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Architecture Urbanism Landscape Architecture Graduation Projects 2015-2016 Amsterdam Academy of Architecture


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Architecture Urbanism Landscape Architecture Graduation Projects 2015-2016 Amsterdam Academy of Architecture


Contents 12 About nature and community, Floris Alkemade, visiting critic ARCHITECTURE 16 Harvest time, Jan-Richard Kikkert 18 24 30 36 42 48 54 60 66 72 78 84 90 98 102

Tjeerd Beemsterboer, Church 33058 Michael van Bergen, New Life for the Dead Milda Grabauskaite, Reintegration Centre for Addicts Marije Brans, Žalgiris National Stadium Bram van den Heuvel, The Bajesbuurt (Bajes neighbourhood) Kristina Petrauskaite, Growing House Laura van de Pol, Urban Mangrove Pieter van Roermund, Space for the City Ramon Scharff, The House of the City Jasper Smits, Space for Parting Sweder Spanjer, Forever Travelling Pim van Tol, The People’s Tribunal Hans Maarten Wikkerink, Marcy Houses Murk Wymenga, Nesting in the Rocky Urban Landscape Michiel Zegers, Domus Botanicus

URBANISM 108 Cities for all and everything, Arjan Klok 112 Stephan Sliepenbeek, The Inclusive City LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 118 The landscape erased, Maike van Stiphout 120 Astrid Bennink, The Small-Economy Landscape 126 Esther Brun, MIN(e)Dscape 132 Antoine Fourrier, A Vegetable Garden for Paris 140 Archiprix 2017 Nominations


Architecture

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Architecture

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About nature and community Floris Alkemade Visiting critic


An interesting aspect of the graduation projects is that these projects are a clear sign of the times. The chosen subjects, themes and underlying intentions reveal the direction in which the new generation, now entering the market, is heading. As such, the graduation projects not only articulate what the current individual student work is about; the combined themes and goals can also be interpreted as a ‘weather forecast’ for the profession. Therefore, apart from assessing the individual projects, as visitors to graduations shows and juries, we should also consider the overall body of work, trying to decode the intentions of the new generation. An important message that every study programme should deliver is that the choices students make do matter. They have consequences; intentions and the chosen subjects do matter. In its extreme form: ‘Wer Bunker baut, wirft Bomben’ (Those who build bunkers, throw bombs). Seven or eight years ago, I was also in the jury for the graduation projects. At that time, the devastating impact of the crisis was dominating all discussions; the future looked grim, which was visible in the student work that seemed to have lost its sense of elation and hubris. Projects so humble and so obedient that I felt sorry for that group of students. Some years later in 2014, I was chairing the Archiprix jury. On that occasion, I was also trying to decipher the new directions in which the students were heading. This proved to be impossible. In the chaotic, collected body of student work that year, there seemed to be no trend at all. It took some time to recognise a structure of a different kind in this apparent chaos: the ‘Lévy walk’ pattern. A survival mode pattern found in nature. The capacity to change direction being essential to survival.

So, I was obviously curious to see what this year’s projects are about. What do they tell us, now that the crisis seems to be coming to an end? When studying the graduation projects and reading the texts, one shared characteristic was obvious. This new generation has a thought-provoking focus on connecting different, often opposite, domains. Connecting citizens to a royal palace; connecting older to younger generations; connecting the past, present and future; connecting the city to natural wilderness; connecting atheists to atheists; connecting life to death. This focus on establishing new connections is a beautiful one, as interaction is what our societies are about. Another aspect that struck me was how poetic the names and themes of these graduation projects are. David Bowie sometimes used a special technique to compose lyrics. He started collecting words, wrote them on pieces of paper and then arranged them in a more or less random way. A technique, he claimed, that helped to reveal the essence. Fascinated as I was by the poetic names of this year’s projects, I did a quick test attempting to decode the concealed messages in a similar way, through arranging the titles more or less randomly.

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Let me read it to you: In ‘NEW YORK’S MARCY HOUSES’, ‘THE COMMUNITY CHURCH 33058’ was’ FROM THE PAST, PRESENT TO THE FUTURE’ a ‘GROWING HOUSE FOR AGING’; ‘THE PRISON NEIGHBOURHOOD’ became ‘THE HOUSE OF THE CITY’. ‘THE INCLUSIVE CITY’, ‘NESTING IN THE URBAN LANDSCAPE’; ‘THE URBAN MANGROVE’ as ‘THE INTROVERTED DOMUS BOTANICUS’; ‘THE SMALL ECONOMY LANDSCAPE’ as ‘A VEGETABLE GARDEN IN PARIS’. ‘THE CANADIAN MINDSCAPE’ in ‘THE PEOPLE’S TRIBUNAL’ created ‘NEW LIFE FOR THE DEAD’, ‘SPACE FOR PARTING’, ‘FOREVER TRAVELLING’. Well, I’m not suggesting it makes a lot of sense, but as you can see they fit remarkably well together and surprisingly enough it did expose what I think is the essence of what this generation is trying to do. It reveals a generation that is no longer focused on the aftermath of a paralysing crisis. It’s a generation trying to untangle the givens of modern life and society with a dual focus on nature and community. Out of seventeen projects, eight projects address nature, while nine projects address the community. So, there is not only the overwhelming desire to connect, but also this dual focus on nature and community. Throughout history, we have seen an interesting and strong equivalent of this philosophy, in which precisely the same link between nature and community was crafted and positioned as the very foundation of our society. The work of Jean Jacques Rousseau is based on the possibility of a guiding moral compass whereby communities are formed that are based on a solidarity 14

agreement: a ‘social contract’ guided by the only force that has not been corrupted, that of nature. According to Rousseau, thanks to the laws of nature, solidarity and moral justice are possible in our society. His work inspired many political reforms and revolutions in Europe. To see the modern times and our civilisation as a force that corrupts and that needs to be corrected by nature and by community building is exactly what we see in this year’s graduation projects. However, we also have to learn from history. Be aware that in the same times and in the same culture, another Frenchman, Marquis de Sade, arrived at the opposite conclusion with the same argument. He claimed that there is no such thing as good or bad in nature. Whatever a man desires to do, is by definition natural and therefore right, no matter how cruel or perverted the act. ‘All universal moral principles are idle fancies.’ We can see both forces at work in the real world nowadays. We witness forms of malice that are way beyond the depths of the soul that Marquis de Sade was exploring in his writing. We also see solidarity in a lot of domains in the spirit of Rousseau’s ‘social contract’. It is great to see so much focus on community building and on nature. Having said that I also recognise another old theme. Adam and Eve already used nature as a cover-up, out of a sense of shame and guilt. Our modern camouflaged soldiers are using the same approach in an attempt to become invisible. What we see a lot in modern architecture is that nature is frequently being used as a cover-up, out of a sense of shame and guilt for what we have become. This year’s graduation projects show a lot of promising signs. The attention to connections, communities and nature is hopeful; the future is looking bright. Let’s just remember that nature is no substitute for morality.


