Harnett County Economic Development

Debbie Taylor, Marketing & Business Recruitment Manager 200 Alexander Dr. or PO Box 1270 Lillington, NC 27546 910-814-6891 919-814-8298 (f) dhtaylor@harnett.org www.harnettedc.org ...................................................................

North Carolina Global Transpark

John W. Rouse Executive Director 2780 Jetport Road Kinston, NC 28504 252-775-6183 252-522-1765 (f) jwrouse@ncdot.gov www.ncgtp.com .................................................................

bxjmag.com

American Municipal Power, Inc.

Alexis A. Fitzsimmons, Director of Economic & Business Development 1111 Schrock Rd. Columbus, OH 43229 614-540-0994 afitzsimmons@amppartners.org www.searchampsites.com ...................................................................

RHODE ISLAND

City of Cranston

Lawrence DiBoni, Director of Economic Development 869 Park Avenue American Municipal Power, Inc. Cranston, RI 02910 401-780-3166 Alexis A. Fitzsimmons, Director of 401-780-3179 (f) Economic & Business Development ldiboni@cranstonri.org 1111 Schrock Rd. www.cranstonri.com Columbus, OH 43229 ................................................................... 614-540-0994 City of Warwick afitzsimmons@amppartners.org Department of Tourism, www.searchampsites.com Culture, and Development ................................................................... Elizabeth J. Dunton, Acting Director 3275 Pos t Road OKLAHOMA Warwick, RI 2886 401-921-7711 401-732-7662 elizabeth.j.dunton@warwickri.com movetowarwickri.com Bartlesville Development ..................................................................

Authority

Jared Patton, Vice President 201 SW Keeler Bartlesville, OK 74003 918-337-8086 918-337-0216 (f) jpatton@bdaok.org www.bdaok.org ...................................................................

Quonset Development Corporation

Steven J. King, Managing Director 95 Cripe Street North Kingstown, RI 2852 401-295-0044 sking@quonset.com www.quonset.com ...................................................................


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SOUTH CAROLINA

Lexington County Economic Development

Sarah J. Johnson Department Director 212 South Lake Drive Lexington, SC 29072 803-785-6818 sjjohnson@lex-co.com www.LexingtonCountyUSA.com ...................................................................

TENNESSEE Blount Partnership

Bryan Daniels CEcD, CCE, IOM President and CEO 201 S. Washington Street St. Maryville, TN 37804 865-983-2247 865-984-1386 bdaniels@blountpartnership.com www.blountchamber.com ...................................................................

Bristol Tennessee Essential Services

April Eads Business Development Manager 2470 Volunteer Parkway Bristol, TN 37620 423-793-5532 423-793-5545 (f) aeads@btes.net www.btes.net/index.php/economic-development ...................................................................

City of Lebanon

Sarah Haston Economic Development Director 200 North Castle Heights Ave. Lebanon, TN 37087 615-443-2839 EXT. 2120 Sarah.Haston@lebanontn.org www.lebanontn.org ...................................................................

NETWORKS – Sullivan Partnership

Clay Walker PO Box 747 Blountville, TN 37617 423-279-7681 cwalker@networkstn.com www.networkstn.com ...................................................................

NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF

ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

TEXAS

Big Spring Economic Development Corporation

Mark Willis 215 W. 3rd Street Big Spring, TX 79720 432-264-6032 markwillis@bigspringtx.com www.bigspringtx.com ...................................................................

Odessa Economic Development Corporation

Wesley Burnett 700 N. Grant Ave. Odessa, TX 79761 432-333-7880 wburnett@odessaecodev.com www.odessatx.com ...................................................................

City of Leander

Evan Milliorn Economic Development Director 201 N Brushy Leander, TX 78641 512-528-2852 emilliorn@leandertx.gov www.leanderbusiness.com ...................................................................

Gainesville Economic Development Corp

Audrey Schroyer 311 S. Weaver Street Gainsville, TX 76240 940-665-5241 aschroyer@cogtx.org www.gainesvilleedc.com ...................................................................

Cameron Industrial Foundation

Ginger Watkins, Executive Director 102 E. First Street, Suite A Cameron, TX 76520 254-697-4970 254-482-1119 (c) gwatkins@cameronindustrialfoundation.com www.cameronindustrialfoundation.com ...................................................................

Cedar Hill Economic Development

Kim M. Buttram, CEcD 285 Uptown Boulevard, Bldg. 100 Cedar Hill, TX 75104 972-291-5132 chedc@cedarhilltx.com www.cedarhilledc.com ...................................................................

City Development Corporation of El Campo

Carolyn Gibson Executive Director 707 Fahrenthold El Campo, TX 77437 979-543-6727 979-320-7727 cell cgibson@elcampoeco.org www.elcampoeco.org ...................................................................

