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2021 NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

March/April 2021 | bxjmag.com

AIRPORT RECOVERY

INTERMODAL EXPEDIENCY

LOGISTICS QUICKER & MORE FOCUSED OPPORTUNITY ZONES & Post-COVID-19 Economic Recovery

EXPANSION OPPORTUNITIES TEXAS • TENNESSEE


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Learn more about the advantages of locating your bioscience company to the HudsonAlpha campus by scheduling a visit to Huntsville – a top 10 tech town, visit hudsonalpha.org/innovate or call our Economic Development team at 256.327.9591.


TABLE OF

CONTENTS

MARCH/APRIL 2021

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FEATURES INDUSTRY OUTLOOK: Opportunity Zones and Post-COVID-19 Economic Recovery The Opportunity Zone (OZ) tax incentive can play an important role as the U.S. economy emerges from the COVID-19 pandemic. By Mary Baker Burke, Government Affairs Counselor, K & L Gates LLP

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Alan Reyes-Guerra areyes@bxjmag.com 205-862-5175

EDITORIAL CONTRIBUTORS David Hodes

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INNOVATION AND STRATEGIES: Airports signaling there’s a recovery on the horizon The pandemic has caused historic financial losses—but there is a silver lining emerging, and new ideas being explored By David Hodes

Mary Baker Burke, Government Affairs Counselor, K & L Gates LLP CREATIVE DIRECTOR Clint Cabiness clint@dialedinmediagroup.com 205-613-5910 EDITORIAL OFFICE King Publishing, Inc.

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INDUSTRY INSIGHT: Logistics getting on a quicker, more focused track The business of getting product to the consumer is applying a dizzying array of big data analytics for better flexibility By David Hodes

1000 Stafford Court Birmingham, Alabama 35242 Tel: 205-862-5175 ONLINE MEDIA ASSISTANT Sonia Buchanan SUBSCRIPTION CHANGES & REQUESTS 205-862-5175 or

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ECONOMIC SPOTLIGHT: More coordinated focus on value and expediency of intermodal operations Rail service, truck service and sea and inland ports closing ranks to deliver what today’s consumer needs By David Hodes

EXPANSION O P P O R T U N I T I E S 24 TEXAS: Texas Enters 2021 as World’s 9TH Largest Economy by GDP

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King Publishing, Inc., 1000 Stafford Court, Birmingham, AL 35242; www.bxjmag.com. Advertising rates are furnished upon request. Subscriptions are free to those who qualify. Non-qualified subscriptions are $69 in the U.S.; $89 in Canada and Mexico; elsewhere outside the U.S. is $99 for 10 issues. Back issue rate is $6 when available. Payment must accompany order. The views expressed in all articles and advertisements appearing in the Business Xpansion Journal magazine are solely those of the author and advertiser, respectively. © Copyright 2021, King Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. No partof this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. POSTMASTER: Send change of address notification to Business Xpansion Journal, 1000 Stafford Court, Birmingham, AL 35242. Subscribers can make address changes by calling 205-862-5175 or by e-mail at www.bxjmag.com.

33 TENNESSEE: Business Starts Here

1000 Stafford Court, BIRMINGHAM, AL 35242

36 2021 National Directory of Economic Developers

TEL: 205-862-5175 2001

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Printed in the U.S.A.


$ INDUSTRY OUTLOOK

OPPORTUNITY ZONES

Opportunity Zones and Post-COVID-19 Economic Recovery BY: M ARY B AK ER BU R KE, Go v e r n m ent A ffairs Co u n s e l o r, K & L G ates LLP

This publication is for informational purposes and does not contain or convey legal advice. The information herein should not be used or relied upon in regard to any particular facts or circumstances without first consulting a lawyer. Any views expressed herein are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the law firm’s clients.

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he Opportunity Zone (OZ) tax incentive can play an important role as the U.S. economy emerges from the COVID-19 pandemic. Although the current focus of COVID-19 relief is largely on legislative action to give the economy a boost, OZ is an existing mechanism that the private sector can utilize. The OZ incentive can be an especially nice fit for investors with a focus on impact investing. .................................................................................................. Enacted as part of tax reform in 2017, OZ incentivizes private investment in distressed census tracts that have been designated as opportunity zones. Individual and business investors with capital gains can receive significant tax benefits by investing in Qualified Opportunity Funds (QOF) that invest in Qualified Opportunity Zone Businesses (QOZB). Taxes on capital gains invested in a QOF can be deferred until 2026 and enjoy a 10 percent increase in basis if the investment is made by December 31, 2021. If held at least 10 years, gains on the investment in the QOF can be completely free from federal income taxation, no matter how large the gain. Almost any type of active, for-profit business can potentially qualify to be a QOZB. This can include operating businesses like retail shops, restaurants, grocery stores, and manufacturing, or real estate projects including low income and affordable housing or commercial space. The incentive works across the gamut of industry sectors, including energy, farming, education, high technology, and start-ups.


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Contact Us to Find Out How We Can Help Your Business Grow (410) 778-0416

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$ INDUSTRY OUTLOOK

OPPORTUNITY ZONES

As with any tax benefit there are rules to qualify as an OZ investment. Following is a brief overview of some of the general requirements. IRS regulations provide several significant exceptions and deviations that offer considerable flexibility in meeting OZ standards. In general, investors have 180 days from the date of the gain to invest in a QOF. The QOF must invest at least 90 percent of its assets in a QOZB or face an IRS penalty. In general, the OZ property or business must be located in and operating out of a designated zone. Tangible property must be acquired after December 31, 2017 and be either original use or substantially improved. For an operating business, at least 50 percent of gross revenues must be derived from the active conduct of the business in the OZ, at least 40 percent of intangible assets owned by the business must be used in the OZ, and less than 5 percent of the QOZB’s assets can be held in non-qualified financial property, including cash and certain other financial products. A written working capital plan can operate as a safe harbor to allow additional cash holdings while a project is under construction.

Although regulations have been finalized, legislative proposals are expected from the Biden administration and Congress to require information reporting to better track OZ investments and their outcomes. This is in response to concerns about the transparency of OZ investments and whether they are being directed to appropriate census tracts. COVID-19 recovery and the focus on economic justice make OZ investments a very timely and apt part of a capital stack. OZ can be combined with other federal, state, local, and tribal incentives, so as Congress considers a post-pandemic economic stimulus plan featuring a wide array of infrastructure priorities, OZ could be a nice fit with incentives offered in that package. Investments can be made into a QOF through the end of 2026. Although a minimum 10-year hold is required to receive the tax-free treatment of gains on investments, final regulations allow QOF investments to be held as late as 2047. The old saying that there is an exception for every rule seems tailor-made for the OZ incentive. If you are interested in whether OZ is a good fit for your project or business plan, seek good counsel and explore the opportunities! X

S I D E B A R

Kent County, Maryland Kent County is a scenic peninsula on Maryland’s Upper Eastern Shore of the Chesapeake Bay, ideally situated less than a two-hour drive from Philadelphia, Washington D.C., Annapolis, Dover and Northern Virginia. It is home to two designated Main Streets, an Arts & Entertainment District, historic Washington College, and one of the largest marina communities in Maryland. Kent County is Open for Business Kent - County is actively providing incentives and workforce development tools to help businesses grow. The County is developing broadband infrastructure and has implemented a 110-mile fiber optic broadband network for high-speed gigabit connectivity. Portions of the County are located within Commerce Zones, an Opportunity Zone, an Enterprise Zone, and a HUBZone. The Department of Economic & Tourism Development works with businesses to identify the tax credits they are entitled to for locating to, and growing within, those designated zones. In addition, the County offers access to programs including the Maryland Commercial Property Assessed Clean Energy (MD-PACE) Program, the Maryland Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MD MEP), and the ExportMD Program. Business Overview - Kent County is home to a wide variety of businesses in industries including manufacturing, healthcare, education, maritime, aquaculture, agriculture, culinary and professional services. Several of the major employers are world-wide manufacturers. The region has access to a workforce close to 300,000 within a 30-minute drive and the unemployment rate continues to be below the national average. County businesses benefit from no county personal property tax and a 6 |

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variety of tax credits making it a profitable place to do business. Chestertown Business Campus - The Chestertown Business Campus is one of the largest economic development projects in many years. The 80-acre site is home to Dixon Valve & Coupling’s new distribution facility, new corporate headquarters, a new manufacturing facility, and a new facility for the growing YMCA, currently under construction. A Gigabit County - Kent County has completed the backbone implementation of a 110-mile fiber optic backbone throughout the county. The county has entered into a public-private partnership with Kent Fiber Optic Systems to provide public institutions with high-speed reliable internet access. KentFOS’ open access network allows Internet Services Providers the ability to offer 1G service to businesses and residences. The primary goal was to enhance the infrastructure needed to support new and existing businesses and organizations in Kent County, particularly with affordable, robust, and high capacity internet access. By taking this action, the county is expanding the competitive capability of local businesses and organizations and providing more opportunities. Data Center Attraction - Kent County led the efforts to pass a state-wide Sales and Use and Personal Property Tax Exemption for Data Center to locate in Maryland. Low land cost, wide open spaces, access to fiber and access to 17 million people within 100 miles make Kent County an ideal place for data centers to locate. Visit www.kentcounty.com/business/resources/datacenterlocations for more information. If you could work from anywhere… you would live here.


Indian River County – Vero Beach, Sebastian, Fellsmere - strikes a perfect balance between business and pleasure. Those who live, work or visit the area find that the local communities are safe and loaded with ecological, cultural, educational and technological amenities. Many corporate-level executives have located their companies to the area because of the executive’s positive vacation experience, or perhaps they own a winter home on Vero’s barrier island. Located on Florida’s east coast, midway between West Palm Beach and Cape Canaveral, Indian River County is within three hours of over 17 million consumers, or 90% of Florida’s population. It has easy access to markets but is far from urban sprawl, traffic and congestion. Visitors from other parts of Florida are amazed, and pleasantly surprised, at the county’s lack of traffic. The area is rich in history and natural resources, with 26 miles of unspoiled beaches and scenic lakes, plus some of the best bass fishing available in Blue Cypress Lake. It is also the center of the world-famous Indian River Citrus District. Indian River County is a cost-competitive location for new or expanding businesses. It has hundreds of acres of low-cost land available for development, much of it located near I-95, a major north-south transportation route along the east coast. The county offers competitive property tax rates, and Florida has no state income tax.

The Opportunity Zone initiative offers investors an even greater reason to consider Indian River County, FL. All properties west of I-95 in Indian River County are designated as an Opportunity Zone and zoned for industrial use, including two shovel-ready industrial parks. State and local incentives are also available to relocating and expanding companies, including property tax abatement, tax refunds, and job training grants. An available and trainable workforce of approximately 638,000 within an hour’s drive time adds to the county’s appeal as a desirable location. Indian River State College (IRSC) has five campuses located throughout the region, offering 2-year and 4-year degrees as well as several industrial and technical certifications. IRSC is very successful in securing training grants for local employers. They can develop specially-designed training programs in a matter of weeks rather than months. Because location is central to success, Indian River County isn’t just where you want to be – it’s central to where your business ought to be. It has the perfect blend of everything the Sunshine State has to offer. For more information on locating your company to Indian River County, Florida, contact Helene Caseltine, Economic Development Director with the Indian River Chamber of Commerce, at 772-567-3491 or helenec@indianrivered.com. Or, visit their website at www.indianrivered.com.