Jan-Richard Kikkert Head of Architecture Department


Harvest time When examining the harvest of 2015-2016, the quality and diversity is immediately apparent. Themes like reuse, dealing with death and the role of nature in architecture are represented in numerous projects. From breathing new life into an unfinished stadium in Vilnius by means of a metropolitan approach to tackling run-down housing estates in New York through strategic interventions and additions. Or closer to home, transforming the former town hall on Dam Square into a ‘House of the City’ through a minimum amount of crucial interventions and the transformation of the former studio of Hildo Krop into a place where senior citizens can live out their old age in a humane way. Whereas bio-based materials were used in the latter project in order to achieve the architectural interventions, the maximum stimulation of biodiversity was the starting point for another design that radically converted the former Tropen Hotel into a building where humans, flora and fauna cohabit on equal terms.   The social role of architecture was also explicitly examined in a number of projects, such as a prominent courthouse situated on the IJ river, which visibly places the judicial system in the heart of the city once again through a new typology and a proposal to restore the (social) significance that the Roman Catholic church in Schagen originally had by means of a system of squares.   The positive effect of the interdisciplinary structure of the study programme is clearly evident in a number of plans in which the combination of architecture and landscape ensure the proposal’s success. Whereas a building has been conceived on the island of Terschelling where nature is used to create a comforting environment, the fundamental rift between mankind and nature has been restored closer to home at the Nieuwe Diep lake. It would appear that this generation of graduates are once again occupied with real architecture. They have abandoned the desire to design buildings that derive their raison d’être from absurd shapes and misplaced use of colour. Given that it will be approximately 10 years before any building will actually take place in the spirit of the current student work, we can already now look forward to beautiful times. 17


Architecture

Tjeerd Beemsterboer Church 33058

From fellowship building to community building

Currently, only one in six people in the Netherlands believes in a divine force and just over a quarter call themselves atheist. There are, therefore, more non-believers than believers in our country for the first time ever. These are the findings of a research into spirituality and belief commissioned by the Dutch national newspaper Trouw, which was conducted by Ipsos and VU University Amsterdam. Believers still made up a narrow majority when this was previously measured in 2012. A number of years ago, I had myself removed from Roman Catholic church records, because I have simply never been able to believe in God. As a result of this, I have also played my part, as an atheist, in the secularisation of the Netherlands, which is expected to continue steadily in the coming decades according to research by Statistics Netherlands (CBS). To be honest, I consider this to be a positive trend and I believe, above all, that people should think for themselves. However, I do worry about the serious consequences this will have for the thousands of religious buildings in the Netherlands. Parishes are being merged throughout the country. It is estimated that more than half of the Roman Catholic buildings will be sold off. Church leaders often prefer demolition in order to prevent the building being designated an 'unbefitting use' or falling into the hands of another religion. In some cases, they even include a demolition agreement in the contract with a new owner. Religious buildings are almost always centrally located and have always helped create communities until today. However, while the secularisation process picked up pace during the 1960s, faith in the church and society gradually decreased. For example, the (SCP) concluded that in addition to a gap between wishes and expectations, there was also a gap between the value people attach to their own life and their valuation of society. While they are satisfied to very satisfied about their own life (81%), they worry about society, which only gets a meagre mark of five. In my opinion, the massive exodus from these buildings and, in particular, the locations can be dealt with in a much smarter way in order to bring people closer together and thus create communities. In his book ‘Religion for Atheists’, Alain de Botton writes that we can actually learn a lot from faith and that if there is one thing that religion is demonstrably good at, that is in creating communities. This was my motive for deploying the core values of faith in order to bring people in an atheist community closer together. Learning, celebrating, serving, contemplating, mourning and meeting translated into an architectural design with the church as central location.

Graduation date 29 08 2016

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Commission members Jan-Richard Kikkert (mentor) Liesbeth van der Pol Gert Jan te Velde

Additional members for the examination Jeroen van Mechelen Rik van Dolderen


Tjeerd Beemsterboer

Entrance square

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Architecture

Christoforus Church in Schagen

Attendance religious services

Church with religious function

Church interior - Cornelis van Dalem

Non-churchgoers to the municipality

Core values learning, serving, celebrating, meeting, contemplating, mourning.

Church buildings in use 2016

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1 - Bezoek1religieuze - Bezoek 1 - Bezoek diensten religieuze religieuze diensten diensten 1 - Bezoek religieuze diensten 0 tot 10% 0 tot 10% 0 tot 10% 0 10 tot tot 10% 20%10 tot 20% 10 tot 20% 1020tot tot20% 30%20 tot 30% 20 tot 30% 2030% tot 30% of meer 30% of30% meerof meer 30% of meer 2 - Onkerkelijken 2 - Onkerkelijken 2naar - Onkerkelijken gemeente naar gemeente naar gemeente 2 - Onkerkelijken naar 0 tot 30% 0 tot 30% 0gemeente tot 30% 0 30 tot tot 30% 45%30 tot 45% 30 tot 45% 3045tot 45% tot 60%45 tot 60% 45 tot 60% tot60% 100% 60 totrestore 100% 60 tot 100% 4560tot Open church and core values 60 tot 100% 3 - Ongeveer 3 - Ongeveer 4000 3 -kerkgebouwen Ongeveer 4000 kerkgebouwen 4000 kerkgebouwen nog in zijn gebruik nogzijn in ano nog gebruik 2016 in gebruik ano 2016 ano 2016 3 zijn - Ongeveer 4000 kerkgebouwen zijn nog in gebruik ano 2016 4 - Ongeveer 4 - Ongeveer 2600 4 -kerkgebouwen Ongeveer 2600 kerkgebouwen 2600 kerkgebouwen nog in zijn gebruik nogzijn in ano nog gebruik 2020 in gebruik ano 2020 ano 2020 4 zijn - Ongeveer 2600 kerkgebouwen zijn nog in gebruik ano 2020

Religious function disappearing, core values too

1 - Kerk met geloofs functie 2 - Kernwaarden geloof: leren; dienen; vieren; ontmoeten; bezinnen; rouwen; 3 - geloofs functie verdwijnt, kernwaarden ook 4 - Kerk openen en kernwaarden terugbrengen

Existing situation

Church buildings in use 2025

1 - Kerk met geloofs functie 2 - Kernwaarden geloof: leren; dienen; vieren; ontmoeten; bezinnen; rouwen; 3 - geloofs functie verdwijnt, kernwaarden ook 4 - Kerk openen en kernwaarden terugbrengen

1 - Kerk met geloofs functie 2 - Kernwaarden geloof: leren; dienen; vieren; ontmoeten; bezinnen; rouwen; 3 - geloofs functie verdwijnt, kernwaarden ook 4 - Kerk openen en kernwaarden terugbrengen

1 - Kerk met geloofs functie 2 - Kernwaarden geloof: leren; dienen; vieren; ontmoeten; bezinnen; rouwen; 3 - geloofs functie verdwijnt, kernwaarden ook 4 - Kerk openen en kernwaarden terugbrengen


Tjeerd Beemsterboer

Section AA

Section cc

Scale model 1:200

Scale model 1:20

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C

Architecture

A A

B

C

B

Zoning map

Facade section knocking through the church

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Facade section hall


Tjeerd Beemsterboer

The square called church

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Architecture

Michael van Bergen New Life for the Dead

A building in the city where life and death are united once again

My project answers the question how we as a society can deal with death in a modern way. In my research paper, I demonstrate how we prefer to banish death from our thoughts, from our daily life and from our city nowadays. The project ‘New Life for the Dead’ is about a a building where life and death are united once again, in the centre of the city of Amsterdam. It is a building where the funeral and the burial are connected once again. As an architect, I went in search of how ‘space’ could be of added value in these types of vulnerable situations. We all recognise the exaltation that we feel in church, or that we only start talking in a lift when the doors open. It was precisely those tangible, physical emotions that I sought, using them to compose a building. The building was designed on the basis of three spatial principles. The first is that spaces melt into one another in a natural way. The second is that you consciously enter a space through physical transitions. The third makes a link between two routes, as a result of which you can design your own ritual. With such a sensitive theme, it is necessary that you immerse yourself in the direct environment and the users of the building. In my assignment, I made a building in Amsterdam for Amsterdam. In order to connect life and death once again, I went in search of the ‘tangible life’ in the city as we know it. For example, like the passage through the Rijksmuseum, the shelter of the Begijnhof and the Blauwe Theehuis, where a wedding on the upper terrace coexists with the park visitors below. They find their recognisable translation in my building. I worked two years on my graduation project. I interviewed many people who have lost their loved ones, visited many cemeteries in the Netherlands and abroad, and sought contact with the funeral and burial industry. The sudden loss of my brother-in-law and ex-girlfriend brought with them an unsolicited deepening of insight. In my vertical building, the history of the funeral finds its home. And the new developments provide modern ways to deal with death. A funeral procession over the canals. An arrival at a sheltered, sunken square surrounded by trees. A unique rope lift that can form part of a ritual through manual operation. A free funeral that builds subtle relationships with the city. A ceremonial funeral in the tree tops. An intimate cremation space in which you see the clouds outside in line with the oven. A cemetery as a stacked park. Memorial chapels where coloured glass urns lets the light inside, where you can read a book and look out over the city. An upper layer where you can celebrate life with panoramic views over water and park. And a place with views over the city centre, where you are free to do nothing for a while. The building consists of four main materials: wood, brick, cement and metal. I tried to express my love of these materials in my scale models, in the same way that I expect them to be used in the building. In line with the design ideas, the materials also had to come from Amsterdam soil: Amsterdam elm wood, from which the Ritual Route was devised and translated into the building model, and brick made from clay sources from the Noord-Zuidlijn metro extension, which is between 70.000 and 120.000 years old. That is what I made my urban model from. The building model can be completely disassembled, as a result of which you experience the thoughts behind the building, layer by layer.

