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2013 Fall Arts Preview pg. 97

It's the

Fall Fashion issue pg. 80

into the wild

3

Romantic Getaways pg. 71

Ghoulish Halloween Delights pg. 88

pg. 104

September/October 2013 Display until October 31

www.jeffersoncitymag.com

Downtown Revolution pg. 45


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A Closer Look: Dr. Sheila Carnett

BY KELSEY GILLESPY In her not-so-distant history, Sheila Carnett was a 3rd grader racing her bicycle down Jefferson City streets. Young Carnett pedaled fast, flying beyond St. Peter’s Church to the domed building on West Capitol Avenue. At the base of the stone stairs, she and her friends hopped from their bikes to spend time at the state capitol. They greeted Thomas Jefferson on their trek up the south stairwell. Later, they climbed a bronze statue at the north entrance and became involved, if only for a moment, in the

10 | September/October 2013

signing of the Louisiana Purchase. As the smooth bronze took shape in her tiny palm, she felt past merge with present. What she didn’t feel was how it would fuse with her future.

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“It’s amazing to be the first person who holds the baby and sees the parents’ faces.”

Now, the bike-riding 3rd grader has transformed into a highly regarded OB/GYN at the Capital Region Medical Center. “Being able to come back to Jefferson City and work at the hospital is kind of like completing a circle in a way,” she says. “I really enjoy working there.” Dr. Carnett provides a wide array of women’s health services and procedures so that she may fully share in her patients’ experience. She establishes relationships with her patients by helping them with contraception, obstetrics, menopause, and pregnancy. “During a pregnancy, you have so many visits with your physician you really get to know them,” Dr. Carnett states. She even performs her own obstetric ultrasounds to get to know her patients better and be completely involved in their adventure to motherhood. When new parents rely on someone to bring life to a tiny loved one, a caring, trustworthy doctor like Dr. Carnett is

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vital to a comfortable experience. “It’s amazing to be the first person who holds the baby and sees the parents’ faces,” she explains. “You have to have that trust.” That mindset trickles to every staff member at the CRMC women’s wellness center. “They have fantastic medical staff,” Dr. Carnett praises. “The nurses on labor and delivery, I can’t imagine any better.” Dr. Carnett even credits patients’ strength for her success in the delivery room. “Babies and women are so resilient. The process of delivering a baby is traumatic to the body, but it bounces back and heals itself,” she says. “It’s really an amazing process.” These days she willingly trades in her handlebars for scrubs and latex gloves, knowing full well that they will give her the ride of her life. “You think of little babies as being so fragile and so delicate, their skin is brand new and so soft, but they are so tough,” notes Dr. Carnett. “They just conform to whatever they’re going through and that continues for the rest of their life. They soak up everything around them and then turn into whatever they’re going to be in the end.” Her heart races now, instead of her feet, as small babies take their first breath in her hands. Coupled with the strength of her patients, she pulls life into this world. Years from now, those children may caress the same bronze statues on West Capitol Avenue, becoming etched into a shared history and launching into their unique future.


Jefferson City Magazine | 11


Jefferson City Magazine | 13


p u b l i s h e r ' s not e

Y

You will not be bored in Jefferson City this fall! I have never seen the calendar so jam-packed with festivals, events and entertainment. And there isn’t a better time of year to get out of the house and enjoy our beautiful historic river city. September kicks off with the return of Thursday Night Live and then is followed with the Downtown Arts Stroll and the Prison Break Race all in the same weekend. Old Munichburg’s Oktoberfest is a sure fix for a great time for the whole family. Come out for the day, and enjoy multiple food vendors serving up yummy fall foods, the kids’ corner for face painting and games for all ages. And, of course, don’t miss the Dachshund costume contest. Those puppies are always crowd pleasers. Find these events and more on page 21. If you need an excuse to grab your sweetie and get away for a fall weekend, check out the three bed-and-breakfasts featured on page 71. Each B&B is paired with a winery where you can taste the local samplings and enjoy the fall foliage and beautiful Missouri landscapes, not to mention some good one-on-one time with that special person in your life. As always, I have to give a shout-out to the fantastic people who are making a difference in Jefferson City. On page 45, you will read about the explosion of new businesses downtown and the investments that people are making in our community. Be sure to walk High Street and patronize these new business ventures. Let them know you are glad they are here. Winter is coming, so get outdoors, and enjoy our wonderful city this fall! Be happy!

Editorial Tami Turner Publisher Rebecca Rademan assoc. Publisher/Editor Katrina Tauchen Copy Editor

DESIGN Kristin Branscom art Director

Marketing Representatives Tami Turner • Tami@JeffersonCityMag.com Angie Huhman • Angie@BusinessTimesCompany.com Mason Neff • Mason@BusinessTimesCompany.com

Creative Services Kate Morrow Creative Marketing Gillian Tracey Graphic Designer

Photography Travis Duncan, Anthony Jinson, Kristina Stafford

Contributing Writers Jill Bednar, Stephanie Bell, Courtney Brown, Matt Cowell, Lauren Sable Freiman, Tom Loeffler, Eric Luebbert, Dana Miller, Rebecca Rademan, Heather Shields, Molly Wright

Management Chris Harrison General Manager Cindy Pudney Operations manager Renea Sapp Business Manager Erica Pefferman DIRECTOR OF Sales

Calendar Event Submissions, News Release, Snapshots or Article Idea Email Rebecca@JeffersonCityMag.com

Subscriptions Subscription rate is $19.95 for 6 issues for 1 year. To place an order or to inform us of a change of address, email CindyS@businesstimescompany.com. Subscriptions available online at jeffersoncitymag.com.

Reprints Contact Cindy Pudney at: 573-635-9395

on t h e co v e r Jefferson City Magazine is published by The Business Times Co., 114 B E. High St., Ste 201, Jefferson City MO, 65101, 573-635-9395. Copyright The Business Times Co., 2012. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of any editorial or graphic content without express written permission of the publisher is prohibited.

2013 Fall Arts Preview PG. 97

It's the

FALL FASHION ISSUE PG. 80

INTO THE WILD

3

ROMANTIC GETAWAYS PG. 71

Ghoulish Halloween Delights PG. 88

PG. 104

September/October 2013 Display until October 31

www.jeffersoncitymag.com

DOWNTOWN REVOLUTION PG. 45

Local native and cover model Jamie Farmer poses with Homer, the bulldog, at the Pantone Color Story fall fashion shoot taken in the industrial district of Jefferson City. See fashion spread on Page 80. Hair and makeup by Marshall & Co. Salon & Spa. Styling by Eric Luebbert. Photo by Anthony Jinson.

Follow Jefferson City Magazine on Facebook.

Jefferson City Magazine | 15


contributors i n t h e n e ws

Hometown Kindness

1

Honoring acts of kindness, peace and joy 2 3

4 ① Courtney Brown, contributing writer While writing about The Inn at Hermannhof, I virtually discovered and explored the inn's impeccable blend of luxury and historic charm. Each fall, I make at least one trip to Hermann to visit Hermannhof. The Inn at Hermannhof will undoubtedly be on my list of must-see places this year, and I hope you will add it to your list as well. Cheers!

② Dana Rademan Miller, contributing writer Missouri’s historical romance with the grapevine is as intriguing and twisted as the vines themselves: a tale of acres of vineyards lost and prosperous wineries shuttered during the dusty years of Prohibition, then the slow but remarkable rebirth in the decades following. It’s a renaissance that continues to transform our rural landscape into quality wine-producing appellations today. And yes, I sometimes romanticize that my sturdy German-French ancestors who settled these rocky hills and valleys looked forward to their annual grape stomp and, in so doing, passed the fascination of the vine on to me. I love Missouri wine and am extremely proud of our hardworking entrepreneurs who are putting the Show-Me State’s wine industry back on the map.

③ Lauren Sable Freiman, contributing writer As a writer, I'm very lucky to have the opportunity to talk to people such as Joshua Lehmen and Sherry Allen, learn more about their stories and ask questions about their inspiration and goals. Their dedication, enthusiasm, creativity and drive motivate me to consider new possibilities and leave me inspired to embark on new projects of my own.

④ Tom Loeffler, contributing writer David Scott has lived a great life. The good doctor has helped thousands of people during his more than five decades of practice, and he's lived his dream of becoming an international biggame hunter; his home is proof of the latter, as it’s a shrine to the wild kingdom. And he’s done it all with the love and support of his wife of 53 years, Virginia, by his side.

“When we were days away from opening our doors two and a half years ago, Gregory and I were pulling all-nighters to get construction and the final details completed. It was stressful and exhausting. When we were days from opening, Jill Bednar just walked into our space and graciously welcomed us to downtown and as her neighboring business. We did not know her until that day. She stopped her busy day and picked up a broom and just started cleaning and dusting. We insisted that she stop, but she continued showing us her tremendously huge heart. She stayed almost a whole day just helping us out. Since then, Jill from Southbank has continued being a lending hand, a friendly smile and wonderful neighbor. Downtown Jefferson City is like a family; we help one another, welcome one another and continue to support and grow our wonderful city.” Jill Bednar Owner, Southbank Gift Co. Resides in Jefferson City Submitted by: Brandon Scott and Gregory Medlin

Did you know? More than 400 people serve as volunteers for United Way of Central Missouri. Check out page 63 to learn more about the agency and its work in the community. Has someone inspired you? Submit acts of kindness to Rebecca@ jeffersoncitymag.com or on our Facebook page at facebook.com/Jeffersoncitymag. Jefferson City Magazine | 17


cont e nts

34

61

80

88

✩ publisher's note p. 15 ✩ Contributors p. 17 ✩ At Home 26 Home Tour: Vineyard Square Style 34 Basement Renovation: Modern Makeover 41 Hit List: Bronzed Age, River City Florist

71

At work 45 Business Feature: Downtown Revolution, Five New Emerging Businesses 51 Business Column: Five Steps to Increase Employee Engagement 52 Business Profile: On Site Oil Change and Auto Repair Shop 56 City Character: Renaissance Man, Dr. Jack Sanders 61 Person You Should Know: Dr. Kevin Rome, Lincoln University 63 Philanthropy: The Muppets Take Missouri, United Way

At ease 69 Book Review: The Gathering Place 71 Local Travel: Three Fall B&B Getaways 77 The Dish: Das Stein Haus 80 Fashion Feature: Pantone Color Report 88 Gourmet: Ghoulish Delights, Frosted Art 97 Artist Profile: Fall Arts Preview 104 The Man Page: Into the Wild, Dr. David Scott

in every issue 21 Agenda 22 Datebook 43 Business Briefs 112 Ask Eric 113 Fashion Forecast 115 Snapshots 122 The Last Word

113

69 63


20 | September/October 2013


agenda

Photo by Kristina Stafford

Sept/Oct

There ion of e n is a xplosainment rt art and entein the capital taking placeson! Check out city this searts preview on our fall a 97 . page

Fall is upon us and offers many wonderful opportunities to immerse oneself in the Jefferson City cultural scene.

13th Annual Oktoberfest what: The family-friendly event includes activities such as German music, dancing, food and, of course, the Muenchberg Beer & Wine Garden with a variety of local entertainers. The Dachshund costume contest and derby are festival favorites, along with a car show, craft and food vendors and a kids' corner. when: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 28 where: Old Munichburg District, Jefferson City info: Cost is free. For details, call 573-635-6524, or visit oldmunichburg.com.

Taste of Missouri Wines “Sip and Sit”

Painted Rocking Chair by local artist Gregory Medlin to be auctioned off at the 2013 “Sip & Sit”

what: Savor the flavors of Missouri at the Cultural Arts Commission “Sip and Sit” wine tasting and art auction that includes: St. Aubert Hills Vineyard, St. James Winery, Stone Hill Winery, Twisted Vine Vineyard, Wenwood Farm Winery and White Mule Winery, all while enjoying the music of Dave Panico. The tasting will be paired with gourmet desserts as well as coffee and tea provided by Three Story Coffee. Guests who attend will also have the opportunity to participate in a local art auction, with pieces decorated by local artists. when: 5:30 to 8 p.m. Friday, Sept. 13 where: Capitol City Cork and Provisions, 124 E. High St. info: Cost is $10 per person; tickets are available at Art Bazaar, Carrie’s Hallmark and Capitol City Cork and Provisions. For details, call 573-338-8800, or visit artsinjc.com.

Prison Break Race what: Once again, Jefferson City Outdoors gives you the opportunity to break out of a real dungeon, deep beneath a 176-year-old abandoned prison, where convicts sat for years at a time without daylight, running water or contact with the outside world. Racers will emerge from the prison’s dungeon, sprint through Housing Unit 4 and set out on a five-plus-mile course that will test every facet of their athleticism. Expect the unexpected; hilly terrain combined with a slew of obstacles will be featured at every turn. When the race is finished, treat yourself to Prison Brews, and buy a growler of your favorite flavor. where: Missouri State Penitentiary, 115 Lafayette St. when: Registration 6:30 to 7:30 a.m., race 9 to 11 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 7 info: Cost is $40 per person; includes T-shirt, mug shot photo and surprise at the end. Call 573-632-2820, or visit jcrprisonbreak.wordpress.com.

22nd Annual Capital Jazzfest and Capital Street Art Fair what: Experience a showcase celebration of the best galleries, artists, photography, restaurants, shops and entertainment downtown Jefferson City has to offer. Take a leisurely stroll down High and Madison streets, and see artists at work, theater groups, acoustic musicians, street performers and more. Buy a $2 wristband, and purchase adult beverages from participating outdoor bars. when: Noon, music from 1:30 to 8 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 7 where: Corner of Madison and High streets, downtown Jefferson City info: Cost is free. For details, call Capital Arts at 573-635-8355, or visit capitalarts.org or artsinjc.com; or contact Jazz Fest at 573-635-6866, capjazz.org.

