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Bradford’s Weekly Newpaper

Bradford Journal

VOL. 173

NO. 21 BRADFORD JOURNAL/MINER

THURSDAY, MAY 22 , 2014

Bradford Journal/McKean County Miner/Mount Jewett Echo

Enjoying The Books From School Library

www.bradfordjournal.com

Phone 814-465-3468

Arrive At Classroom

Bradford Journal Photo First grade students in Ms. McCormick’s room look up from reading their library Bradford Journal Photo books, May 19th, at GGB Elementary School. Left to right are Jonathan Jasper, Tam- Left to right in the photo are Katlynn Johnlynn Lafredo, and Brayden Frair Taking a look around the table, it seems that books son 10, Jascinda Buzzelli 10, and Chase about planets and sports dominate this table. Dinch 12. They are fourth grade students in Mrs. Rhoades’ classroom at School Street Elementary, waiting for the morning meeting to begin, May 16th.

Read About Parties, Animals, & Trucks

INDEX Local News/Weather Comments & Opinions Obituaries Social News Local/Regional News

Bradford Journal Photo From the left, clockwise around the table are Brynn Cross, Anthony Harris, Gabriella Anderson, and Malachi Benjamin look up from their library books, May 19th. They are first grade students in Ms. McCormick’s classroom at GGB Elementary School, reading about dogs, big trucks, birthday parties, and more.

2 3 4 6 9

Comics/Sudoku/ 13 DVD New Releases Classifieds 19 Word Seek/Crossword 20 Bradford Journal P.O. Box, Bradford, PA 16701 www.bradfordjournal.com Phone: 814-465-3468


Page 2 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 22, 2014

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LOCAL & AREA NEWS Use Of Food Stamps Rises In McKean County The use of food stamps in McKean County increased during the recession, assisting families in stretching their food dollars, contributing to local spending and helping spark a national debate about the future of the federal nutrition program. The proportion of McKean County residents receiving food stamps hit 17.5 percent in 2011, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food and Nutrition Services. That’s an increase of 5.1 percentage points since 2007, the year the recession started. Across Pennsylvania, 14.1 percent of residents in 2011 received support from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), as the food stamp program is officially known. Nationally, 14.8 percent of the population receives SNAP benefits. Places like McKean County, which are located outside metropolitan areas, tend to have a higher percentage of the population receiving SNAP benefits. That’s because incomes are generally lower in nonmetropolitan counties. The inflation-adjusted median household income in McKean County in 2011 was $41,779, compared to the Pennsylvania median of $52,015. Nationally, median household income was $52,306 in 2011.

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-by Emily Guerin and Tim Marema In 2011, residents of McKean County received a combined $10,958,882 in SNAP benefits. The USDA reports that each $5 in SNAP benefits generates $9.20 in spending. SNAP benefits start to circulate in the economy quickly. Participants spend nearly all their food stamps within one month of receipt, according to a study by the University of New Hampshire Carsey Institute. Grocers say they feel the impact of SNAP and other USDA nutrition programs like Women, Infants and Children (WIC). “Without SNAP and WIC, we wouldn’t be able to make it,” wrote the owner of the Mill City Market in the small town of Mill City, Ore., in a survey of rural grocers conducted by the Oregon Food Bank and Kansas State University Rural Grocery Initiative. Owners know they have to stock the shelves to prepare for more business when SNAP benefits hit the streets, said David Procter with the Rural Grocery Initiative It’s not just the mom-and-pop stores that see a bump from food-stamp spending in small towns and rural areas. Walmart reported in a recent Securities and Exchange Commission filing that a decrease in SNAP benefits last year could affect the retail giant’s bottom line. Average SNAP benefits nationally fell about $30 a month per family in November after a temporary increase that was part of the 2009 economic stimulus package. More funding decreases are on the way. This summer, Congress agreed to trim about $8 billion from SNAP over the next decade. Backers of the cuts said the program had expanded too much in recent years and was creating too much reliance on government assistance. SNAP expenditures increased 135 percent between (Continued on page 9)

THE BRADFORD AREA 5-DAY WEATHER FORECAST Thursday, May 22: Mostly cloudy today with some scattered showers in the morning. High of 63°. Thursday Night: Mostly cloudy with scattered showers tonight. Low of 46°.

Friday, May 23: Mostly cloudy with scattered showers today. High of 63°. Friday Night: Mostly cloudy with scattered showers in the evening. Low of 45°.

Saturday, May 24: Partly sunny and warmer today with a high of 68°. Saturday Night: Partly cloudy this evening becoming mostly clear late tonight . Low of 44°.

Sunday, May 25: Sunny and nice today. Warmer with a high of 72°. Sunday Night: Mainly clear tonight and a little warmer with a low of 46°.

Monday, May 26: Variable cloudiness today and warm with a high of 75°. Monday Night: Periods of rain tonight with a thunderstorm possible. Warmer tonight with a low of 53°.

CHECK OUT OUR PHOTO GALLERY

WHEN YOU VISIT THE BRADFORD JOURNAL ON THE WEB!


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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 22, 2014 Page 3

5 ¢ENTS WORTH

by Grant Nichols

This week, at the request of fourth grade student Katlynn Johnson, we stopped at Mrs. Rhoades’ classroom at School Street Elementary School for some photos. Interestingly, we arrived shortly before the school day officially began, May 16th, and witnessed the early morning routine there. In addition, we took more planned photos for this issue, in Ms. McCormick’s first grade classroom at GGB Elementary School, where students were reading their library books…….In this edition, also, is an unscheduled photo taken during a lecture about the human brain, presented to first grade students in Mrs. Shanks’ classroom at GGB, by Dr. David Merwine of UPB…….We would like to thank the following sponsors for this week’s Memorial Day special page: Hedlund Glass, Timeless Treasures Gift Shop, Bradford Vet’s Club, Bottorf Embroidery & Screen Printing, Dexter Service & Collision, Tasta Pizza of Bradford and Tasta Pizza Express of Limestone, The New Keystone, McCormick Construction, and Worth W. Smith Co……..Our readers will find a new addition to our comics selection, entitled “RECESS,” on page 13 of this week’s Bradford Journal. We were intrigued and pleased with the slightly different and refreshing bent from the minds of artists Andy Anderson and Wil Panganiban, and hope that our readers enjoy this new comic as well……..For those who want to know, the Bradford Area High School Alumni Association (BAHSAA) is alive and well, and is in the process of judging High School entries for its annual college scholarship presentations. As in previous years, there will be a luncheon in honor of the recipients of the scholarships. Also scheduled for this year is the biennial dinner to be held October 11th at the Bradford Club. For our reader’s information, all class members and employees of Bradford Area High School are welcome and encouraged to join this organization and to attend this year’s dinner……..With more and more people across the United States installing their own home power generating units, major energy providing corporations known under the common name of “utilities” are beginning to take notice. If individual householders take care of their own power needs, how will utility companies remain relevant to their investors in the future? Fortunately for them the answer is close at hand. They merely have to repeat the process taken by the telephone companies to save themselves, as alternative methods of communications became available- that of establishing surcharges for access to their lines. Laws are already being pushed through legislatures around the country to include such a surcharges with electric bills. We would rather see investors jump into the industry of alternative, and self-contained energy markets.

It’s A Matter Of Opinion... Guest Columnist “Stubble And Ink”

-by Bob Perry

We find ourselves being confronted with the stubble look and the ink of tattoo artists. Everyone goes through the issue of self-identification and these two avenues are becoming more popular in everyday life. The issue here is not one of distinction and professionalism but one of recognizable distinction. This has been made popular by the movie actors when they present themselves to the public. Stubble combined with a business suit is quite notably unsuited. When it comes to the stubble of a mustache or beard, some women find it attractive but steer clear of the facial contact in necking sessions since the short hairs are stiff and leave a tell tale redness. Such men may consider just growing a full mustache or beard. The two male judges on American Idol have the stubble and while it makes them more recognizable they just might appear more professional if they were clean shaven. In addition to the stubble, Keith Urban has the most unkempt hair setting him aside from most singers and dresses somewhere in the 4‘s. One should always have the goal of looking one’s best and have pride in doing so. Jlo, in comparison, always dresses to the 9’s and creates such a disparity in images. Harry Connick

Jr. dresses dramatically better than Keith but continues to display the stubble. The Voice has a couple of stubble judges and in the case of Adam Levine the image he presents is somewhat disturbing because in addition to the stubble and the clothes he wears flaunts the ink (tattoos) that we really do not need to be confronted with. In truth the use of ink is another thing that is pushing the Creator out of our lives since the use of ink is forbidden. Check Leviticus 19:28 and 1 Corinthians 6:19-20 for references to the reverence we need to show our Creator given body. The Bible is clear in things one should not do to to the physical form. In considering Dancing With The Star judges, one gets the image of professionalism as all judges dress impeccably and present the image of professionalism. It would be a positive thing if those who flood the media would present a more respectable presence for the audience which includes impressionable youth. Hoping for people who are role models, whether they want to be or not, do some soul searching as to how they present themselves to the public. Without such consideration, their presence is lopsided with self-indulgence.