Graduation date 17 12 2015

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Commission members Laurens Jan ten Kate (mentor) Ira Koers Jeroen Atteveld

Additional members for the examination Lada Hršak Rik van Dolderen


Michael van Bergen

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Architecture

BIJZONDERE PLEK IN AMSTERDAM 


[1] location Marnixplantsoen [2] former Palmkerkhof 1655-1875 [3] funeral procession over the canals [4] coming together on a square in the shelter [5] free funeral [6] cycling through the building [7] celebrating life [8] projection at the location

[9] urban model 1:500

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[10] building made from ceramics 1:500


Michael van Bergen

[1] creating space with volumes (Peter Zumthor)

[2] distinction between main and ancillary space with three steps (Adolf Loos)

[3] breaking down the ritual (Herman Zeinstra)

[4] pile of excavations as source of inspiration ‘creating space’.

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Architecture

[1] around the dead

[2] directed towards the dead

[3] taking a walk from place to place

[1] free funeral

[2] ceremonial funeral

[3] cemetery as a park

[4] celebrating life

[3] the dead in the memorial chapel

[4] view over water and park

[4] view over the city centre

Image caption

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Michael van Bergen

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Architecture

Milda Grabauskaite Reintegration Centre for Addicts Protective yet inspiring

Reintegration centre is a temporary residence for people who have just finished an inpatient addiction treatment programme and are on their way to live independently. Here they could gain some working experience, necessary related skills and knowledge, social connections and psychological support. One of the main tasks of the building is to provide its users with a protective yet inspring place to rediscover themselves, to think about what it was that addictive substances gave them and how they can fill in the void left after they quit using substances in a more natural and less harmful way. Private and shared The main theme in this project is the relationship between private and shared spaces in the building. Private rooms were designed to have the character of a rather personal space, so that the inhabitants will feel like they’re at home rather than in an institution. That will comfort and calm them down which is important in a journey of healing and self-discovery. Nevertheless, rooms also need to be a little bit generic because of their purpose to house different people at different times. I was aiming to find the right balance of spaces being personal and generic at the same time and I believe I did so by introducing smaller scale, level differences, custom-made furniture into the room Shared spaces have a strong relationship with nature, they are open to inner courtyards with trees and other plants, their floor level is lowered down a little bit to bring plants closer to people’s eyelevel. The shared spaces are more abstract in the way they are made which gives them a character of a pavilion rather than a regular building. This pavilion-like atmosphere gives a hint of being on the boundary between inside and outside of the building, and represents a step to the outside world, A smooth transition between the two types of spaces was made by introducing several levels of semi-private spaces in between.

Graduation date 01 12 2015

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Commission members Machiel Spaan Gus Tielens Tom Frantzen

Additional members for the examination Albert Herder Jan-Richard Kikkert


Milda Grabauskaite

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Architecture

Image caption Front elevation

Location

Image caption

Side elevation

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Urban solution

Image caption

Functions and spaces

Image caption

Image caption


Milda Grabauskaite

Image caption Section fragment

Image caption

Plan fragment

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Architecture

Bedroom detailization. Plan fragment

Private spaces. Bedroom

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Bedroom detailization. Section


Milda Grabauskaite

Shared spaces. Plan fragment

Shared spaces. Section

Shared spaces. Psychologist’s room

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Architecture

Marije Brans Žalgiris National Stadium

From the past, to the present, into the future

The history of Lithuania has a strong grip on people’s daily lives. Modern-day Lithuanians are very proud of the events from the early days of Lithuania, but they are also confronted every day with their country’s history of occupation, which lasted over 200 years. Twenty five years after the Baltic states became independent, you feel that Lithuania is still struggling to discover its identity. There are a lot of ways that Lithuania could regain or re-establish its national spirit. One of them is through sports. Sport has always been a means for Lithuanians to retain their freedom, pride and strength, especially during the hard moments in life. Unfortunately, this means of uniting, which could be embodied in a national sports centre, does not yet exist. Vilnius, the capital of Lithuania, has been trying to build a main national stadium for the last 30 years. The last attempt to build a multi-use stadium failed in 2010, just like the first one in 1987, due to economical crisis and corruption. The abandoned skeleton of reinforced concrete structure and wild vegetation are the only things that remain of the national stadium dream. Without a doubt, one of the longest-lasting projects in Lithuania’s history is a scar on the hearts of the Lithuanian people. After spending, or more accurately, losing 78 million Euro, any discussion about the national stadium is like rubbing salt in an open wound. I believe that in order to escape its ignominious past and be proud of the glory days, Lithuania needs to realize the dream of building a home for national sport. The national stadium will help the country and its people to reclaim the national spirit, to fight for common goals and to unite for better results, thus inspiring future generations. The new stadium would not only be a symbol of something that Lithuanians stood up and fought for. The building would also solve a lot of problems in the surrounding area, the Šeškine district, as well as becoming an important unifying element for the landscape and urban tissue of Vilnius.

Baltic state - Lithuania

Graduation date 31 08 2016

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Commission members Gloria Font (mentor) Dingeman Deijs Micha de Haas

Capital city - Vilnius

Additional members for the examination Ira Koers Marcel van der Lubbe


Marije Brans

Retail

ŠEŠKINĖ Housing district

Entertainment

Leisure/ park

GELVONŲ GATVĖ

Housing

GE

LV ON

ŲG

AT V

Ė

ŠEŠKINĖS OZAS National park

URBAN PLAZA +4000 CROSSOVER to Šeškinės Ozas

ŽALGIRIS NATIONAL STADIUM -3000

CROSSOVER Pedestrian bridge approx. +5000 KAROLINIŠKIŲ National park

PARK SQUARE Access to urban plaza, Akropolis and park Street level = 0

VIEWPOINT Stadium view +8000

UKMERGĖS GATVĖ

CROSSOVER Pedestrian bridge

TRAINING FIELD Football practise +6000

ŠEŠKINĖ CLINIC 4 mins

Amphitheatre

PRIVATE HOSPITAL AND CLINIC ‘KARDIOLITA’ 5 mins

EVENT TERRAIN +6000

ŠEŠKINĖS KALVOS family park

AKROPOLIS SHOPPING CENTRE Commercial plinth Street level = 0

Tribune

TRAINING FIELD Athletics and football practise +5000

BUS STOP ‘GELVONĖLIS’ 3 mins

BUS STOP ‘ŠEŠKINĖ‘ 7 mins

VIEWPOINT City view +5000

Ė

KO

O

NI

ŽI

LE

GE

TV GA

BUS STOP ‘ŠEŠKINĖS KALVOS’ 2 mins

VILNIUS TRAIN STATION 13 mins

L VI

VILNIUS INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 14 mins

Masterplan for the redevelopment of Žalgiris National Stadium and Šeškine kalvos

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Architecture The gate to the landscape

The historical element - reflection on the past

Natural reserve

The window

The wall

ŠEŠKINĖ OZAS

STADIUM GROUND

KAROLINIŠKIŲ

LANDSCAPE

NATIONAL RESERVE

LANDSCAPE Landscape element - an expanse of scenery that can be seen in a single view

Existing situation

Approach

Existing situation Šeškinė direction

Outer circulation

UTENA

OUTSIDE SPORTS GROUND

OZO GATV

OUTER CIRCULATION

Akropolis

RG ME UK A / RIG

INTERNAL CONCOURSE SEATING

OZO GATV

PLAYING FIELD Zone 1

ds Lan

Old City

Landscape direction Slow traffic and slow vehicle traffic

Slow and fast vehicle traffic

New situation

Zone 2

Old City

CENT

Zone 4

CITY

CE NTR E

Zone 3

CITY

Fast vehicle traffic

RE

Zone 5

Vitality element - ability to live or exist

Viewpoint from family park Šeškines Kalvos to the landscape entrance of Žalgiris National Stadium