Visit Jefferson City Magazine’s online calendar at jeffersoncitymag.com. Jefferson City Magazine | 21


save the date datebook

Sept. 7

datebook

Sept. 13

September 2013

5/Thursday

14/Saturday

6/Friday

20-22/Friday-Sunday

Thursday Night Live, 6-9 p.m., High Street, Downtown

Art Stroll, 6-9 p.m., Downtown

7/Saturday

Prison Break Race, 9-11 a.m., Missouri State Penitentiary 22nd Annual Capital Jazzfest and Capital Street Art Fair, Noon to 8 p.m., Downtown

13/Friday

Sit and Sip, 5:30-8 p.m., Capitol City Cork and Provisions 22 | September/October 2013

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Roots N Blues N BBQ, Friday at 5 p.m., Saturday and Sunday at Noon, Stephens Lake Park, Columbia

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KNLJ Second Annual Christian Business Expo, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Capitol Plaza Hotel

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United Way Kick Off for Kids, 5-7 p.m., Memorial Park Pavilion

Mon Tues Wed Thur 2

Labor Day Parade, 11 a.m., High Street

12/Thursday

Sun 1

Race to the Dome, 9 a.m., Providence or Hartsburg

JCMG Free Fun Walk/Run into the Night, Registration at 6:30 p.m., Walk at 7 p.m., JCMG Orthopedics Parking Lot

Preserving Our History and Remembering 9/11, The Historical Society Museum and Courtyard, 5:30 p.m.

Sept. 20-22

Historic Jefferson’s 2013 Annual Homes Tour Featuring Hayselton Drive, 1-5 p.m.

28 /Saturday

Sept. 29

Cruisin’ for MDA, 4-8 p.m., Capital Mall Old Munichburg Oktoberfest, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Old Munichburg District Angiepalooza 2013, Downtown Street Party, 2-5 p.m., High Street, Jefferson City

29/Sunday

Jefferson City Airport Open House/Fly-In, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., Jefferson City Airport

Visit Jefferson City Magazine’s online calendar at jeffersoncitymag.com.


datebook

Oct. 15

datebook 1/Tuesday

Treatment Options for Pain in the Hand, Finger, Wrist and Elbow Seminar, 5:30-6:30 p.m., Hawthorn Bank Community Room

3/Thursday

Calena’s Fashions Fall Fashion Show, Noon, Meadowlake Acres Country Club, RSVP Requested

4/Friday

Capital City Cross-Country Challenge, 8:15 a.m., Oak Hills Golf Center Helias Homecoming, 6:30 p.m.

10/Thursday

JCHS Homecoming Parade, 6:30 p.m.

12/Saturday

Missouri Special Olympics Over the Edge, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Jefferson State Office Building Hartsburg Pumpkin Festival, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Hartsburg

13/Sunday

Hartsburg Pumpkin Festival, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Hartsburg 24 | September/October 2013

Oct. 25

Oct. 12-13

October 2013 15/Tuesday

11th Annual Realtors and Friends Keep the Home Fires Burning Chili Supper, Raffle and Food Drive, 4-7:30 p.m., The Eagles on Missouri Boulevard

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Jefferson City Area Chamber of Commerce, Start Up Jefferson City Competition, 9 a.m., Capital Event Center

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JCMG Breast Cancer: Latest Options for Prevention and Treatment Seminar, 5:30-7 p.m., Hawthorn Bank Community Room

25/Friday

Dreams to Reality Black and White Masquerade Ball, 7 p.m., G2 Gallery

28/Monday

Oct. 30

River City Wine Riedel Tasting, 6-9 p.m., G2 Gallery

30/Wednesday

Family Howlin’ Halloween Costume Party, 6:30-8 p.m., Missouri River Regional Library

Visit Jefferson City Magazine’s online calendar at jeffersoncitymag.com.


26 | September/October 2013


Vineyard Square Style The Burrusses modernize a vintage East End home

B y H e at h e r S h i e l d s Photos by Travis Duncan

Jefferson City Magazine | 27


28 | September/October 2013


“This house has been a part of Jefferson City and so many people’s lives for a very long time. It needed to be restored, and we were happy to do it.” — Kathy Burruss

J

Jefferson City natives Chris and Kathy Burruss have always loved the history-rich homes on the East End of town. They kept an eye out for one that spoke to them, and a house on Vineyard Square did just that. “This house has been a part of Jefferson City and so many people’s lives for a very long time,” Kathy says. “It needed to be restored, and we were happy to do it.” After purchasing the home in October 2011, renovation began. “We ultimately tried to keep as much of the character that we could,” Chris says. Built in 1925, the home was originally a gift from female contractor Mayme Vineyard to her son. Vineyard designed and built 23 homes in the area and was known to use quality materials, which was evident in the four-bedroom, two-and-a-half-bath home. The Burrusses found the structur-

al integrity of the home basically intact but wanted to modernize things. “But we didn’t want the house to become something it wasn’t,” Kathy says. Once the interior demolition began, Kathy says it “quickly became that piece of string on a piece of clothing that you pull, and it just keeps unraveling.” Challenges were revealed but ultimately led to opportunities to make the house even better. The renovation included all interior walls stripped to the studs with new drywall installed due to wiring needs; refinished hardwood floors, all of which are original except for in the kitchen; new plumbing; new electrical wiring and service; new bathroom fixtures and flooring where needed; lighting fixtures throughout the house and outside; a new retaining wall; new kitchen cabinets and appliances; new energy-effiJefferson City Magazine | 29


cient windows; and new roofing. It also included losing one of the bedrooms to create a larger master suite and opening up the entryway in the home. Despite the extensive work done to modernize the home, the Burrusses maintained what character and charm they could. In addition to refinishing all the original hardwood floors, they reused much of the original trim and added where needed to keep the original look throughout the house. “We kept the arched doorway into the den, the wooden front door with the stained glass, the wood screen door and the French doors to the outside front patio,” Chris says. The original fireplace came from St. Louis, and though it is currently too shallow to burn wood, it will be updated to a gas fireplace. However, its ornate mantel and marble are intact and have been given a new coat of paint to match the neutral color palette of the house. 30 | September/October 2013

“It’s a beautiful fireplace,” general contractor Shannon Wade, owner of Real Property Improvements, says. T h e n e u t r a l colors throughout the home were chosen specifically to highlight the Burrusses’ extensive art collection. “I wanted the art to be the focal point, not the wall,” Kathy says. Wade also says his favorite room of the completed renovation is the kitchen. “It’s an amazing kitchen. It’s not the largest kitchen, but the Burrusses maximized space by using tall kitchen cabinets.” A kitchen focal point is the custom butcherblock island Kathy and Chris commissioned from the Amish in Stover. “It’s ash, oak and walnut,” Kathy says. The sea-grass green island complements the cream-colored cabinets with bronze hardware, black, cream and gray granite countertops and stainless-steel appliances.


Originally, there were sleeping porches on the back of the house that the Burrusses wanted to save but due to safety issues had to be removed. A two-tier deck was added instead. However, Kathy says the most surprising aspect of the project was the basement. A complete remodel of the basement was undertaken, though not planned for, when it was discovered the main support beam was cracked. A new steel support beam was added and the house leveled over several days. “There was a positive outcome,” Kathy says. “Before, you had to tilt your head to one side when coming down the stairs to the basement due to the way the staircase was laid out. There wasn’t much head space. Because we had to replace the beam, we were able to move it back enough to create much more space.” R e n o vat i o n s c a n uncover many unexpected situations, but unique treasures can also be discovered. “We also found some old campaign signs from when Henry Andrae [a previous owner of the home] ran and was subsequently elected to the Missouri House of Representatives,” Kathy says. “As it turns out, Henry and my husband’s grandfather served in the Missouri House together.” Now, Chris, Kathy, son Caleb, daughter Kelsey and her son, Caden, are serving up warmth and comfort in their modernized home and adding their own history to Vineyard Square. JC

Resource guide: General contractor: Shannon Wade, Real Property Improvements Plumbing contractor: Raithel Plumbing Electrical contractor: Chiles Electric Retaining wall: Heath Duemmel Sidewalk, den and patio: All Seasons Landscaping Outdoor decks: Scott Shlueter, American Deck Co. Hardwood flooring: Scruggs Lumber Appliances: Coleman Appliance

Jefferson City Magazine | 31


32 | September/October 2013


Jefferson City Magazine | 33


Modern Makeover Greg and Sherry Allen convert an unfinished basement into a contemporary retreat 34 | September/October 2013


By Lauren Sable Freiman Photos by Travis Duncan Jefferson City Magazine | 35


W

When Greg and Sherry Allen host family gatherings at their Riverwood Drive home, guests no longer congregate in the kitchen. That’s because the basement — once an uninviting space where no one ventured — has been transformed into a comfortable hangout more reminiscent of a studio apartment than a traditional cellar. “Before it was fixed up, we never went down there,” Sherry says. “We always have family over, and everyone always congregated in the kitchen. No one would ever go downstairs because there wasn’t running water.” With the help of nephew Matt Allen and his construction company, MRA Construc36 | September/October 2013

tion, the Allens, who love to entertain, completely gutted the basement, removed a wall and began anew with the goal of adding another level of usable living space to the home they bought 17 years ago. After months of planning, selecting finishes, demolition and rebuilding, the newly remodeled basement is anything but typical; in fact, it has become an enjoyable gathering place for guests and has played host to many family get-togethers, movie nights and social events. “I just knew I wanted to do something different from the rest of my house,” Sherry says. “I went and bought my artwork first, then designed around it. I knew I wanted to do brown

tones, so I picked out tiles in rich brown tones and golds. Then I built around that.” T h e n e w b a s e m e n t, illuminated by 26 can lights with dimmer switches, is anchored by a large bar with a commercialgrade wooden bar top. With a commercial-grade icemaker, microwave, sink with garbage disposal and mini refrigerator, the room is fully equipped for entertaining. Rope lighting beneath the bar highlights a stone backsplash. The lower cabinets are topped with a high-definition laminate, which Matt describes as a less-expensive alternative to granite.


Jefferson City Magazine | 37


It’s possible It’s possible Want to know what’s trending with home decorating? Gayla and Casey at Mid-City Lumber can help you with design ideas to update your home beautifully and economically. They can show you how home fashions change with women’s fashions and trends vary about every 5-7 years.

"Certain shades of Red never go out of style."

<<

- Gayla Schanbacher

<<

"Gray in various shades is the new Black. Also, Tan has lost some of its popularity to gray."

- Casey Marsch Call Mid City Lumber and ask Interior Designers Gayla Schanbacher and Casey Marsch about how It’s Possible.

118 Jaycee Dr. • Jefferson City, MO 573.636.6138 • mclumber.com 38 | September/October 2013

“The full-size bar is really big and has outlets for Crock-Pots, so when we entertain or have family over, it works really well,” Sherry says. “I can lay food out, and it is a homey environment that people can hang out in.” Those gathered around the bar have a clear view of the sleek entertainment wall featuring a recessed television, a recessed electric remote-controlled fireplace and two custom bookshelves that are also built into the wall. While the walls were open, Matt also wired the room for Bluetooth-ready surround sound.

T h e A l l e n s a l s o thought it was important to add a full bathroom to the space. The glass-enclosed, custom-tiled shower has a stamped concrete floor, glass accent tiles and a rain head. Custom cabinetry offers ample storage, and a custom-made pocket door provides privacy. Although pops of color have been introduced into the basement through artwork, the bathroom’s bright green paint is a welcome contrast to the basement’s neutral color palette. “The bathroom is so nice, my husband moved in and showers in there,” Sherry says. “Now the basement is a place you can live in. We turned it into a comfortable, family-friendly, usable living space.” Although Sherry still plans to add a few finishing touches to the room, including window treatments, she says the whole family is thrilled with the outcome of the renovation. “My daughter lives down there with her friends,” she says. “Every time someone is over, they are down there. We moved the biggest, best TV in the house down there. It isn’t a basement anymore; it is a living space. It really is a gorgeous room.” JC

Resource guide: Architect: Randy Allen Contractor: MRA Construction LLC Electrician: Vanloo Electric Plumber: Mike Howell and Son Plumbing Flooring: Howells Carpet Cabinetry: Toby’s Cabinets Finishes and tile work: MRA Construction LLC


Jefferson City Magazine | 39


40 | September/October 2013


h i t l i st

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Photo by Travis Duncan

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Win A Ho Door Swa liday River City g from F Valued at lorist $ To enter, v 100

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Archway Garland (9 by 20): $773; Banister Garland: $227.50 each; Door Swags: $102.95 each; Hanging Light DĂŠcor: $48.95. Design and dĂŠcor provided by River City Florist and Gifts, 212 Madison St., 573-634-3737

Jefferson City Magazine | 41

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Support in

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42 | September/October 2013


b u s i n e ss b r i e fs

Business Briefs Promoted, Hired, Recognized

The American Red Cross recently launched the Team Red Cross App, which allows people to sign up to help and receive notifications about Red Cross disaster volunteer opportunities. When the Red Cross has a need for volunteers, the Team Red Cross App will notify users based on their location, and potential volunteers can instantly accept or decline the volunteer opportunity. To download, search for American Red Cross on the Apple App Store or the Google Play Store, or visit redcross.org/mobileapps.

Boyce and Bynum Pathology Laboratories announced that Michael Gray, the lab’s general manager since 1968, began a half-time retirement track on July 1. By the end of this year, Gray’s executive management responsibilities for the laboratory and physicians’ professional practice will transition to Richard Cotten, BBPL’s newly appointed chief operating officer and general manager. Cotten, a Texas native and Texas A&M University alum, brings with him 26 years of executive laboratory management experience.