INDIAN RIVER COUNTY IS EMERGING AS THE FLORIDA HUB, A LOCATION THAT’S SEAMLESSLY BLENDED THE BEST OF EVERYTHING THAT FLORIDA HAS TO OFFER

Because location is central to success •

Within 3 hours of 90% of Florida’s population

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Skilled pool of available workers

Vibrant cultural mix including Florida’s largest teaching museum

North-south and east-west transportation connections

Sebastian

Indian River County Vero Beach West Palm Beach

Miami

Central to where your business needs to be. Visit: IndianRiverED.com Call: 772.567.3491 or email: helenec@indianrivered.com

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S I D E B A R

Indian River County, Florida – Central to Where Your Business Needs to Be


INNOVATIONS & STRATEGIES

AIRPORT DEVELOPMENT

Airports signaling there’s a recovery on the horizon B Y: DAV ID HO D ES

The pandemic has caused historic financial losses—but there is a silver lining emerging, and new ideas being explored

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irport flight and passenger activity hit the pause button in early 2020 due to the pandemic. Many are still in a holding pattern in terms of development. .................................................................................................... But that hasn’t stopped all airport development. In fact, it has helped accelerate some projects. Many projects that were planned for 2020 were either cancelled or delayed because of the pandemic, according to a survey of members by the Airport Consultants Council, an airline industry trade group. Over 90 percent of airport construction companies have experienced delays or cancellations of projects, with 21 percent of companies experiencing major delays. But some projects were able to continue. For example, on October 27, 2020, Salt Lake City International Airport (SLC) completed phase 1 of a $4.1 billion redevelopment project that features operational and other upgrades throughout the airport, including a new 908,754-square-foot terminal. Demolition to prepare for phase 2 at the SLC airport began this February, with completion expected by late 2024. The second phase may actually get accelerated due to lower passenger traffic through the airport, according to reports from airport officials. The project hit a number of delays over the course of the major development that had been planned since the late 1990s, with a few snags along the way, including 9-11 and the 2008 recession when some airlines using the airport declared bankruptcy. Construction began with a ground-breaking in 2014. The first phase included building


industry level, the focus is on a new parking structure, one survival, not adding capacity and central terminal, and the infrastructure.” west end of Concourse A. In May, 2016, the west end of Concourse B was built. Help is on the radar Initially the plan was to In a letter to congressional leaders use some of the older facilon July 9, 2020, Todd Hauptli, ities—those older concourse president and CEO of American gates—after building a Association of Airport Executives bridge that connected the (AAAE), and Kevin Burke, president main terminal to those old and CEO of Airports Council concourses. International-North America Artist rendering of passengers in terminal plaza at Salt “When the pandemic hit (ACI-NA), pleaded for help. and our numbers dropped, we Lake City International Airport “Passenger levels declined by as recognized that we wouldn’t much as 95 percent system-wide need those gates,” Nancy for an extended time and are still SFO officials chose to move up Volmer, director of communications and at only 20 to 25 percent of previous levels,” this construction project because of marketing for SLC, says. “So a decision Hauptli and Burke wrote to Congress. the reduced flight activity due to the was made to shut down all of the old “Billions of dollars in revenue that airports pandemic, coordinating the construction facilities once we opened Concourse B expected to be generated by travelers have planning with the scheduling of flights by in late October, and demolish all of the evaporated. Billions more in anticipated some of the airlines serviced at SFO. old facilities rather than do it in a phased passenger facility charge collections have approach. That is what is helping us to also disappeared, depriving airports of a Still in wait-and-see mode speed up the construction timeline for key source of revenue to support bond But that sort of good news was more the phase 2. It is expected to save us up to payments. Airports hold nearly $100 billion exception than the rule last year. $300 million.” in collective debt, with some $7 billion Look at what has happened globally: In mid-February last year, during in airport bond principal and interest Before the pandemic, there were 128,000 the ski season, they were seeing 30,000 payments due in 2020.” worldwide flights every day on 1,478 passengers a day come through the Funding from the March, 2020, $2.2 commercial airlines carrying 12.5 million airport, Volmer says. At the lowest point trillion Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and passengers and $18 billion of goods, in the pandemic, around September, Economic Security Act (CARES), they according to the International Air Transport they were down to just 1,500 passengers wrote, has provided a critical lifeline to Association (IATA). The commercial airline coming through. airports in the near-term that will protect industry supported 8.8 million jobs in She says that it was really to their jobs, enhance cleaning and sanitization North America alone. benefit to open the airport with fewer efforts, ensure that debt payments can be But in 2020, there was a 61 percent passengers in 2020. “You get more of a made and help keep construction projects drop in worldwide aviation revenue chance to see passengers interact with moving forward. “Unfortunately, the relief (which includes a 46 percent drop in North the new facility and then make changes, provided by CARES Act funding is only America alone), and a 66 percent drop in or add more signage for example, and see temporary given the depths of the crisis.” passengers, according to the IATA. what we needed to tweak to make the “Airports need to do more to increase passenger experience more pleasant,” she Safety and the internet of the operating capacity of existing says. things infrastructure and governments need SLC will have their non-stop flights to As the pandemic continues, going forward to encourage and facilitate timely and Paris and Amsterdam coming back on the it’s all about passenger—and worker— cost-effective expansion of congested schedule for this spring, Volmer says. safety in airports. airports and airspace,” the IATA concluded. Another example of a silver lining One example of how to make airports The pandemic has caused a in the pandemic cloud is San Francisco cleaner and safer comes from the hit-and-miss attempt regarding future International Airport (SFO), which is Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International planning. “On a case-by-case basis, some continuing to accelerate its runway Airport. airlines and/or airports have continued improvement projects. Dr. Kofi Smith, president and CEO of with ongoing projects, while others The airport closed one main runway the Atlanta Airlines Terminal Company have been scaled back or suspended,” for four months beginning in January to (AATC) has responsibility for the central Perry Flint, head of USA corporate complete upgrades originally scheduled passenger terminal complex of the airport. communications for the IATA, wrote in to be worked on in 2022. All work is now Smith has integrated big data, cloud an email response to an inquiry by BXJ. scheduled to be completed by Labor Day technology, mobile technology, artificial “But aviation is in its gravest crisis. At the 2021. intelligence and collaborative smart bxjmag.com

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INNOVATIONS &

S I D E B A R

STRATEGIES

AIRPORT DEVELOPMENT

City of Warwick, RI, is home to T.F. GREEN AIRPORT Located in the heart of southern New England, the City of Warwick, RI, is home to T.F. Green Airport and the InterLink intermodal commuter rail station, making their community very well positioned to offer unique development opportunities for businesses looking to capitalize on our proximity to air, rail, and Interstates 95 and 295. Ease of travel is important for employees and business clients alike, and T.F. Green offers that and more. The InterLink is connected to the terminal via a skywalk, providing expedient and efficient access to rental car companies, the MBTA commuter rail, and public bus transportation. In fact, T.F. Green’s reputation for convenience, short lines, and affordable parking has recently earned it honors in “best of” rankings in Travel + Leisure, Condé Nast Traveler and USA Today readers’ choice awards. There’s also legislation pending before the state General Assembly that would change the name to “Rhode Island T.F. Green International Airport,” which would raise the airport’s brand awareness further. The City is capitalizing on its role as host to the airport and the convergence of air, rail, and interstate with the creation of City Center Warwick, comprised of more than 100 acres surrounding the airport and InterLink. Our award-winning City Centre Master Plan, which envisions a “live/work/play” environment, offers development opportunities supported by accommodating zoning and streamlined permitting for the area, with Tax Stabilization Agreements (TSAs) for qualified projects - all of which make City Centre an attractive and feasible

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location for development. A market analysis has found that the area would support a number of industries, including, but not limited to, foreign trade, education, financial companies, distribution and high-end manufacturing. They’re now seeing this transformative vision become a reality with projects that include construction of the Hyatt Place Hotel, renovation of both Fairfield Inn & Suites by Marriott and the Radisson Hotel, and construction of the Seasons Corner Market. The Hilton Garden Inn, a brownfields redevelopment, was sold for $25 million to a Wall Streetbased investment company, and the adjacent IronWorks Tavern has been purchased by a Rhode Island-based hospitality group. That’s all in addition to a $3-million investment in safety and aesthetic improvements along one of City Centre’s major corridors and a $2.8 million federal grant that’s funding a feasibility study of Amtrak rail service at the InterLink. Smaller businesses are also investing in exterior and landscaping improvements, niche industries such as Proclamation Ale are finding terrific homes in the district, and a 75-unit condominium and apartment development has recently received master plan and zoning approvals. The momentum is only continuing, with many mixed-use projects being actively considered by multiple investors. They invite you to contact them to learn how you can be a part of transforming this area’s former manufacturing base into a 21st Century, transit-oriented development and hub of commerce within the regional, national, and global marketplaces.

machines at the airport. The airport has a real-time dashboard showing the cleaning schedules and inspections for all of the airport spaces, assets, and washrooms, according to the white paper explaining how the system works. Each area and their related inspections are scored and published so an employee or traveling passenger is aware of what has been done to ensure their safety. The busiest areas and restrooms at the airport have sensors with smart toilet paper holders, paper towels, trash and visual lighting sensors—with a wireless link from Georgia Pacific and other partners—to share information via cloud-based processing and data storage with facility managers and their staff. Other internet-of-things ideas to be added include artificial intelligence with a facial recognition feature to help understand what a passenger in the terminal either likes or doesn’t like—by analyzing their smiles or frowns—so the airport knows which services to upgrade or enhance.

Leading edge still sharp Even as the airport industry deals with the pandemic, new ideas in passenger air travel are being explored. One example comes from Ferrovial, a global infrastructure operator, working in partnership with Lilium, an aviation company to develop an all-electric, vertical take-off and landing (eVTOL) jet aircraft and service that is working a niche between large scale commercial airline travel and small private jet travel. The companies are in the early stages of developing a network of at least ten vertiports connecting various locations in Florida. Vertiports will provide infrastructure for landing, recharging, and taking off with passengers. Ferrovial and Lilium will collaborate in designing and constructing the vertiport facilities as well as the operation and maintenance of the vertiports for passenger service. The first location in south Florida is expected to be announced soon. Once all the vertiports are built in the state, nearly 20 million Florida residents will live within 30 minutes of at least one of them, according to company officials.


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INNOVATIONS &

S I D E B A R

STRATEGIES

AIRPORT DEVELOPMENT

Piedmont Triad International Airport an Aerospace Employment Center

The Piedmont Triad International Airport in central North Carolina is a hub of aerospace employment thanks to companies such as Honda Aircraft Company, Textron/Cessna, FedEx Express and HAECO Americas – all of which have major operations at the airport. Employment on the airport campus totals more than 8,600, which makes the airport one of the top five employers in the Piedmont Triad Region, according to the Triad Business Journal, a local business publication. But that’s only part of the story. A recent economic impact study conducted by researchers at North Carolina State University determined that the airport is responsible for employment of more than 30,000 people in the region and has an annual economic impact of roughly $9 billion – all of this in a traditionally blue-collar region best known until 20 years ago for tobacco, textiles and furniture. “The Authority believes that the airport has a crucial role to play in local economic development,” says Kevin Baker, the airport’s executive director. “We are a passenger airport, certainly, and we take that responsibility very seriously. “But our airport is also uniquely positioned to attract and keep large employers. We have an ideal location at the center of the East Coast, we have direct