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New City

c ap e

Slow traffic

+

Lan

d sc a

pe

+

New City


Marije Brans P

OZO GATVĖ +2000

PARKING 885 parking places Additional parking for Akropolis

PLAZA ENTRANCE Street level = 0

GELVONŲ GATVĖ Street level = 0 PLAZA ENTRANCE Street level = 0

URBAN PLAZA +4000

i

PUBLIC PLINTH BUS STATION 10 places

P

P

PARKING Street level = 0

STADIUM PARKING 520 parking places

MAXIMA Supermarket approx. 5000 m²

ŽALGIRIS NATIONAL STADIUM -3000

CAFE/RESTAURANT Hospitality approx. 1800 m²

Image caption

UKMERGĖS GATVĖ

PARK SQUARE Street level = 0 Access to urban plaza, Akropolis and park

CROSSOVER karoliniškių National park

VIEWPOINT +8000 Stadium view

Entrance level Žalgiris National Stadium

ŠEŠKINĖS KALVOS FAMILY PARK Entrance to park and stadium

AKROPOLIS SHOPPING CENTRE Commercial plinth

P

PARKING Street level = 0

TRAINING FIELD Football practice

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40

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-10

9 87 654 32 1

Cross section

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Image caption

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98 765 43 21

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Long section

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4.00 Level +1 stadium entrance and business club

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98 76 543 21

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987 65 432 1

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0.00 Street Level VIP parking and stadium facilities

100

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-4.50 Level -1 field access (-3.00) and players’ entrance

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8.00 Level +2 VIP boxes and exhibition space

11.20 Level +3 upper passage

12.20 Level +4 upper tribune

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Architecture

Facade

Cellular cast aluminum foam ALUSION™ Large Cell (open one side)

Principal detail section

32,800

100

Stadium programme

View from the upper passage to the field

40

32,800

100

27,000

18,800

70

30,000

19,300

70

27,000

32,800

100

36,000


Marije Brans

View from the Cross Over to Žalgiris National Stadium (left Šeškine district / urban character and right Šeškine kalvos / landscape character)

Masterplan connecting Žalgiris National Stadium with Vilnius city and sport facilities

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Architecture

Bram van den Heuvel The Bajesbuurt (Bajes neighbourhood) A new future for the Bijlmerbajes prison

In my graduation project, the Bijlmerbajes is transformed from a prison into a new living environment for Amsterdam, the Bajesbuurt (Bajes beighbourhood), and this will serve as a catalyst for the social cohesion of the location, the neighbourhood and the city. From prison to a new living environment Forty years after the opening of a revolutionary prison concept, the Bijlmerbajes prison must close. The pioneering nature and the rehabilitation concept, which are the basis of the Bijlmerbajes prison, have led to a exceptional complex. However, this complex, a landmark at the entrance to the city with a unique character, no longer fulfils the current requirements of the prison policy. In addition to the prison policy, the city and the society are also subject to change. Paradoxically, there are high vacancy rates and, at the same time, there is a serious lack of housing. Moreover, we, as residents of the city, are now using the city differently than in the past. Building a new neighbourhood By using the cultural-historical elements of the Bijlmerbajes prison, such as the moat, the wall and its six towers, I want to preserve the existing character. I will exploit the isolation of the complex in order to create a new location for the city. The design follows on from the concept that the neighbourhood increasingly serves as a type of living room. More and more activities of urban dwellers take place outside the home, such as working, meeting and relaxing. The inner area of the Bijlmerbajes prison will become the living room and will, over the course of time, be developed by occupants, entrepreneurs and local residents. The basis consists of a parcelling out of the inner area, which is cleared of buildings that divided the area instead of connecting it. In the first instance, this area will be filled in with nature and agriculture. This will be supplemented in later stages with facilities for the occupants, neighbourhood and city. The wall provides natural social control and protection. This enables the space to be vulnerable, but also offers a physical platform for experimenting with new initiatives. The wall connects with the environment by means of ecological and cultural solutions. The towers will each be separately repurposed with the focus on a different theme per tower, such as working, joint project commissioning or healthcare. This will create a varied and social balance in the neighbourhood. I worked out one of the towers in greater detail, in which working will be the main focus. Within this theme, I have developed various housing typologies for different target groups, such as single people, families, communes and urban nomads. This variety of homes is expressed in the aesthetics of the building. The homes are small and simple, mainly used for sleeping. All other, primarily, social activities take place in the open heart of the building and in the inner area of the complex. For example, various basic facilities have been designed, which are shared by the occupants, and there is free space that can be jointly given shape by the occupants. By making use of the existing construction, routing and shafts, while also adding atria, the closed tower is converted into a new open complex with an internal network of galleries, balconies, squares and staircases, as a result of which new unexpected relationships are created on both a spatial and social level. Graduation date 17 06 2016

42

Commission members Laurens Jan ten Kate (mentor) Albert Herder Bruno Doedens

Additional members for the examination Herman Kerkdijk Judith Korpershoek


Bram van den Heuvel

43


Architecture

visualisation inner area first phase

visualisation inner area final phase

44


Bram van den Heuvel

original situation

scale model 1:1000 location

scale model 1:500 design complex

construction and shafts

additions / atria

facade

existing

new

scale model 1:100 heart of the building

45


Architecture

seclusion / orangery

living

meeting / working

new design tower

46


Bram van den Heuvel

top floor

inner area

entrance

47


Architecture

Kristina Petrauskaite Growing House House for aging together

This project is an endeavour to propose a solution for the accommodation problems of elderly citizens. The project aims to improve the housing and well-being of the elderly. The ‘Growing house’ project introduces concepts and ways to use collective spaces for increasing interaction and collaboration between, as well as the quality of life of, its inhabitants. The combined use of nature, light and materials make it possible to merge private and public life, so that inhabitants get the best out of both spheres. The mixture of private and public programmes within the building allows elderly people with limited mobility to experience the richness of social urban life. The project gives a new lease of life to an old historical building located in the Amsterdam city centre by using novel materials and spacial concepts, as well as integrating public, private and in-between spaces. The building consists of courtyards, greeneries, internal streets and flexible spaces that create a diverse environment for its residents. The idea of living together and helping each other has been around since time immemorial. Today’s society has become centered around individual needs and people are less aware of their surroundings. Human connection is gradually disappearing. Knowledge, experience and traditions can’t be passed down if these connections are lost. In order to create a sustainable community lifestyle, connecting people with like-minded and shared values is necessary. This project takes advantage of the ‘living in community’ concept to develop solutions to connect various generations. The ‘Growing house’ is a place where young and old with same interests live together, help each other, complete each other, exchange ideas and connect through art, nature and architecture. In this house, people have a chance to grow and age together. Use of different materials, light and shapes creates various atmospheres, even in the very same room. The combination of these architectural elements helps to create spaces for collective activities, while taking privacy into consideration. The choice of the materials is inspired by the context of the old building, former artists working at the location and novel ecological materials (mycelium). The ‘Growing house’ never dies. Using different materials, which can be recycled, reused or degraded in different conditions transforms the house every day, every season and every year. The house changes the people as people change the house. Living and studying in Amsterdam made me think of ageing generation problems. The rapidly increasing elderly population of Amsterdam and their social isolation, the changing economy and the inadequate healthcare system have made the future for old people even more insecure. Growing up in a collective environment encouraged me to promote the idea of community living. We are the future elderly. The way our generation is going to age will be different. In order to achieve a better quality of life, we need to start preparing and changing now. We should rethink how we want to age. The ‘Growing house’ will be for seven people. It will contain five private units, collective and public spaces. Housing units will shrink to the minimum size and will provide sleeping spaces and showers. Each private unit is connected to the outdoor space with a view to ensuring people do not feel locked up. The laundry room, kitchen, dining and living rooms will move to collective/sharing spaces. Multifunctional spaces can be used for daycare, sports, small events, workshops or as a big living space for residents and their guests. Workplaces, libraries and personal spaces will be created in the building so inhabitants are provided with rooms that fit their needs. This will be merged with an art workshop next to the house. It will include workshops, guest bedrooms, storage spaces, a gallery and a museum. Graduation date 17 02 2016