Capital Region Physicians announced the addition of Dr. Nikki Albin to Capital Region Physicians – Edgewood. Albin earned her medical degree at the University of Missouri and completed her first year of residency at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. She then returned to MU, where she completed her final years of residency. To schedule an appointment with Albin, call 573-644-6999.

Providence Bank announced the acquisition of Allied Mortgage Group Inc.; the opening of a new mortgage center at 700 Cherry St., Suite L in Columbia; and the expansion of the bank’s residential lending division statewide. The new office will be the headquarters for the bank’s expanded residential lending division. Concurrent with the opening of the mortgage center, the bank is announcing the establishment of an expanded residential lending team, including Chris Sanders, SVP, director of residential lending sales; Rory Dunham, AVP of operations; John Brison and Josh Smith, residential bankers for the Columbia market; Carrie Ward, residential banker for the Jefferson City and Columbia market; William “Bill” Wehrend, VP, regional market manager and residential banker for the St. Louis market; and mortgage processors Sandy Coleman and Shelli Laurie. Providence Bank is a Member FDIC and Equal Housing Lender.

Jefferson City Medical Group welcomes Dr. Ameer Shams. Shams is a board-certified family medicine physician with more than five years of private practice experience and has personal ties to central Missouri. He was born and raised in California and completed a family medicine residency at Forbes Regional Hospital in Pittsburgh. Shams welcomes families and new patients of all ages. To schedule an appointment, call JCMG Family Medicine at 573-635-JCMG (5264). JCMG Pediatrics announced extended hours beginning Oct. 1. The clinic will offer extended hours Monday through Thursday from noon to 7 p.m. On Saturday and Sunday, a pediatric provider will co-staff the JCMG Extended Care Clinic from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Dr. Sarah Gordon, JCMG pediatrician, will transition from her role as a general practitioner to staff the Pediatric Extended Care Clinic Monday through Thursday. She will alternate weekends with several of the pediatric nurse practitioners.

Central Bank has named Amy Veasman as vice president. Veasman assumed the role of branch manager at the Tuscumbia, Mo., facility on July 1. Previously, Veasman served Central Bank for 10 years in various roles including that of real estate loan officer. For the past eight years, she has been in community bank lending. Veasman earned a Bachelor of Science in business administration with a minor in accounting from Lincoln University.

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Heerdt, Bigge, Triesch, Petterson

For the second time this summer, William Woods University has earned a place on a list of top Missouri colleges for return on investment. AffordableCollegesOnline.org recently launched a new ranking, AC Online: Highest Return on Investment Colleges in Missouri, which analyzed 222 Missouri colleges and identified the 27 colleges where degrees pay off the most. WWU ranked No. 20. Riders and horses from William Woods University earned 18 World Champion and Reserve World Champion titles, in addition to high point awards, at the 2013 Pinto World Championships in Tulsa, Okla., this summer. WWU competitors included Danielle Heerdt, Katie Bigge, Emily Triesch and Jennifer Petterson. Pediatrician Dr. Emily George will join the group at JCMG Pediatrics in September. She is currently completing her pediatric residency at St. Louis Children’s Hospital, which is the pediatric hospital for Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. To schedule an appointment, call 573-556-7704. JC Jefferson City Magazine | 43

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5 new and emerging businesses that are transforming the river city

B y M o l ly W r i g h t Photos by Anthony Jinson A n d R e b e cc a R a d e m a n Jefferson City Magazine | 45


Downtown Evolution

Proprietor: Carrie Carroll, owner, Carrie’s Hallmark, 117 E. High St.

Brandenberger Apartments

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Carrie (Tergin) Carroll might be only one of a handful of people who had a store named after her before she even started school. “My parents named it after me when I was 4,” she says. A native of Jefferson City, Carroll is actually the third generation to own a business in the capital city. Her grandfather George Tergin, a Greek immigrant, fell in love with Jefferson City and started his shoe-shining and hat-cleaning shop on Madison Street. Eventually he moved his business, which in the 1960s was known as 1 Hr Dry Cleaning, to High Street. When her grandfather retired in 1976, her dad, Jim Tergin, opened a Hallmark store in the 1880s building. Over the years, the store has grown considerably, and three years ago they underwent a major remodel. “Essentially we remodeled from floor to ceiling and wall to wall, the entire store,” says Carroll, who says they worked with Jim Wisch, owner of Wavco, on the renovation. They additionally followed suggested Hallmark Corp. guidelines when they installed their new façade with an LED Hallmark sign, new carpet, walls and ceiling tiles and a new backdrop and countertops. Although the store is in Carroll’s name, she says it’s still very much a family business. “My parents are there all the time,” she says. “They love seeing what’s new, talking with customers and being with people.” Carroll also works hard to make sure the store carries a wide variety of unique and exciting gifts. “We are the place to go to get a great gift at a reasonable price, right in the heart of downtown, and we’re happy to have been there for 37 years,” she says. For the past several months, Carroll has been renovating three apartments directly above her father’s Coffee Zone shop on East High Street. “We named it Brandenberger Apartments,” Carroll says, “after the former Brandenberger Drug, to keep the history.” For now, the two single second-story rooms along with the two-bedroom suite on the third floor have been rented, but for more information, Carroll suggests checking out her Brandenberger Facebook page: facebook.com/BrandenbergerApartments. 46 | September/October 2013

Proprietor: Jonny Ver Planck, musician/tour manager, 301 Ash St.

Shrunken Head Tropic Lounge

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Jonny Ver Planck, owner of the Shrunken Head Tropic Lounge, has always loved tiki bars. “I’ve wanted to open one pretty much my whole life,” says Ver Planck, who originally tried to open a micro-distillery with a tasting room/bar in town but couldn’t find the right place or partner. Originally from California, Ver Planck also spent some time in Belize and says his establishment reflects his time there. The bar is also reminiscent of lounges in the ’30s ’40s and ’50s and offers hand-poured specialty drinks and no premixes. Ver Planck’s intent is to provide area residents with something different from anything else in the area. “It’s a very laidback tropical-style bar with a mesh of Hawaiian, Caribbean and South Pacific along with a large dose of mid-century American hot rod/tiki culture,” he says. A tour manager and live sound/recording engineer, Ver Planck, who has worked with such bands as Sublime, Reverend Horton Heat, Hank Williams III, Linkin Park and Hoobastank, also showcases local distilleries at his bar. “There are a wide variety of local craft distilleries in Missouri,” he says. “We’ve got about nine in the state now.” Although renovations of the 100-year-old building were a bit slow, particularly because it sat vacant for a long time, Ver Planck felt the location and the timing were right, especially with Prison Brews expanding next door. “Even though the lounge is a tiny spot, maybe 35- to 37-person capacity, there’s a lot going on in this block, which is a good thing,” he says. “We’ve got several outdoor parties planned, and we will definitely be working closely with Prison Brews.” After a soft opening on Aug. 1, the Shrunken Head Tropic Lounge will have a grand opening in September. The lounge opens at 4 p.m. on Thursday and Friday and at 2 p.m. on Saturday. Closing is at 10 p.m. on Thursday and midnight on Friday and Saturday.


Downtown Evolution

Proprietors: Ashley and Ryan Freeman, Mike and Shelby Reed, Freed Developments LLC, 128 Dunklin and 704 Madison

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Freed Developments LLC Event, Retail and Lofts

When Ryan and Ashley Freeman, of Freeman Mortuary, partnered with Mike and Shelby Reed, another Jefferson City couple, to create Freed Developments LLC, they knew it was a good fit. “The Reeds currently live in KC, but Mike was born and raised in JC,” Ashley says. “Mike and Ryan have been friends since they were young kids.” In May, Freed Developments purchased the Milo H. Walz Buildings, one at 128 Dunklin St. and the other at 704 Madison St. in an area called Old Munichburg. “The area has turned around a lot in the past few years and has lots of traffic,” says Ashley, adding that Madison is one of the busiest streets in Jefferson City. But there

is also a family connection to the buildings; Milo H. Walz was Ryan’s great-grandfather on his mother’s side. Built in the 1920s, the Dunklin Street building, which is around 5,000 square feet, was originally a hardware store. The Madison building, with more than 20,000 square feet, was constructed in the 1970s, and a breezeway connects the two buildings. Plans are already in the works for the Dunklin building. “We have just signed a lease agreement with Wilson’s Fitness to open a yoga studio at 128 Dunklin St.,” says Ashley, who says it was serendipity that she was in the right place

at the right time. “When we bought the building, I told Ryan that my dream scenario would be to have a hot yoga studio in the 128 building.” While checking out yoga classes around central Missouri to see what was available, she happened to be in Megan Sappington’s class, an instructor for Wilson’s, on the day Sappington announced that they were seeking a new location in the downtown area. Plans for the Madison Street property are still in the works. “Most likely we will put three loft apartments upstairs and are considering putting in a multi-purpose event space on the main floor,” Ashley says. Jefferson City Magazine | 47


Downtown Evolution

Brandenberger Apartments Proprietor: Jami Wade, owner, Capitol City Cork and Provisions, 124 E. High St.

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Cork Cinema

When Jami Wade opened Capitol City Cork and Provisions in April 2011, it was a bit of a gamble. “In 2008 I got engaged to my husband and moved back to Jefferson City,” she says. “I had been living in Columbia since the mid-1990s and had a wonderful teaching career at Hickman High School.” But Wade, who is originally from Jefferson City, was not looking forward to commuting back and forth to Columbia every day. Knowing it would also be hard to replace the teaching job she loved so much, she decided the time was ripe to begin a new career. She also felt Jefferson City offered her many opportunities. “I have always loved downtown Jefferson City, and I knew I wanted to be a part of reenergizing our historic downtown,” she says. Following her success with Capitol City Cork and Provisions, Wade is now taking on a new venture by renovating the former Chez Monet into a one-screen art house/theater. “We will have a 50-seat theater where we will be showing first-run, independent, foreign and documentary films,” Wade says. In addition, they plan to provide tableside dinner and drink service for the moviegoers. “The process is exciting but also daunting to begin a business that really is not profitable,” Wade says, though she’s encouraged and optimistic. “Overall, the project has garnered an enormous amount of support and excitement from community members.” Having applied for 501(c)3 status, they are in the process of getting the board together to launch a large funding campaign to pay for the new digital projector. Although Wade is keeping her options open for future entrepreneurial opportunities, she’s in no hurry to add to her plate. “I think these two businesses will keep me busy for the foreseeable future,” she says. 48 | September/October 2013

Proprietor: Cameron Schulte, Pharm D, 226 E. High St.

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Tolson’s Drug

Cameron Schulte and Dave Stribling had batted around the idea of Schulte buying Stribling’s store, Tolson’s Drug, several months ago. “It started off as more of a joke,” says Schulte, who has known Stribling as a family friend and a fellow church member for years. “We started talking more seriously about six months ago.” Once Schulte graduated from St. Louis School of Pharmacy in May and passed his boards in July, the transition of ownership became a reality. “I didn’t see this happening quite so quickly,” says Schulte, who is 24, “but the opportunity was too good to pass up, especially getting to be back in Jefferson City, where I grew up, where my friends and family still are.” But Schulte was also excited to see so many changes in the downtown area. “Since I’ve been gone in St. Louis, the downtown has really grown, and there’s so much more potential and definitely more life,” he says. Tolson’s was purchased by Stribling in 1972 and has been a staple of Jefferson City since it began in the late 1800s. “It’s exciting and scary all at the same time,” he says. “You want to do right by all the history, keep it going and keep the store in the community.” He plans to incorporate “Tolson” as part of the business name in the future. At some point, Schulte also hopes to move into one of the apartments that are above the store so he can be closer to the pharmacy, especially for those after-hours calls. “We are hoping to renovate one apartment in the near future, but the building is really old, and there’s no electric, and the plumbing is ancient,” he says. Other than that, Schulte says he hasn’t made too many other plans with everything moving so fast. “We definitely want to expand the pharmacy, and we also want to provide a wide variety of services to the community.” JC


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Operation Motivation 5 easy steps to increase employee satisfaction

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B y m at t c ow e l l Imagine a workplace without conflict, everyone loves his or her job and business is thriving. What would you think? Most of you would think I’m totally crazy and that this isn’t possible in today’s environment. Well, you are sadly mistaken. One of the biggest challenges facing business today is how to get employees engaged. The Gallup Poll released in June 2013 estimates that active employee disengagement costs the United States $450 to $550 billion per year. They have found that managers who focus on their employees’ strengths can practically eliminate active disengagement and double the average of U.S. workers who are engaged nationwide. Gallup’s extensive research shows that engagement is strongly connected to business outcomes essential to an organization’s financial success, including productivity, profitability and customer satisfaction. Engaged employees are the ones who are the most likely to drive the innovation, growth and revenue that their companies desperately need.