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Interstate highway access, we have runway capacity, we have large tracts of land available for development and we have a track record of successfully completing large, complex projects.” The seeds of PTI’s growth into an economic development powerhouse were first sown about 30 years ago when two major employers moved onto the airport. First, Cessna (now owned by Textron) opened a maintenance base for its Citation line of jets. That service center has now grown to be one of the largest in Textron’s system. About the same time, TIMCO was founded on the airport as a third-party Maintenance Repair and Overhaul (MRO) operation. TIMCO grew significantly over the years and was later acquired by HAECO. HAECO is one of the largest third-party MRO’s in the world. The pivotal moment in the region’s aerospace development came 10 years

later, when the airport attracted the attention of delivery giant FedEx. The company was looking for a place to locate a 1 million-square-foot Mid-Atlantic Hub, which could sort 24,000 packages an hour overnight and send them back out in the early morning hours. When the hub opened at the airport in 2009, it had brought with it a new 9,000-foot runway, parallel to the existing 10,000-foot runway, a new highway interchange providing immediate access to nearby Interstate highways and overnight delivery capability that was attractive to companies that were beginning to depend on overnight delivery as a business necessity. “When FedEx located at the airport, it was a game changer for the Piedmont Triad,” says Stan Kelly, president of the Piedmont Triad Partnership, the region’s economic development organization. “The hub established the region as a viable 21st Century distribution center. Today, in addition to the FedEx air hub, we have a major FedEx Ground hub and an Amazon fulfillment center located nearby.” Next to arrive at the airport was the Honda Aircraft Company, manufacturer of the HondaJet, which is a top seller in the light jet category. Michimasa Fujino, who developed the innovative design for Honda, completed research and development of the jet at PTI and tested the first prototype there. When Honda made the commitment


to manufacture the new type of jet, competition was fierce to have the company locate in larger cities around the country. Airport officials went to work to make the case for Honda to locate at PTI. “Honda is an aircraft manufacturer,” Baker says, “which means that they would be a large employer providing good jobs. Attracting a company like that is something that every community would like to do.” Honda’s decision to locate at the airport solidified PTI as ground zero for a growing aerospace industry that has taken root in the Piedmont Triad, a region of moderate temperatures and gently rolling hills in the heart of North Carolina anchored by the three cities of Greensboro, High Point and WinstonSalem. The region is now home to nearly 200 aerospace companies. In 2014, when international maintenance and repair giant HAECO purchased TIMCO, and made the airport facility its North American headquarters, the airport’s aerospace trifecta was complete. Now the airport was home to key companies from the cargo sector, from the manufacturing sector and from the third-party maintenance and repair sector. “Two decades ago, our region faced a crisis,” says Kelly, president of the Piedmont Triad Partnership. “Tobacco and textiles were leaving. We needed to diversify. The airport became the lynchpin of a new industry for us – aerospace.” PTI leadership is still looking forward. The Airport Authority has acquired and cleared more than 1,000 acres of new property, all with direct access to the airfield and served by numerous interstate highways. The airport sites have been graded, received preliminary environmental approval and are ready for development. “We understand that when aerospace companies decide to develop a new location, they don’t want to wait for a site.” Baker says. “When the next aerospace opportunity presents itself, we will be ready.”

Artist conception of an all-electric vertical take off and landing jet developed by Lilium, landing at a veriport in Florida developed by Ferrovial, an infrastructure developer

Evolving to a smart airport Airport development is becoming more focused on transitioning to a smart airport, in part because of the pandemic and the need for fewer touchpoints passengers. But the transition is occurring because of other issues as well: passenger wait times, security check-ins, less real-time information, flight delays, less space in airport, lack of proper customer service, improper baggage handling, lost baggage complaints and more. According to Market Study Report, a Delaware-based market studies company, to help overcome all these problems, airports across the globe are working towards smart airport development to

provide a better and seamless personalized experience for the passenger. The North American smart airport market size is expected to reach $7.74 billion by 2026. Smart airport security system technology is driving the market as various airports are implementing new innovative smart components such as flight booking management, automatic check-in, and more. Modernization of old airports, introduction of new airports, development in commercial aviation, and increasing focus on green initiatives are the key growth drivers expected to boost the market for smart airports in North America, according to the report. X

Artist rendering of SLC North Concourse exterior. bxjmag.com

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INDUSTRY

LOGISTICS

INSIGHT

Logistics getting on a quicker, more focused track B Y DAV ID HO D ES

The business of getting product to the consumer is applying a dizzying array of big data analytics for better flexibility

R

eliance on the continued accumulation and application of data, and analyzing best methods of product delivery to a more demanding customer, are two key hallmarks of logistics evolution in today’s business climate. ....................................................................................................... A white paper by DHL, a logistics provider, laid out how big data analytics can provide competitive advantage because of five distinct properties: Optimization to the core. Using data analytics to track delivery time, resource utilization and geographical coverage coupled with advanced predictive techniques and real-time processing for forecast and resource control;

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Tangible goods, tangible customers. Millions of customer touchpoints a day create an opportunity for market intelligence and product feedback;


3. 4. 5.

In sync with customer business. A tight level of integration with customer operations lets logistics providers feel the heartbeat of individual businesses, vertical markets, or regions; A network of information. Apart from using data for optimizing the network itself, network data may provide valuable insight on the global flow of goods, and; Global coverage, local presence. Processing a huge stream of data originating from a large delivery fleet creates a valuable zoom display for demographic, environmental, and traffic statistics.

But all that takes management buy-in and implementation inside the operations of many different logistics operations. It takes a coordinated effort and the willingness to reshape— and invest in—how a business operates. In 2020, that effort at coordinating and updating how the logistics industry works and what new ideas could be implemented got hit by a pandemic—a serious bump in the road.

Year over year – the 2020 dip Things were going well before 2020. According to key findings from the report “State of Logistics 2020,” by the Council of Supply Chain Management

Professionals (CSCMP), a trade organization, the logistics industry was supporting a strong economy in 2019, growing to $1.652 trillion in expenditures. The industry productivity improved, bringing its cost to 7.6 percent of GDP, an improvement from 7.9 percent over the previous year. The report found that road freight, the biggest segment of U.S. logistics spend, was already slowing down in 2019. But the current pandemic-driven recession ended 126 months of growth. Other pandemic-related findings in the report included that the pandemic and public response accelerated an already fast growth in e-commerce which has different logistics needs than traditional retailing; and that bxjmag.com

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when the economic recovery begins, it will likely be uneven and staggered. The study also said that the industry needs to reconfigure supply chains for other sectors, like heavy industry; adapt to the residual effects of social distancing as it accommodates an even larger consumer appetite for home deliveries; and that supply chains will need to be more flexible to cope with uncertainty.

The changes to come In a survey by Auburn University and industry partners about the future of logistics, respondents reported customer requirements further ramping up. Nearly 80 percent believe that same-day and next-day fulfillment will be the dominant customer requirement from distribution centers over the next decade. A majority of respondents also agree that customers will place more 16 |

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case- and unit-level orders with distribution centers in the future, causing average shipment sizes to drop. Warehouse and distribution operations will need to fundamentally change over the next decade, according to 88 percent of the respondents. These changes include a greater reliance on automation and robotics; smaller distribution centers serving narrower geographic regions; and deployment of temporary, on-demand capacity. The survey concluded with action items, including enhancing rapid fulfillment capability through localization of warehouses and distribution centers; upgrading distribution strategies to consider leveraging logistics partners through warehousing-as-aservice (using on-demand fulfillment services, and deploying agile automation in distribution centers to create distribution capacity that is both

nimble and efficient); and investing in skills of the future, which means more complex roles for the logistics worker to balance multiple objectives that will require greater use of analytics, technology, and automation. Brian Gibson is Auburn University’s executive director for the Center for Supply Chain Innovation. Gibson led the research team on the survey. “A major change we are seeing is the impact on consumer shopping habits changing how companies have to manage and fill orders,” he says. The speed or volume at which consumers have gone to mobile purchasing and online purchasing has sped up over the last nine months, reaching a level that wasn’t expected for five years, Gibson says. “There has been a big shift in what and where consumers buy things. People are buying more groceries because they are not eating out at restaurants as


WE THINK BUSINESS

T

he City of Ontario, located in Southern California, continues to create development opportunities and urban lifestyle districts that provide sustainable places to live, work and play. Just 35 miles east of downtown Los Angeles, the City of Ontario is ideally situated as the gateway to Southern California. With 182,000 residents, Ontario is San Bernardino County’s fourth-largest city – and growing. Ontario is also home to one of the hottest housing markets in the country, and that boom will only continue as master-planned communities are slated to add nearly 50,000 new homes in the next few decades. At the center of the City is the Ontario International Airport, a full-service airport. UPS, FedEx and Amazon have hubs located at the Airport, making Ontario one of the top markets for outbound cargo shipments in the nation. Ontario is centered on a transportation corridor that extends throughout Southern California and across the continental United States and sits 45 miles from the two largest ports in the country –the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach. Ontario provides strategic access to the ports through its interconnected freeway and rail systems. The Ontario Opportunity Zone is an ideal location for opportunity fund investments, utilizing privately sourced funds into eligible economic development and community reinvestment

projects. Ontario also offers the advantage of being in the Foreign Trade Zone, which allows companies to reduce the costs associated with International Trade. The ability to increase international sales, realize greater importing and exporting opportunities, and succeed in global markets is often a deciding factor for location, relocation and expansion in Ontario. The mass of freight transport – via both rail and road – run through the City of Ontario. Three major freeways crisscross the City and the surrounding areas: Interstate-15 from San Diego to Las Vegas and beyond; Interstate-10 from west coast to east coast; as well as State Route 60 for easy regional access. Ontario’s stable environment, lifestyle amenities, modern facilities, technical amenities, efficient infrastructure and leaders that continually work to improve the City’s pro-business environment make Ontario the best place to develop your business. A talented workforce, reasonable lease rates, quality office and retail development, and over 110 million square feet of industrial, manufacturing and distribution space offers a large market for corporate headquarters, large professional firms and high technology companies. To find out more information about the advantages of doing business in Ontario, California, visit www. ontariothinksbusiness.com or call 909.395.2005. You can also follow @OntarioEDA on social media.

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much, for example.” There are other industries where sales have exploded during the pandemic, like fitness equipment, outdoor equipment, and do-it-yourself home improvement companies. “Home Depot and Lowes, for example, have had to throw out their original 2020 forecasts and make some

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significant changes at a time when other retailers are barely keeping their doors open,” Gibson says.

The logistics focus on e-commerce A report released in October, 2020 by the research foundation of the Commercial Real Estate Development Association (NAIOP), addressed the demands of e-commerce. It found that e-commerce supply chains require more than three times the distribution space required by traditional retail supply chains centered on brick-and-mortar distribution. In the traditional model, warehouses are used principally for longer-term storage. “With the rise of e-commerce, warehouses have expanded beyond storing bulk inventory to become full-service

fulfillment centers,” Gibson says. “Fulfillment centers still hold inventory, but for shorter periods. Individual items are stored in smaller quantities, with the expectation that inventory will be turned over quickly as orders are consistently shipped,” he says. This shift in warehouse utilization has renewed demand for older, smaller warehouses located close to dense urban areas and primary transportation routes. These warehouses may not have the clear heights, dock-to-square-footage ratios or yard space needed for modern large-scale logistics uses, but they can accommodate fast-moving, quick-turning and frequently ordered e-commerce inventory, and they are well positioned to serve as micro-distribution or micro-fulfillment centers. One example of a new approach to logistics is Darkstore, based in San Francisco. It is backed by heavy-hitter investors, including San Franciscobased Cota Capital Management LLC, focused on modern enter-


prise technologies; and EQT Ventures, part of a global investment organization. Darkstore is an on-demand, last-mile distribution provider currently working from 43 urban warehouses across the U.S. The company developed an app, FastAF, that enables product delivery to a customer’s doorstep on an average of 27 minutes.

But for now... Darkstore is an example of how the rapid growth of business-to-consumer e-commerce is causing a dramatic restructuring of supply chains within urban areas. According to a report by the International Transport Forum, this restructuring is currently proving a very fertile area for innovation with new transport modes (drones and droids), new business models (crowdshipping and ‘Uberization’), new fulfilment options (lockerbanks and click-and-collect) and new land use patterns (conversion of shopping malls to distribution centers). Going forward, logistics professionals hope to emulate the so-called Amazon effect that results from having a more automated, constantly updated and carefully planned logistics system. “Amazon has forced other retailers and manufacturers to say that they can’t tell the customer no,” Gibson says. “We have seen the entire industry over the last ten years go from a position of we can get it to you next week, to we can get it to you in a few days, to where we can get it to you in 2 days guaranteed at a very low cost and low risk,” he says. “And that’s all thanks to Amazon pushing the envelope over and over again.”