48

Commission members Jan-Richard Kikkert (mentor) Lada Hršak Rene Heijne

Additional members for the examination Gus Tielens Floor Arons


00

Kristina Petrauskaite

SECTIONS D-C-B-E

SECTIONS D-C-B-E

Floor plan 00

Section C-C

Section E-E

49


MATERIAL TESTS Architecture

INSPIRATION TO REUSE MATERIALS

MATERIAL TES

HOUSE FOR 7 IN THE URBAN SURROUNDINGS

INSPIRATION TO REUSE M

MATERIAL TESTS

MATERIAL TESTS

INSPIRATION TO REUSE MATERIALS

INSPIRATION TO REUSE MATERIALS

Location - Amsterdam city centre

Material test 1

Situation - inside of the urban block

MATERIAL MATERIAL TESTSTESTS

MATERIAL TESTS

INSPIRA MATERIALS INSPIRATION TO TION REUSETO MAREUSE TERIALS

INSPIRATION TO REUSE MATERIALS

Material test 2

Material test 3

ROOF TOP SECTIONS A-F-1-2

FLOOR PLAN 01

Material test 5

Floor plan +01

50

Material test 6

Material test 4

Material test 7

Roof top

Material test 8


Kristina Petrauskaite

Semi-public hairdressing salon and greenhouse

VIEWSEMI PUBLIC HAIRDRESSER SPACE AND GREENHOUSE

Workshop

WORKSHOP

Entrance zone

ENTRANCE ZONE

51


Architecture

Entrance to the block ENTRANCE TO THE BLOCK

Bathroom visualization

BATHROOM VISUALIZATION

Collective space

52

Model picture

Model picture


Kristina Petrauskaite

Model picture

Model picture

Model picture

Model picture

Model picture

53


Architecture

Laura van de Pol Urban Mangrove

How food ecosystems can revitalise cities

Inspired by the Old Amsterdam Food Tours and the book ‘Hungry City, Carolyn Steel’, the ambition with this project is to create a programme with a deep connection to its location that feeds from its surrounding and is able to give back added value to the city by transforming and connecting existing flows. This vision can be seen as a sustainable pilot, demonstrating how this intervention can contribute to revitalising and reactivating the city, simply by connecting history, functions and economy that create a smart grid. The history of the city, which developed from a small village by the Amstel in the 12th century to the centre of the international trade in the Golden Age, was literally shaped by food. The old entrance of Amsterdam was the port where the latest trends, foods and goods where discovered; a place to be inspired, to discover and to meet people. The port of Amsterdam was the capital of the world. Food was visible everywhere in the city and played a major role in shaping the urban fabric. Markets were formed by or on the canals that were the veins of the city’s structure. Oxes walked into the Kalverstraat on their way to the cattle market on the Spui, vegetables were sold on the Warmoestraat, while on the Dam there was a daily fish market with the Haringpakkerssteeg as a side alley where the herring was salted to preserve it. The food imprint that Amsterdam holds, tells us that the supply, storage, transportation and consumption of food have always been of great cultural and social value. Besides the streetnames and facade bricks, this history and story of Amsterdam has dissapeared from our streetscape. But if we look at the patterns of streets, the canals, squares and buildings, it’s possible to discover signs of Amsterdam’s past food history. Amsterdam’s appearance is more than coffeeshops, souvenir shops, sex museums and multinational corporations, which could be the impression you get from entering the city from Amsterdam Central Station. This project can contribute to changing the city’s appearance in a positive way by making a statement in terms of aesthetics, its connection to its local characteristics and the importance of food. To bring back the old function of Amsterdams harbour, Urban Mangrove is a metaphor for an ecosystem that is fed by the water. Like a living organism, it has the ability to adapt, to change form, to grow or shrink, to multiply itself and is part of a bigger network aimed at making it sustainable. The goal is to strengthen the relationship that Amsterdam had with food by reactivating the water network. In this way, the canals are reused as a form of transportation and a floating market can ‘plug in’ at any of the ‘Mangroves’ in the city. By doing this, it serves to revitalise the function of the old harbour that used to be along the Prins Hendrikkade. This covered city square is a focal point where people mingle and meet where the floating market (reused canal boats) dock onto the flexible piers. It can facilitate several scenarios, such as kiosks, an open air theatre, concerts, festivals and cinemas. These scenarios change during the course of the day and during the seasons. This ecosystem is a reaction to and platform for facilitating what the city needs today, adapting to its surroundings. The design is divided into three components: permanent (quay-brick material), temporary (roof and kiosks - modular systems - wood/bamboo material) and flexible (piers-water) as design principles. These translate into the spatial design of the public space. The roof is a unique element in the design. It consists of a modular and flexible construction method of bamboo which is able to form any shape. It is a reaction to its direct influences: the flow of traffic, people and programme. I believe that we should start seeing our cities as ecosystems as the people and our cities are contantly changing and developing. This way we root our cities with it’s surroundings and we can give ourselves the freedom and the space to react to the needs of today and tomorrow. Graduation date 11 11 2016

54

Commission members Jeroen van Mechelen (mentor) Gloria Font Henk de Weijer

Additional members for the examination Herman Kerkdijk Albert Herder


Laura van de Pol

55


Architecture

‘View of Amsterdam from the IJ’, 1829-1852 by N.M. Wijdoogen

Vegetable market Lijnbaansgracht

Amsterdam 1320

Amsterdam 1625 (Golden Age)

Amsterdam 1597

Amsterdam 1877 (Old harbour disappears)

tijdelijk

permanent

flexibel

concept concept concept bouwstenen

Analysis location the old harbour, Prins Hendrikkade

bouwstenen

bouwstenen

concept section

quay - permanent - stone

permanent permanent

Amsterdam Urban Mangrove network locations

56

modules - temporary - wood

pier - flexible - water

flexibel (wekelijks) flexibel (wekelijks tijdelijk (kwartaal) tijdelijk (kwartaal) permanent flexi tijdelijk (kwartaal)