5 Steps to Better Employee Engagement 1. Clearly defined goals: Organizations can greatly impact overall engagement by developing their leaders/employees and linking key performance indicators to these eight areas: absenteeism, turnover, shrinkage, safety incidents, quality (defects), customer satisfaction, productivity, profitability. When employees are linked to the overall goals of the organization, they work harder knowing that they are part of the success. The toughest part for leaders is assessing every employee. 2. Feedback is immediate, and everyone gets it: Today’s performance evaluations are reviewed once a year. The reality is that most people think in 90-day timeframes. That being said, performance and goals should be set and reviewed every 90 days, if not sooner. 3. Push employees to balance tasks and capabilities: Studies show that most employees are only being utilized to 50 percent of their capacity. When employees don’t feel they are contributing enough, they become disengaged. We need to continually raise the bar: not a lot but enough to keep them challenged. 4. Employees have a sense of control in their jobs: Leaders should ask for employee input in the decision-making process even when they have an idea on the solution. If employees aren’t included in the process, do they own the goal? 5. Appropriate use of time: It is important for every employee to know that even some of the most mindless tasks are linked to the overall success of the organization. Employees don’t want to feel like the tasks they complete are a waste of time. ➺ Start implementing these steps in Matt Cowell is the president your organization today. It may be of Ascend Business difficult at times, but you will begin Strategies in Jefferson City. to see your profit margin and emFor more tips and info, visit ascendbusinessstrategies.com ployee engagement go up. JC Jefferson City Magazine | 51


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B u s i n e ss p r of i l e

Geared for Success

On Site Oil Change and Auto Repair

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By Lauren Sable Freiman As the assistant manager at a Jefferson City auto parts store, Joshua Lehmen interacted with many customers every day. But he never could have guessed where one conversation with two former Xerox employees — and a leap of faith — would land him 10 years later. Lehmen was familiar with the men. They weren’t mechanics, but they frequently stopped at the store to pick up oil and filters for their mobile oil change company. One day, they mentioned they were selling the business. “I thought about it for a month and wasn’t sure it was right for me,” Lehmen says. “They asked again, and I thought about it for two more months. Then I thought, if you don’t try something, you don’t know what it can do for you, so I tried it.” After putting together a business plan and securing a business loan, Lehmen was officially a business owner. Dressed in a hooded sweatshirt and pair of old overalls, the uniform he wore through his first winter as a business owner, he took the 1989 Chevy half-ton, two-wheel-drive pickup truck he bought with the business out on the road to change oil in cars and commercial vehicles. “When I bought the business, I had a customer list that was about 30 lines long, and all the tools I got with the business came in a little box,” he says.

Af t e r s i x months in mobile oil change, Lehmen realized that oil changes alone were not going to sustain his business. Although he had gotten out of “turning wrenches” several years earlier and sold all his tools, he decided to draw on his training as an auto technician to increase business. He rented a 12-by-24-foot bay at a local shop and began doing repair work along with mobile oil changes. “As it went on, I got busier, and then I rented out the bay next to me and had two bays,” he says. “Then I got the third bay. I was working by myself, doing onsite oil changes and repair work, and I kept getting busier.” When the building housing his bays went on the market, Lehmen jumped at the opportunity to purchase it and expand his business once again. Within three years of acquiring the business, Lehmen ran a four-bay facility, complete with a full office and waiting area. For more than six years, Lehmen worked day and night by himself repairing vehicles, doing mobile oil changes and developing a satisfied and loyal customer base. 52 | September/October 2013

Joshua Lehmen Photo by anthony jinson


“I worked seven days a week, and I was there nights until 10 p.m. working on repairing vehicles. The latest I worked was 4:45 a.m., putting in an engine for a commercial company that needed the vehicle by 6 a.m.” — Joshua Lehmen, owner

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“I worked seven days a week, and I was there nights until 10 p.m. working on repairing vehicles,” Lehmen says. “The latest I worked was 4:45 a.m., putting in an engine for a commercial company that needed the vehicle by 6 a.m.” Lehmen’s sleepless nights and outstanding customer service paid off. Two years ago, in order to service a large and steadily growing customer base, he built a new eight-bay automotive repair facility located on Railton Road, just off Highway 179 in Jefferson City, and surrounded himself with a top-notch team of five employees. “There are six people working here every day, and there is no way I could provide the customer service we provide without my team,” Lehmen says. “The team is a huge part of the success of this business. It can’t be done without them, and I make sure they know that every day. They are phenomenal, and they are the best at what they do.” A lt h o u g h the old facility averaged 110 invoices per month, the new shop averages be54 | September/October 2013

tween 350 and 400 each month. Lehmen attributes his team’s success to honesty; quality parts that last; and thorough and meticulous labor that comes with a 12-month, 12,000-mile warranty, all geared toward satisfying customers. In fact, On Site Oil Change and Auto Repair Shop was voted the No. 1 mechanic and No. 1 auto repair shop in Jefferson City by the 2013 News Tribune’s Readers Choice Awards — proof positive of the quality service Lehmen’s team provides. Lehmen is adamant that his team is to thank for much of his success, but he is also thankful for a family that understands his drive and work ethic. After all, he hasn’t taken a vacation in 10 years, since the day he started the business. But his wife, Alicia, and sons, Theodore, 5, and Calvin, 1, are supportive and understanding of the business and Lehmen’s heavy workload. And Theodore knows just where to find his play tools in his dad’s toolbox. “Theodore is always talking about the shop and the tools,” Lehmen says. “I have

good family support. Without them, everything would be a lot harder.” As h e s e r v i c e s e n g i n e s , transmissions, brakes and more at the shop, Lehmen stays true to the company’s roots. He still goes out on the road to change the oil in commercial vehicles but has upgraded from the old Chevy he once used. He also keeps future growth in the back of his mind. “Of course it is always a dream,” he says. “I never thought we’d be as big as we are today. I take every day one step at a time. If the opportunity comes for more growth, I’d love to do it but would like to do it slowly and make sure it is done right.” As he looks back on his journey, Lehmen is certain he made the right choice when he decided to give business ownership a try. “It’s been a fun road,” he says. “I’ve enjoyed every day of it. I think back and think it was worth it. Every step has led me to where I am today.” JC


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Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s scaled the Swiss Alps, been published internationally, performed lifesaving operations by flashlight and just completed the Grand Canyon Rim to Rim walk. Dr. Jack Sanders proves he just might be the most interesting man in the world. B y Mo l l y Wr i gh t

thinkstock.com

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Photo by anthony jinson

In May, Dr. Jack Sanders, retired Jefferson City cardiologist, completed the Grand Canyon Rim to Rim walk. Although it’s no walk in the park for anyone, Sanders was 84 at the time and might have been the oldest person to complete the challenging undertaking. Yet his intent was not to set any records. He was just following a lifelong philosophy passed down from his father “to do as much as you can and learn as much as you can.” It’s a way of living that has served him well over the years. Born in St. Louis, Sanders moved to Joplin, Mo., when his father, who worked for Southwestern Bell, was transferred to the area. When Sanders was only 18, his mother died of tuberculosis, but with his father’s encouragement, he continued his education. He went on to receive two undergraduate degrees, a B.A. from Washington University in St. Louis and a B.S. from the University of Missouri, before graduating from Harvard with his medical degree. On staff at the University Medical Center in Columbia as a cardiologist and also in internal medicine early in his career, Sanders moved to Jefferson City in 1961. As the first cardiologist in the capital city, Sanders implanted the first pacemaker, created the rehab unit and trained the first intensive care nurses unit. About this time, he also got interested in mountaineering. Following his father’s advice once again, he learned as much as he could about the sport. During the next 16 years, Sanders climbed all over the United States, Peru, Pakistan and Canada, including scaling the Swiss and French Alps. As a cardiologist he developed an interest in the effects of high altitude on the heart. “I got a research grant to study this,” he says.

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Utilizing the first Holter monitor, which records a continuous electrocardiogram, Sanders climbed Longs Peak, the highest mountain in northern Colorado. He published his results in an article entitled “Dynamic Electrocardiology at High Altitude” in a national journal, which earned him international attention. “I got requests for reprints from all over the world,” Sanders says. W i t h a l o v e f o r t r av e l , Sanders often went on trips and served as a physician. In 1980, he joined an American College of Cardiology group, lead by a former Harvard professor who went to China to speak to the evolving nation about heart problems. “I talked and lectured throughout the region on pacemakers,” Sanders says. Often Sander’s wife, Jimmy Kay, went with him on these trips. On one particularly memorable one, they accompanied famed New Zealand mountaineer and explorer Sir Edmond Hillary on a hike through Nepal in the 1980s. “I took his blood pressure every day,” Sanders says. Sanders and his wife also walked across England, followed the Camino Pilgrimage trail in Spain and hiked the Haute Route in the Alps.

“You have to keep moving. If you start sitting down, you’re going to stay sitting down. Visit places you haven’t been, even if you have to go without other things. Above all, try not to get discouraged. Victory is often just around the corner if you give it a chance.” — Dr. Jack Sanders

photos courtesy of Dr. Jack Sanders

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Sanders often tended to the medical needs of the local population when he took trips abroad. “People knew I was there,” he says, adding that they often came at all hours. “In Pakistan, I operated by flashlight on a guy in the middle of the night who had an ax wound.” He even stepped a bit outside of his medical specialty and pulled a tooth while he was there. It was a family raft trip about 49 years ago that inspired Sanders to consider the Grand Canyon walk. He was so impressed with the scenery, he wanted to return and had been thinking about it for a while.

Yet at 84, he also knew there were concerns. “The classic way of doing it is a four-day trip with three nights of camping out,” he says. His son, cardiologist Dr. Jeffrey S. Sanders, ultimately helped make the trip possible. According to Sanders, his son said, “If you do everything I say and let me be in charge, I’ll do it.” O n M ay 2 5 , Sanders’ team, which included his son, his two daughters and a guide, began their descent into the canyon. “It’s 14 miles or more from the top of the north rim to the bottom and about a 25-mile walk total,” Sanders says. “We camped out seven miles down, at the bottom of the canyon and halfway up the south wall.” The journey was challenging to say the least, but Sanders was repeatedly encouraged by people who stopped to talk with him along the way. “I got all sorts of people coming up to me, giving me a thumbs up,” he says, humbled by all the attention. When they were about 100 yards short of reaching the end of the trail, a woman came down from the south rim to greet them and get a picture with the 84-year-old man she had heard so much about. Sanders continues to follow his father’s sage advice to never stop learning and encourages others to do the same. “It’s always good to learn,” he says. “You’re not going to be interested in everything, but certain things will attract you, and you’ll wonder what they are all about. If you don’t like something, at least learn why you don’t like it, and then you can form your own opinion.” As a physician, he has some additional advice of his own: “You have to keep moving. If you start sitting down, you’re going to stay sitting down. Visit places you haven’t been, even if you have to go without other things.” Above all, try not to get discouraged. “Victory is often just around the corner if you give it a chance,” Sanders says. Regarding any future plans, Sanders is going to take a backseat for a while. “My wife has always been a great travel companion,” he says. “I want to make sure we do some things that she specifically wants to do for a change. Overall, I want to stay in as good of shape as I can.” JC


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P. Y. S . K .

Dr. Kevin Rome

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President, Lincoln University

Number of months in that position

2

Family (including pets): Stefanie, Kevin Jr. and Kendel Education: Undergraduate degree at Morehouse College, master’s at the University of Georgia, Ph.D. at the University of Texas at Austin Community involvement: United Way, Chamber of Commerce and St. Mary’s Hospital Board Why I’m passionate about my job: I love assisting students in achieving their dreams of higher education. Biggest career obstacle I’ve had to overcome: Developing patience in a career that is slow to change. Favorite charitable organizations you’ve been involved in and why: Serving on the board of the Madam C. J. Walker Museum because of the history of Madam Walker and all that she was able to do in very challenging times. Accomplishment I’m most proud of: The development of our children, Kevin Jr. and Kendel Favorite place to spend a Saturday afternoon: Watching college football Last book read: Calico Joe by John Grisham Favorite TV show: Chopped Favorite comfort food: Ice cream Favorite app: Pandora Dream vacation: Alaskan cruise Secret aspiration: To be a movie star

photo by anthony jinson

Source of inspiration: God and my mother

What is something that has changed your life? Higher education

Favorite hobbies: Golf, fishing and playing cards What current and/or future goals do you have for Lincoln University? Increase retention, graduation rates and enrollment as well as become a better partner with the community and increase resources. JC Jefferson City Magazine | 61

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p h i l a nt h r op y

The Muppets Take Missouri The United Way kicks off its 2013 ‘You Can Make Dreams Come True’ campaign

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It’s an amazing feeling to receive help when help is needed. It can often mean the difference between despair and hope. That’s what the United Way of Central Missouri offers to mid-Missouri residents: hope. Since 1925, it’s been serving the counties of Cole, Moniteau, Miller, Osage and southern Callaway and will continue to be a beacon of hope to those in need. However, to do so means raising the funds to support its 24 current partnering agencies. Each year, the United Way reviews its partner agencies to determine budgets and need and then has an annual campaign to raise the needed funds. This year’s campaign theme is “You Can Make Dreams Come True,” and Lori Massman, campaign co-chair, says some special friends will help get that message across: the Muppets. “The Muppets themselves were a community, looking out for each other and just trying to make the world a better place by telling their story through laughter and songs of hopes, dreams and progress,” Massman says. “The Muppet theme is meant to inspire people to reach for a meaningful accomplishment, and that is the United Way. Our vision this year is to inspire hope and create opportunities for a better tomorrow.” M a ssm a n s ay s t h e organization’s objective was to determine the campaign goal while being sensitive to the fact that every

Photo by Anthony Jinson

B y H e at h e r S h i e l d s

United Way Muppeteers ham it up at the Jefferson City Magazine photo shoot. This year’s Muppet theme is meant to inspire people to reach for a meaningful accomplishment and will work to raise $1.7 million during its 2013 annual campaign. Back row, from left: Mike Downey, communication chair; Andy Fechtel, co-chair; Dan Westhues, chairman of the board. Front row, from left: Lori Massman, co-chair; Ann Bax, president.