Gibson says that the challenge he sees for logistics companies is trying to sift through all of the interesting opportunities out there today with technology and figure out which technology will give their organization the best return on investment. Another key challenge is finding the right people to keep these different technological tools integrated so that they can be somewhat customized or tailored to their needs. “A robotics vendor can do that for you,” Gibson says. “But there are issues of cost, and issues of their availability. You have to find that balance of who is going to install and who is going to maintain the automated system.” Then there is the consideration of hiring a third party logistics provider. According to the Intermodal Association of North America (IANA), there are just over 10,000 third party logistics managers for shippers across North America; 6 million intermodal

shipments arranged by third party logistics managers annually; and $11 billion in revenues generated annually by third party logistics companies managing U.S. intermodal. DHL is getting more and more queries from Fortune 500 companies to be their third party logistic providers. “When a third party provider gets hired, the business that hires them will not have to have their own trucks, or their own warehouses, or people to run them,” Gibson says. “Taking that capital expense burden off of their shoulders is great thing for the company.” Gibson says that the biggest thing that these third party providers do is give these large companies the flexibility to increase their capacity on an as-needed basis to handle certain order and fulfillment surges. “Third party logistics providers is an ongoing trend.” X

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To learn more visit quonset.com bxjmag.com

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SPOTLIGHT

INTERMODAL

More coordinated focus on value and expediency of intermodal operations B Y: DAV ID HO D ES

Rail service, truck service and sea and inland ports closing ranks to deliver what today’s consumer needs

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A

s with so many global businesses, intermodal distribution has been seriously affected by the COVID pandemic. Help is needed. ....................................................................................................... Mario Cordero, the chairman of the board of the American Association of Port Authorities, and former co-executive director of the one of the country’s busiest seaports, the Port of Long Beach, California, testified before Congress in early February about the need for emergency relief by citing the impact of the pandemic on the nation’s ports. “The COVID-19 pandemic caused 2020 to be one of the most erratic and volatile years in terms of container volumes,” Cordero testified. “By the end of the year, total waterborne trade volume was down 4.8 percent compared to the prior year—and the value of that trade


It is estimated that about 95 percent of the world’s manufactured goods at some time travel in a container before they arrive in the hands of the customer. There are 7,000 trucking companies delivering intermodal freight in North America, and 17 million intermodal loads moved by rail in the U.S. annually. Up to 25 percent of U.S. railroad revenues come from intermodal freight. There are 60 ports handling containers in North America, and 63 million twenty-foot equivalent units (TEUs) moved through North American ports annually. Today, in the pandemic world, there is too much uncertainty crowded into an intermodal system that only succeeds on monetizing certainty and tightening various coordination efforts. sometimes on the fly. An evolving, flexible, pro-active intermodal system is more critical today than in any previous year to meet challenges never seen before.

The rebound continues It’s been a bad news/good news dichotomy in intermodal activity for truck freight, containership traffic, and rail service. The U.S. Department of Transportation (U.S. DOT) revealed in a report that, in the immediate period before the pandemic, freight activity remained strong. “Amtrak was near breakeven operations. Air travel passenger volumes were at a record,” the report stated.

Then the pandemic hit.

dropped by 11.3 percent.” Seaport problems are just the tip of the iceberg in the interconnected system of intermodal distribution processes. It is a time of profound change for the intermodal way of doing business all throughout the intermodal system. And it’s coming just in time for a more demanding consumer.

Intermodal facts and figures Intermodal operations represent a significant global force for economic prosperity and growth. The Intermodal Association of North America (IANA) reports that the connection of the global supply chain of stakeholders — railroads, ocean carriers, ports, intermodal truckers and over-the-road highway carriers, intermodal marketing and logistic companies, and suppliers to the industry—move billions of dollars in cargo every day. The North American intermodal market in particular is estimated at $40 billion, and is the largest in the world. According to the IANA, each year, a fleet of more than 34.5 million containers circling the globe are responsible for moving more than half a billion shipments between shippers and customers worldwide.

But the pandemic has not affected the transportation of freight nearly as much as it has affected passenger-related transportation, according to the U.S. DOT. “Since the height of the pandemic in April, when freight was most affected, freight volumes have generally rebounded to higher levels than before the pandemic as of August 2020. This is true for freight transportation modes by land, water, and rail.” Vehicle miles traveled (VMT) by trucks on all interstate highways started to decline in March 2020, and by April, had reached a low. VMT declined almost 20 percent compared to the same time a year ago. But since then, truck VMTs have rebounded for six consecutive months. VMTs recovered above the pre-pandemic levels in July, and, as of October, were staying positive above the 5 percent range. The carrying capacity of containership vessels calling at U.S. ports was down in the 10 percent range for the first several months of the pandemic through July, compared to 2019. But by August, 2020, it had recovered above the pre-pandemic level, and has continued to trend upward. Intermodal rail freight reached its low level in April but has since rebounded in consecutive months to above pre-pandemic levels. As of October, 2020, intermodal rail freight was almost 10 percent higher compared to the same time a year ago. bxjmag.com

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The rail freight industry remains confident that the third quarter recovery will continue into the near future, according to the DOT report. The rail freight industry reported a difficult second quarter of 2020, with significantly lower traffic, which required some furloughs and layoffs.

E-commerce and other evolutionary changes A white paper from CenterPoint Properties, an industrial real estate management and development company, finds that across the country, the swelling volume of intermodal facilities is creating industrial real estate hotspots. These hotspot areas are in close proximity to multiple forms of transportation, large population centers, or both. According to the paper, major brands from BMW to Walmart, and the logistics firms that service them, are planting roots along the country’s key intermodal corridors in the Midwest, West Coast and Southeast regions in and around these hotspots. It’s a strategic move to address more e-commerce activity. 22 |

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The e-commerce effect on intermodal services is growing stronger. As e-commerce expands, even brick-and-mortar retailers are being forced to meet new customer demands. Same-day and next-day delivery options have encouraged retailers to create more flexible supply chains, and operate omni-channel fulfillment centers where traditional and online orders can be handled simultaneously, according to the CenterPoint white paper. At the same time, pressure from online competitors has forced retailers to broaden their product offerings, forcing supply chains to have wider reach. Customer expectations for quicker delivery and overall better service have changed during the pandemic, and the intermodal system is being forced to respond.

The new plan To maintain service quality, big corporate retail brands are scrambling to acquire industrial real estate with prime access to transportation nodes and the corridor hotspots. For example, Walmart and Home Depot are two national


retailers that service Midwest stores and customers through distribution centers within the 6,400-acre CenterPoint Intermodal Center in Joliet/Elwood, Illinois, just outside of Chicago. The center, one of the largest inland ports in the country, has fast access to two major rail intermodal centers (BNSF Logistics Park Chicago and Union Pacific Joliet Intermodal Terminal), two major rail carriers (Northern Southern Railway and CSX), and two major interstates (I-55 and I-80). Shrinking the distance between distribution centers and available transportation has enabled Walmart, for example, to save $100 on every container move since opening distribution facilities at the CenterPoint center. More recently, Amazon has begun pursuing plans to develop fulfillment centers in southern Wisconsin and the Chicago area to expedite deliveries. Amazon has just over 100 such centers in the U.S., including 13 in California and 14 in Kentucky, all identified by the identification code of the nearest airport. There are other distribution ideas cropping up in

response to the effect the pandemic has had on retail sales. James Scott, lead researcher at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Real Estate Innovation Lab, says that he recently came across two struggling retail stores in a popular Boston shopping area that had been reconfigured into micro distribution centers. “They shut their retail concept down, only allowing customers or delivery persons to go in and pick up online orders,” he says. “These locations had become mini-micro-distributors. For the last few years, the likes of underutilized suburban shopping malls have been seen as possible last mile fulfillment centers and it has been envisaged that this concept could gradually move into downtown areas of cities over time,” Scott says. “While the pandemic has been a major trigger in all of this, we are seeing this transformation coming far faster than we ever thought possible.” There are more changes coming in the warehousing side of the intermodal system, led by new ideas in automation such as artificial intelligence (AI) within warehouses to unload trucks, store products, pack and ship—adjusting in real time to the tasks that need to be performed. Using AI doesn’t mean that humans won’t still be in charge. “Most applications require human elements in order to create the greatest efficiencies,” Scott says. “AI has been around for many years, but we are only now really beginning to see the fruits of its application. We are still a long way away from the concept of Artificial General Intelligence (AGI), which is the concept of a machine thinking like a human.” For example, in most warehousing operations, there is a door where a truck loaded with products will arrive. But how they arrive is completely different. “You will have a van or a truck or a large 40 footer truck or a new autonomous truck that is part of a system going to arrive,” Scott says. “Unless something is arriving at the exact same point every single time, you can’t really automate that. You still a huge design or need some components brought to bear to think about how you are going to get that delivery to position A within the facility. It’s not simple.” Autonomous electric driverless semi-trucks (in phased testing now) are often cited as being the first fleet of autonomous vehicles that will be seen on the nation’s highways, Scott says, eventually driving in autonomous-only lanes. “What you will have here is a completely different logistics network, because these vehicles work 24-7,” he says. “You will have super trucks going cross country only taking breaks to charge at the next electrical charging station.” That will mean that these autonomous electrical vehicles, traveling in their own lanes and lined up in systematic synchronized configurations, have the potential to create significant competition for rail services. “Rail is an incredibly efficient way to distribute over large distances and cross country,” Scott says. “But their distribution capability is still limited to stops on the rail lines.” X bxjmag.com

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TEXAS:

TEXAS ENTERS 2021 AS WORLD’S 9TH LARGEST ECONOMY BY GDP “T his serves as proof of the success of a long-term strategy to make Texas the best place to start or relocate a business,” said Robert Allen, president and CEO of the Texas Economic Development Corporation.

................................................................................... TxEDC is an independently funded non-profit organization in partnership with the Governor’s Office of Economic Development and Tourism charged with marketing Texas as a premier business location, the cornerstone of Texas Governor Greg Abbott’s economic development agenda. “While 2020 brought about unique challenges, Texas continued to shine as a beacon of hope and opportunity,” Abbott said. “Texas’ ranking as the world’s ninth largest economy is 24 |

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because of the hard-working men and women of the Lone Star State, our commitment to economic freedom, our state-ofthe-art infrastructure and business climate. As we cultivate an environment of growth and opportunity, Texas will continue to build an even brighter future for all Texans.” Gross Domestic Product is a measurement of the size and strength of an economy. As of 2019, the United States has a GDP of $21.4 trillion, making it the world’s largest economy, followed by China, Japan, and Germany, according to IMF. Texas has a GDP of $1.9 trillion. In 2020, Amazon, CBRE, Tesla, HP and Oracle moved to or expanded their operations in Texas, which has further bolstered the strength and size of Texas’s economy. This trend is expected to continue in 2021, Allen said.


Looking for a better place to do business? Call us! 956-216-5081 | harlingenedc.com


EXPANSION

OPPORTUNITIES

TEXAS: CROCKETT Crossroads of East Texas ................................................................................