Impression


Laura van de Pol

Image caption

Floating market

Concept organisation

57


Architecture

Aanzicht Oost 1:200

Aanzicht West 1:200

Aanzicht Zuid 1:200

Detail roof construction

Aanzicht Noord 1:200

Section

Doorsnede Lengte 1:200

Doorsnede B-B Dwars

Floating cinema at night

58

Detail foot of roof construction


Laura van de Pol

Aanzicht Oost 1:200

Aanzicht West 1:200

Aanzicht Zuid 1:200

Plan ground floor

Aanzicht Noord 1:200

Doorsnede Lengte 1:200

Section

Doorsnede B-B Dwars

Doorsnede F-F 1:200

Section IJ to Victoia Hotel

59 Doorsnede G-G 1:200


Architecture

Pieter van Roermund Space for the City

Research into a residential environment for middle class urban families

Since 2008, there has been a visible change in the number of middle class families that live within the A10 ring road. The advantages of living in the city outweigh the associated disadvantages. This positive trend ties in with the municipal policy, in which the middle class are considered to be ‘the motor of the city’. In this respect, Amsterdam occupies a unique position internationally. Whereas other large cities deliberately allow capitalist gain to prevail, Amsterdam is speaking out against this and wants to actively devote itself to remaining a non-dual city and binding the middle class to the city. This project elaborates on this ambition. It offers middle class urban families – with or without children – housing and a living environment that is in line with their specific wishes. However, the design does more. It addresses a strategy that seeks to increase the density the city, as a result of which more public space is actually created and the local residents share in the added value that the project offers. The urban design concept is based on making parts of the inner courtyard of the (closed) housing block communal and even partially open to the public. This generic concept forms the first part of the graduation work and is specifically elaborated on during the second part. On the scale level of the city, the design provides an answer that is in line with the direction as described by the municipality in the Structural Vision Amsterdam 2040, in which a densification, with the addition of 70.000 homes within the current building lines, is taken into account. The location for the developed part is the Bellamy neighbourhood. As stated in the presentation, there were a number of possible locations, but I know the Bellamy neighbourhood quite well and it has an extremely interesting urban design history, which provides a reason for the chosen interventions on various scale levels. The design follows on from the urban planning concept – exploiting the inner courtyards of housing blocks – and consists of an informal network that is placed as superposition over the infrastructural network of the neighbourhood. Programme in inner courtyards, connected with each other through gates and informal passageways. In this way, it forms a network for the neighbourhood; something to be proud of and something that gives the Bellamy neighbourhood an identity, building on the history of the neighbourhood. My graduation work examines the elaboration of one of these spots in greater detail. A hybrid housing project within the Schimmelstraat, Korte Schimmelstraat, Jan Hanzenstraat and Tweede Kostverlorenkade block. The design and the presentation examine three themes that play an important role: • Densification with added value; densification provides something positive; offering instead of threatening opportunities. The design provides the new residents of the project with housing, but the living environment also provides quality that will ensure that the existing residents see its added value and participate in the project. • Continuity and movement in the outdoor space. It is important precisely for the action radius of the young families to also have quality outdoor space in the direct vicinity of the home. In addition, it is also important that children will discover the direct living environment, without being in danger. • Attachment to the existing fabric. Inherent to the development of a section of the inner courtyard is the relationship with the existing buildings. How does old become attached to new and how is privacy handled when the informal rear side of the home suddenly borders the public space? My graduation work ‘Space for the City’ is the result of a (long) search for the answer to the question of how I, as an architect, can offer good housing and an interesting living environment, which takes the requirements and wishes of the modern urban family into consideration and in which justice is done to the above-mentioned points for attention.

Graduation date 08 04 2016

60

Commission members Eric Frijters (mentor) Harald Mooij Marcel van der Lubbe

Additional members for the examination Judith Korpershoek Herman Kerkdijk


Pieter van Roermund

61


Architecture

A network of events superimposed on the infrastructural network of the Bellamy neighbourhood

concept for the urban design linking scales between the houses and the housing block

Exploded view of the upper apartment in one of the houses

new build programme in the interior of the housing block

62


Pieter van Roermund

elevated street level in front of the library

materials and detailing 1

materials and detailing 2

63


Architecture

section view showing the visual relations between inside and outside

section view of building 1

64


Pieter van Roermund

facade view of building 1

65


Architecture

Ramon Scharff The House of the City

An examination of the possibilities for the Royal Palace on Dam Square

The Royal Palace on Dam Square was originally built as the city hall of Amsterdam in 1648. The centre of the world, the place where it all happened, a magnificent monument in the city. A public building with many functions, such as the administrative courts, the city government, the exchange bank, a prison, the home of the mayor and place to get married. Due to its impressive appearance, the building was also called the eighth wonder of the world in the 18th century. When Louis Napoleon became the first king of the Kingdom of Holland in 1806, he put the city hall of Amsterdam into use as a Royal Palace. The city hall functions disappeared from the building and were moved to various locations in the city. Between 1810 and 1935, the building was property of Amsterdam, but was rarely used. In 1935, it was sold to the central government. Since that time, it has been made available for festive occasions of the royal family. This only happens a few times per year. The rest of the time it is unoccupied.... The Royal Palace currently has a closed appearance, but it is located at one of the most public spots in the city. In the past the Royal Palace played an important role as the public centre of the city, the place where the residents of the city came to meet each other and arrange their business. Many people do not know that the building was once the city hall of Amsterdam and that part of the Royal Palace is currently open to visitors. Wouldn’t it be fine if the city would once again have a palace with public functions? On the basis of historical, architectural and spacial research, it may be concluded that the building has already undergone a significant transformation through the years and the building is incredibly well-constructed. It is suitable for a range of functions and can change function with minimal interventions. Louis Napoleon arrived with new wallcovering and furniture, and it suddenly became a palace. The examination demonstrates that the building already possesses great potential. On the basis of this conclusion, the challenge is to make use of as many of the existing qualities as possible. The goal is to shape the new function based on the qualities of the building. It could be that the function is thus moulded on the basis of the available spaces. Should larger essential interventions actually be necessary, then I will fall back on the building-historical appraisal, which I will examine to see if I can justify the interventions. The new functions will be linked to functions from the past. The Exchange Bank will become a Food Bank, The Night Watch will be returned to its original spot in the Krijgsraadzaal (Court Martial Hall), the cell complex will become a royal Crèche, the old mayor’s home will become the home of the King and the Palace museum will remain as it is now. In order to ensure the functions actually function, I will have to place new furniture, just like Louis Napoleon did in 1808. The use of materials for this furniture will follow on logically from the materials used in the past. Graduation date 10 03 2016

66

Commission members Rob Hootsmans (mentor) Machiel Spaan Jeroen Schilt

Additional members for the examination Jan-Richard Kikkert Bart Bulter


Ramon Scharff

67


Architecture

Stadshuis

Paleis op de Dam

1648

Het Huis van de Stad

2015

2020

Image caption

Image caption

plan ground floor

plan first floor

plan second floor

plan third floor

entrance The Night Watch

exit The Night Watch

entrance Food Bank

entrance Home of the King

crèche in the old cell complex

68

food bank


Ramon Scharff

Section AA

Section BB

Section CC

69


Architecture

plan third floor

The Night Watch returned to its original location

70


Ramon Scharff

the home of the king

71


Architecture

Jasper Smits Space for Parting

bidding farewell and cremation

A close acquaintance of my parents died and was cremated. The evening before, I bade her farewell and offered my condolences to her family in a building of the funeral and cremation services company Yarden. I walked into the crematorium. We could leave our jackets in the cloakroom. People said hello here and there. I didn’t see any family members or relatives of the deceased. The sign above the entrance to the auditorium lit up: silence. The undertaker opened the doors to the auditorium. I saw the family sitting down with their backs towards us. The final farewell began with beautiful words and music. After half an hour, we were led past the casket by the undertaker, and the coffee and sandwiches were waiting in the condolence room. Family and close relatives joined us a little later. They were present during the lowering of the casket. The offering of condolences began. I was done after one and half hours and saw another hearse with a family waiting for the following farewell service. The casket of our good acquaintance will have already been burnt. The above-mentioned cremation aroused anger and aggression in me. It describes the businesslike, chilly and above all slickly-run organisation of the cremation. No contact with the outside world at all. The restricted space and limited opportunity for movement: from reception area to auditorium then condolence room and, as a result of this, the limited time given to experience, reflect on and share emotions in relation to the deceased and her family. The undertaker’s rigid direction of the proceedings made the guests feel hounded. The experiences gained at the three funerals inspired me when formulating ideas about what is needed to provide the cremation ceremony with a sense of space and togetherness, as well as ensuring people can take responsibility, have time and direct proceedings themselves. How could I answer these demands as an architect? Both the archetypal crematorium and the farewell ceremony of a cremation are aimed at efficiency and taking care of all one’s needs. As a result of this, the final farewell has become a production lasting an hour and a quarter. The bereaved are kept at arm’s length and are observers instead of participants. The result is a fleeting farewell in which the contribution of the bereaved is minimal. As a result of this, one can only relive the memory through photos. Death, but also the individualisation of society, calls for a more personal farewell in which there is sufficient time, space and resources to arrange the farewell oneself. The traditional village funeral had both spatial and personal qualities that have been lost over the years. The commotion, the transience, the hustle and bustle and the scale of the modern city offers no space for a comparable ceremony. The landscape, which demands nothing and is always in motion, makes the farewell more intense. ‘When the casket was lowered, it started to snow.’ That is why I am making a crematorium in the landscape with a family house and a studio where one has the time and space over the course of a week to bid farewell and hold the farewell ceremony as one sees fit.