Elementary Students Learn About The Brain

Bradford Journal Photo Dr. David Merwine talks about the evolution of brain science with first grade students in Mrs. Shanks’ classroom at GGB Elementary School, May 19th. The lecture, tailored for young students, recounted historical incidences to show how brain function has become known over the millennium, and to peak and direct the children’s interest in the brain and its relationship to the mind, and related fields of study and occupation. (Dr. Merwine is the Director of Biology program and Associate Professor of Biology at UPB.) Students included in the photo, among others, are Zoey Albaugh, Haley Baker, Jennifer Eggers, Joshua Everetts, Marcus Griffin, Franklin Howard, Gage Livingston, Paul Marion, Dale Miller, Mackenzie Moss, Rylee Nichols, Bryonna Schoonover, Andrew Sprester, Cody Vancise, Allyson Verolini, Aiden Willard, Angel Wilmoth, and Gage Wilmoth.


Page 4 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 22, 2014

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OBITUARIES Jennifer Hughes Jennifer M. Hughes, 44, of Bradford, passed away on Sunday (May 11, 2014) at her home. She was born on Nov. 12, 1969, in Atlanta, Ga., a daughter of Joanne M. Brown Meconi. On Sept. 23, 1995, in St. Bernard Catholic Church, she married Stephen C. Hughes, who survives. She was a 1987 graduate of the Glen Ridge High School, Glen Ridge, N.J., and a graduate of Edinboro University, where she earned her bachelor’s degree in elementary education and her master’s degree in special education. She was most recently employed by Beacon Light Behavioral Health Systems and St. Bernard School as a substitute teacher. In addition to her husband, Stephen Hughes of Bradford, and her mother, Joanne (Cliff) DeWolfe of West Bloomfield, Mich., she is also survived by two

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sons, Brandon and Ryan Hughes, both of Sue Ann Platko Bradford; one stepson, Andrew Hughes of Sue Ann Leona Platko, 79, of 947 High Bradford; one sister, Alicia Velazquez of Street Ext., Bradford, passed away MonGrand Blanc, Mich.; and several loving day (May 12,2014) at The Pavilion at aunts, uncles, cousins, nieces and neph- BRMC surrounded by her loving family. ews. Born May 16, 1934, in Custer City, she was a daughter of the late Frederick Karrasch and Bernice Woodring Karrasch BarBetty Jackson Betty Frances Wachob Jackson, 91, of ber. On Aug. 23, 1952, in Our Mother of Olean Road, passed away Sunday (May Perpetual Help Church, she married Steve 11, 2014) at her home following a lengthy Platko who survives. They were the first illness. She had resided on Olean Road for couple to be married with the permanent altar in Our Mother of Perpetual of Help nearly 70 years. Born July 19, 1922, in Juneau, Pa., she Church. Mrs. Platko graduated from Bradford was a daughter of Harry and Barbara Noerr Wachob. On June 3, 1944, in Co- High School. After high school she and lumbia, S.C., Betty married Henry James her husband, who was serving in the U.S. Army, spent some time in Germany. Upon Jackson Sr., who died Dec. 31, 1974. Betty and her husband owned and oper- returning to the States, she became a stayated the Lafayette Motel from 1954 until at-home mom and raisied her children. 1965. She was a secretary in the Bradford Later in life she worked at Minard Run Area High School library from 1966 until Oil Company for over 20 years, retiring in 1999. 1989, when she retired. In addition to her husband of 61 years, She is survived by a daughter, Julie (Kenneth) Eddy of Bradford; a son, Henry she is survived by four daughters, CynJames (the late Beverly Robbins) Jackson thia (William) McEwen, Julia (Jeffrey) Jr. of Derrick City; seven grandchildren, McLaughlin, Lorraine (Michael) Hannon, Laurie (Art) Howell, Brenda (Jeff) Stack, and Rebecca (Kenneth) Yohe; two sons, Kevin Jackson, Angela Jackson, Matthew John (Bev Tallentire) Platko and Mark Jackson, Devon Hayden and Sara (James) (Kelly) Platko; 16 grandchildren, Matthew Furlong; and 10 great-grandchildren, Platko, Jillian Platko, Garrett (Nicole) Alecsy Howell, Jessica Stack, Christian McEwen, Mitchell McEwen, Charles Jackson, Haley Jackson, Brooke Bailey, (Arouna) McEwen, Brian McLaughlin, Brooks Hayden, Leah Hayden, Colin Ok- Emily McLaughlin, Brandi Bucheit, Chad erlund, Kenley Okerlund and Jameis Fur- (Melissa) Bucheit, Tara (Jeremy) Smith, Megan Yohe, Cassandra Platko, Brianna long. Burial was in McKean Memorial Park, Platko, Angela (Dylan Rimer) Yohe, Russell Tallentire and Alyssa (Jason) Wood; Lafayette, PA. four great-grandchildren; a brother, Donald (Peggy) Karrasch; and many nieces and nephews. Burial was in Willow Dale Cemetery, Bradford, PA.

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(Continued on page 9 ) USPS-062-740 Postmaster: Send address changes to: Bradford Journal P.O. Box 17 Bradford, PA 16701-0017 Phone: 814-465-3468 Subscription In Advance (By U.S. Mail) Yearly/$50.00 Within County Yearly/$68.00 Outside County Periodica postage paid at USPS Bradford, PA 16701-9998

Copy Deadline: Noon Saturday Published every Thursday at 69 Garlock Hollow. Bradford, PA 16701, Except for the third Thursday in the month of June. Internet Color Version - $15.00 yearly Email Color Version - $26.00 yearly Grant Nichols Publisher Debi Nichols Editor Don Poleteo Military Correspondant


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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 22, 2014 Page 5

BUSINESS & PERSONAL FINANCES Seven Money Habits To Curb Now Whether it is biting our fingernails, losing track of house keys or procrastinating; we all have some bad financial habits that we’d like to break. Often, we simply “accept” our bad habits without thinking about how they may actually be standing in the way of us living our lives as we want to. When it comes to making the most of your money, consider curbing some of these actions that may be taking a toll on your wallet. Ignoring your bills: Just because you don’t look at them does not mean they don’t exist. Mail has this unfortunate way of piling up very quickly, so take a few minutes every day to sort through your papers to make sure you don’t miss bills or other important paperwork. Setting up automatic payments through your bank can make this process easier. Maxing out your credit cards: When used correctly, credits cards are an effective and useful tool in helping you to make big purchases and build a good credit history. The key is paying off your balance every month. Be wary of spending up to your credit limit and just paying off the minimum amount each month. That is one way people fall easily into debt. Not contributing to your 401k plan: It may feel like you have absolutely no money to spare, but investing in your company’s retirement plan is crucial to building a nest egg for the future. Start by talking to the HR person at your company and learning about your benefits. Then, try to contribute as much as your company matches since it is essentially free money towards your personal savings. Spending blindly: It’s important not to be oblivious to how much money you spend on a daily, weekly and monthly basis. All of those receipts for gas, snacks, soft drinks and restaurants add up very quickly if you are not aware of how much you are spending every day. You can use this calculator to create a budget for your daily expenses. Not having an emergency fund: Whether your car breaks down, you chip a tooth eating, or you get laid off – unexpected events can wreak financial inconvenience and havoc. Save regularly for a rainy day (experts recommend having 3–6 months worth of living expenses saved) so you will be covered if the unexpected happens. Living beyond your means: With so many temptations from new electronic equipment, to new fashion every season, to “big” sales every other day at your favorite department store, it is

-by Jason Alderman

easy to fall into the habit of constantly buying new things. Becoming a financially disciplined person is simply learning how to resist the urge to spend what you don’t have. You can use this Saving for a Goal calculator to set aside money for something special. Stop playing money mind games: What we say to ourselves and to others about our finances can have a big

impact on how we interact with money. Watch out for statements like, “I’ve never had money, and I will never make any money,” “Shopping is my therapy,” and “But, I’ve always let my partner take care of our finances.” Be aware of excuses and negative talk that may keep you from feeling confident about being able to manage your finances.

Students Display Their Taste In Reading

Bradford Journal Photo Students in Ms. McCormick’s classroom at GGB Elementary School, show us their library books, May 19th. From the front, clockwise around the table are Benjamin Bloomfield, Jeremy Frey, Grace Tyler, and Chase Everly. They are reading about cats, police work, haunted houses, and more.