Welcome to the best of both worlds: state-of-the-art manufacturing and local hamburger joints; International commerce and Friday night football; multimillion-dollar deals and downtown parades; excellent logistics and easy access. Discover what makes Crockett, Texas a place you and your business can call home. A close-knit community with a storied past and drive for the future is what you’ll find when you come to Crockett. Crockett is referred to as the crossroads of East Texas, as several highways converge on the city, and is a multimodal transportation channel. Crockett offers access to Highways 7, 21, 19, and 287. There is air access to three nearby airports: Dallas/Fort Worth International (DFW), George Bush International (IAH), and Crockett Municipal (DKR). Dallas is only 150 miles away; Houston is 120 miles; and Austin is 175 miles. Crockett Economic & Industrial Development offers aggressive incentive packages to attract new business. They will negotiate with local, state and federal governments to provide financial assistance to your company. For more information, please call 936-546-5636 or visit www.crockettedc.org

TEXAS: HARLINGEN

.......................................................................................... Strategically situated in the Rio Grande Valley in Southern Texas, the city of Harlingen and the surrounding region might be one of the best-kept secrets of the Lone Star State. Harlingen is in a great location in terms of market accessibility, which opens the door to draw in more investors to 26 |

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the area. Harlingen is connected to major metro areas through its airport, proximity to Mexico, the Port of Harlingen, and the interstate system. Plus, Harlingen also boasts a low cost of living, which can be enticing for outside companies looking to relocate or expand. With an in-city population of up to 1.3 million within a 45-minute radius, Harlingen also benefits from several other advantages, such as being located in a Foreign Trade Zone, Freeport Tax Exemption, no personal state income tax and no corporate income tax. All of these factors point to Harlingen as a strategic location for a large business interested in expanding its operations or an aspiring entrepreneur looking to establish a new small business.

Harlingen’s business climate is perfect for companies specializing in logistics, distribution, manufacturing, healthcare, technology and those that are also interested in launching something new – literally. The Harlingen Economic Development Corporation (HEDC) has spurred major growth in aerospace with companies like United Launch Alliance (ULA), that has chosen Harlingen for more than 20 years, and has helped companies from many sectors to either relocate or expand into Harlingen and the Rio Grande Valley. Those companies include United Healthcare, Penske Logistics, Qualfon, and CARDONE Industries, the world’s largest auto parts manufacturer. The HEDC has a lot to proud of and their industrial sector has made great strides in 2019. The HEDC worked with Poly Sachi Polymers to set up a relocation of the plastics firm to the Harlingen Industrial Park from their location in Taylor, Texas. Harlingen is also proud of the expansion happening at Valley International Airport through the addition of new airlines, more frequent flights, and FedEx’s Express facility, which brought the airport up to rank as 71st in the nation in terms of cargo facilitation. There are many other major projects creating jobs,


CHOSE LA MARQUE LA MARQUE MEANS BUSINESS Amazon’s ground-up, 180,000 square foot delivery station is under construction in La Marque, Texas. Hundreds of new jobs are expected in late 2021, and the market is red hot.

CALL US IF LOCATION MATTERS • • • •

Frontage tracts from a few to 400 acres. Expanding I-45 corridor & easy access to air, rail and port. Galveston - Kemah - NASA tourism market. Booming 30 percent population growth.

LIFE IS GOOD IN LA MARQUE • • • •

Pro-business and future-focused city leadership. New neighborhoods, new schools, new direction. Coastal lifestyle protected by flood levee. Budding downtown revitalization seeking entrepreneurs.

ALEX GETTY, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR La Marque Economic Development 409-938-9258 | agetty@lmedc.com

1130 1st Street La Marque, TX 77568 LMEDC.com | cityoflamarque.org


EXPANSION

OPPORTUNITIES

improving our workforce, and contributing to local economy. Harlingen may not be a secret much longer. Learn more about why your business should choose Harlingen for business and much more by visiting our website for more information: www.harlingenedc.com.

TEXAS: LA MARQUE

..........................................................................................

Job creation is one of the primary goals of any economic development organization, so when city officials were able

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to drop the Amazon announcement on January 28, 2021, La Marque city and economic development corporation staff were doing figurative backflips. Amazon is a gamechanger. The influx of quality jobs combined with economic impact will have a longstanding positive impact on the city, and Galveston-Bay Area Houston region. There’s no doubt about it – Amazon choosing La Marque solidifies them as an optimal distribution hub location. The 180,000 square foot warehouse is under construction and expected to open later in 2021. The new Delivery Station will power Amazon’s last-mile delivery capabilities to speed up deliveries for customers around Galveston County. Amazon will generate about 400 on-site jobs, ranging from drivers to management positions and team leads. Projections show 150 additional indirect jobs created by the development, such as janitorial suppliers or employees in restaurants built to accommodate the expanded workforce. The addition of these jobs will lead to an annual economic impact of $56.7 million across the region. The ripple effects of this development are yet to be realized. Just to build the Amazon facility, 231 construction workers are needed, which leads to a one-time regional economic impact of $76.3 million. La Marque boasts 14.3 miles of prime real estate along the expanding Interstate 45 corridor, right in the center of the Houston-Galveston-NASA-Kemah tourism market. More than 7 million visitors pass through La Marque to visit Galveston Island each year, and with the expanding cruise ship terminal in Galveston that number will continue to grow. The City of La Marque serves as the southern anchor to the economically strong Houston/Galveston region with quick access to four deep water ports, two rail lines, three airports, and the ever-expanding Houston-area highway systems. There are projected to be $1 billion in area road infrastructure improvements over the next 10 years, and neighboring Texas City is home to one of the largest petrochemical complexes in the world. Businesses can locate here, and rest assured their investment is protected by a coastal flood levee system. Investors can cash in on opportunities, employees can enjoy coastal lifestyle and owners can focus on growth. Win-win-win. Amazon Chose La Marque. Who’s next? Call them at 409-938-9258 if you want to build your business in La Marque. DATA SOURCE: Calculations by the Greater Houston Partnership Research Department based on multipliers supplied by the IMPLAN Group Inc.


MarbleFallsEconomy.com


EXPANSION

OPPORTUNITIES

TEXAS: MARBLE FALLS Business Friendly. Family Friendlier ......................................................................

Marble Falls is perfectly situated in the Texas Hill Country, 50 minutes from Austin, 90 minutes from San Antonio, and 3 hours from Dallas/Fort Worth and Houston. All roads lead to Marble Falls. Taxable sales set a new record at just over $476 million, an increase of about $34.1 million, or 7.72% over the previous year. For reference, the state as a whole grew by 4.71% in 2019. The retail sector grew by 11.22%. Construction is up an astounding 176.78%. Because Marble Falls is the economic hub of the Highland Lakes region, development activity along the lakes and throughout the large unincorporated areas of Burnet and Llano Counties benefits Marble Falls more than any other area community. Also contributing to the upward economic trajectory are strong population and household income growth in Marble Falls’s primary retail trade area. The percentage of the RTA population with an associates degree or higher has increased from 30.1% to 33.4% in the last three years. Workforce development remains a key focal point for area economic development agencies.

Downtown Marble Falls is the city’s third largest employer. It also happens to be the community’s largest concentration of locally-owned businesses. Efforts have been focused on developing Downtown Marble Falls into a destination for both locals and visitors. Strategies have included supporting existing business owners, preserving and enhancing historic buildings, partnering on parks projects, and welcoming new investments in the area. Downtown Marble Falls is poised to be the perfect blend of heritage and progress.

Now in 2021, the Marble Falls Economic Development Corporation remains committed to enhancing the community’s appeal as a destination through the commencement of Phase 1b of the Park Improvement Plan and finalizing a development deal to bring a hotel and conference center to the Downtown area. The recent expansion of the Business & Technology Park should result in several new businesses. A couple of new, master-planned subdivisions on the south side of town should deliver their first lots in the coming year, and some exciting retail and entertainment projects are expected to be announced very soon. Community leaders have very high expectations for 2021. For more information, please contact the Marble Falls EDC at 830-798-7079 or visit their website at www.marblefallseconomy.com

TEXAS: NEW BRAUNFELS Making An Impression!

.........................................................................................

MAKING AN IMPRESSION NEW BRAUNFELS, TX

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In the heart of the Texas Hill Country lies the beautiful community of New Braunfels. Refined by old-world German heritage and complemented by an unrivaled quality of life, it’s no wonder this town of 90,206 is visited by more than three million tourists each year and has grown by 102% since 2003. The city’s strategic location in Central Texas puts it at almost equal distances between the seventh largest city in the U.S.


Economic Development Corporation From corner stores to Fortune 500 companies, Tomball is focused on business! A skilled workforce, low property taxes, and a well-connected transportation system provide an ideal backdrop for your business to prosper.

(281) 401- 4086 •–•–• TOMBALLTXEDC.ORG


EXPANSION

OPPORTUNITIES

(San Antonio) and the State Capitol (Austin). This opportunistic placement, along with access to a strong education system, an affordable cost of living, a stable economic climate, and a plethora of recreational opportunities, has created an environment people are flocking to. Ranked as the 2nd fastest growing county and the 9th fastest growing city in the nation, the New Braunfels area is experiencing unprecedented growth. Industry is thriving in New Braunfels, despite the weak economy nationally. New Braunfels is in the heart of the Austin-San Antonio corridor, offering a low-cost, strategic location directly on Interstate 35 and minutes from Interstate 10. Population growth exceeds the state average, giving ever-growing markets. The workforce within commuting distance is over 450,000. City employment has increased 75% since 2003. The New Braunfels community boasts a diverse base of businesses, including distribution, manufacturing, data centers, healthcare related, and the aviation industry. Increasing sales tax revenues allows the city to invest heavily in infrastructure and quality of life assets desired by the current and future talent workforce. Businesses utilize the Alamo Colleges - Central Texas Technology Center and nearby colleges and universities to upgrade skills and values.

Plus, with over 300 days of sunshine a year and 550+ acres of outdoor water recreation, New Braunfels is a premier destination for work or play, year-round. “Making an Impression” has been a New Braunfels tradition since 1845! To learn more, please visit their website at www.businessinnewbraunfels.com or call 866-927-0905.

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TEXAS: TOMBALL

.......................................................................................... Tomball, Texas is where the best of business, lifestyle, education and transportation converge. Those who experience the Tomball community instantly recognize its uniqueness. A strong history blends with innovation; a sense of community combines with a thriving business environment; and local partnerships have global impacts.

From corner stores to Fortune 500 companies, Tomball is focused on business! A skilled workforce, low property taxes, and a well-connected transportation system provide an ideal backdrop for your business to prosper. The Tomball Economic Development Corporation promotes job creation by encouraging attraction, expansion and retention of business by way of: assisting with site selection; identifying incentives; connecting to workforce resources; and providing business and industry data.

The Tomball Business & Technology Park, a project of the Tomball Economic Development Corporation, encompasses 99.5 acres of land within the City of Tomball. The Park is Master Planned and Deed Restricted with a Light Industrial zoning classification. The Park is fully served with all utilities and provides off-site detention. Its flexible lot sizes and competitive pricing combined with low property taxes and a skilled local labor force make the Park an attractive location for new and expanding businesses. There are +/- 58.5 usable acres still available. For more information on all the opportunities in Tomball, please call the Tomball Economic Development Corporation at 281-401-4086 or visit their website at tomballtxedc.org . X


EXPANSION

OPPORTUNITIES

TENNESSEE:

Business Starts Here

T

ennessee is known for its sound fiscal management and new investments in the economic ecosystem. The state’s budgetary discipline has allowed it to make investments in public education, workforce development and international business reach. The right-to-work state has no personal income tax on wages or salaries and has the lowest debt per capita in the country, according to the Tax Foundation.