City of Fort Worth

Robert Sturns, Director 1150 S. Freeway Fort Worth, TX 76104 817-392-2663 Robert.Sturns@fortworthtexas.gov ...................................................................

Conroe Economic Development Council

Danielle Scheiner, Executive Director 505 West Davis Street Conroe, TX 77301 USA 936-538-7118 scheiner@conroeedc.org www.conroeedc.org ...................................................................

Jacksboro Economic Development Corporation

DeSoto Economic Development

Lynda Pack Executive Director P.O. Box 610 Jacksboro, TX 76458 940-567-3151 lyndapack@jacksboroedc.com www.jacksboroedc.com ..................................................................

LCRA

Olivia Varela, President & CEO P.O. Box 2682 Laredo, TX 78044 956-722-0563 ovarela@laredoedc.org www.laredoedc.org ...................................................................

Joe Newman, CEO 211 E. Pleasant Run Road DeSoto, TX 75115 Ph: 972-230-9611 jnewman@dedc.org www.dedc.org ...................................................................

Laredo Economic Development

Karen Dickson Economic Development Manager 3700 Lake Austin Blvd. Austin, TX 78703 512-578-3291 karen.dickson@lcra.org www.lcra.org/economic-development/pages/default.aspx ...................................................................

Mansfield Economic Development Corporation

301 S. Main Street Mansfield, TX 76063 817-728-3652 www.mansfield-texas.com ...................................................................

McKinney Economic Development Corporation

Marble Falls EDC

Peter Tokar III, President/CEO 5900 S. Lake Forest Drive McKinney, TX 75070 972-435-6953 ptokar@mckinneyedc.com www.uniquemckinney.com ................................................................... bxjmag.com

Christian Fletcher 801 Fourth Street Marble Falls, TX 78654 830-798-7079 cfletcher@marblefallseconomy.com www.marblefallseconomy.com ................................................................... |

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NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF

ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

WEST VIRGINIA Mount Pleasant EDC

Nathan Tafoya, Executive Director 1604 N. Jefferson Ave. Mount Pleasant, TX 75455 903-572-6602 nathan@mpedc.org www.mpedc.org ...................................................................

New Braunfels EDC

Chester Jenke 390 S. Seguin Avenue New Braunfels, TX 78130 830-608-2811 holly@innewbraunfels.com www.newbraunfelsedc.com ...................................................................

Pflugerville Community Development

Veronica Ramirez 3801 Helios Way Suite 130 Pflugerville, TX 78660 512-990-3725 veronicar@pfdevelopment.com www.pfevelopment.com ..................................................................

Whitesboro Economic Development Corp.

Lynda Anderson Director P.O. Box 340 or 111 W. Main Whitesboro, TX 76273 930-564-3311 landerson@whitesborotexas.com www.whitesborotexas.com ...................................................................

UTAH

Michael Fox, Executive Director 1906 West 5th Plainview, TX 79072 806-293-8536 michael.fox@plainviewedc.org www.plainviewedc.org ...................................................................

TexAmericas Center

Ruth Jackson Customer Eng. Specialist 107 Chapel Lane New Boston, TX 75570 903-223-9841 ruth.jackson@texamericascenter. com www.texamericascenter.com ...................................................................

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Traci Blido Economic Development Director 122 E. Main St. Suite 202 Bedford, VA 24523 540-587-5670 540-586-0406 (f) tblido@bedfordcountyva.gov www.bedfordeconomicdevelopment.com ...................................................................

County of Gloucester Eagle Mountain Economic Development

Aaron Sanborn, City Administrator 1650 E. Stagecoach Run Eagle Mountain, UT 84005 801-789-6621 asanborn@emcity.org www.eaglemountaincity.com ...................................................................

Sherry A. Spring Director of Economic Development 6489 Main Street Gloucester, VA 23061 804-693-1414 sspring@gloucesterva.info www.gloucesterva.info ..................................................................

WASHINGTON

VIRGINA City of Lakewood Economic Development Alexandria Economic Development Partnership

Plainview Economic Development Corporation

Bedford County Office of Economic Development

Adrianne Griffith Marketing & Communications 625 North Washington St. Suite 400 Alexandria, VA 22314 703-739-3820 730-739-1384 (f) griffith@alexecon.org www.growALX.com ...................................................................

Arlington Economic Development

Telly Tucker, AED Director 1100 N Glebe Rd Suite 1500 Arlington, VA 22201 703-228-0808 703-228-0805 (f) ttucker@arlingtonva.us www.arlingtoneconomicdevelopment.com ...................................................................

bxjmag.com

Becky Newton, Manager 6000 Main Street SW Lakewood, WA 98499 877-421-9126 bnewton@cityoflakewood.us www.buildyourbetterhere.com ...................................................................