Page 6 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 22, 2014

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AREA SOCIAL NEWS Bradford Area Calendar of Events: MAY 2014 MAY 22: Knitting Club 1-3pm Bradford Area Public Library, 67 W. Washington Street, Bradford, PA. Whether you are an expert knitter or have never picked up a set of needles, this informal club is for you. Meets weekly in the Carnegie Room. For more information, call the Bradford Area Public Library at 814-362-6527 MAY 23: FCCLA Story Time 10:30-11:30am Bradford Area Public Library, 67 W. Washington Street, Bradford, PA. Includes story, craft, snack, and social interaction. Geared toward pre-K children, accommodates infants and toddlers. For more information, contact Bradford Area Public Library at 814-362-6527 MAY 24: Story Time 10:30am Bradford Area Public Library, 67 W. Washington Street, Bradford, PA. Preschool craft-related program. Opportunity for young children to interact with others their age while listening to stories, making projects, and enjoying snacks. For more information, contact the Library at 814-362-6527. Book and Craft 1pm Bradford Area Public Library, 67 W. Washington Street, Bradford, PA. For more information, contact the Bradford Area Public Library at 814362-6527. MAY 26: Memorial Day – No School Bradford Area School District Wee Readers 10:30am Bradford Area Public Library, 67 W. Washington Street, Bradford,

PA. Little ones can bring their favorite stories to share with a friend! For more information, contact the library at 814362-6527. MAY 27: Play Doh Pals 10:30am Bradford Area Public Library, 67 W. Washington Street, Bradford, PA. Story hour centered around play doh sculpting. For more information, contact the Library at 814-362-6527. MAY 28; Story Time 10:30am Bradford Area Public Library, 67 W. Washington Street, Bradford, PA. Preschool craft-related program. Opportunity for young children to interact with others their age while listening to stories, making projects, and enjoying snacks. For more information, contact the Library at 814-362-6527.

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Bradford Journal Photo We were invited to visited Mrs. Rhoades’ fourth grade classroom, May 16th, at School Street Elementary School. On the left is Alyson Ngo 9, who will be a contestant in the “24-challenge” later in the day, and on the right is Katlynn Johnson 10, who earlier in the week, invited us to visit her homeroom, by contacting us on facebook.

Bradford TOPS # Article submitted TOPS#16 PA meeting on May 15th was opened with the Tops’ theme song, “The More We Get Together the Slimmer We’ll Be”. Leader Vickie Johnson conducted the meeting at the First Presbyterian Church. There were 25 weigh-ins with a loss of 17 pounds. Vickie Johnson was officer of the week and loser in waiting. The forbidden food for the week is any kind of candy. The fashion tip by Jean Miller was: Heat can warp your frames on your glasses so always keep them in a hard case and never wear them on the top of your head on a hot day. Linda Hedlund’s helpful hint was on uses for coffee grounds: Fertilizer for acid-loving plants such as azaleas and rhododendrons, “Fridge freshener”: place grounds in a plastic container with holes in the lid. Place container in refrigerator to absorb odors. Odoreliminator: Keep grounds in a can near the sink, then rub a small amount over your hands when peeling onions, chopping garlic or handling fish to get rid of the odor. Elaine Harris read the Super Foods which this week were Tomatoes, Cooked or processed tomatoes are your very best source of cancer-fighting lycopene. New research shows it may offer bone protection, too. So enjoy your spaghetti sauce, tomato soup, or pizza. Adding a touch of fat, like olive oil, increases absorption. Yogurt is an excellent source of protein and calcium, and famed for its friendly bacteria {the “probiotics” which promote good digestion and and boost immunity}. Yogurt may be good for your waistline, too. New research links certain dairy foods to reduced body fat. The club shared a recipe for Fruit Salsa. Happy Birthday this week to Jean Salter. The meeting ended with several articles read from the TOPS magazine by all the ladies, then the friend ship circle and TOPS prayer.

BIRTHS

DAUGHTER, May 8, 2014, to Kristin Luna, Bradford, PA. SON, May 11, 2014, to Bethany Knight, Bradford, PA. DAUGHTER, May 11, 2014, to Samantha Cotarobles and Nathaniel Westlake, Bradford, PA. SON, May 12, 2014, to Kristy and Britt Moore, Bradford, PA.


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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 22, 2014 Page 7

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Page 8 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 22, 2014

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ON THE HEALTHY SIDE You Can Help Find A New Way To Fight Huntington’s Disease

Misty Oto, seen with her mother, is part of an effort to find a more effective way to treat the symptoms of Huntington’s disease.

(NAPSI)—In the 14 years that her mother lived with Huntington’s disease, the only time that Misty Oto saw her mother not move was when her heart stopped. “It became a realization to me that no other families should have to go through this. They should not have to see their loved ones sedated in a bed, or subjecting themselves to injuries,” said Oto, now an advocate with the Huntington’s Disease Society of America. Huntington’s disease causes a harsh gradual decline of motor and mental function marked by uncontrollable “shaking” muscle movements, called chorea. There is only one FDA-approved treatment available, and many patients do not take it as prescribed due to side effects. “Daily activities as simple as tying a shoe or pouring a glass of water are difficult for patients with Huntington’s disease due to involuntary muscle movement,” said Victor Sung, M.D., assistant professor in the University of Alabama at Birmingham’s Department of Neurology. “Like exercise, treatments only work if you stick to the regimen. We’re exploring ways to make it easier for patients to take the medicine they need, and eligible patients are now able to participate in these studies.” Physicians across the country are exploring a potential new treatment option for patients with Huntington’s disease as part of a global effort coordinated by the Huntington Study Group, a non-profit organization led by researchers to find new treatments that make a difference for patients and families with the disease. One investigational new treatment being studied, called SD-809, is for the chorea associated with Huntington’s disease. SD-809 could potentially have fewer side effects and less frequent dosing than the only marketed drug, which could potentially improve the treatment by making it easier for patients to take the medicine

AICR HealthTalk

-by Karen Collins, MS, RD, CDN American Institute for Cancer Research

Q. I see soy protein in the ingredients of so many breads, bars, cereals and other foods now. Is that likely to push me above what is considered moderate consumption of soy? A: Moderate consumption of soy is 1 to 2 standard servings daily of whole soy foods, such as 1/3 cup tofu or 1 cup soy milk. One serving averages about 7 grams of protein and 25 milligrams of isoflavones, compounds with a chemical structure similar to estrogen. You’re right that different forms of soy protein, including isolated soy protein, are added to many foods today to improve texture or moistness or to boost protein. However, the amounts that are added are so small that the amount of isoflavones in a serving of these foods is equal to about onetenth to one-third of a serving of a traditional soy food such as tofu, edamame, soymilk or soynuts. Early lab research had suggested that too many isoflavones may increase breast cancer risk. Now, larger and stronger studies have demonstrated up to 3 servings a day does not link to increased breast cancer risk. Soy is seen as a healthful part of Asian diets, where it has been a long-term dietary staple for generations. Keep in mind that whole soy foods contain many other nutrients so we can’t assume that processed forms of soy protein would have the same links to health. It is possible that if you eat large amounts of soy protein fortified bars and cereals daily, you could exceed isoflavone levels that are characteristic of healthful Asian diets. However, eating that sort of diet would have you missing out on many nutritious foods, which would be unhealthy. Bottom line: as long as your concern is not related to some sort of soy allergy or intolerance, normal use of these foods with small amounts of soy protein added likely pose neither a concern nor added health benefits. they need to manage their disease. The study will determine if SD-809 helps to reduce the chorea associated with Huntington’s disease. Because SD-809 is not broken down in the body as quickly as the marketed drug, tetrabenazine, it has a longer duration of action. These features of

Look Up From Books

SD-809 may improve how well a patient’s body reacts to the drug, as compared to tetrabenazine, with the potential for less involuntary movements and potentially fewer side effects. It is also possible that SD-809 may be taken fewer times a day than tetrabenazine. Patients interested in the clinical trials evaluating SD-809 can learn more by visiting www.huntington-study-group.org or calling (800) 487-7671.

ORDER YOUR FAMILY REUNION T-SHIRTS & HATS HERE! Bradford Journal Photo Dinosaurs, bears and other critters are the topics of interest around this table of first graders, May 19th. From the left, clockwise around are Armani Hannahs, Lily Goodreau, Bryce Johnson, and MacKenzie Taylor. They are students in Ms. McCormick’s classroom at GGB Elementary School, and enjoy reading books from the library there.