“The Muppet theme is meant to inspire people to reach for a meaningful accomplishment, and that is the United Way. Our vision this year is to inspire hope and create opportunities for a better tomorrow.” — Lori Massman, co-chair, United Way annual campaign

family’s budget is being stretched and that each of the partnering agencies is receiving more requests for services. The goal for the 2013 campaign is $1.7 million, which reflects a $50,000 increase from 2012. “The 2013 campaign has one very specific goal,” says Executive Director Ann Bax. “We want to do more and do better for those we serve and make a difference for the long term for our community.” “The money stays here to serve our neighbors and friends,” Massman adds. The community campaign kicked off on Aug. 29 at the Capitol Plaza Hotel and will continue with employee sponsors hosting events and activities through the end of the campaign, which will culminate on Nov. 7 with the Victory Celebration at Missouri Farm Bureau, where the final projected campaign totals are announced to the community. Jefferson City Magazine | 63

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In addition to monetary donations, the United Way lives united with the help of its many volunteers. “Lori has served in almost every United Way volunteer capacity and most recently was awarded the Live United Award for outstanding volunteerism,” Bax says of Massman’s work with the organization. Andy Fechtel is Massman’s co-chair for this year’s campaign, and, according to Bax, his United Way volunteerism dates back to high school when he served on the United Way Board of Directors as the high school student liaison. “One of the many reasons Lori and Andy were tapped to lead the campaign is due to the passion and dedication they have given in their respective leadership roles in their United Way campaigns at Scholastic and Fechtel Beverage and Sales,” Bax says. “They have taken their campaigns to new levels of success and are confident they will do the same with the community campaign.” JC

It’s Possible Turn your house plan or blueprint into your dream home.

Matt Evers at Mid City Lumber will tailor your ideas into a home that will fit your family for years to come. With your imagination and Matt’s expertise you’ll have a house plan that makes the most of space, is practical and functional, and even makes use of the latest technology. Call Mid City Lumber and ask Matt about how It’s Possible to have the home of your dreams.

118 Jaycee Dr. • Jefferson City, MO 573.636.6138 • mclumber.com 64 | September/October 2013

United Way in Numbers

➔ 1 in 2 mid-Missourians were touched by the United Way in 2012. ➔ 90 percent of contributions go to services through agency funding and one-time grants. ➔ Almost 8,000 individuals gave to the campaign last year. ➔ In 2012, more than 88,000 people were served by a United Way agency. ➔ More than 44,000 individuals received emergency services in response to crisis. ➔ More than 13,415 low-income adults and children received medical, dental and mental health care. ➔ More than 27,000 youth and adults received educational and mentoring services. ➔ More than 400 people serve as volunteers for the United Way each year.

Find out how you can get involved by visiting the United Way of Central Missouri online at unitedwaycemo.org.


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b ook r e v i e w

Enhancing Traditions around the Table Review of Michelle Huxtable’s The Gathering of Friends cookbook series

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By Jill Bednar If you love decorating, cooking or entertaining, this is the cookbook series for you or the perfect gift for someone cherished. Author and decorating guru Michelle Huxtable made this more than just a cookbook. Many of the menus include inspiring decorating and tablescape ideas with beautiful pictures that are mouthwatering to look at and dishes that taste even better than pictured. All of the recipes are easily made with everyday ingredients and feature a shopping list at the end of each chapter, including staples needed for preparation. Huxtable has based the series on the pleasures of having friends and loved ones gathered around your table to enjoy good food and one another’s company. I was so lucky to host Michelle as she and I prepared a meal for a gathering in my home last May

to celebrate the 10th anniversary of my business, Southbank Gift Co. While shopping for groceries and preparing the meal, I got to see how much thought she put into every detail. Although the pictures taken of that day are wonderful, they don’t do justice to the feelings of joy and contentment we all felt as we served, laughed, tasted and shared. It truly was a labor of love — and that is what her cookbooks are all about.

Huxtable has based the series on the pleasures of having friends and loved ones gathered around your table to enjoy good food and one another’s company.

5 Titles to Pick Up Now

Spooky & Bright by the Editors of Country Living

Empty Mansions by Bill Dedman and Paul Clark Newell Jr.

The German Kitchen by Christopher Knuth

Win this of full cookbookering and t mouthwa recipes! originabylleaving a comment Enter to win oncitymag.com/ at jeffers est. cont

There are currently five volumes (pictures taken at my home are in chapter 10 of volume five). Volume six will be out this fall. JC Available at Southbank Gift Co., 110 E. High St., 573-659-GIFT, southbankgifts.com ➝ Jill Bednar is the owner of Southbank Gift Co., a unique and locally owned gift shop in the heart of historic downtown Jefferson City that offers a wide selection of gifts in good taste and at moderate prices, including: bath and body luxuries, gourmet and specialty foods as well as home décor accessories.

Chosen by Missouri River Regional Library

The Longest Ride by Nicholas Sparks

The Pioneer Woman Cooks by Ree Drummond

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3 bed-and-breakfasts to venture to this fall

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Cliff Manor Inn

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B y R e b e cc a R a d e m a n | P h o t o s c o u r t e s y o f C l i ff M a n o r I n n

This enchanting local historical landmark is nestled in the center of the capital city of Jefferson. It sits off a quiet treelined neighborhood cherished for its rich history and beautifully preserved character and is within walking distance of the State Capitol, downtown business district and Katy Trail. Cliff Manor is graciously decorated in a European-living atmosphere that includes beautiful linens and quaint bedrooms set high over the river town that offer both gorgeous scenic river and city views. Enjoy your morning cup of coffee while sitting on your balcony or private porch, and watch the mist rise from the Missouri River as the sun reflects stunningly from the Capitol, located just west of the property. Ask for the Riverview or Bridgeton suites where you can unwind in elegant décor with a king size bed, fireplace and Jacuzzi tub after a long day of cycling or sightseeing. A stay at the Cliff Manor includes a nearly entirely organically grown and locally sourced two-course breakfast each morning, consisting of savory offerings such as homemade biscuits with sausage gravy, fresh hen eggs, Belgian waffles, Dutch baby pancakes and crème brûlée French toast, served with fresh gourmet coffees and teas and fresh fruits of the season. While visiting the tourist staples of the area such as the Capitol, Governor’s Mansion, Historic Missouri State Penitentiary and Cole County Historical Society Museum, stroll the river city’s newly revived historic downtown area, which has recently

Jefferson C cliffmanori ity nn.c 573-636-2 om 013

begun to experience an explosion of emerging art galleries, theater groups, boutique shopping, restaurants and charming bistros. Down the hill from the manor is the cherished Paddy Malone’s Irish Pub, a favorite local hangout, where you can enjoy an evening brew on the deck while listening to traditional Irish melodies performed by the owner and local musicians. Just atop the opposing river bluffs from the manor is the newly reopened Canterbury Hill Winery & Restaurant, where one can try a King Tower white wine sampler with grand names such as Medieval Mist and Noble Norton in the rustic tasting room or on the patio overlooking the vineyard and beautiful sunlit river bottoms. During colder months, savor your favorite notes fireside along with a tasty appetizer or dinner. A short drive away is the Historic South Side and Old Munichburg District, where the area celebrates its German heritage with traditional music, dance and food at the annual Oktoberfest in September. If you’re craving the country, take the 15-minute scenic drive while admiring the breathtaking colors of the trees on your way to the darling and crowd-drawing Hartsburg Pumpkin Festival celebration that takes place each fall. Cliff Manor offers historic charm and modern conveniences to anyone who is looking for a historic river town getaway to the capital city and surrounding areas. Check out cvbjeffersoncity.org and our Fall Arts Preview (page 97) for a complete listing of upcoming seasonal events within the area as you plan your stay.

➺ RATES: Basic suites are $105 on weekdays, $129 on weekends; Jacuzzi suites are $159 on weekdays, $179 on weekends; pricing includes dining. Romance and Katy Trail packages are available for couples and groups. Free shuttle service is provided for registered guests to Amtrak, Katy Trail and Jefferson City Municipal Airport.

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The Inn at Hermannhof

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B y C o u r t n e y B r ow n | P h oto s c o u r t e sy o f T h e I n n At H e r m a n n h o f

Nineteenth-century elegance blends seamlessly with modern luxury at the Inn at Hermannhof in the historic town of Hermann, Mo. Built in 1886 at the corner of First and Gutenberg, the inn’s main building originally housed small businesses on the first level and featured a prominent family residence on the two upper levels. Restoration of the building was completed in 2007. The inn’s six restored hillside cottages originally served as house wineries in the 19th century. The Inn at Hermannhof is located less than one hour from Jefferson City by car or Amtrak. Whether you choose a luxury guestroom inside the main inn building or in one of the hillside cottages, you are guaranteed to find modern amenities and luxuries including California king-sized beds, fireplaces in the bedroom and bathroom, oversized steam showers and whirlpool tubs, flat-screen TVs and Wi-Fi. Prepare to be delighted by charming personal and historic touches, as each guestroom is thoughtfully furnished with family heirlooms and antiques, fine linens and historic color palettes. After checking in, venture out on the historic town of Hermann for the day. The Inn at Hermannhof is situated at the center of the thoroughfare. Browse through unique art galleries and antique stores, sample an array of beers at the Tin Mill Brewery, and be sure to enjoy live music and wine tastings at the Hermannhof Winery, the first two-time winner of the Brown-Foreman Trophy for Best New World White Wine.

Hermann, innatherman Mo. nhof 573-486-5 .com 199

Upon returning to your room at the Inn at Hermannhof, sit back and allow breathtaking views of the town and river to captivate you as you enjoy a complimentary bottle of wine. For a complete calendar of events in Hermann, go to visithermann. com. Cheers to the perfect getaway!

➺ Rates: Luxury suites in both the inn and the hillside cottages start at $318, premium guest rooms start at $278, deluxe guest rooms start at $238 and classic guestrooms, which feature twin- and/or queen-sized beds, start at $198.

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White Mule Winery & Inn

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By Dana Miller | Photos courtesy of White Mule Winery and Dana Miller

What happens when you combine a team of white mules, a gorgeous country setting and some excellent vino? Throw in a former state lawmaker, and the recipe is complete: The White Mule Winery and Bed and Breakfast. For the greater part of the past two decades, residents of Owensville and the surrounding countryside called upon Charlie Schlottach, a four-term state representative and former Gasconade County commissioner, on matters of state and local governance. These days, however, Charlie, his wife, Karen, and the entire Schlottach family — including Gus, Woody and Gracie — can be found tending the vineyards and managing the family’s winery and bedand-breakfast in an operation that is fast becoming the trendiest spot in Gasconade County. According to Karen, the winery has hosted 20 weddings this year alone; other seasonal events include the autumn “apple butter cook” (made the old-fashioned way, complete with copper kettles and wooden stir paddles) and an annual summer barbecue cook-off. Looking for something to do Friday night? Each week, the winery serves a scrumptious steak dinner, complete with homemade dessert, baked from scratch by Charlie’s mother. Friday is also the night to hear live music by area musicians. Perhaps the greatest treasure of the White Mule is the family who has cultivated the land and transformed a once-ramshackle farmhouse and acres of pasture into a flourishing B&B, vineyard and winemaking op-

Owensville , whitemule Mo. bnb.com 573-764-4 800

eration. The Schlottachs’ commitment to

their craft is on display in every handcrafted detail on their property, and the product of the vine is further evidence of their dedication to the intricate art of winemaking. Whether you are a local regular or one of the many travelers just passing through on Highway 50, visitors to the White Mule are always greeted warmly by Karen or Charlie, who will treat you to a full tasting of the White Mule’s excellent wines. The winery offers six varietals and a range of blends to complement any palate, from the full-bodied and complex Norton (one of the best in Missouri wine country) to the light and fruity Double Tree Red (a perennial favorite). You’ll soon find yourself heading toward the patio to relax with a full glass and enjoy live music in the open-air pavilion. To top off your wine flight, leave room for a tipple of the winery’s signature spirit — the famous Mule Shine — a velvety smooth dessert wine (think port) made from the complex Norton grape and served directly from miniature oak casks. If the Mule Shine kicks a bit too much, consider staying in the bed-and-breakfast located in the cozy turn-of-the-century German farmhouse located directly adjacent to the winery. Each of the four rooms has a private bath, but for a real treat ask for the double, and experience a relaxing soak in the vintage claw-foot tub. The next morning, Karen will be over to fix a huge country breakfast. For a memorable country getaway just a short drive from Jefferson City, try the White Mule Winery and Bed and Breakfast. You’ll be back! JC

➺ Rates: Individual room pricing is $69 weekdays, $79 on weekends and includes breakfast. Whole-house rental is $239 on weekdays, $269 on weekends and does not include breakfast but allows use of the kitchen facilities. For a small fee, send your grocery list to Karen, and the house will be stocked with items you request upon arrival.

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Your Home... Well Designed.

shop/office hours: Tuesday - Friday: 10 am – 5:30 pm Saturday: 10 am – 5 pm Additional hours by appointment.

contact us: 573 · 445 · 4122 1029 East Walnut Street Columbia, MO 65201

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Introducing

Community Health Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new Acute Clinic & Sarah Herbert, FNP!

Visit us at our new location! 3400 W. Truman Blvd. Jefferson City, MO 573.632.2777 | www.chccmo.org

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the dish

Gute Appetitn! Save

room fo black for r the est c o r ba n a n a k e as foster!

Photo by Travis Duncan

Das Stein Haus Classic Wiener Schnitzel Celebrate pumpkin season with an Oktoberfeast at Das Stein Haus this fall. When visiting, be sure to congratulate longtime chef and owner Helmut Steiner on celebrating the establishment’s 32nd anniversary in Jefferson City. Known for its

cozy and hospitable European culture, the Haus delivers real German food at its finest. Partake in German music and an extensive list of wines and brews out on the new extended patio. We sent contributing photographer Travis Duncan to try the classic wiener schnitzel when he confessed never visiting the

Owner Helmut Steiner thankfully toasts the community for the establishment's 32 years in business.

restaurant after more than seven years in Jefferson City. After digging into this tasty, traditional German dish, here’s what he had to say: “Amazing food, incredible hospitality with authentic ambience and genuine charm. I love the fact that this isn’t another massmarketed chain restaurant. Jefferson City needs more places like this!” JC

1436 Southridge Drive, Jefferson City, 573-634-3869, dassteinhaus.com Jefferson City Magazine | 77

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Pantone Fashion Color Report

For more than 20 years, Pantone, the global authority on color, has surveyed the designers of New York Fashion Week and beyond to bring you the season's most important color trends. This report previews the most prominent hues for fall 2013.