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A few benefits of working in the state: No personal income tax on wages and salaries. • A right-to-work state. • A long history of fiscal responsibility that crosses party lines. • Lowest state debt per capita in the country, per The Tax Foundation. • Second lowest in the U.S. for state and local tax taxes paid per capita, per The Tax Foundation. • Triple A rate by all major rating services. • Successful overhaul of our tort and workers compensation laws. From a quality of life standpoint, the Volunteer State spans three distinct regions, each with its own personality from 33 |

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the mighty Mississippi to the foothills of the Great Smokey Mountains. Tennessee’s music and arts pedigree is undeniable claiming the birthplace of rock ‘n’ roll and country music, the home of the blues and the starting point of soul. Nashville is a must see destination with the Ryman and Grand Ole Opry, and just the word Memphis conjures up the blues and mouth watering barbecue. Tennessee is home to the second busiest cargo airport in the world, the third largest rail center in the U.S. and the nation’s fifth largest inland port. It’s also accessible within a day’s drive to a majority of U.S. markets. There are 6 commercial airports 880 miles of navigable waterways and 95,000 miles of highways. While some states may not have focused as much on their manufacturing workforce in recent years, Tennessee still makes a huge variety of products, including cars, guns, guitars, batteries, refrigerators, savory snacks and whiskey. These products are made in Tennessee and shipped out all over the world. Overall enrollment in Tennessee public higher education has increased by 13%. More than 33,000 students have enrolled in the Tennessee Promise, which commits to providing two years of community or technical college absolutely free of tuition and fees to graduating high school seniors on a continual basis. The first class of Tennessee Promise students entered school and the workforce training pipeline in the fall of 2015.


EXPANSION

OPPORTUNITIES

TENNESSEE: CLARKSVILLE Top Spot for Tech Companies on the Rise

facility and excited for the competitive career opportunities it will bring,” said Frank Tate, Executive Director of the Clarksville Montgomery County Industrial Development Board.

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A low-tax burden, highly skilled available workforce and strategic central U.S. location in Tennessee are just a few of the key factors attracting tech companies to the 1600 acre CMC Corporate Business Park. In February of 2021, American-Owned

and Operated EV Battery manufacturer, Microvast Power Solutions announced Clarksville, Tennessee as the location for its U.S. facility. The new facility will include an R&D department and manufacturing facility, producing Li-ion battery cells, modules, and packs. The Microvast headquarters marks significant progress in the U.S. energy sector and will truly expand opportunities for growth in the energy and tech sectors for Middle Tennessee. “I am thrilled Montgomery County was selected for this

WHY CHOOSE TECH IN CLARKSVILLE? A History of Success Among the 52 companies that call the CMC Industrial park home, are mainstay household names such as LG Electronics, Bridgestone Metalpha, Hankook Tire and Google, bringing investments totaling $2.4 Billion to the community over the last decade.

Economic Prosperity There are no signs of slowing down for Clarksville - in fact, USA Today recently named Clarksville a top city for job growth during the pandemic. With population growth reaching 24% over the last decade, it is no surprise the area was featured as a top city for migration with more people moving to Tennessee than any other state in 2020!

A Diverse Ecosystem Paving the way for the high-tech scene in the Southeast and named one of the TOP THREE EMERGING TECH HOTSPOTS by the Wall Street Journal — Clarksville-Montgomery County, Tenn., is the best place for your business. This gig city has it all, ready for you. clarksvilletned.com 931.647.2331

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A young community full of opportunity, with a median age of just 29, Clarksville is home to over 50,000 active-duty soldiers and their families – and was ranked 9th among all (MSA’s) in the US for Economic Strength by Area Development in 2019.

New development is thriving The community recently broke ground on a $130 million Multi-Purpose Event Center in the heart of downtown with an additional $50 million, 4-acre retail development planned nearby – And an additional 40,000 sq. ft. Conference Center is in development with hotel & office space, retail and dining options. X


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NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF

ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

ALABAMA Tuscaloosa County Industrial Dev. Auth

Sissie Browning, Assistant Director P.O. Box 2667 Tuscaloosa, AL 35403 205-349-1414 info@tcida.com www.tcida.com ...................................................................

Cullman Economic Development Agency

Dale Greer P.O. Box 1009 Cullman, AL 35056 256-739-1891 daleg@cullmaneda.org www.cullmaneda.org ...................................................................

ARIZONA

Arizona Regional Economic Develoment

Mignonne Hollis, Executive Director 750 E. Bartow Drive Suite 16 Sierra Vista, AZ 85635 520-458-6948 hollism@aredf.org www.aredf.org ...................................................................

Etowah Economic Alliance

Marilyn Lott 800 Forrest Avenue Suite 220E Gadsden, AL 35901 256-456-9938 mlott@eeaalabama.org www.eeaalabama.org ...................................................................

City of Flagstaff Economic Development

John Saltonstall, AZED Pro Business Retention & Expansion Manager Economic Vitality Division City of Flagstaff 211 W. Aspen Avenue Flagstaff, AZ 86001 Office 928-213-2966 Cell 928-606-9430 jsaltonstall@flagstaffaz.gov www.flagstaffaz.gov ...................................................................

Gadsden Industrial Development Authority

David Hooks, Executive Director 1 Commerce Square Gadsden, AL 35901 256-543-9423 davidhooks@gadsdenida.org www.gadsdenida.org ...................................................................

Pinal Alliance for Economic Growth

Elmore County Economic Development

Patti King, Executive Mgr. 17235 N. 75th Avenue Suite D-145 Glendale, AZ 85308 520-836-8686 pking@pinalalliance.org www.pinalalliance.org ...................................................................

Cary Cox P.O. Box 117 Wetumka , AL 36092 334-514-5843 cary.cox@elmoreeda.com www.elmoreeda.com ..................................................................

Chaffee Crossing

Ivy Owen, Executive Director 7020 Taylor Avenue Fort Smith, AR 72916 479-452-4554 479-452-4566 (f) property@chaffeecrossing.com www.chaffeecrossing.com ...................................................................

Kristina Keogh 601 Genome Way Huntsville , AL 35806 256-327-9591 kkeogh@hudsonalpha.org www.hudsonalpha.org ................................................................... |

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James Lee Sillman Executive Director 625 Adams Aveune Camden, AR 71701 870-836-2210 870-836-8899 (f) director@teamcamden.com www.teamcamden.com ...................................................................

City of Siloam Springs

Don Clark Community Development Director P.O. Box 80 Siloam Springs , AR 72761 479-238-0927 dclark@siloamsprings.com whysiloam.com ...................................................................

CALIFORNIA

City of Eastvale

Gina Gibson-Williams Economic Development Manager 12363 Limonite Ave. Suite 910 Eastvale, CA 91752 951-703-4425 ggibson-williams@eastvaleca.gov www.eastvaleca.gov ...................................................................

City of Moreno Valley Economic Development

Mike Lee Economic Development Director 14177 Frederick Street Moreno Valley, CA 92553 951-413-3460 edteam@moval.org www.morenovalleybusiness.com ...................................................................

ARKANSAS

HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology

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Ouachita Partnership for Economic Development

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City of Ontario Economic Development

Tanya Spiegel Executive Director Ecnomic Development 303 East B Street Ontario, CA 91764 909-395-2081 tspiegel@ontarioca.gov www.ontariothinksbusiness.com ...................................................................

Greater Irvine Chamber

Linda DiMario 36 Executive Park Suite 100 Irvine, CA 92614 949-502-4124 ldimario@irvinechamber.com www.irvinechamber.com ...................................................................

COLORADO

City of Fountain Economic Development Commission

Kimberly A. Bailey Economic Development/ Urban Renewal Director 116 S. Main Street Fountain, CO 80817 719-322-2056 kbailey@fountaincolorado.org www.fountaincolorado.org ...................................................................

Grand Junction Economic Partnership

Robin Brown, Executive Director 122 N. 6th Street Grand Junction, CO 81501 970--245-4332 robin@gjep.org www.gjep.org ...................................................................

DELAWARE

American Municipal Power, Inc.

Alexis A. Fitzsimmons Director of Economic & Business Development 1111 Schrock Rd. Columbus, OH 43229 614-540-0994 afitzsimmons@amppartners.org www.searchampsites.com ...................................................................

FLORIDA City of Kissimmee

Belinda O. Kirkegard, Economic Development Director 101 Church Street Kissimmee FL 34741 407-518-2307 BKirkegard@kissimmee.org www.Kissimmee.org ...................................................................


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City of Sanford

Bob Turk Economic Development Director 300 North Park Ave. Sanford, FL 32771 407-688-5015 bob.turk@sanfordfl.gov www.sanfordfl.gov ...................................................................

City of St. Cloud

Antranette Forbes Economic Development & Special Projects Manager 1300 9th Street St. Cloud, FL 34769 (407)957-7234 antranette.forbes@stcloud.org www.stcloud.org/926/economic-development ...................................................................

City of Titusville

Lisa Nicholas 555 South Washington Avenue Titusville, FL 32796-3584 321-567-3774 lisa.nicholas@titusville.com www.YEStitusvilleFL.com ...................................................................

Elevate Lake Economic Development

Tracy Garcia CEcD, EcDMP Director 20763 US Highway 27 Groveland, FL 34736 352-343-9647 352-801-7498 (f) tgarcia@lakecountyfl.gov elevatelake.com ...................................................................

Greater St. Petersburg Area Economic Development Corporation

J.P. DuBuque President and CEO 100 2nd Ave N Ste 130 St. Petersburg, FL 33701 727-388-2906 jpdubuque@stpeteedc.com StPeteEDC.com/BurgBiz ...................................................................

NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF

ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

Haines City Economic Development Council, Inc.

Cyndi Jantomaso, President Post Office Box 3845 Haines City, FL 33845-3845 863-422-2525 863-206-0007 cyndi@hainescityedc.com www.hainescityedc.com ...................................................................

Hernando County Office of Economic Development

Valerie M. Pianta Economic Development Director 15800 Flight Path Drive Brooksville, FL 34604 352--540-6400 vpianta@hernandocounty.us www.hernandobusiness.com ...................................................................

Holmes County Development Commission

Joe Rone, Executive Director 106 E Byrd Avenue Bonifay, FL 32425 850-547-6154 jrone@westflorida.coop hcdc1978@gmail.com www.holmescountyedc.com ...................................................................

Indian River Chamber of Commerce

Helene Caseltine Economic Development Director 1216 21st Street Vero Beach, FL 32960 772-567-3491 helenec@indianrivered.com www.indianrivered.com ...................................................................

Osceola County

David Rodriguez, Economic Development Manager 3 Courthouse Square, 2nd Floor Kissimmee, FL 34741 407-742-0620 407-742-4202 (f) david.rodriguez@osceola.org www.greaterosceola.org ...................................................................

Forward Forsyth

Pasco Economic Development Council

Bill Cronin, President & CEO 16506 Pointe Village Drive Suite 101 Lutz, FL 33558 813-926-0827 813-926-0829 (f) bcronin@pascoedc.com pascoedc.com ...................................................................

James McCoy, President & Ceo P.O. Box 1799 Cumming GA 30028 770-887-6461 770-842-1170 jmccoy@focochamber.org www.forwardforsyth.org ...................................................................

Putnam Development Authority Pinellas County Economic Development

Mike Meidel, CEcD, Director 13805 58th Street North, Suite 1-200 Clearwater, FL 33760 727-464-7332 mmeidel@pinellascounty.org www.pced.org ...................................................................

Tallahassee-Leon County Office of Economic Vitality

Cristina Paredes, Director, OEV 315 S. Calhoun Street, Suite 450 Tallahassee, FL 32301 850-300-7559 Cparedes@OEVforBusiness.org www.oevforbusiness.org ...................................................................

GEORGIA

City of College Park

Artie Jones III Director of Economic Development 3667 Main Street College Park, GA 30337 404-305-2052 404-305-2057 (f) artiejones@collegeparkga.com www.collegeparkga.com/ ...................................................................

City of East Point

Maceo Rogers CEcD 2757 East Point Street East Point, GA 30344 404-270-7057 jmrogers@eastpointcity.org www.eastpointcity.org ...................................................................