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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 22, 2014 Page 9

LOCAL & REGIONAL Memorial Day Marks First Fish-for-Free Day

The Great Day Begins

(HARRISBURG, PA) – Families and friends visiting Pennsylvania’s popular outdoor spots over the Memorial Day holiday weekend can enjoy a day of free fishing, thanks to the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission (PFBC). Memorial Day - Monday, May 26 – marks the first of two free fishing days in the Commonwealth. Fish-for-Free Days allow anyone – residents and non-residents – to legally fish in Pennsylvania without a fishing license. From 12:01 a.m. to 11:59 p.m. on both days, no fishing license is needed to fish in Pennsylvania's waterways. All other fishing regulations apply. “Fish-for-Free days are an easy way to introduce friends and family to the sport of fishing,” said PFBC Executive Director John Arway. “Many families spend the day at lakes and parks throughout the state. Now they can try fishing at no cost. We know that once people try it, particularly kids, they will see that fishing is a great recreational activity and they will want to do it more.” Newcomers to the sport can borrow equipment from dozens of fishing tackle loaner sites across the state. “We want to encourage individuals to try fishing so we’ve made it easy by setting up tackle loaner sites,” adds Laurel Anders, director of the Bureau of Boating and Outreach. “Many of the sites are right at state parks, which are always a popular place for visitors on Memorial Day. But we also have loaner sites at county parks and some public libraries.” The second Fish-for-Free Day is Independence Day – Friday, July 4. More information is available on the PFBC website at: Bradford Journal Photo www./fishandboat.com/fishforfree.htm Fourth grade students in Mrs. Rhoades’ The website includes interactive maps, regional fishing reports, and tips on fishing homeroom, get set for another great day fundamentals. at School Street Elementary School, May 16th. From the front left, clockwise around are Jayden Elliott 10, Emily Szelangowski (Continued from page 4) Phylis was a 1977 graduate of Bradford 11, Tyler O’Neil 10, and Sailor Campbell High School. She had been employed at 9-1/2. Tyler received the “We Care Award” Phylis Dickinson Burger King and McDonald’s for over 20 for the week, and he will also compete in Phylis B. Dickinson, 55, of 22 Merrow years. She enjoyed showing her 76 Cadil- the “24-challenge” later in the day. Ave., Bradford, passed away, Thursday lac Fleetwood in area car shows. She loved (May 15, 2014) at the Bradford Regional going to the Country Fairs in the summerMedical Center. time and was devoted to her animals. She Born April 8, 1959, in Bradford she was attended Temple Beth El. a daughter of the late Lester D. and Rose Surviving is a son, Ryan P. (fiancée KrisR. (Cooper) Popiel. She was formerly tin Johnson) Dickinson of Bradford; two married to Richard Dickinson. She and sisters, Michele Popiel of Pittsburgh and her loving companion, David Manion, her twin, Harriet Powers, of Bradford; two have spent 20 years together. grandchildren, Ryan Dickinson and Cameron Dickinson; one niece, Angel SimUse Of Food Stamps mons; and one great-niece, Haylie Rose Rises In McKean County Simmons. She was preceded in death by her parents; and one daughter, Lindsay (Continued from page 2) Dana Dickinson, who died Feb. 15, 2001. Burial was in Beth Israel Cemetery, 2007 and 2011. U.S. Rep. Eric Cantor (Va.-R) backed a Bradford, PA. measure that would have removed SNAP from the farm bill entirely. “While [SNAP] is an important part of our safety net, our overriding goal should be to help our citizens with the education •Inspections and skills they need to get back on their feet so that they can provide for them•Collision Work 28 Yrs Exp selves and their families,” Rep. Cantor •Expert Mechanical Repair said during congressional debate. 156 W. Wash. St. Bradford Food stamps have been part of the farm Phone 814-362-3888 bill for the past 50 years. The legislation’s combination of farming and nutrition programs has helped ensure the bill receives broad backing from farm-country representatives and more urban-based members who support anti-poverty programs. That alliance was tested but held with the passage of the 2014 farm bill.

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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 22, 2014 Page 10

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Bradford Journal Photo These three fourth grade students in Mrs. Rhoades homeroom, at School Street Elementary School are ready to head out for their enrichment classes. It’s the end of the week, Friday, May 16th, and smiles come easily. Left to right are Kendra Jackson 9, Ayden Sherwood 10, and Alicia Jones 10.


Page 11 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 22, 2014

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Memorial Day 2014 Memorial Day represents something more than just another day off from work. In this time of national and world uncertainty, we have been reminded of the need for a strong, unified national identity - a spirit of cooperation. It’s increasingly important that we, as Americans, learn to appreciate what we have: our resources, the varied qualities we have in each other. It is a time to reflect on the work and sacrifice of those who fought for our right to a secure, profitable life. Our veterans stand out in this group. Through the decades, from our very beginning, our service men have given their youth, risked personal safety and comfort to protect and prolong what we know as the “American Way of Life.” Many have lost their lives. At this time, we feel it crucial to honor the memory of those men and women, to keep it alive in all of us. It’s time to start working together again to keep our values intact.

Photo by Joe Rosenthall

Five Marines and a Navy Corpsman raise the flag over the Island of Iwo Jima .

“I am the Flag” - by Ruth Apperson Rous

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I am the flag of the United States of America. I was born on June 14, 1777, in Philadelphia. There the Continental Congress adopted my stars and stripes as the national flag. My thirteen stripes alternating red and white, with a union of thirteen white stars in a field of blue, represented a new constellation, a new nation dedicated to the personal and religious liberty of mankind. Today fifty stars signal from my union, one for each of the fifty sovereign states in the greatest constitutional republic the world has ever known. My colors symbolize the patriotic ideals and spiritual qualities of the citizens of my country. My red stripes proclaim the fearless courage and integrity of American men and boys and the self-sacrifice and devotion of American mothers and daughters. My white stripes stand for liberty and equality for all. My blue is the blue of heaven, loyalty, and faith. I represent these eternal principles: liberty, justice, and humanity. I embody American freedom: freedom of speech, religion, assembly, the press, and the sanctity of the home. I typify that indomitable spirit of determination brought to my land by Christopher Columbus and by all my forefathers - the Pilgrims, Puritans, settlers at James town and Plymouth. I am as old as my nation. I am a living symbol of my nation’s law: the Constitution of the United States and the Bill of Rights. I voice Abraham Lincoln’s philosophy: “A government of the people, by the people,for the people.” I stand guard over my nation’s schools, the seedbed of good citizenship and true patriotism. I am displayed in every schoolroom throughout my nation; every schoolyard has a flag pole for my display. Daily thousands upon thousands of boys and girls pledge their allegiance to me and my country. I have my own law—Public Law 829, “The Flag Code” - which definitely states my correct use and display for all occasions and situations. I have my special day, Flag Day. June 14 is set aside to honor my birth. Americans, I am the sacred emblem of your country. I symbolize your birthright, your heritage of liberty purchased with blood and sorrow. I am your title deed of freedom, which is yours to enjoy and hold in trust for posterity. If you fail to keep this sacred trust inviolate, if I am nullified and destroyed, you and your children will become slaves to dictators and despots. Eternal vigilance is your price of freedom. As you see me silhouetted against the peaceful skies of my country, remind yourself that I am the flag of your country, that I stand for what you are - no more, no less. Guard me well, lest your freedom perish from the earth. Dedicate your lives to those principles for which I stand: “One nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.” I was created in freedom. I made my first appearance in a battle for human liberty. God grant that I may spend eternity in my “land of the free and the home of the brave” and that I shall ever be known as “Old Glory,” the flag of the United States of America.

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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 22, 2014 Page 12

FAMILY FEATURES

ou can turn any summer day into a special occasion with a cool ice cream treat. From classic favorites to innovative new flavors, it only takes a scoop or two to bring out plenty of smiles. For kids, summertime is about chilling out, and there’s no better way to enjoy this slowed down pace than with a refreshing, frosty treat. Celebrate birthday parties, holiday gatherings or days that end in “y” with special ice cream concoctions that are destined to create sweet memories.

Y

Celebrate summer Grab a spoon and dig into these scrumptious recipes, featuring delicious Blue Bunny ice cream flavors. These treats make it easy for everyone to customize to their own sweet preference, whether it’s pairing creamy Blue Bunny ice cream with the gooey goodness of freshly-baked chocolate cake, the buttery finish of a flaky pie crust or in a classic, richly adorned parfait. For other great ideas to cool down your summer days and nights, visit www.BlueBunny.com.

Ice Cream Cupcakes Yield: 18 to 20 cupcakes Cupcake liners 1 1/8 cups all-purpose flour 1/2 cup unsweetened cocoa powder 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon salt 1/2 cup butter, softened 1 cup white sugar 1 egg 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 cup brewed coffee 1 container Blue Bunny Caramel Fudge Brownie Sundae, Vanilla or your favorite Blue Bunny flavor Decorations (such as sprinkles, cupcake skewers, cherries) To make cupcakes, preheat oven to 350°F. Place cupcake liners in cupcake pan. Sift together flour, cocoa, baking soda and salt. Set aside. In medium bowl, cream butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Add egg and vanilla and beat well. Add flour mixture, alternating with coffee. Beat until just incorporated. Fill cupcake liners about 1/3 full to allow for ice cream. Bake for 10 to 15 minutes or until toothpick inserted comes out clean. Let cupcakes cool. Using round ice cream scoop, scoop out rounds of ice cream and set on baking sheet in freezer. Once ice cream scoops are frozen, carefully place one into each cupcake and top with fun decorations. Note: Though the recipe calls for brewed coffee, the cupcakes won’t take on its strong flavor.