Graduation date 31 08 2016

72

Commission members Donald van Dansik (mentor) Floris Hund Bruno Doedens

Additional members for the examination Bart Bulter Judith Korpershoek


1981

1990

2000

2010

Jasper Smits

polder structure

sand mining A27

dumping household rubbish and industrial waste

dumping dredging spoil

lake shoaling

Up until the 1970s

The 1970s

1974 - 1977

1978 - 1979

2015

2016

Fifteen-metre-deep lake

polluted lake

Result: Five-metre-thick mud layer, heavily contaminated locally

Dredging spoil covered with slightly polluted mud (shoaling), win-win for surplus mud Utrecht and biodiversity at the location.

Design: lake as place to bid farewell Lake is divided into 3 sections (woods, reeds and water), each section is given a building. Historical polder structure revealed once again. Ceremony goes from closed to open environment.

0m

100 m

500 m

0m

100 m

landscape and buildings 25m

500 m

0m

100 m

500 m

0m

100 m

50m

100m

150m

entrance and ceremony route

200m

25m

500 m

0m

100 m

50m

100m

150m

200m

routes and buildings 25m

50m

100m

150m

200m

500 m

entrance

parking

path ceremony

family house with reception area

woodland path

memorial house

house for final farewell

cremation, farewell

footpath

Design at Hooge Kampse Plas Utrecht

73


Architecture concept

huis

ontvangst

gedenkruimte crematie condoleance

huis

ontvangst

gedenkruimte crematie

cafe I restaurant

condoleance cafe I restaurant

huis

ontvangst

gedenkhuis

crematie

condoleance I cafe I restaurant

huis

ontvangst

gedenkhuis

crematie

condoleance I cafe I restaurant

huis

ontvangst

gedenkhuis

crematie

condoleance I cafe I restaurant

familiehuis ontvangst

1. a reinterpretation of the tradition and the idea that one walks from one part to the other, just like at a funeral.

gedenkhuis

crematie

2. an active contribution from the bereaved by replacing the staff, where possible, with the bereaved.

afscheidshuis

3. a farewell lasting several days with space to live together, bid farewell and direct your own ceremony.

1 roof structure, 3 types of daylight

roof structure house for final farewell

bk dakrand = 4595 bk dakconstructie = 4530+p

0,2m

0,4m

0,5m

1m

1m

1m

2m

2m

4m

0,6m 1,5m

2.5m

3m 8m

1:20 1:50 1:100 1:200

incidence of light reception area

74

0,2m

0,4m

0,5m

1m

1m

1m

2m

2m

4m

0,6m 1,5m

2.5m

3m 8m

1:20 1:50 1:100 1:200

0,2m

0,4m

0,5m

1m

1m

1m

2m

2m

4m

bk dakrand = 4595

ok dakconstructie = 3545

ok dakconstructie = 3545

bk vloer BG P=0

bk vloer BG P=0

bk vloer BG P=0

bk dakconstructie = 4530+p

0,6m

N

1:20 1:50 1:100 1:200

bk dakrand = 4595

ok dakconstructie = 3545

bk dakconstructie = 4530+p

1,5m 2.5m

3m 8m

incidence of light memorial house

incidence of light house for final farewell

N

roof structure memorial house

N

roof structure reception area family house


Jasper Smits route from parking to cremation

family house

Section family house

from closed to open

plan of family house

75


Architecture memorial house technische ruimte

schoonmaak werkkast

spoelkeuken

gedenkruimte

beamer

keuken video en audio

opslag

N

section memorial house

arrival memorial house

plan of memorial house

76

view from memorial house

1:20 1:50 1:100 1:200

0,2m

0,4m

0,5m

1m

1m

1m

2m

2m

4m

0,6m 1,5m

2.5m

3m 8m


b k vloer BG P=0

b k vloer BG P=0

b k dakrand = 3000+p

b k dakrand = 3000+p

o k dak = 2700+p

o k dak = 2700+p

b k vloer BG P=0

b k vloer BG P=0

Jasper Smits cremation b k dakrand = 4970+p

b k dakrand = 4970+p

o k dakconstructie = 3850+p

o k dakconstructie = 3850+p

b k dakrand = 4970+p

b k dakrand = 4970+p

o k dakconstructie = 3850+p

o k dakconstructie = 3850+p

b k vloer BG P=0

b k vloer BG P=0

b k vloer BG P=0

b k vloer BG P=0

b k dakrand = 4970+p

b k dakrand = 4970+p

o k dakconstructie = 3850+p

o k dakconstructie = 3850+p

b k dakrand = 4970+p

b k dakrand = 4970+p

o k dakconstructie = 3850+p

o k dakconstructie = 3850+p

b k vloer BG P=0

b k vloer BG P=0

b k vloer BG P=0

b k vloer BG P=0

cremation on the water

house for final farewell bk dakrand = 3525+p

ok dakconstructie = 2700+p

bk dakrand = 3525+p

ok dakconstructie = 2700+p

bk vloer BG P=0

bk vloer BG P=0

western facade

southern facade

bk dakrand = 3525+p

ok dakconstructie = 2700+p

bk dakrand = 3525+p

ok dakconstructie = 2700+p

bk vloer BG P=0

northern facade bk vloer BG P=0

eastern facade

plan of house for final farewell

77


Architecture

Sweder Spanjer Forever Travelling A crossing to Terschelling

I love Terschelling. Not only because my family has been born and bred there for generations, but especially due to the romance of the boat trip, the different landscapes on a small piece of the earth and the abundant forces of nature present. Many more people love Terschelling apart from me, as evidenced by 400,000 people crossing over each year. These people come back each year, if not more often, to the island. The love for the island is often passed on to successive generations, as families spend their holidays here together. And then a person is suddenly confronted with death and also, therefore, his or her next of kin. You ask yourself how you would like to spend the last moments of your life. Do you do that in a hospice, as is customary nowadays? Although it may be exaggerating somewhat, a large number of people stay in a simulated home environment, where they all wait for death, in combination with the necessary medical care. A place where a rift arises between the living environment and the place where one will die; where the family comes to visit now and again. I believe that things should be done differently, and can be done differently! Wouldn’t it be nice to make the crossing to Terschelling, the place you love so much, one final time with the family, who are often spread out across the country. And to spend the remaining time there together, almost like previous holidays. Surrounded by mother nature, with her forces, rhythms and influences. The wind, which ensures that the landscape is continually in motion. The sea with its tides, the turbulent weather which you see coming from afar. The crystal-clear nights with the starry sky. A place where you can find solace, because you realise that we are all part of nature, a greater whole. That consists of influences which we have no control over and rhythms that are constantly recurring, just like the cycle of life and death. And we will all ultimately be swept along in these natural trends, in which we abandon ourselves to nature and can surrender to dying. A place where there are memories of previous holidays on the island, as a result of which you reflect on beautiful, special events and moments. And then you spend your final moments on one of the most beautiful locations on the island, right on top of a dune. Surrounded by people that you love, at a place you love. A place where the future bereaved can support each other, as an important part of the care. Where the collective bond between the families is shaped by providing the primary needs, food and warmth, together and maintaining this throughout the year. As a result of this, the interaction between the various families and people is stimulated and the interaction can lead to a bond or a friendship, like a form of enrichment. Seven families can stay here, so that following the death of one or two people, the other families are not immediately in the minority and no undesirable imbalance is created between the current and new families. As a result, there is also a balance between life and death. I believe that seven accommodations for seven families with an average stay of three weeks will result in a balance between them, so that there is no coming and going of families. A place where I have achieved the personal ambition of uniting death and commemoration in one place. The place where someone dies is of great significance to me and, in addition, there is no interruption in living environment at a time when you are particularly vulnerable as surviving relative. Given that the death may be confronting for the other families, I have consciously dealt with this phase and the accompanying emotions in a subtle manner. The phasing through time and the introverted character of parts of the accommodation and the courtyard tie in with this. Then returning to the extroverted landscape after a few days mourning, where you meet your friends and family before saying farewell. Graduation date 26 08 2016

78

Commission members Jan-Richard Kikkert (mentor) Bruno Doedens Gunnar Daan

Additional members for the examination Ira Koers Bart Bulter


Sweder Spanjer

79


Architecture

After the boat has moored, you continue your way across Terschelling, go to the east and turn left before the village of Formerum, ride thorough the forest of Formerum.

Once you come out of the forest, the building reveals itself in the distance.

Up the dune, the road rises steeply, the winding road constantly offers new views of the building.