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by Rebecca Rademan photos anthony jinson Model Jamie Farmer Styled by Eric Luebbert Hair/Makeup by Marshall & Co. Salon and Spa: Brandy Ash and Aisha Stapleton

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Mykonos Blue: a bold, meditative blue, for a classic and relaxed fall look. On JAMIE: Michael Kors Blue Jay Leather Moto Jacket, Saffees, $495. Adam Jacobs Mineral Print Dress, Saffees, $140. Silver Clutch, Calenaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fashions, $44.99. Interchangeable Sterling Silver Marble Ring, Southbank Gift Co., $95. Bussola Taupe Suede Boots, American Shoe, $175.

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Koi: a decorative orange with dazzling and shimmering qualities, a statement color that serves as a pick-me-up for your wardrobe. ON JAMIE: Nancy Bolen Spicy Orange City Girl Suit, Calena’s Fashions: Jacket, $124.99; Skirt, $82.99. Audrey Kate Necklace, Semi-Precious Stones, Calena’s Fashions, $88.99. Mary Francis Kerala Elephant Bag*, Calena’s Fashions, $265. Gold Cuff Bracelet, Calena’s Fashions, $43.99. Gold Ring, Southbank Gift Co., $15.95. *Item featured on pages 80-81.

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Turbulence: a dark mercurial gray and sophisticated alternative to the black this season. On JamIE: Cartise Faux Fur Jacket, Calena’s Fashions, $250. Gray Leather Gloves, Calena’s Fashions, $29.50. Street Label Silver Jegging, Calena’s Fashions, $102.99. Sorel Graphite Leather and Woven Peep-Toe Wedge, American Shoe, $160. Ms. Ashley Animal Print Clutch, Calena’s Fashions, $39.99. Ms. Ashley Earring, Calena’s Fashions, $12.

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Emerald: a classic, elegant hue that continues to sparkle and fascinate, bringing luxury to any palette. ON JAMIE: Thea Dora Emerald Dip-Dyed Evening Gown, Saffees, $160. Emerald Stone Bracelets, Saffees, $18 Each. Rhinestone Hoop Earrings, $18.

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acai & Vivacious: unruly and wildly deep exotic hues that add mystery and richness to create a number of powerful fall combinations. On Jamie: Multicolored Jovani Strapless Sequin Dress, Saffees, $460. Black Suede Over-the-Knee Boots, Saffees, $40. Earrings, Calenaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fashions, $19. JC

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Ghoulish

Delights Get inspired for Halloween with these tricked-out treats

b y R e b e cc a R a d e m a n Photos by Travis Duncan C r e at i o n s b y Ca r o l W i e b e r g of Frosted Art Studio 88 | September/October 2013


The Boo Crew

This ghost treat is a fun sculptural cake. Why go flat sheet cake when you can go 3-D? Bakerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tip: You can sculpt edible treats with items other than cake. Try Rice Krispies treats or modeling chocolate.

Assorted decorative pumpkins and gourds, The Schaefer House, $4.50-12 each

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Deathly Hallows

Our black and white three-tiered cake adorned with a spider and its web is both elegant and frightening. Bakerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tip: Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t over-decorate your cake. Sometimes less is best.

Wax-shaped flameless candles, Good & Perfect Gifts, $2.99 each

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Whacky Lil’ Monsters

These Halloween cookies mix the silly with the scary. The one big eye does the trick. Baker’s tip: Don’t be limited by what’s available in traditional cookie cutter shapes. Cut out your own cookie shape and size, and add a puffed design effect to give the cookie more dimension. Add some texture for even more visual interest.

TAG Halloween dish towel, The Schaefer House, $6.50

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➺ Chef Bio

C a r o l W i e b e r g developed a love and talent for sculpture clay before converting to the culinary world. Nowadays, Wieberg specializes in custom cake design, cookie art, pies and sweet treats as the owner of Frosted Art in Jefferson City. Wieberg combines clients’ personal style and inspiration with her artistic talents to create delicious edible works of art for both casual and special occasions. “We do freehand painting, which is a rarity in the Jefferson City and Columbia areas,” she says. “I love baking; it’s an art. Anything sculptural, that’s my thing.” JC 92 | September/October 2013


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Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your backstage pass to the capital cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s arts and culture scene this season B y R e b e cc a R a d e m a n

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FILM Apparitional Capital 8 Theaters, Showtimes TBA goodrichqualitytheaters.com Andrew P. Jones’ successful suspensethriller, Apparitional, will return to Capital 8 Theaters this Halloween for another showing. Apparitional is about a reality TV ghosthunting crew from L.A. that investigates an abandoned prison where evil spirits haunt the halls and attack humans. Just as suspected, their visit leads them through an untold journey of horror and history that will send chills and shivers down your spine. Cost: $6 to $9 depending on showtime and/or adult or student

L i t e r at u r e Author Talk: John Drake Robinson Sept. 10, 7 p.m., Missouri River Regional Library To truly understand and appreciate America, you need to take a roadtrip. Meet and speak with the author of A Road Trip into America’s Hidden Heart, who’s traveled every mile of every road on his highway map, a 250,000-mile journey to discover the real America beyond the interstate. They’re real people, obscure places, forgotten facts. His story unfolds in Missouri, but it could be about any state or any traveler who drives into America’s hidden heart. Called Again: An Evening with Appalachian Trail Endurance Hiker and 2012 National Geographic Adventurer of the Year Sept. 12, 7 p.m., Missouri River Regional Library mrrl.org Jennifer Pharr Davis, five-time author and record-breaking hiker, will speak about the many challenges and lessons that present themselves along the trail. She’ll show slides from the more than 12,000 miles of long-distance hiking that she has completed on six different continents and answer questions about her exploits. After her presentation, she will sign copies of her new book, Called Again: A Story of Love and Triumph.

V i s u a l Ar t What He Saw, What I Saw Sept. 17, 7 p.m., Missouri River Regional Library Take a photographic journey with local artists Bob Colvin and Walt Mose, who traveled to the Rockies and documented their adventure along the way. The exhibit consists of differing photo styles as shown by “What He Saw” and “What I Saw.”

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Museum After Hours: Grandpa’s Tool Chest Sept. 4, 7 to 9 p.m., Missouri State Museum, 573-751-2854 From his childhood, speaker John Cunning remembers his father letting him play around in the woodshop and make toys out of scrap lumber, but the power tools were always off limits. From those early experiences, Cunning became fascinated with hand tools. He has collected historic woodworking tools for more than 20 years and used them to build and repair furniture. Learn about some of the woodworking tools from the Missouri State Museum’s collection, both familiar and unfamiliar. If you own a woodworking tool that you would like to know more about, bring it with you. This program will be held in the museum classroom, which is located in the History Hall in the east wing of the State Capitol. Cost: Free Capital Arts Greenway Trail/Katy Trail Exhibition Sept. 1 to 12, Tuesday to Thursday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday and Sunday 1 to 4 p.m., Capital Arts Gallery, capitalarts.org The natural beauty of the Greenway Trail in Jefferson City and the Katy Trail is showcased in this not-to-be-missed exhibit of photography and artwork capturing the many facets of both entities throughout the year. Cost: Free Downtown Arts Stroll Sept. 6, 6 to 9 p.m., Downtown Jefferson City, facebook.com/artsstroll Experience a showcase celebration of the best galleries, artists, photography, restaurants, shops and entertainment downtown Jefferson City has to offer. Take a leisurely stroll down High and Madison streets, and see artists at work, theater groups, acoustic musicians, street performers and more. Then stop to enjoy culinary creations from your favorite restaurants and bistros. Buy a $2 wristband, and purchase adult beverages from participating outdoor bars. It’s Your History – Behind the Scenes Tour: Quilts Sept. 26, 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., Riverside Collections Facility, 573-751-2854 Part of the Missouri State Museum’s It’s Your History series, these behindthe-scenes tours are offered the last Thursday of each month through October. Come see the quilts and coverlets in the museum’s collections.

Jefferson City Multicultural Fall Festival Oct. 12, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., downtown Jefferson City, jcmcf.net The annual fall festival and downtown HarvestFest have merged into one event that promises a great day of entertainment, food, arts, crafts and storytellers for the children, community information booths and vendors that embrace the diverse cultures found in mid-Missouri. Experience the community’s diversity in downtown Jefferson City. Cost: Free

L i v e M u s i c Thursday Night Live Sept. 5, 6 to 9 p.m., Downtown Jefferson City, facebook.com/thursdaynightlivejc Everyone’s favorite downtown party continues this fall with three live bands, great food and various entertainment and activities provided by local businesses. Thursday Night Live is an adult event that’s family friendly. Children younger than age 16 are not allowed entrance without an adult. Adult beverages are available in an event cup for guests 21 and older who buy a $2 wristband from participating outdoor bars. Cost: Free RiverSong Women’s Chorus Oct. 18, Miller Performing Arts Center, riversongchorus.com RiverSong, a 35-member women’s a cappella chorus, is celebrating 50 years of ringing chords and stellar performances. Audiences love RiverSong’s exciting and memorable shows in four-part a cappella harmonies that feature both contemporary and nostalgic toe-tappers and ballads. Cost: $25 for adults and $15 for students, thejcaa.org Rocket Man: A Tribute to Sir Elton John Sept. 12, 7 to 9 p.m., Miller Performing Arts Center, rocketmanshow.com Dubbed the “U.S.A.’s No. 1 Elton John tribute” and described as “a wonderful show” by Mary Mitchell of The Elton John AIDS Foundation, The Rocket Man Band gives an energetic performance time after time, throwing around cool jams such as “Saturday Night’s Alright” and “Pinball Wizard” before sending audiences exploding into space with extended ’70s instrumental versions of “Rocket Man,” “Goodbye Yellow Brick Road” and “Levon.” Cost: $25 for adults and $15 for students, thejcaa.org

22nd Annual Capital JazzFest and Capital Street Art Fair Sept. 7, noon to 8 p.m., corner of Madison and High streets, Downtown Jefferson City, capjazz.org Expand your understanding and appreciation of jazz and the arts with multiple concerts and art exhibitions featuring live music and artists at work. Browse insanely realistic chalk art drawings full of optical illusions at the Street Art Fair while enjoying the live performances and some of the best locally based, regional and national jazz and blues musicians Missouri — and the world — has to offer. Cost: Free Cultural Arts Commission Taste of Missouri Wine “Sip and Sit” Sept. 13, 5:30 to 8 p.m., Capitol City Cork and Provisions, artsinjc.com Savor the flavor of Missouri at the “Sip and Sit” wine tasting that includes local wineries St. Aubert Hills Vineyard, St. James Winery, Stone Hill Winery, Twisted Vine Vineyard, Wenwood Farm Winery and White Mule Winery, all while enjoying the music of Dave Panico, treasured and passionate soloist sax player, otherwise known as “The Soaring Saxman.” The tasting will be paired with gourmet desserts as well as coffee and tea provided by Yani’s Coffee Zone. Guests who attend will also have the opportunity to participate in the Rocking Chair Auction, featuring pieces decorated by local artists. Cost: $10 per person. Tickets are available at Art Bazaar, Carrie’s Hallmark and Capitol City Cork and Provisions; artsinjc.com Roots N Blues N BBQ Sept. 20 to 22, Stephens Lake Park, Columbia, rootsnbluesnbbq.com This increasingly popular blues and barbecue event moves to its new location for three days of great food, live music and family fun, including a half marathon, 10K, the Whole Hog Lounge, Blues in the Schools and more. This year’s artist lineup includes The Black Crowes, Blues Traveler, Steve Earle, Jimmy Cliff, Keller Williams with The Traveling McCourys, Bela Fleck and more. Cost: $40 for Friday and Sunday, $45 for Saturday, $75 for a three-day pass, $250 for the Whole Hog pass


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t h e at e r

Hamlet By Knighthorse Theatre Co. Sept. 5 to 7, 7:30 p.m.; Sept. 8, matinee, 2 p.m.; Scene One Theatre, sceneonetheatre.com Enjoy Shakespeare’s greatest play brought to life by a single actor on a bare stage, using nothing but tremendous stamina, great imagination and “words, words, words.” Cost: $20 per show or both shows [see Shakespeare on Demand below] for $30 My Son Pinocchio By David Stern Music and lyrics by Stephen Swartz Directed by Mary Alexander Oct. 24 to Nov. 9, Thursday and Friday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, 2 p.m.; Stained Glass Theatre, sgtmidmo.org Join the Blue Fairy, Stromboli and a lively cast of characters as Geppetto journeys beyond the toy shop to discover what makes the perfect child. When Pinocchio runs away to become a star in a traveling show, Geppetto must negotiate through a maze of adventures and comic encounters to find him. This family-friendly musical follows Pinocchio’s journey from an awkward wooden puppet to a real, live boy. Cost: $9, $7 on opening night Shakespeare on Demand By Knighthorse Theatre Co. Sept. 12 to 14, 7:30 p.m.; Sept.15 matinee, 2 p.m.; Scene One Theatre, sceneonetheatre.com This one-man adaptation of Hamlet is a theatrical mashup, featuring speeches from The Tempest, King Henry the Fifth and As You Like It. Shakespeare on Demand has played to packed houses and won rave international reviews. Cost: $20 per show or both shows [see Hamlet above] for $30 I Hate Hamlet Directed by Keith Enloe Oct. 10 to 12, 7:30 p.m., The Little Theater, Miller Performing Arts Center, tltjc.org A young and successful television actor relocates to New York, where he rents a marvelous gothic apartment. With his television career in limbo, the actor is offered the opportunity to play Hamlet onstage, but there’s one problem: He hates Hamlet. His dilemma deepens with the entrance of John Barrymore’s ghost, who arrives intoxicated and in full costume to the apartment that once was his. The contrast between the two actors, the towering, dissipated Barrymore, whose Hamlet was the greatest of his time, and Andrew Rally, hot young television star, leads to a wildly funny duel over women, art, success, duty, television and, yes, the apartment. Cost: $15