Peanut Butter Sundae Parfaits

Layer Up with a Topping Station The sky’s the limit when it comes to the finishing touches of your favorite ice cream treats. Whether you’re indulging in a decadent parfait or simply dishing out a couple of scoops, it’s easy to get everyone involved in a topping soiree. A topping station is the perfect activity for birthday parties or other kid-oriented summer celebrations. Just make sure the station is easily accessible — at their level — and place each topping in its own special bowl or serving dish along with a spoon. Also, be sure to label each topping in case anyone has a food allergy, especially when serving nuts and fruits. The little ones will have a blast mixing different tastes for the perfect sweet combination. Here are some tasty topping ideas to take your ice cream topping bar to a whole new level: 

Colorful sprinkles



Maraschino cherries



Icing



Mini chocolate chips



Gummy bears



Chocolate candies



Strawberry slices



Pineapple chunks



Banana chunks



Chopped pecans, peanuts or almonds



Crushed cookies



Crushed mint candies



Fruit preserves



Whipped cream



Hot fudge or caramel

Yield: 10 to 12 sundae parfaits 6 waffle or sugar cones Chocolate cake or brownies Chocolate chip cookies Blue Bunny Peanut Butter Panic Ice Cream Maraschino cherries, sprinkles or cupcake pompom topper for garnish Break up waffle cones, chocolate cake or brownies and chocolate chip cookies into bite-size pieces and place in individual containers or cupcake cups. Or use favorite cake or cookie flavors to customize. Layer ice cream, waffle cone pieces, cake pieces and cookie pieces into mini parfait glasses, or any small glass or bowl. Garnish with Maraschino cherry, sprinkles or cupcake pompom topper. Tip: Other fun mix-in ideas include pretzels, chocolate candies, marshmallows, graham crackers, fudge sauce or caramel sauce.

Mini Ice Cream Pies Yield: 10 mini pies 2 round pie crusts, thawed 1 3 1/2-inch round cookie cutter 10 2- to 3-inch scalloped tart shells 3 cups chocolate chips Blue Bunny Bunny Tracks Ice Cream 1/2 cup chopped peanuts Preheat oven to 425°F. Roll out round pie crusts and use round 3 1/2-inch cookie cutter to cut out circles from pie dough. Round cookie cutter should be slightly larger than top of tart shell. Cut out 5 rounds from each pie crust. Grease tart shells and place pie dough rounds down into tart shells, carefully pressing dough into scalloped edges and bottom of tart shell. Pierce bottom of tart shell with fork to prevent it from baking too high. Bake tartlet shells for 8 to 9 minutes or until golden brown. Remove from oven and allow to cool before flipping out onto work surface. Melt chocolate chips in microwave-safe bowl or double broiler. Carefully dip scalloped edges of tart shells into chocolate and flip over to let cool. Scoop mini balls of ice cream into shells. Top with drizzle of warm, melted chocolate chips and garnish with chopped peanuts.


Page 13 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 22, 2014

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THAT’S ENTERTAINMENT! May 13: That Awkward Moment R I, Frankenstein PG-13 Her R Sleeping Beauty Not Rated

NEW DVD RELEASES Goodbye World Not Rated Special ID PG Deadly Code R Poseidon Rex Not Rated Stalingrad

R Eastbound & Down: The Complete Fourth & Final Season TV-MA Orange Is the New Black: Season 1 TV-MA Chlorine Not Rated Compound Fracture Not Rated Cowboys vs. Zombies: The Devil’s Crossing Not Rated Crook Not Rated Easy Money III Not Rated Generation Iron PG-13 Godzilla, King of the Monsters Not Rated May 20: Monuments Men Includes Digital Copy; UltraViolet PG-13 3 Days to Kill PG-13 Pompeii

Includes Digital Copy; UltraViolet PG-13 About Last Night R Vampire Academy PG-13 Grand Piano R McCanick R Way of the Wicked Not Rated Duck Dynasty: Duck Days of Summer Fugitive at 17 Not Rated House of Dust R Patrol Not Rated No God, No Master PG-13 Raze Not Rated Report 51: Alien Invasion Not Rated National Geographic: Brothers in War Not Rated Right Kind of Wrong R

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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 22, 2014 Page 14

First Graders Intent On Their Library Books

Bradford Journal Photo Left to right, around the table are Carson Bishop, Thomas Hainey, and Kylee Reed, first grade students in Ms. McCormick’s room at GGB Elementary School, May 19th. They are intent on the books they picked up at the school library, one of which is about that now famous character, SpongeBob.

Ready To Head Out For Enrichment Classes

Tips For Dealing With Kitty’s Potty Problems (NAPSI)—“Why is my kitty going outside the litter box?” is one of the top questions that veterinarians get asked by cat parents. According to Dr. Laura Wiles, a veterinarian who specializes in feline medicine, it might be a health issue, behavioral problem or the cat’s environment. Dr. Wiles advises cat parents to first take kitty to their vet to rule out any health problems. For behavioral and environmental issues, Dr. Wiles offers some tips to help make kitty’s trips to the litter box less stressful: • Place the litter box in a location that’s best for kitty-not you. Cats prefer that their litter box be in a quiet, easy-to-access location that offers them some privacy-not a high-traffic or noisy area. • Keep the litter box clean. Sift the litter regularly to keep it fresh. Wash the litter box every time you do a complete change of litter, using mild soap and water or an enzymatic cleaner (not bleach). • Have multiple litter boxes if you have multiple cats. The gold standard is one litter box per cat, plus one extra. Make sure they’re big enough, too. • Find out if your cat prefers covered or uncovered litter boxes. If your cat with issues has a box with a cover, try uncovering it as a test. • Use a litter that kitty likes. Choose a cat litter such as the new Simple Solution 30 day Super Absorbent Litter, made from attapulgite clay, that stays fresh and clean for up to a month. Cats especially like it because its soft texture is gentle on their paws. Finally, if you have indoor cats, help them get rid of excess energy and stop them from getting bored by playing with them during the day. For more information, visit www.30daycatlitter.com

CROSSWORD SOLUTION

Bradford Journal Photo From the front left, clockwise around are Shakira Griffin 10, Noah Grove 10, Devon McKean 11, and Donovan Smith 10. They are fourth grade students in Mrs. Rhoades’ homeroom at School Street Elementary School, and are about to leave for their enrichment classes, May 16th.

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Page 15 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 22, 2014

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Take This Quiz To Check Your Meat Nutrition IQ (NAPSI)—Many are surprised when they learn that they underestimate the nutritional value of meat and poultry in a balanced diet. Recent polling shows many consumers aren’t aware of the important nutritional benefits that meat and poultry can offer when included in a balanced diet. That’s the word from the experts at the American Meat Institute Foundation. Here is a short quiz that can give you an idea how your meat nutrition IQ stacks up. Question 1: Which food group is the only group consumed in the proper amount among Americans? Only one in three consumers recognized that the protein category is the only food category consumed at the proper levels, according to federal data. The U.S. Dietary Guidelines recommend two to three three-ounce servings of protein. A three-ounce serving of meat is approximately the size of a deck of cards. American men eat 6.9 ounces of meat, poultry and seafood per day and women, on average, eat 4.4 ounces. By contrast, fruits, vegetables and whole grains are underconsumed, while discretionary sugars and fats are overconsumed by Americans. This means that when it comes to meat and poultry, most consumers should continue consuming the amount of meat and poultry they currently enjoy but pair meat and poultry with more vegetables and enjoy fruit for desserts, sides or snacks. Add a whole grain bun to a burger and sip on an unsweetened beverage. Question 2: From which food does the body absorb the most iron? While the No. 1 answer for many consumers was spinach, kale and leafy greens, the correct answer is meat, poultry and fish. While greens such as spinach are high in iron, greens contain a type called “non-heme iron” that is not absorbed by the body as readily as heme iron, which is found in meat, poultry and fish. Consumers may also not realize that when meat and vegetables are consumed together, the heme iron in meat actually helps the body absorb the nonheme in vegetables more readily. Iron deficiency is a serious matter. According to the American Academy of Family Physicians, iron deficiency anemia is the most common nutritional deficiency worldwide. It can reduce the ability of adults to work at capacity, increase fatigue, and impact motor and mental development in children and adolescents. It affects 2 percent of all females 12 to 69. Question 3: What is the only natural

source of vitamin B12, which keeps the body’s nervous system healthy? If you said cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli and cauliflower, you are in good—but mistaken—company with 20 percent of consumers. Only 12 percent correctly answered “animal products.” Animal products are, in fact, the only natural source of the important nutrient B12. Nutritionists recommend that adult men and women consume 2.4 micrograms of B12 per day. While some foods, such as

cereals, are fortified with B12, animal products are rich in B12 naturally. For a complete, dietitian-authored brochure about the role that meat and poultry can play in your balanced diet, send a self-addressed, 4.5” x 6” envelope with 69 cents postage to American Meat Institute/Nutrition Brochure, 1150 Connecticut Ave., NW, Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20036. You may also download the brochure on the home page of: www.meatami.com

Morning Meeting- Special Schedules For Day

Bradford Journal Photo Long term substitute teacher, Bethany Mealy, conducts the morning meeting in Mrs. Rhoades’ fourth grade classroom, May 16th, at School Street Elementary School. Included in the photo are her students Jacinda Buzzelli, Sailor Campbell, Chase Dinch, Jayden Elliott, Shakira Griffin, Noah Grove, Kendra Jackson, Katlynn Johnson, Alicia Jones, Isaac McCormick, Devon McKean, Zeke Myers, Alyson Ngo, Tyler O’Neil, Ayden Sherwood, Donavan Smith, and Emily Szelangowski.