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Terry Schwindler Econmical Devleopment Director 117 Putnam Drive, Eaton, GA 31024 706-816-8099 tschwindler@putnamdevelopmentauthority.com www.putnamdevelopmentauthority.com ...................................................................

ILLINOIS

Champaign County Economic Development Corporation

Carly McCrory-McKay, Executive Director 1817 S. Neil Street, Suite 100 Champaign, IL 61820 217-359-6261 carly@champaigncountyedc.org www.champaigncountyedc.org ...................................................................

City of Highland Economic Development

Mallord Hubbard 1115 Broadway, P.O. Box 218 Highland, IL 62249-0218 618-654-9891 618-654-4768 (f) mhubbard@highlandil.gov www.highlandil.gov ...................................................................

City of Litchfield Ecnomic Development

Shelly Herman 120 E. Ryder Street Litchfield, IL 62056 217-324-8146 Sherman@cityoflitchfieldil.com www.litchfieldil-development.com ................................................................... MARCH/APRIL 2021

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NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF

ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

INDIANA City of Marshall

Jennifer Bishop Economic Development Director 201 S. Michigan Ave Marshall, IL 62441 217-826-2034 jbishop@marshall-il.com www.marshall-il.com ...................................................................

American Municipal Power, Inc.

KENTUCKY Dodge City/Ford County Development Corporation

Joann Knight, Executive Director Alexis A. Fitzsimmons 101 E. Wyatt Earp Blvd. Director of Economic & Business Dodge City, KS 67801 Development 620-227-9501 1111 Schrock Rd. 620-227-2957 (f) Columbus, OH 43229 jknight@dodgedev.org 614-540-0994 www.dodgedev.org afitzsimmons@amppartners.org ................................................................... www.searchampsites.com ...................................................................

City of Vandalia

Amber E. Daulbaugh, Director of Economic Development 431 W. Gallatin St. Vandalia, IL 62471 618-283-1152 618-335-9510 (Mobile) vandaliaed@vandaliaillinois.com www.vandaliaillinois.com ...................................................................

Mark Wickersham Executive Driector 8 West Market Street Huntington, IN 46750 260-356-5688 mark@hcued.com www.hcued.com ..................................................................

Brent Case Senior Vice President Business Development 230 W. Monroe St. Chicago, IL 60606 312-667-6013 brent.case@intersectillinois.org intersectillinois.org ...................................................................

Miami County Economic Development Auth.

Jim Tidd 1525 W. Hoosier Boulevard Peru, IN 46970 765-689-0159 jtidd@miamicountyeda.com www.miamicountyeda.com ...................................................................

Molly Howey, CEcD 120 SW 6th Ave. Topeka, KS 66603 785-231-6040 mhowey@gotopeka.com www.gotopeka.com ...................................................................

Steven S. Johnson. CEO One Metropolitan Square Suite 1300 St. Louis, MO 63102 314-444-1105 sjohnson@alliancestl.com alliancestl.com ...................................................................

City of Parsons Economic Development

Jim Zaleski Economic Development Director 112 S. 17th Street Parsons, KS 67357 620-421-7030 jzaleski@parsonsks.com www.growparsons.com ...................................................................

Village of Arlington Heights Business & Economic Development

Coffey County Economic Development

Charles Witherington-Perkins Director of Planning & Community Development 33 S. Arlington Heights Arlington Heights, IL 60005 847-368-5220 cperkins@vah.com www.vah.com ................................................................... BXJ MARCH/APRIL 2021

Bobby Skipper, Director 110 S. 6th St., Room #5 Burlington KS 66839 620-364-8780 620-364-3608 bskipper@coffeycountyks.org www.coffeycountyks.org ................................................................... |

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South Western Kentucky EDC

Carter Hendricks, Executive Director 2800 Fort Campbell Blvd. Hopkinsville, KY 42240 270-885-1499 chendricks@southwesternky.com www.southwesternky.com ...................................................................

LOUISIANA Russell County Eco Devo & CVB

Mike Parsons, Director 331 E. Witchita, Russell, KS 67665 785-483-4000 785-324-0126 rced2@russellks.org www.russellcountyks.org ...................................................................

KANSAS

Alliance STL | St. Louis Regional Economic Development

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Jill Fraley Dotson, Executive Economic Development Director 773 Hambley Boulevard Pikeville, KY 41501 606-437-5128 info@whypikeville.com www.whypikeville.com ...................................................................

Greater Topeka Partnership Huntington County Economic Development

Intersect Illinois

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City of Pikeville

Shawnee Economic Development

Ann Smith-Tate, President CEO 15100 W. 67th Street Suite 202 Shawnee, KS 66217-9344 913-631-6545 asmithtate@shawneekschamber.com www.shawnee-edc.com ...................................................................

Wyandotte Economic Development Council

Greg Kindle, President 727 Minnesota Avenue Kansas City, KS 66101 913-371-3198 gkindle@wyedc.org www.wyedc.org ...................................................................

Louisiana Economic Development

Anya G. Hudnall 1201 N. Third Street Suite 7-210 Baton Rouge, LA 70802 225-342-5396 Anya.hudnal@la.gov www.la.gov ...................................................................

SWLA Economic Development ALLIANCE

George Swift 4310 Ryan Street Lake Charles LA 70605 337-433-3632 gswift@allianceswla.org www.allianceswla.org ...................................................................

St. Mary Parish of Economic Development

Frank Fink, Director 500 Main Street, 5th Floor Courthouse Franklin, LA 70538 337-828-4100 ffink@stmaryparishla.gov www.stmaryparishdevelopmant.com ...................................................................


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NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF

ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

MAINE

MISSOURI Kent County Department of Economic & Tourism Development

Town of Richmond Community, Economic, & Business Development

Darryl Sterling, Director 26 Gardiner Street Richmond, ME 04357-0159 207-737-4305 x 331 207-737-4306 (f) director@richmondmaine.com www.richmondmaine.com ...................................................................

MARYLAND

Calvert County Economic Development

Kelly Robertson-Slagle, Director 205 Main Street Prince Frederick, MD 20678 410-535-4583 kelly.slagle@calvertcountymd.gov www.ecalvert.com ...................................................................

Carroll County Economic Development

Jamie L. Williams, CEcD, Director 400 High Street, 3rd Floor Chestertown MD 21620 410-810-2168 jlwilliams@kentgov.org www.kentcounty.com/business ...................................................................

Maryland Department of Commerce

Tom Riford 100 Community Place Crownsville, MD 21032 877-634-6361 www.maryland.gov ...................................................................

Montgomery County Economic Development

Kristin O’Keefe 1801 Rockville Pike, Ste. 320 Rockville, MD 20852 240-641-6703 kristin@thinkmoco.com www.thinkmoco.com ...................................................................

MICHIGAN

Paige Sunderland, Director 225 N. Center Street, Ste. 101 Westminster, MD 21157 410-386-2070 psunderland@carrollbiz.org www.carrollbiz.org ...................................................................

Michigan Economic Development Corporation

Cecil County Economic Development

The Right Place, Inc.

Chris Moyer, Director 200 Chesapeake Blvd., Ste 2700 Elkton, MD 21921 410-996-8465 cmoyer@ccgov.org www.ccgov.org ...................................................................

Dorchester County Economic Development

Susan Banks, Director 104 Tech Park Drive Cambridge, MD 21613 410-228-0155 sbanks@choosedorchester.org www.choosedorchester.org ...................................................................

Doug Kulper, SVP Business Marketing & Communication Director 300 North Washington Square Lansing, MI 48913 www.michiganadvantage.org ...................................................................

Andria Romkema 125 Ottawa Avenue, Suite 450 Grand Rapids, MI 49503 616-771-0563 romkemaa@rightplace.org www.Rightplace.org ...................................................................

Northeastern Nevada Regional Development Authority

Alliance STL | St. Louis Regional Economic Development

Steven S. Johnson, CEO One Metropolitan Square Suite 1300 St. Louis, MO 63102 314-444-1105 sjohnson@alliancestl.com alliancestl.com ...................................................................

NEW JERSEY

Taney County Partnership

Jonas Arjes Executive Director 269 State Highway 248 Branson, MO 65616 417-334-4084 jarjes@taneycountypartnership.com www.taneycountypartnership.com ...................................................................

NEVADA

City of Henderson Economic Development

Derek Armstrong, Director City Hall Annex 280 Water Street MSC 512 P.O. Box 95050 Henderson, NV 89009-5050 702-267-1650 702-267-1651 (f) derek.armstrong@cityofhenderson. com www.hendersonnow.com ...................................................................

Tom Bianco, Director 1480 Tanyard Rd., Sewell, NJ 08080 856-384-6930 tbianco@co.gloucester.nj.us www.gloucestercountynj.gov ...................................................................

Perry Ursem Vice President, Business Retention + Expansion 6720 via Austi Parkway Suite #330 Las Vegas, NV 89119 702-791-0000 www.Ivgea.org ................................................................... bxjmag.com

Allegany County Industrial Development Agency

Craig Clark, Executive Director CrossRoads Center 6087 State Route 19N Suite 100 Belmont, NY 14813 585-268-7445 585-268-7473 (f) clarkcr@alleganyco.com www.acida.org ...................................................................

The Agency-Broome County IDA/LDC

Las Vegas Global Ecnomic Alliance

David Olson, Director 20195 Holyoke Avenue Lakeville, MN 55044 952-985-4421 dolson@lakevillemn.gov www.lakevillemn.gov ...................................................................

Gloucester County Department of Economic Development

NEW YORK

MINNESOTA

City of Lakeville Community & Economic Development

Sheldon Mudd, Executive Director 1500 College Pkwy McMullen Hall #103 Elko, NV 89801 775-738-2100 775-738-7978(f) smudd@nnrda.com www.nnrda.com ...................................................................

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Stacey Duncan, Deputy Director of Community & Economic Development Five South College Drive Suite 201 Binghamton, NY 13905 607-584-9000 607-584-9009 (f) smd@theagency-ny.com www.theagency-ny.com ...................................................................

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NORTH CAROLINA

NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF

ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

NORTH DAKOTA

PENNSYLVANIA

TENNESSEE Blount Partnership

Bryan Daniels CEcD, CCE, IOM President and CEO Alexis A. Fitzsimmons, Director of 201 S. Washington Street Economic & Business Development St. Maryville, TN 37804 1111 Schrock Rd. 865-983-2247 Columbus, OH 43229 865-984-1386 614-540-0994 bdaniels@blountpartnership.com afitzsimmons@amppartners.org www.blountchamber.com www.searchampsites.com ................................................................... ...................................................................

American Municipal Power, Inc.

Beaufort County Economic Development

Bismarck Mandan Chamber EDC

Martyn Johnson, Director 705 Page Road Washington, NC 27889 252-946-3970 252-946-0849 (f) martyn.johnson@beaufortedc.com www.co.beaufort.nc.us ..................................................................

Nathan Schneider CEcD-Vice President 1640 Burnt Boat Dr. Bismark, ND 58503 701-223-5660 nschneider@bmcedc.com www.bismarckmandan.com .................................................................

OHIO

American Municipal Power, Inc.

Harnett County Economic Development

RHODE ISLAND

City of Cranston

Lawrence DiBoni, Director of Economic Development 869 Park Avenue Cranston, RI 02910 401-780-3166 401-780-3179 (f) ldiboni@cranstonri.org www.cranstonri.com ...................................................................

Alexis A. Fitzsimmons, Director of Economic & Business Development 1111 Schrock Rd. Columbus, OH 43229 City of Warwick 614-540-0994 Department of Tourism, afitzsimmons@amppartners.org Culture, and Development www.searchampsites.com ................................................................... Elizabeth J. Dunton, Acting Director 3275 Pos t Road OKLAHOMA Warwick, RI 2886 401-921-7711 401-732-7662 elizabeth.j.dunton@warwickri.com movetowarwickri.com .................................................................. Bartlesville Development

Debbie Taylor, Marketing & Business Recruitment Manager 200 Alexander Dr. or PO Box 1270 Lillington, NC 27546 910-814-6891 919-814-8298 (f) dhtaylor@harnett.org www.harnettedc.org ...................................................................