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The Miracle Worker By William Gibson Directed by Melanie Thompson Sept. 12 to 28, Stained Glass Theatre, sgtmidmo.org Young Helen Keller, blind, deaf and mute since infancy, is in danger of being sent to an institution. Her inability to communicate has left her frustrated and violent. In desperation, her parents seek help from the Perkins Institute, which sends them a “half-blind Yankee schoolgirl” named Annie Sullivan to tutor their daughter. Trapped in a secret, silent world and unable to communicate, Helen Keller is violent, spoiled, almost subhuman and treated by her family as such. Only Annie realizes that there is a mind and spirit waiting to be rescued from the dark, tortured silence. Through persistence, love and sheer stubbornness, Annie breaks through Helen’s walls of silence and teaches her to communicate. Cost: $9, $7 on opening night The MOMologues By Sheila Eppolito, Stefanie Cloutier and Lisa Rafferty Directed by Kathleen Lavery Sept. 6 to 7 and 12 to 14, 6:30 p.m.; matinee Sept. 8 and 15, 12:30 p.m.; Capital City Players, Shikles Auditorium, capitalcityplayers.com This hilarious shoutout to motherhood was written by three mothers about the funny sides of conception, pregnancy, labor, adjustments to newborns and dealing with preschoolers. It’s a salute to motherhood that reveals all the things mothers know about the early years but rarely discuss. Get ready, moms, as Capital City Players pays tribute to what one mother in the play calls “the toughest job you’ll ever love.” Cost: $35 for dinner and show (catered by Argyle Catering Co.) The Women of Lockerbie By Deborah Breevort Directed by Mark Miles Nov. 14 to 16 and 21 to 23, 7:30 p.m., Scene One Theatre, sceneonetheatre.com A mother from New Jersey roams the hills of Lockerbie Scotland in search of her son’s remains that were lost in the crash of Pan Am 103. She meets the Women of Lockerbie, who are fighting the U.S. government to obtain the clothing of the victims found in the plane’s wreckage. The women, determined to convert an act of hatred into an act of love, wants to wash the clothes of the dead and return them to the victims’ families. The Women of Lockerbie is loosely inspired by a true story, though the characters and situations in the play are purely fictional. Written in the structure of a Greek tragedy, it is a poetic drama about the triumph of love over hate. Cost: $10, $5 on opening night JC


Cuties of Capital Region

BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENTS

Adalynn June Call

Parents: Blake Call & Shyanne Denton Weight: 7 pounds length: 19 inches What has surprised you most about being parents? It sounds so cliche, but honestly it’s been the overwhelming feeling of love towards this tiny being. Before she came, people would always say, “It’s hard to explain until you experience it for yourself.” I always tried to imagine the amount of love I’d feel for her but it’s true! There aren’t words to describe the feeling when you see your baby for the first time or when she is inconsolable until you lay her across your chest and she instantly calms down. It is the best feeling in the entire world.

Quinn Kelly

parents: Seth & Michelle Kelly Weight: 6 pounds 9 ounce length: 19 inches What is your favorite moment so far? Our favorite moment of parenting has been enjoying our daughter’s smiles. They make her eyes light up and the dimples are adorable. Her first giggle was at her big sister Madison.

If you have given birth at Capital Region Medical Center and would like your baby announcement on the Jefferson City Magazine website and published in the print edition of the magazine go to www.jeffersoncitymag.com to submit your announcement and picture.

1125 Madison St. • Jefferson City, MO 65101 573.632.5000 • www.crmc.org 102 | September/October 2013


Cooper Raye Newton

Parents: Terrance & Tina Newton Weight: 7 pounds 14 ounces length: 21 inches

PHOTO BY: KEEP IT SIMPLE PHOTOGRAPHY

What is your favorite moment so far? Well, Cooper is our third child, and I have to say my favorite moment so far is watching my two older children love and care for their little brother. The tenderness they have with him is heart-warming, and I could just sit back and watch that all day. What is the best lesson you’ve learned from parenting? You can’t protect them from everything. They will fall, they will get bruises and cuts, they will be hurt and they will learn things the hard way. We can’t keep them in a bubble, we have to let them learn for themselves.

Kinley Ann Albert

Kenzie Politte

Parents: Jonathan & Sarah Albert Weight: 6 pounds 7 ounces length: 20.5 inches

Parents: Shannon Politte Weight: 7 pounds 13 ounces length: 21 inches

What is the best lesson you’ve learned from parenting? The little things and moments in life are the most important; everything else can wait. What is your favorite moment so far? Cherishing the miracle of life. It’s amazing how many lives and hearts she has already touched.

How has being a parent changed you? Being a mother has taught me to be patient when overwhelmed, to be strong during trying times and how to love unconditionally. What is your favorite moment so far? The moment Kenzie looked up and smiled at me; I knew everything was going to be just fine.

1125 Madison St. • Jefferson City, MO 65101 573.632.5000 • www.crmc.org Jefferson City Magazine | 103


into the wild Dr. David Scott has traveled the world to hunt big game â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s made his home a shrine to the wild kingdom B y T o m L o e ff l e r | P h o t o b y T r a v i s D u n c a n

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“I told her that I had friends that went hunting, and their wives got mad at them before they went, while they were gone and when they got back. They don’t understand that hunting’s in our DNA.” — Dr. David Scott

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Republic of South Africa, March 2012, on the edge of the Kalahari Desert, close to Botswana: It was 110 degrees. “We tracked a lion for three and a half hours in that heat,” Dr. David Scott says. “They have the largest lions in the world in that area. Anytime you hunt one of the big five [more on this to come] in South Africa, you have to have two professional hunters with you. It’s the law. I had one in front of me and one behind me, and we tracked and tracked and tracked. “We came out of this very thick, dense bush, and the lion came right out of it, straight at me, growling,” he continues. “It was at my feet. It was less than two steps away from me.” Scott was 75 at the time. “I beat the professional hunters, both of them,” he says. “They both should have shot. She would have killed me before they could have done anything. I don’t know if they didn’t have their guns ready or what. But she took us totally by surprise; she ambushed us.” But with one shot from his .460 Weatherby, the lion was dead — and luckily, not the good doctor.

“But I stood my ground,” he continues. “That was the first and only serious, deadly charge I’ve had at close range. It locked on me, and I killed it instantly. I shot him right between the shoulders. My professional hunters were slapping me on the back. They couldn't believe it. ‘Doctor, that was an incredible shot!’ I did exactly what I needed to do; it was instinctual, really. That was a rush, I’ll tell you.” S c o t t g r e w up on a farm in Osage County and always knew big-game hunting would be his passion. “I had read Outdoor Life and Field and Stream and always dreamed about being an international big-game hunter,” he says. He had other passions. From his 20s to 40s, he was a voracious runner, running nineto 10 miles a day four to five times a week. He ran a marathon. He’s been on the sidelines of Jefferson City Jays football games for more than five decades as both the official and unofficial team doctor after playing for the Jays and graduating in 1954. After earning his medical degree from the University of Missouri, he had a family practice in Jefferson City for 36 years and then

Those are Scott’s passions. But the love of his life is his wife of 53 years, Virginia, who made it all possible: in particular, his big-game ventures. Some wives get upset when their husbands are gone for a few hours to play golf or go fishing or hunting. That’s not Virginia, even though Scott would be gone up to 28 days at a time. They married after his first year of medical school; she was in nursing school. “I told her that I had friends that went hunting, and their wives got mad at them before they went, while they were gone and when they got back,” he says. “They don’t understand that hunting’s in our DNA. “I told her I would study hard, I’d work hard, and I will provide for all of our family’s needs and most of their wants,” he continues. “But I'm going to be a big-game hunter, and that’s expensive. That was our verbal prenuptial agreement. She’s never had a problem with it, ever. She is the best.” That understanding led to Scott’s big-game hunts all over the United States and around the world — about 30 of the latter — including 10 in Africa (where he also took two trips and

Dr. Scott poses with an African lion and buffalo during a safari hunt close to the Kalahari Desert, South Africa, in March 2012. Scott notes that American trophy hunters play a critical role in protecting wildlife by helping finance the game reserves, wildlife management areas and conservation efforts as well as boost the economic growth of the surrounding native villages.

“There was no time to get nervous or scared,” he says. “But I was sure nervous afterward. I always wondered what I would do if I was charged by a dangerous animal. Some hunters throw their guns down and run, and that’s the absolutely worst thing you can do. 106 | September/October 2013

served as medical director of the main prison from 1996 to 1999. “That was an education,” he says. At age 67, he went back to school at MU to take four classes to be able to work in emergency rooms. And he did, from Haiti to Warrensburg, Mo., before working in Rolla the past several years.

just took pictures), Mongolia, Canada, Central and South America and the Arctic Ocean. He’s taken 50 different species and a total of about 200 animals. His home is an absolute shrine to the wild kingdom. “And I’ve given half of them away to the Museum of Natural History in


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St. Louis because I didn’t have any more room,” he says. He’s taken both of his daughters, all three grandchildren and his wife on his trips. “She was stalking animals with me, crawling on her hands knees through the bush.” D u r i n g h i s 4 4 years of big-game hunting, Scott has achieved golf ’s version of the grand slam — plus one. He’s gotten the big five: elephant, rhino (by dart gun), lion, leopard, Cape buffalo. “Shot placement is the key on dangerous game,” he says. “You have to make sure your first shot is perfect. There are books where they show you where you need to hit each animal because each one is different. “I don’t believe I’ve ever missed one because I don’t shoot running animals,” he continues. “I think it’s unethical. The chances of wounding them and them going off and suffering are too great. I can’t stand to see an animal suffer.” And for you PETA folks who are still reading this, Scott's efforts — and those of the other big-game hunters — do a lot more good than harm. “The license fee I paid for the elephant, back in 1970, was $5,000,” he says. “Half of that went to the government, and that pays for anti-poaching efforts, and the other half goes to the chief of the area you’re hunting. What he gets out of it is all the meat, and with that $2,500 he builds classrooms, he builds wells, he builds medical clinics.” Like all of us, either now or eventually, Scott has been slowed by age. He hasn’t worked since February — he worked his last three months in Rolla in a wheelchair — and is scheduled to have both hip and knee replacement surgery this year. So his work and his passion will have to wait — until 2014. “I’m going back to work; I’m just looking for a smaller hospital,” he says. “And I’ll probably go on two hunts next year, an alligator hunt in Louisiana that’s already booked and a trip to the Congo to hunt bongo. That will probably be my last African hunt. But I’ve said that before, starting in 1978. But why not?” Indeed, why not? JC

With nearly 29 years of journalism experience, Tom Loeffler has become a fixture on the local sports scene. Loeffler is now a sports columnist for KRCG and connectmidmissouri.com.

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City Magazine fashion stylist Eric Luebbert provides a forecast of this season's most flattering trends All summer long I have been weeding out my clothes one closet at a time. What a project! Although my drawers and I are feeling lighter, I still have some heavy lifting in front of me. Coats, sweaters, pants, and boots, oh my! I’m overwhelmed. I can’t figure out what to keep and what to let go. Please advise. No worries, I’ll get you set up. Turns out you’ve saved the best for last. Coats, sweaters, pants and boots move to the front of the closet this season. Eye-catching coats make a statement and are the No. 1 fashion accessory this fall and winter. You can’t have too many! Think bold furs, oversized parkas and cool colorful leathers. Don’t be shy. Candy-coated colors such as pastel pink and light blue and pluggedin colors such as electric blue, green and shades of yellow are very prominent and chic in outerwear this season. Maybe something furtrimmed? Emerald green, Pantone’s color of the year, remains in vogue and looks terrific any way you wear it. Try pairing it with other jewel tones such as garnet, amethyst and sapphire. Black and white combos have been a staple. This fall and winter they surrender to shades of gray, the new neutral: light gray to dark graphite. Blocks of color with black remain strong and will look fresh when you add white and camel to the mix. Winter white worn head to toe ruled the runways this year, so don’t pack up all your white after Labor Day. In fact, a crisp white

jean, a cozy cable-knit sweater and some boots might be the perfect uniform this fall. Speaking of uniforms, military-inspired looks remain strong this season. Double-breasted jackets and coats paired with skinny leathertrimmed jeans and rugged military lace-ups or over-the-knee boots rock out this fall and winter. This look can also be heightened with a nod to the trendy ’80s punk rock theme by adding some tartan plaid, a cool beanie, an Andy Warhol-inspired repetitive bold print and a hot leather moto jacket (studs, chains and safety pins optional). If you tend to be more comfortable in traditional styles, you’re in luck. Classic menswear fabric patterns of hounds tooth, pinstripe and plaid, joined by leopard print — now considered a basic — can be found in both modern and traditional silhouettes that will help keep you in high style. Add a loafer or boot and hat, and you’ll be tops this season. New hat choices this fall are the beanie, floppy knit beret, a baseball-styled hat or a classic fedora. Now that you’ve taken inventory, you probably have a better idea of what you have

Have A Style Question for Eric?

Ask Eric your style questions, arrange a closet rehab, book a special event, wardrobe reinvention or discuss individualized speciality shopping by contacting him at eric@jeffesoncitymag.com or 314-660-4148.