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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 22, 2014 Page 16

Five Tips To Help You Land A Home You’ll Love (NAPSI)—With mortgage rates still low, now could be a great time to buy a new home. Before diving into the market headfirst, however, it’s important to do your homework so that you’re prepared to tackle each hurdle in the homebuying process. With this in mind, the “What I Wish I Knew About the Homebuying Process” survey gauges the preparedness of recent homebuyers. As a result, these five tips can help you make the right homebuying decision. 1. Identify your “must-haves.” Identifying your “must-haves” is key to guaranteeing satisfaction with your home purchase. The survey found that nearly four in 10 recent homebuyers (39 percent) said that, knowing what they know now, they would buy a home of a different size, at a different price point, and/or in a different area. In addition, first-time homebuyers (55 percent) are more likely to say that they would make significant changes with respect to the home’s size, price and/or location. To help you look back regret-free, make a checklist of top priorities (access to a good school district, for example) and perks you can forgo (such as a multiplecar garage). Know what you’re willing to compromise on and what you are not so that you’re prepared to find the home that’s right for you. 2. Understand the financial aspects of the homebuying process. Nine of every 10 recent homebuyers felt prepared going into the homebuying process, but in hindsight, more than half (56 percent) wish they had been armed with more knowledge about the financial aspects of purchasing a home, according to the survey. In fact, it found that recent homebuyers would have liked more knowledge about the ins and outs of the closing and settlement process (22 percent), negotiating/making an offer on a home (19 percent) and financing a home (15 percent). To help people overcome the challenges of buying a home and give them a primer on what to expect,

Chase launched the My New Home app and YouTube Channel. 3. Prepare with technology. Key aspects of the homebuying process differed from expectations. A majority said the length of the process was not what they anticipated, saying it either took longer (40 percent) or shorter (16 percent) than expected. Thirty-four percent of recent homebuyers overall said the costs and fees of maintaining their home were more than they expected, with the sentiment especially felt by first-time homebuyers (55 percent). Chase’s My New Home suite of educational tools can help individuals and families avoid surprises and fully prepare for one of the biggest purchases they will ever make. 4. Seek out advice from experts. Homebuyers continue to rely on Realtors and mortgage bankers to meet their needs. Sixty-eight percent of homeowners sought

out advice from Realtors throughout the homebuying process and about half (45 percent) turned to mortgage bankers and loan officers. Seek out Realtors, mortgage bankers and loan officers with key industry data and tools that are easy to understand so you have all the information you need to find the right house—one that you will be proud to call home. 5. Consider the desire to renovate. The desire to renovate is bound to hit even the newest of homeowners. While recent homebuyers said the home they bought aligns well with their “must-have” list (97 percent) and considered the home movein ready (83 percent), 76 percent have done or are planning to make renovations to their home in the near term, according to the survey. A Chase Home Equity Line of Credit (HELOC) is one product that homeowners can continue to rely on to put their ideas and visions into action.

Make Early Morning Decision About Lunch

SUDOKU SOLUTION

Bradford Journal Photo “Who wants pizza rolls?” asks Alyson Ngo, at the right, during the morning “lunch count” process, May 16th, in Mrs. Rhoades’ fourth grade homeroom, at School Street Elementary School. The information will be sent to the cafeteria to give workers there, a heads up on how much of each main course to prepare for lunch, later in the day


Page 17 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 22, 2014

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“Must-Haves” For Travelers (NAPSI)—Most people know the basic necessities to pack, but what about ways to enhance the travel experience, not just make it happen? Americans will take more than 2 billion trips for business and pleasure this year, the U.S. Travel Association estimates. Here are some tips to keep in mind when preparing for your next trip: Technology for Travel • Electronics accessories. Keep your devices charged and running with power converters, adapters and transformers. These tools will come in handy, especially for international travel. Converters are used to fit the plug-in on the wall, while adapters and transformers help prevent battery damage. This power can be useful for items such as hair dryers, shavers, laptops or cell phones. • Access to news. One of the most important aspects of taking a trip is knowing about the area you’re traveling to—but it doesn’t hurt to stay updated on what’s happening at home as well. PressReader provides travelers full-content access to more than 2,500 newspapers and magazines worldwide, so they can keep up on the latest news from their smartphone, tablet or laptop. This digital newsstand gives you the option to translate any article into 16 languages, so you can read local stories in your native language. With an engaging and interactive reading experience, travelers can do everything from reading local restaurant reviews to understanding the current political landscape. PressReader is available at various hotels and resorts, airport lounges and cruise ships around the world. For more information or to try PressReader, visit www. pressreader.com. • GPS trackers. Ever worry about losing your valuable items when traveling? Constantly checking your pockets for your cell phone or passport? With GPS trackers, travelers can add tags to their cell phones, passports, luggage, car keys and more. So when they lose something important, they can find it using the GPS remote. Healthy Travel • A first aid/emergency kit. Keep a small bag in your carry-on luggage for when unexpected situations arise. You can load this up with the typical items, like bandages and aspirin, but go beyond that by packing an empty water bottle, snack, sleeping aid, vitamin C and more. • Hand sanitizer. One of the best ways to ruin a business trip or vacation is falling ill. While many people try to protect themselves with alcohol-based sanitizers, what they don’t realize is that these types of products don’t reduce illness. There is a product, however, that is effective and works for hours: Zylast. Studies show this revolutionary new hand sanitizer kills germs on contact, but is also persistent for six hours—unlike alcoholbased sanitizers that stop working after 15 seconds. Zylast is the only sanitizer effec-

tive against the common cold, flu and norovirus, which are the main bugs infecting travelers. That’s not a risk that travelers want to take, considering the recent national travel survey that revealed 63 percent of travelers get sick on vacation and spend more than $1,200 per trip. For more information and to receive a 10 percent discount on your order, visit www.zylastdirect.com and enter the code travel10.

• Motion sickness medication. If you’re prone to motion sickness or not a seasoned traveler, motion sickness medication can help while on an airplane, boat or in a car. You can also add some ginger to your emergency kit, as studies have found it alleviates the nausea associated with motion sickness. Green apples and crackers are other natural remedies. Keep these tips in mind as you embark on your next business trip or leisure travel adventure.


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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 22, 2014 Page 18

CHRONOLOGICAL LISTINGS Engagements, Marriages, Births & Deaths ENGAGEMENTS:

NEELY/TAYLOR Nikki M. Neely, daughter of Jack Maryellen and Neely of Bradford, and James M. Taylor, son of Leonard and Rita Taylor of Gifford, have announced their plan to wed. The bride-elect is a 2004 graduate of Bradford Area High School and a 2005 graduate of the Continental School of Beauty. She is the owner of Eclipse Hair Salon. Her fiance is a 1999 graduate of Smethport Area Junior-Senior High School.The couple lives in Bradford. A summer wedding is planned

MARRIAGES: (None) BIRTHS: MAY 8, 2014: DAUGHTER, to Kristin Luna, Bradford, PA. MAY 11, 2014: SON, to Bethany Knight, Bradford, PA. DAUGHTER, to Samantha Cotarobles and Nathaniel Westlake, Bradford, PA. MAY 12, 2014: SON, to Kristy and Britt Moore, Bradford, PA. SON, to Alan and Randi Sears, Little Valley, NY. SON, to Bryan Tillinghast and Melinda Jones, Cattaraugus, NY.