American Municipal Power, Inc.

Alexis A. Fitzsimmons, Director of Economic & Business Development 1111 Schrock Rd. Columbus, OH 43229 614-540-0994 afitzsimmons@amppartners.org www.searchampsites.com ...................................................................

Mingo County Redevelopment Authority

Leasha Johnson, Executive Director 1657 East Fourth Avenue Williamson, WV 25661 304-235-0042 304-235-0043 (f) ljohnson.mcra@suddenlinkmail.com www.developmingo.com ...................................................................

WISCONSIN

Madison Region Economic Partnership

Kathy Collins, VP Economic Development 455 Science Drive, Suite 160 Madison, WI 53711 608-571-0407 kcollins@madisonregion.org www.madisonregion.org ...................................................................

New North, Inc City of Maple Valley

Tim Morgan Economic Development Manager P.O. Box 320 Maple Valley, WA 98038 425-413-8800 tim.morgan@maplevalleywa.gov www.maplevalleywa.gov ..................................................................

Try-City Development Council

Carl Adrian, President & CEO 7130 W. Grandridge Blvd #A Kennewich, WA 99336 509-735-1000 cadrian@tridec.org www.tridec.org ..................................................................

Barb LaMue, President & CEO 2740 W. Mason Street Green Bay, WI 54303 920-676-1960 barb.lamue@thenewnorth.com www.thenewnorth.com ...................................................................

Portage County Business Council, Inc. PCB

Todd Kuckkahn, Executive Director 5501 Vern Holmes Drive Stevens Point, WI 54482 715-344-1940 715-344-1940 (f) tkuckkah@portagecountybiz.com www.portagecountyconnects.com ...................................................................


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NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF

ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

WYOMING City of Brandon

City of Guelph

Middlesex County

City of Mississauga Economic Development

County of Elgin

Vaughan Economic and Cultural Development

Sandy Trudel Director of Eocnomic Development Main Floor, 410 9th Street Brandon, Manitoba, Canada R7A 6A2 204-729-2131 s.trudel@brandon.ca www.economicdevelopmentbrandon.com ...................................................................

Cheyenne LEADS

Betsey Hale, Chief Executive Officer One Depot Square 121 W. 15th St. Suite 304 Cheyenne, WY 82001 307-638-6000 betseyh@cheyenneleads.org cheyenneleads.org ...................................................................

CANADA

Town of Ajax

Bonnie Brown Mississauga City Hall 300 City Centre Drive, 3rd Floor Mississauga, ON L5B 3C1 Canada 800-456-2181 905-896-5931 bonnie.brown@mississauga.ca www.TheFuturelsUnlimited.ca ...................................................................

Don Terry Manager, Economic Development & Tourism 65 Harwood Avenue South Ajax, Ontario, Canada L1S 2H9 905-619-2529 ext. 3252 don.terry@ajax.ca www.ajaxfirstforbusiness.com ...................................................................

Cara A. Finn, BBA, M. Ad.Ed. Director of Economic Development 399 Ridout St. North London, ON N6A 2P1 519-434-7321 cfinn@middlesex.ca www.investinmiddlesex.ca ...................................................................

Christine Chapman 1 Carden Street Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1H 3A1 519--822-1260 ext. 2823 Christine.chapman@guelph.ca www.guelph.ca/business ...................................................................

Dennis Cutajar Vaughan City Hall, Level 200 2141 Major Mackenzie Drive Vaughan, Ontario, Canada L6A 1T1 905-832-8526 ext. 8274 dennis.cutajar@vaughan.ca www.vaughan.ca ...................................................................

Alan Smith, General Manager, Economic Development 450 Sunset Drive St. Thomas, Ontario, Canada N5R 5V1 519-631-1460 ext. 137 asmith@elgin.ca www.progressivebynature.com ...................................................................

ADVERTISER & EDIT INDEX Advertiser

AD Edit

ALABAMA

City of Ontario

IFC

17

22 22 19 18 21 20

Allegany County Mohawk Valley

NORTH CAROLINA

Piedmont Triad International Airport

KANSAS

Dodge City/Ford County Salina

37 37

36 37

TENNESSEE Blount County

31 29 32

30 30

25 BC 27 3 1

23 26 24 26

34 35

34

IBC 48

WISCONSIN

KENTUCKY

Northern Kentucky Pikeville South Western Kentucky

17

Cecil County Dorchester County Kent County Port of Baltimore Talbot County

NEW YORK

FLORIDA

Indian River County Santa Rosa County Titusville

AD Edit

MARYLAND

HudsonAlpha Institute For Biotechnology

CALIFORNIA

Advertiser

Madison Region

39

38

8

9

CANADA (ONTARIO) Middlesex County

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