112 | September/October 2013

Peplum sweater and bold hounds tooth pencil skirt, bananarepublic.com

and what you’ll need to get through this season in style. You might want to pick up a couple fresh turtlenecks, something with leather, a beanie hat for sure and a peplum blouse, skirt or dress, a must-have to define your waist and/ or accentuate your curves. Enjoy the crisp, beautiful fall! Yours in style,

Jefferson City native Eric Luebbert has been a wardrobe and fashion stylist for more than two decades and is the style expert on KRCG-TV13 Sunrise Style. Visit jeffersoncitymag.com for more expert style advice.


f a s h i on fo r e c a st

Fall Wardrobe Updates These key items will take your style to the next level this season.

Featurehdion in our efaads on spr 82! page

Clockwise from Top Left: Collection B Quilted Double-Breasted Jacket in Olive, JC Penney, $100; Green Cartise Coat, Calena’s Fashions, $355; Black Faux Leather Leggings, Karen Kane, Saffees, $108; Essie Fall 2013 Nail Color Collection, Cashmere Bathrobe, Haute Salon, $8; Michael Kors, Blue Jay Leather Moto Jacket, Saffees, $495; Dress with Fur Trim, Calena’s Fashions, $220; Ponte Short-Sleeve Peplum Top, Banana Republic, $49.50; Cozy White Knit Sweater, HM.com, $50; Scottish Fine Soaps Co., Soap-In-A-Tin (Heather or Seaweed), Haute Salon, $12; Oversized Beanie, JCPenney, $18; Frye “Jane Tall Cuff ” Overthe-Knee Boots, Dillard’s, $418; Hounds Tooth Knit Jacket, White House Black Market, $148; Evan Convertible Hounds Tooth Crossbody, Banana Republic, $198; Leopard Print Platform Loafer, Bernardo, American Shoe, $168.

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Cork, Fork & Brews

1. Tyler and Susan Beck 2. Katelyn, Chris and Lauren Hackman 3. Erica Prasad and Victoria Caywood 4. Kathy Young and Cyndy Schnieders 5. Jayne Dunkmann, Jerome Offord, Benecia Williams and Curtis Creagh 6. Matt and Sarah Alsager, Kristi Gratz and Jason Harper 7. American Culinary Federation 8. Laura Payne with Tami Turner, co-chair 9. Sam Donahue and Arnold Parks 10. Front row: Larry and Katie Neill; Back row: Bryan and Missy Dunn, Malorie McGowin, Cassandra and Brandon Atchison 11. Stephanie Johnson, director, Boys & Girls Club of the Capital City 12. Chris Carter, Sally Powell and Chef David Sale 13. Chef Ryan P. Davis, Argyle Catering

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The 2013 Capital Region Bill Quigg Memorial Golf Tournament

1. Brad Roark, Randy Lueckenotte, Dave Cliburn and Lee Wilburs 2. Jason Hoffman, Dan Hinds, Cotton Walker and Darren Heckman 3. Nancy Gratz and Sharon Naught 4. Theresa Rogers, Andy Wheeler, Nick Nichols and Herb Kuhn 5. Grant Shorthose, Chi Cheung, Rick Naught and Rod Smith 6. Jack Pletz, Ken Kuebler and Harry Otto 7. Mark Brandt, Bill Burnett, Lana Trammel and Mike Niemeyer 8. Jake Schmitz, George Pardalos, Steve Bohlken and Brad Sloan

Joe Machens Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram Grand Opening

1. Driver Mark Hall 2. The Raminator in action. 3. Huge truck = happy boy! 4. Hundreds of guests gather for the Raminator. 5. Gary Drewing and grandson Brayden 6. Gary Drewing addressing the crowd. 7. Rusty Drewing, Bob Jacaway, Mike Zuppardi and Gary Drewing 8. The Raminatorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s transport vehicle. 9. Guests surveying the aftermath of the Raminator.

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City Magazineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2013 Ones to Watch Recognition Luncheon

1. Annie Jarrett, Mandy Lawrence and Janet Wear-Enloe 2. Jason Jett, Bill Plank, Kevin Callaway and Ken Hussey 3. Karen Enloe and Ashley Freeman 4. Chris Harrison, Kat Cunningham and Angie Huhman 5. Mason Neff, Teresa White, Angie Huhman and Cindy Pudney 6. Tina Shoemaker and Kristi Gratz 7. Clyde Lear and Ed Stroesser 8. Trey Cunningham and Jason Jett

Men of the Club

1. Jeff Naught, Ryan Freeman and Matt Alsager 2. Cappie Stevens, Gus Wagner and Kasey Green 3. Chip Gentry 4. Matt Allen, Ryan Imhoff and Mitch Rademan 5. Steve Robinson 6. Steve Loethen 7. Gerardo Cornejo and Bobby Showers 8. Derek Schnieders and Tyler Beck 9. Female guests cheer the boys on. 10. 2012 Mr. Capital City Brandon Wooley taking his final walk as king. 11. Newly crowned All Star King of the Capital City Chip Gentry.

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8th Annual Pro-Life Golf Classic to Benefit Vitae Foundation

1. Ed Zagorac and Darrell Moore 2. Rick Stokes, Stephanie Bruemmer, Jerry Kauffman and Fr. Chris Cordes 3. Dr. Tim Rieke, Greg Grank, Bob Ashal and Jack Voigt 4. Kelly Burre, Dana Lueckenoff, Larry Pleus and Roger Dudenhoeffer 5. John Cassmeyer, Ken Wegman, Mark Kleene and Brian Berhorst 6. Doug Bax, Dr. Jake Tomlinson, Jim Neuner and Bruce Bax 7. Thomas Rost, Dr. Ken Rowan, Dr. Matt Gassen and Jonathan Rost 8. Nate Drennan, Ramey Workman, Colby Davis and Ryan Davis

Apparitional Red Carpet Premiere

1. Austin Catorn, Charley Koontz and Otis Catorn 2. Cindy Reichard and Mark Reichard 3. Jamie and Katherine Reed, Ryan and Will Burns 4. Funtez Robinson and Bruenetta Robinson 5. Andrew P. Jones and Brad Morrow 6. Dan and Melanie Walsh 7. Jeffrey Johnson 8. Melanie Stock and Linara Washington 9. Warren Yeager and Eric McHugh

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ADVERTISER INDEX American Shoe Store......................................................................62 Ascend Business Strategies..........................................................44 Ata Martial Arts...............................................................................55 Barbara E Howard, Md....................................................................42 Bee At Home....................................................................................59 Bella Capelli Salon And Spa........................................................... 75 Blue Diamond...................................................................................62 Burks Interior Design......................................................................50 Burns Optical...................................................................................49 Calena's Fashions.........................................................................108 Capital Dentistry For Children......................................................114 Capital Region Medical Center..................................... 10, 101-103 Carrie's Hallmark.............................................................................40 Catherine Crum Salon...................................................................100 Central Travel................................................................................... 76 Central Bank................................................. 65, 87, 115,116,117,119 Central Trust.................................................................................... 37 Cliff Manor Bed And Breakfast Inn...............................................39 Columbia College.............................................................................44 Columbia Facial Plastic Surgery.................................................108 Columbia Pool & Spa.....................................................................109 Community Health Center............................................................. 76 Concannon Plastic Surgery & Medical Spa....................................7 Designer Kitchens & Baths............................................................ 70 Dreams To Reality............................................................................60 Ecowater Systems.........................................................................114 Eric Luebbert....................................................................................50 Fischer Body Shop..........................................................................68 Frank Schrimpf Plumbing.............................................................121 Frosted Art.....................................................................................109 Furniture Select..............................................................................118 Haute Salon...................................................................................... 76

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Hawthorn........................................................................................ 124 Healthlink.........................................................................................92 Home Helpers................................................................................... 76 Huber And Associates....................................................................55 HyVee..........................................................................................94,95 Initially Yours....................................................................................92 J Pfenny's..........................................................................................51 JCMG Laser & Vein Center...............................................................5 JCMG.................................................................................................13 JCMG & St Mary's Cancer Conversations...................................49 JCMG Orthopedics & Sports Medicine........................................68 Jefferson Bank Of Missouri...........................................................93 Jefferson City YMCA......................................................................93 Mercedes-Benz Of Joe Machens..................................................25 Joe Machens BMW............................................................................2 Joe Machens - Volkswagen...........................................................20 Joe Machens Capital City Ford................................................. 8, 12 Joe Machens Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge Ram....................................66 Joe Machens Fiat.............................................................................18 Joe Machens Hyundai.................................................................... 79 Joe Machens Mazda....................................................................... 67 Joe Machens Mitsubishi................................................................ 78 Joe Machens Nissan....................................................................... 23 Jones Beltone Hearing Center......................................................118 KMIZ...................................................................................................14 Kwik Kar Wash And Detail............................................................ 123 La Belle Cabinetry & Lighting........................................................40 Longfellow's Garden Center.........................................................121 Marshall & Co...................................................................................99 Martellaro Marble And Granite.....................................................121 Mid-City Lumber Co.................................................................38, 64 Midwest Block & Brick......................................................................9

Missouri Credit Union....................................................................... 4 Missouri Valley Mercantile.............................................................39 N.H. Scheppers Distributing Company....................................... 107 Naught Naught Insurance Agency..............................................109 O'donoghue's ................................................................................118 On Site Oil Change........................................................................120 Organize That Space.......................................................................99 Paddy Malone's Pub.......................................................................39 Prison Brews....................................................................................59 Riley Chevrolet................................................................................. 70 Riley Toyota - Scion......................................................................... 37 River City Florist .......................................................................32,33 River Region Credit Union..............................................................50 Roots N Blues...................................................................................16 Saffee's............................................................................................65 Samuel's Tuxedos..........................................................................114 Scruggs Lumber..............................................................................59 Signature Homes............................................................................. 87 Smart Business Products..............................................................42 Sommers Interiors...........................................................................49 St Mary's Health Center....................................................................3 Studio Home.................................................................................... 75 The Blue Heron Restaurant............................................................. 11 The Ecco Lounge.............................................................................68 The Grand Cafe................................................................................42 The Snob Shop Exchange..............................................................96 Three Story Coffee..........................................................................40 Victoria's Bridal...................................................................... 110-111 Wallstreet Group................................................................................6 Whaley's Pharmacy Inc..................................................................62 Wilson's Total Fitness....................................................................99


November 20th, 2013 5:00-7:30 p.m. | Capital Plaza Hotel Tickets go on sale in October. Check online for more updates about the upcoming event!

THE E V SA E! DAT

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Jefferson City En route to a better tomorrow

W By Stephanie Bell

What wonderful things are happening in our JCMO! This issue is full of stories of just some of the many inspiring people with big dreams breathing new life into our city. With these changes, it is imperative we take time to reflect on where we are headed and how we are going to get there. Jim Collins, in his article “Good to Great,” studied nearly 1,500 companies over 40 years to determine how companies achieve greatness. He explains, “To decide where to drive the bus before you have the right people on the bus is absolutely the wrong approach.” Collins suggests that, even with a great vision, without the right people on the bus, you can only achieve mediocre results. To me, it seems the right people are getting on the bus here in Jefferson City. And as I hear our people share their stories, I’ve found that they subscribe to three important truths.

W e m ay n o t be home to the Arch, Worlds of Fun or Truman the Tiger, but we are home to a beautiful State Capitol building, a historic penitentiary, Binder Park and the Missouri River Bike/Pedestrian Bridge, along with a number of unique and longstanding businesses such as Capitol City Cork and Provisions, Madison’s and Southbank Gift Co. The people on the bus have embraced our distinctive community assets and are capitalizing on those assets. The more JCMO reflects the interests and values of its own citizens, the better we are for it. The people on our bus find a way to make things happen. How many times do we hear, “Jefferson City doesn’t have X, Y or Z”? It’s easy to put the blame on the any number of other organizations or people for your town not hav122 | September/October 2013

photo by anthony jinson

ing what you want, but now we’re watching citizens step up and bring in the businesses and services they want themselves. Five years ago, there was no such thing as Thursday Night Live, a weekly summer entertainment festival that now draws approximately 5,000 people into the heart of downtown. We also didn’t have a Yo-Yums, The Grand Café, J. Pfenny’s Sports Grill and Pub or The Twisted Canvas. But with some very motivated entrepreneurs, these new businesses are benefiting the community as a whole. I’ve found that, in this town, if you have a good idea and are willing to put in the work, the community will come together to support you in that endeavor. These people all have their own JCMO story. I’m telling mine several times a week on my blog, myJCMOblog.com. I started my blog because I wanted others to see Jefferson City as I do: a wonderfully interesting place to live with ample opportunities to learn, grow and connect. People question how I got into blogging as a lawyer, but for me, it makes perfect sense; I’m an advocate by profession. As citizens, it’s our choice to advocate for JCMO. The people on my bus are doing it day in and day out, and they don’t use slang to refer to our town or say

things like “It’s nice — for Jefferson City.” We are quick to offer information or positive experiences in the face of complaints, suggest a local spot for shopping or dining, encourage friends and family to visit here or promote JCMO as a prime spot for an event or meeting. I t i s t r u e : We are our own worst critics, but we are also our best advocates. No one can tell the JCMO story like we can, like the way our favorite local meal tastes, the pride with which people claim their neighborhoods and the unbelievable generosity of the community. We are headed to a great JCMO because the right people are getting on the bus. Although I don’t know the exact destination, I do know there are seats still available. And if this issue is any indication, we are going to need a bigger bus. JC ➝ Stephanie Bell is an attorney with Blitz, Bardgett & Deutsch LC and is active in a variety of civic, charitable and religious activities in the Jefferson City area. In 2012, she was the first person to receive the Fast Forward Award by the Jefferson City Area Chamber of Commerce. She promotes the community through her blog, myjcmoblog.com. Bell resides in Jefferson City with her husband, Chris, and their toddler, Drew.


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