DAUGHTER, to Alfred and Morgan Reynolds, Rushford, NY. MAY 13, 2014: SON, to Jacob Dunn and Sabrina Irvin, Friendship, NY. SON, to Jacqueline and Nick Byron, Kane, PA. DAUGHTER, to Anna Kennedy and Zachery Watts, Salamanca, NY. MAY 15, 2014: DAUGHTER, to Morgan Billey-Vail and Jordan Christiansen, Salamanca, NY. SON, to Xanthea Klitzke, Allegany, NY. SON, to Roselynn Reid and Daniel Brown, Olean, NY. MAY 16, 2014:

DAUGHTER, to Crystal Hicks, OIean, NY. SON, to Andrew Strang and Kattie Beeles, Great Valley, NY. DAUGHTER, to Shane and Kailei Sudbrook, Olean, NY. DEATHS: MAY 8, 2014: RU T H E R F O R D, James Freeman, 72, of Washington, D.C., formerly of Bradford, PA. MAY 9, 2014: PHILLIPS, Raymond K., 55, of 125 Walnut St., Kane, PA. SMEAD,Ida Valjean, 69, of Mexico, MO, formerly of Wrights

YOUR WEEKLY HOROSCOPE MAY 22 - MAY 28, 2014 ARIES - (Mar. 21 - Apr. 19) This week, focus on what you need to learn now and you won’t have to work so hard to safeguard your place in the future. TAURUS - (Apr. 20 - May 20) Something is giving you cause for concern. You know a brave step must be taken in a particular area of your world. GEMINI - (May 21 - June 20) You have a valid point to make and can help someone enormously by doing so. CANCER - (June 21 - July 22) Trust how certain your instincts can be bow regarding an uncertain situation. LEO - (July 23, - Aug. 22) You don’t need to encourage someone to face a fact. They’ll do so of their own accord. VIRGO - (Aug. 23 - Sept. 22) This week, you will recognize what you have that appears small or insignificant has potential to become something much bigger. LIBRA - (Sept. 23 - Oct. 22) Have faith in the fact that your recent support of someone or something isn’t going to go unnoticed. SCORPIO - (Oct. 23, - Nov. 21) Expect, in some way, recognition of a particular talent – and not before time! SAGITTARIUS - (Nov. 22 - Dec. 20) This week, give someone a chance to see what you already know to be obvious. CAPRICORN - (Dec. 21 - Jan. 19) A fresh start with a new level of agreement is about to commence and looks set to last for a long time to come. AQUARIUS - (Jan. 20 - Feb. 18) Something needs to be taken seriously and, if you take it seriously, then you can expect a serious result. PISCES - (Feb. 19 - Mar. 20) Someone you know is putting on a false front. Be the one who looks deeper at the reality of their frame of mind.

Corners, PA, and Hastings, FL. MAY 10, 2014: ORCUTT, Ruth E., 93, of Hill Haven, Webster, NY, formerly of North Fork and Westfield. ADAMS, Joseph C., 71, of 209 Market St.,Warren, PA, formerly of Kane, PA. HEATH, Justin D., 72, of Coudersport, PA. MAY 11, 2014: HUGHES, Jennifer M., 44, of Bradford, PA. KELLER, Winifred T. “Peg”, 85, of Broad Acres Health & Rehabilitation Center, Wellsboro, PA, formerly of Westfield and Wellsville, NY. WACHOB, Betty Frances, 91, of Olean Rd., Derrick City, PA. TO R RU E L L A , Katrina Beeson, 34, of Cleveland, OH, formerly of Port Allegany, PA. KEREKANICH, George, 88, of Columbia, SC. MAY 12, 2014: THOMAS, Joseph A. “Art”, 89, of Cyclone, PA. PLATKO, Sue Ann Leona, 79, of

947 High St., Ext., Bradford, PA. MAY 13, 2014: LEMN, Margaret Ann, 85, of Rochester, NY. MAY 14, 2104: GUELFI, Norma Jean, 86, of Jamestown, NY. STILES, LeRoy Jr., 54, of Lafayette Township, PA. JACOBS, Kathleen A., 61, of 275 W. Center St., Johnsonburg, PA. LAWTON, Ronald W., 26, of Eldred, PA. PICCOLO, Monica Ll, 92, of Elk Haven Nursing Home, formerly of 404 Rightmeyer St., St. Marys, PA. MAY 15, 2104: DICKINSON, Phylis B., 55, of 22 Merrow Ave., Bradford, PA. HEDBERG, Robert, of 459 Main St., Kersey, PA. BAXTER, Delbert W., 76, of Main St., Roulette, PA. MAY 16, 2014: LITTLE, S. Jean, 73, of Ralton, formerly of Duke Center and Westfield, PA. URBANCIC, James L. 75, of 202 Bandeau Rd., Kersey, PA.

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Page 19 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 22, 2014

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JOURNAL CLASSIFIED ADS need some work done. Located just off Rt. 6 between 2006 Ford Explorer. Smethport & Port Leather interior, Allegany. $59,000 7 passenger, sun 814-512-2588 roof, remote starter. $7000 obo. Call MISCELLANOUS: 558-9543 For Sale 2007 Lincoln, • Matching sofa & 63,000 miles great love seat. Both have condition. 814-225 recliners -3270. $12,000 •10 ft by 24 ft building with steel floor, Volkswagen Beetle good cond., must ‘05 gray 32,108 mi, be moved, very reaauto. $2500 724- sonable. 259-8645 • House/camp w/ 2 stall garage, 10 APARTMENTS acres, off Rt. 6 beFOR RENT: tween Smethport & Port Allegany 1BR upper, 24 WalkWANTED: er Ave., No pets. Washer, dryer, re$350/mo + G&E. frigerator, Call 558-3143 cooking range and furniture. 1BR, appliances WANTED TO & city utilities inBUY: cluded. Off street •Bar & Restaurant pkg, $400/mo + sec. equipment and 814-598-9380. All fixtures including utilities included, booths/tables & close to Pitt-Brad- chairs ford, •Mobile Home and a house under 2BR lower, off street $40,000 parking. $650/mo Also will haul Call 366-2393 away your unwanted appliances, veNice 1 BR Apt on hicles etc for Free! 2nd floor of Brad- Will clean out baseford Main St Build- ments, garages & ing. Rent includes attics at reasonable utilities. Security rates! & references re814-512-2588 quired. No Pets. Call 598-1672 for 2007 Honda Shadmore information. owAero 750 cc. 6,000 miles, needs Nice 2BR upper, off tires. $5,000, call street pkg, referenc- Joe 814-465-3437 es & sec. required. 814-577-4684 CARS/TRUCKS:

HOMES FOR SALE: 3BR, 1BA house & barn on 1 acre lot 2 wells, Cameltown Rd., Mt. Jewett. Call 814-965-2013 or 814-229-5339 FOR SALE: House/Camp w/ 2 stall garage, sits on 10 acres in McKean County. All amenities, house does

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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 22, 2014 Page 20

JUST PASSING TIME THEME: “19th CENTURY”

ACROSS: 1. Plant life 6. OB-GYN test 9. What the Big Bad Wolf did 13. Couch 14. Hit the slopes 15. #1 Across partner 16. North African inhabitants 17. *He patented the saxophone in 1846 18. Inflexible 19. *Queen Victoria’s other half 21. Flying high 23. U.N. workers’ grp. 24. “Rhinestone Cowboy” singer 25. Seasonal blues 28. As opposed to stereo 30. Like having pH less than 7 35. Climbed down 37. Beverage usually served hot 39. Swelling 40. Nessie’s abode 41. *Nicholas I and Alexander III 43. Distinctive flair 44. Beforehand 46. *The Three Musketeers, e.g.

47. Singular of “algae” 48. *Famous HMS Beagle voyager 50. *”William ____ Overture” 52. Costa del ___ 53. Talk like a sailor? 55. Ice-T on “Law & Order: SVU” 57. *The Great _______ in Ireland 60. *Sitting Bull’s tribe 63. Like Cheerios 64. *”The Murders in the ___ Morgue” 66. Give a boot 68. Antler point 69. Geological Society of America 70. Hawaiian island 71. First-rate 72. *van Gogh severed his left one 73. Live snowmen? DOWN: 1. Governmental approver 2. *Italian money starting in 1861 3. Face shape 4. Teacher of Torah 5. Founder of Scholasticism 6. Quiet attention grabber 7. Rap sheet abbreviation

8. Resolution dot 9. Fisherman’s fly, e.g. 10. *Sled sport, originated in 1800s 11. Author Bagnold 12. Roll of bills 15. *Louisiana Purchase seller 20. Fowl place 22. Grassland 24. Soap Box Derby vehicles 25. Tossed starter 26. Luau greeting 27. Kitchen device 29. *a.k.a. Father of the American Cartoon 31. Brainchild 32. Small valleys with trees and grass 33. Idealized image 34. *Erie or Suez 36. Spring event 38. One of Great Lakes 42. SolfËge syllables: 5th and 4th 45. Cutting into cubes 49. Convent dweller (Crossword Solution on page 14) 51. Probable 54. Type of twill fab- 58. Perching place 61. Windshield op- declared war on ric 59. ____ room tion Britain in 1812 56. Star bursts 60. Shakespeare’s 62. Palm tree berry 67. “___ the season king 63. Pick ...” 57. Betting game 65. *This country

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Page 21 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 22, 2014