North Carolina Global Transpark

Authority

John W. Rouse Executive Director 2780 Jetport Road Kinston, NC 28504 252-775-6183 252-522-1765 (f) jwrouse@ncdot.gov www.ncgtp.com .................................................................

Jared Patton, Vice President 201 SW Keeler Bartlesville, OK 74003 918-337-8086 918-337-0216 (f) jpatton@bdaok.org www.bdaok.org ...................................................................

Quonset Development Corporation

Steven J. King, Managing Director 95 Cripe Street North Kingstown, RI 2852 401-295-0044 sking@quonset.com www.quonset.com ...................................................................

SOUTH CAROLINA

Stanly County Economic Development Commission

Ponca City Development Authority

Candice Boyd Lowder, Director 704-986-3682 704-986-3685 (f) clowder@stanlyedc.com 1000 North First Street, Suite 11 Albemarle, NC 28001 www.stanlyedc.com ...................................................................

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David Myers, Executive Director 102 S. Fifth Street Suite 3 Ponca City, OK 74601 580-765-7070 580-765-7070 (f) dmyers@goponca.com www.goponca.com ................................................................... |

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Lexington County Economic Development

Sarah J. Johnson Department Director 212 South Lake Drive Lexington, SC 29072 803-785-6818 sjjohnson@lex-co.com www.LexingtonCountyUSA.com ...................................................................

Bristol Tennessee Essential Services

April Eads Business Development Manager 2470 Volunteer Parkway Bristol, TN 37620 423-793-5532 423-793-5545 (f) aeads@btes.net www.btes.net/index.php/economic-development ...................................................................

City of Lebanon

Sarah Haston Economic Development Director 200 North Castle Heights Ave. Lebanon, TN 37087 615-443-2839 EXT. 2120 Sarah.Haston@lebanontn.org www.lebanontn.org ...................................................................

NETWORKS – Sullivan Partnership

Clay Walker PO Box 747 Blountville, TN 37617 423-279-7681 cwalker@networkstn.com www.networkstn.com ...................................................................

TEXAS

Big Spring Economic Development Corporation

Mark Willis 215 W. 3rd Street Big Spring, TX 79720 432-264-6032 markwillis@bigspringtx.com www.bigspringtx.com ...................................................................


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NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF

ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

Cameron Industrial Foundation

Ginger Watkins, Executive Director 102 E. First Street, Suite A Cameron, TX 76520 254-697-4970 254-482-1119 (c) gwatkins@cameronindustrialfoundation.com www.cameronindustrialfoundation.com ...................................................................

Cedar Hill Economic Development

Kim M. Buttram, CEcD 285 Uptown Boulevard, Bldg. 100 Cedar Hill, TX 75104 972-291-5132 chedc@cedarhilltx.com www.cedarhilledc.com ...................................................................

City Development Corporation of El Campo

Carolyn Gibson Executive Director 707 Fahrenthold El Campo, TX 77437 979-543-6727 979-320-7727 cell cgibson@elcampoeco.org www.elcampoeco.org ...................................................................

City of Fort Worth

Robert Sturns, Director 1150 S. Freeway Fort Worth, TX 76104 817-392-2663 Robert.Sturns@fortworthtexas.gov ...................................................................

City of Leander

Evan Milliorn Economic Development Director 201 N Brushy Leander, TX 78641 512-528-2852 emilliorn@leandertx.gov www.leanderbusiness.com ...................................................................

Conroe Economic Development Council

Danielle Scheiner, Executive Director 505 West Davis Street Conroe, TX 77301 USA 936-538-7118 scheiner@conroeedc.org www.conroeedc.org ...................................................................

DeSoto Economic Development

Joe Newman, CEO 211 E. Pleasant Run Road DeSoto, TX 75115 Ph: 972-230-9611 jnewman@dedc.org www.dedc.org ...................................................................

LCRA

Karen Dickson Economic Development Manager 3700 Lake Austin Blvd. Austin, TX 78703 512-578-3291 karen.dickson@lcra.org www.lcra.org/economic-development/pages/default.aspx ...................................................................

McKinney Economic Development Corporation

Peter Tokar III, President/CEO 5900 S. Lake Forest Drive McKinney, TX 75070 972-435-6953 ptokar@mckinneyedc.com www.uniquemckinney.com ...................................................................

Odessa Economic Development Corporation

Wesley Burnett 700 N. Grant Ave. Odessa, TX 79761 432-333-7880 wburnett@odessaecodev.com www.odessatx.com ...................................................................

New Braunfels EDC

Gainesville Economic Development Corp

Audrey Schroyer 311 S. Weaver Street Gainsville, TX 76240 940-665-5241 aschroyer@cogtx.org www.gainesvilleedc.com ...................................................................

Chester Jenke 390 S. Seguin Avenue New Braunfels, TX 78130 830-608-2811 holly@innewbraunfels.com www.newbraunfelsedc.com ...................................................................

Pflugerville Community Development

Jacksboro Economic Development Corporation

Lynda Pack Executive Director P.O. Box 610 Jacksboro, TX 76458 940-567-3151 lyndapack@jacksboroedc.com www.jacksboroedc.com ..................................................................

Veronica Ramirez 3801 Helios Way Suite 130 Pflugerville, TX 78660 512-990-3725 veronicar@pfdevelopment.com www.pfevelopment.com ..................................................................

Plainview Economic Development Corporation Laredo Economic Development

Olivia Varela, President & CEO P.O. Box 2682 Laredo, TX 78044 956-722-0563 ovarela@laredoedc.org www.laredoedc.org ...................................................................

Mansfield Economic Development Corporation

TexAmericas Center

301 S. Main Street Mansfield, TX 76063 817-728-3652 www.mansfield-texas.com ...................................................................

Marble Falls EDC

Christian Fletcher 801 Fourth Street Marble Falls, TX 78654 830-798-7079 cfletcher@marblefallseconomy.com www.marblefallseconomy.com ...................................................................

Mount Pleasant EDC

Nathan Tafoya, Executive Director 1604 N. Jefferson Ave. Mount Pleasant, TX 75455 903-572-6602 nathan@mpedc.org www.mpedc.org ................................................................... bxjmag.com

Michael Fox, Executive Director 1906 West 5th Plainview, TX 79072 806-293-8536 michael.fox@plainviewedc.org www.plainviewedc.org ...................................................................

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Ruth Jackson Customer Eng. Specialist 107 Chapel Lane New Boston, TX 75570 903-223-9841 ruth.jackson@texamericascenter. com www.texamericascenter.com ...................................................................

Whitesboro Economic Development Corp.

Lynda Anderson Director P.O. Box 340 or 111 W. Main Whitesboro, TX 76273 930-564-3311 landerson@whitesborotexas.com www.whitesborotexas.com ...................................................................

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NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF

ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

UTAH County of Gloucester

Sherry A. Spring Director of Economic Development 6489 Main Street Gloucester, VA 23061 804-693-1414 sspring@gloucesterva.info www.gloucesterva.info ..................................................................

Eagle Mountain Economic Development

Aaron Sanborn, City Administrator 1650 E. Stagecoach Run Eagle Mountain, UT 84005 801-789-6621 asanborn@emcity.org www.eaglemountaincity.com ...................................................................

WASHINGTON

Mingo County Redevelopment Authority

Leasha Johnson, Executive Director 1657 East Fourth Avenue Williamson, WV 25661 304-235-0042 304-235-0043 (f) ljohnson.mcra@suddenlinkmail.com www.developmingo.com ...................................................................

WISCONSIN

City of Brandon

Sandy Trudel Director of Eocnomic Development Main Floor, 410 9th Street Brandon, Manitoba, Canada R7A 6A2 204-729-2131 s.trudel@brandon.ca www.economicdevelopmentbrandon.com ...................................................................

VIRGINA New North, Inc City of Lakewood Economic Development

Becky Newton, Manager 6000 Main Street SW Lakewood, WA 98499 877-421-9126 bnewton@cityoflakewood.us www.buildyourbetterhere.com ...................................................................

Alexandria Economic Development Partnership

Adrianne Griffith Marketing & Communications 625 North Washington St. Suite 400 Alexandria, VA 22314 703-739-3820 730-739-1384 (f) griffith@alexecon.org www.growALX.com ...................................................................

Portage County Business Council, Inc. PCB City of Maple Valley

Tim Morgan Economic Development Manager P.O. Box 320 Maple Valley, WA 98038 425-413-8800 tim.morgan@maplevalleywa.gov www.maplevalleywa.gov ..................................................................

Arlington Economic Development

Telly Tucker, AED Director 1100 N Glebe Rd Suite 1500 Arlington, VA 22201 703-228-0808 703-228-0805 (f) ttucker@arlingtonva.us www.arlingtoneconomicdevelopment.com ...................................................................

Try-City Development Council

Carl Adrian, President & CEO 7130 W. Grandridge Blvd #A Kennewich, WA 99336 509-735-1000 cadrian@tridec.org www.tridec.org ..................................................................

WEST VIRGINIA

Bedford County Office of Economic Development

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Todd Kuckkahn, Executive Director 5501 Vern Holmes Drive Stevens Point, WI 54482 715-344-1940 715-344-1940 (f) tkuckkah@portagecountybiz.com www.portagecountyconnects.com ...................................................................

Bonnie Brown Mississauga City Hall 300 City Centre Drive, 3rd Floor Mississauga, ON L5B 3C1 Canada 800-456-2181 905-896-5931 bonnie.brown@mississauga.ca www.TheFuturelsUnlimited.ca ...................................................................

City of Guelph

Christine Chapman 1 Carden Street Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1H 3A1 519--822-1260 ext. 2823 Christine.chapman@guelph.ca www.guelph.ca/business ...................................................................

WYOMING County of Elgin Cheyenne LEADS

Betsey Hale, Chief Executive Officer One Depot Square 121 W. 15th St. Suite 304 Cheyenne, WY 82001 307-638-6000 betseyh@cheyenneleads.org cheyenneleads.org ...................................................................

Alan Smith, General Manager, Economic Development 450 Sunset Drive St. Thomas, Ontario, Canada N5R 5V1 519-631-1460 ext. 137 asmith@elgin.ca www.progressivebynature.com ...................................................................

CANADA Vaughan Economic and Cultural Development

Traci Blido Economic Development Director 122 E. Main St. Suite 202 Bedford, VA 24523 540-587-5670 540-586-0406 (f) tblido@bedfordcountyva.gov www.bedfordeconomicdevelopment.com ...................................................................

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Barb LaMue, President & CEO 2740 W. Mason Street Green Bay, WI 54303 920-676-1960 barb.lamue@thenewnorth.com www.thenewnorth.com ...................................................................

City of Mississauga Economic Development

American Municipal Power, Inc.

Town of Ajax

Don Terry Alexis A. Fitzsimmons, Director of Manager, Economic Development Economic & Business Development & Tourism 1111 Schrock Rd. 65 Harwood Avenue South Columbus, OH 43229 Ajax, Ontario, Canada L1S 2H9 614-540-0994 905-619-2529 ext. 3252 afitzsimmons@amppartners.org don.terry@ajax.ca www.searchampsites.com www.ajaxfirstforbusiness.com ................................................................... ................................................................... |

bxjmag.com

Dennis Cutajar Vaughan City Hall, Level 200 2141 Major Mackenzie Drive Vaughan, Ontario, Canada L6A 1T1 905-832-8526 ext. 8274 dennis.cutajar@vaughan.ca www.vaughan.ca ...................................................................


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March April 2021 Digital Issue  

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