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Pairing The Right Wine With A Meal Can Make A Difference (NAPSI)—No matter what you’re cooking, and whether you’re dining alone or entertaining a crowd, the right wine can elevate a simple meal. Fortunately, selecting, serving and enjoying great wine doesn’t have to be complicated or expensive if you join the right wine club. Consider this easy recipe and wine pairing tip provided by one of the oldest clubs around. Grilled Chicken Makes 4 servings 4 large skinless, boneless chicken breast halves 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 teaspoon dried rosemary 1 teaspoon dried thyme 1 teaspoon dried oregano 1 teaspoon chopped garlic ½ teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon ground black pepper Preheat grill to medium heat, pierce chicken several times with a fork. Place chicken into a resealable plastic bag and pour in olive oil. Seal and shake bag to coat chicken; add rosemary, thyme, oregano, garlic, salt and black pepper to the bag, seal, and shake again to coat chicken with herbs. Grill chicken until the juices run clear and the meat thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the meat reads at least 165 degrees F. Add fresh-squeezed lemon to finish the chicken. This works well with a bright, fresh, crisp white wine. According to the experts at The California Wine Club, top picks are New World Sauvignon Blanc, Unoaked California Chardonnay, French Pinot Gris and Italian Pinot Grigio. Wines like these are meant to be uncorked and enjoyed while young, so look for newer vintages, 2011 or later, depending on the winemaker and region. The acidic level of the wine is what makes for a good food and wine pairing. The flavors of the food and wine should complement each other, neither one overtaking the other and each becoming better because of the other. The club was created to provide recommendations and selections, just as a friend would recommend a great bottle of wine to another. Members say The California Wine Club is like touring wine country from the comfort of home. As a member, you can get convenient home delivery—monthly, every other month or even quarterly—and the best choice of handcrafted wine from small, family-owned wineries at the lowest possible price. There are experienced wine consultants to assist you with your wine

choices and questions and even wine country travel experts to help you plan a wine country getaway. What’s more, each shipment includes a newsletter called Uncorked that’s a fun and easy way to learn about wine and get to know the families behind each winery. Bruce and Pam Boring, who founded the club, discover these small wineries and leverage their years of experience, exquisite taste and long-built relationships with craft winemakers to hand select and deliver award-winning wines to you. They know the wineries and vintners know them, so club members get introduced to wineries and wines they might never have found on their own. Five kinds of membership are available: • Premier Series—the most popular • Signature Series—for collectors and connoisseurs • International Selections—from small wineries around the world • Aged Cabernet Series—Napa’s most prestigious Cabernets, aged eight to 12 years. • Pacific Northwest Series—limited-production, award-winning wines from Or-

egon and Washington. There are no membership fees, and customers can stop or modify their preferences at any time. Learn More: For further facts, tips and wine suggestions and to learn how to get a gift membership or become a member yourself, visit www.cawineclub.com or call (800) 777-4443.

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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 22, 2014 Page 22

Community Gardens: More Beneficial Than Many Think (NAPSI)—People around the U.S. are increasingly bringing the “green” back to their neighborhoods. In addition to initiatives like Community-Supported Agriculture (CSA) and environmental education through the schools, residents are starting to focus much of their attention on building long-lasting landmarks such as community gardens. The American Community Gardening Association estimates that there are already 18,000 community gardens throughout the country, and for good reason. According to Minnesota nonprofit Green Matters, community gardens decrease crime in urban areas with little vegetation, increase the value of properties in the surrounding area and can help locals save money on food through garden-generated produce. Instead of driving to a distant supermarket for produce or a faraway park for some green space, it’s just a matter of walking over to the nearby garden. The health benefits associated with these gardens show how important open garden spaces can be to otherwise “greenless” urban environments. In 2013, University of Utah researchers found that residents who get involved with community garden projects have recognizably lower body mass indexes than nongardeners, with less chance of being overweight. Not only that, fresh produce from community gardens is less likely to be contaminated with pesticides than other kinds and can be used to teach kids about better nutrition. Organizations such as GrowNYC try to make neighborhood gardens more prevalent. It has already helped establish more than 70 community gardens in New York City, one made with recycled beauty waste with the help of Garnier and recycling company TerraCycle. Initiatives like these not only help establish community gardens in areas

with otherwise sparse vegetation, but get the public involved, increase environmental awareness, and educate the community at the same time. Assistant Director Lenny Librizzi shared these tips for getting involved in a community garden.

• If At First You Don’t Succeed—Each garden has different rules and management systems. If you don’t feel like you’re gelling with the group, try out another one or consider starting your own.

• Look Online—Well-organized comOrganizations such as the National munity gardens usually have websites Recreation and Park Association and or Facebook groups. the U.S. Department of Agriculture offer grant programs to communities to • Visit—Take a walk through nearby help fund garden projects. Some comgardens to see which one you’re most panies are also helping. For example, drawn to. TerraCycle and Garnier will bring another Garnier Green Garden made out • Get Your Hands Dirty—Being a mem- of recycled beauty waste to one of five ber of a community garden is about urban areas in the U.S. in a contest demore than just growing vegetables. All cided by a public vote. members should expect to help with To vote and learn more, visit: common areas, composting, watering, www.green.garnierusa.com or volunteering time.Ê

Improving The Quality Of Your Tap Water (NAPSI)—While health and wellness experts urge consumers to drink more water, doing it safely isn’t as easy as it sounds: tap water might not be as clean as you think. It could contain contaminants that are potentially harmful to your health, such as chemical by-products, heavy metals, and microbial cysts. In fact, according to research supported by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there may be as many as 16 million waterborne illnesses in the U.S. each year. An easy solution for consumers to enjoy clean, great-tasting water for drinking and cooking is to filter water at-home.

One filter system to consider is PUR, which removes contaminants that other systems, including Brita, could leave behind. PUR Faucet Mount Filters re_ duce 61 contaminants found in drinking water such as lead, heavy metals, agricultural pesticides, industrial pollutants, pharmaceuticals, mi_crobial cysts, and chlorine. PUR pitcher filters are certified to reduce 2x more contaminants than Brita pitcher filters, while PUR Faucet Mount Filters reduce 10x more contaminants than Brita pitcher filters. Beyond the superior filtration technology of PUR, the filters come in many styles and finishes, such as the new Stainless Steel Style Faucet Mount.

Another one of the latest additions to the PUR family of filters is the 11-Cup Pitcher. It is de_signed to offer a more convenient way to filter drinking water by reducing the frequency of re_fills. The pitcher base also uses the same footprint as a gallon of milk to save space in the refrigerator. To learn more, visit: www.purwater.com


Page 23 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 22, 2014

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Memorial Day 2014 Memorial Day represents something more than just another day off from work. In this time of national and world uncertainty, we have been reminded of the need for a strong, unified national identity - a spirit of cooperation. It’s increasingly important that we, as Americans, learn to appreciate what we have: our resources, the varied qualities we have in each other. It is a time to reflect on the work and sacrifice of those who fought for our right to a secure, profitable life. Our veterans stand out in this group. Through the decades, from our very beginning, our service men have given their youth, risked personal safety and comfort to protect and prolong what we know as the “American Way of Life.” Many have lost their lives. At this time, we feel it crucial to honor the memory of those men and women, to keep it alive in all of us. It’s time to start working together again to keep our values intact.

Photo by Joe Rosenthall

Five Marines and a Navy Corpsman raise the flag over the Island of Iwo Jima .

“I am the Flag” - by Ruth Apperson Rous

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I am the flag of the United States of America. I was born on June 14, 1777, in Philadelphia. There the Continental Congress adopted my stars and stripes as the national flag. My thirteen stripes alternating red and white, with a union of thirteen white stars in a field of blue, represented a new constellation, a new nation dedicated to the personal and religious liberty of mankind. Today fifty stars signal from my union, one for each of the fifty sovereign states in the greatest constitutional republic the world has ever known. My colors symbolize the patriotic ideals and spiritual qualities of the citizens of my country. My red stripes proclaim the fearless courage and integrity of American men and boys and the self-sacrifice and devotion of American mothers and daughters. My white stripes stand for liberty and equality for all. My blue is the blue of heaven, loyalty, and faith. I represent these eternal principles: liberty, justice, and humanity. I embody American freedom: freedom of speech, religion, assembly, the press, and the sanctity of the home. I typify that indomitable spirit of determination brought to my land by Christopher Columbus and by all my forefathers - the Pilgrims, Puritans, settlers at James town and Plymouth. I am as old as my nation. I am a living symbol of my nation’s law: the Constitution of the United States and the Bill of Rights. I voice Abraham Lincoln’s philosophy: “A government of the people, by the people,for the people.” I stand guard over my nation’s schools, the seedbed of good citizenship and true patriotism. I am displayed in every schoolroom throughout my nation; every schoolyard has a flag pole for my display. Daily thousands upon thousands of boys and girls pledge their allegiance to me and my country. I have my own law—Public Law 829, “The Flag Code” - which definitely states my correct use and display for all occasions and situations. I have my special day, Flag Day. June 14 is set aside to honor my birth. Americans, I am the sacred emblem of your country. I symbolize your birthright, your heritage of liberty purchased with blood and sorrow. I am your title deed of freedom, which is yours to enjoy and hold in trust for posterity. If you fail to keep this sacred trust inviolate, if I am nullified and destroyed, you and your children will become slaves to dictators and despots. Eternal vigilance is your price of freedom. As you see me silhouetted against the peaceful skies of my country, remind yourself that I am the flag of your country, that I stand for what you are - no more, no less. Guard me well, lest your freedom perish from the earth. Dedicate your lives to those principles for which I stand: “One nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.” I was created in freedom. I made my first appearance in a battle for human liberty. God grant that I may spend eternity in my “land of the free and the home of the brave” and that I shall ever be known as “Old Glory,” the flag of the United States of America.

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Bradfordjournalcolorissue5 22 14u  

Fourth Issue May 2014

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