80


Sweder Spanjer Total As a whole, this building is made up of various zones. These zones form part of a larger whole, which symbolise the size of the world of the dying. This world grows smaller and smaller.

Collective The outermost zone is permeable to the landscape. Spaces are located here, which are closely connected to the landscape, the wind and which each have a specific orientation. Orientated towards the sun, the view and linked to an activity.

280 m2

140 m2

165 m2

240 m2

Interior spaces associated with collective need (activity)

Orientation landscape/sun/ view

Collective needs (activity)

Entrances landscape

Surface areas collective spaces

Interconnecting landscape The interconnecting landscape is situated within this zone. This interconnecting landscape is easily accessible to everyone, also if you are in a wheelchair. The difference in height are in keeping with the landscape and constantly offer new perspectives. The interconnecting landscape provides access to both the collective spaces and the private accommodations for the families.

Accommodations The private domains of the families are located within. The vertical relationships are the primary focus here. The spaces are lit from above when the sun shines and provide an opportunity to see the stars at night. As a result, it ties in with the day and night rhythm in a pure manner. The theme of rain also plays a role in the zone.

2

m

30

0m

2

250

300 m

m2

300

2

250

Ongoing care programme

7 unique views

35

0 m2

0m

2

2

m

35

Surface areas of accommodations (2 floors)

Courtyard garden The introverted courtyard garden lies hidden at the centre of the building. There is talk of this garden and perhaps people smell it, but it is only revealed once someone dies. After the death, this garden provides a feeling of relief and offers solace.

M

M

S

M

S

Wave before daylight

L

L

7 accommodations heptagon

Amorphous like a dip in the dunes

Section from south to north, from dune to beach and North Sea

81


Architecture

After eating you take another walk through the interconnecting landscape, the interconnecting landscape broadens out and there is a place in order to be outside, a fire is already being started, but bad weather is coming in from the sea

Impressions left by wind in the dune sand

Shells, water, dune sand and cement together make up the concrete

Section in which the application of the material can be seen

Processing of the Terschellinger wood, in keeping with the theme of the assignment.

The children from the various families have already become friends. They play, of course, in the dunes, while the mothers keep an eye on them from inside

82


Sweder Spanjer

There are various skylights in the accommodation. The sun shining during the day creates a fascinating play of light. Once the sun sets, a clear starry sky follows as time passes. You can spend your final moments together with your family in total peace

Colourful grasses and flowers together with burnt wood. It offers solace that nature can be so beautiful, while you have just experienced that nature can also be very harsh

After the service, the deceased can be taken away to the final resting place and that person will be forever travelling

83


Architecture

Pim van Tol The People’s Tribunal

The new way of administering justice transparently

The people’s tribunal is a new typology for a court of law where the focus is on observing the administration of justice, just like one could observe this in the open in the past. A vierschaar (the historical term for a Dutch tribunal, which literally means ‘foursquare’) is the name for the court of law in the early Middle Ages, where they demarcated a room by means of four sticks in the ground and stretched a rope between them. At the four edges, there were benches [squares] upon which the sheriffs [judges] took their seats, and the accused stood in the middle. Justice was administered within these four squares. The term transparency is an important theme within the modern judicial system and has been considered a structural principle of the judicial system for centuries. Public access compensates for the lack of democratic control. It gives citizens the opportunity to form an opinion about what the judge does and to criticise it. It can be seen as contradictory that a large section of modern society is no longer aware of the fact that the judicial system is, in principle, freely accessible to everyone and the court of law thus forms a public building. The task itself lies between two contrasts, namely the public and transparent character on the one hand, and the complexity of different routes and the security on the other hand. The people’s tribunal emerged in this area of tension, a central courtroom with a number of routes of public and secure zones orbiting around it. These different transparent zones operate as filter, thus reflecting the various layers of the court. At a time in which the public nature of the court is under pressure, the people’s tribunal reacts to this with a transparent building which addresses the public nature of the judicial system. The theme of transparency in the administration of justice is a topical theme within the judicial system. For example, Geert Corsten [President of the Supreme Court] advocated the importance of public access in the judicial system in the magazine of the Council for the Judiciary [September 2014 #03]. “The image of the judicial system is of it being withdrawn, unaccessible, old-fashioned, maybe even unworldly.” This was said by the former Minister of Security and Justice [Ivo Willem Opstelten] during his introduction to the presidents of the courts in October 2012. And he subsequently said: “We all know that the reality is different, but we do need to do something to change that image.”

Graduation date 08 03 2016

84

Commission members Machiel Spaan (mentor) Jana Crepon Daan Petri

Additional members for the examination Rik van Dolderen Jeroen van Mechelen


Pim van Tol

85


Architecture

13th century tribunal [court]

tribunal = point of departure for the design impartiality

tribunal process

> omni-directional orientation emphasises

central positioning in the heart of the city, recognisable, visible and easily accessible

+

urban design orientation people’s tribunal

86

addition urban waterfront

connect boulevard alongside the banks of the IJ river

current Sixhaven introverted

Incorporate Sixhaven in public space


Pim van Tol

openbaar

privé

-1 verdieping

openbaar

privé

begane grond

openbaar

privé

1e verdieping

openbaar

privé

1e verdieping optioneel

openbaar

privé

2e verdieping

openbaar

privé

3e verdieping

87


Architecture

courtroom

entrance judges

public corridor zone

library

2

section

88

5

10

1:200

doorsnede 01


Pim van Tol

square side people’s tribunal

fragment section quay

89


Architecture

Hans Maarten Wikkerink Marcy Houses

A case study of social housing in New York City

If anything is typical of the demographics of New York City, it is its character of enclaves. While higher level demographic data show a diverse, vibrant melting pot, small-scale New York City is relatively segregated. This seems to work just fine in most neighbourhoods. Unfortunately, this is not the case for the poorest New Yorkers. Since the 1930s, they have been housed in large-scale housing developments popularly referred to as ‘projects’. Over 400,000 people live in these subsidised houses, divided over 334 developments. The majority of these neighbourhoods are based on the ‘Towers in the Park’ scheme. They breathe modernism and a top-down urban design mentality. The fact that they have a waiting list of 200,000 people is an indication of its continuing relevance. The Marcy Houses in the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood of Brooklyn are a representative example of a housing ‘project’. They are situated in a beautiful area of central Brooklyn and they are surrounded by picturesque neighbourhoods where a happy middle class finds identity. However, the Marcy Houses themselves are often referred to as a neighbourhood with a lot of problems. With the need for 50% more social housing than currently available, that also has to be funded in a different way than has traditionally been done I am adding 25% more market-rate apartments and commercial spaces, on top of the 50% extra social housing. As such, densification and diversification not only becomes desirable from a socio-economic perspective, but also from a purely economic and affordability standpoint. The Marcy Projects should be proud like New York City, showing off their resilience, as well as their richness in diversity and history.

Graduation date 29 08 2016

90

Commission members Laurens Jan ten Kate (mentor) Marcel van der Lubbe Gus Tielens

Additional members for the examination Elsbeth Falk Machiel Spaan


Hans Maarten Wikkerink

91


Architecture

Existing Marcy Houses

Marcy Houses master plan

92

Adjacent street view

Entry way

Street view

Corner building


Hans Maarten Wikkerink

Superimposition of new grid

Partial demolition

Brooklyn typologies for newly-built volumes

Difference in ceiling height old and new

Second floor

93


Architecture

Gallery

Inner courtyard

94


Hans Maarten Wikkerink

Standard apartment

Split level special

Model master plan

Image caption

Triplex loft

Model building

Western facade

95


Architecture

Murk Wymenga Nesting in the Rocky Urban Landscape A biodiverse guest accommodation

As an inhabitant of Amsterdam, I miss the engagement with nature in my immediate environment like I had when I grew up in Friesland. The swallows that return under the eaves each year, the smell of the seasons from the open window or the sounds of the house resisting a violent storm. One is more inclined to see the natural wilderness as a problem in the city rather than something valuable. However, this ‘nature’ provides us with the basic necessities of life and could provide an answer for typical urban problems like peak rainfall, air pollution or mental stress. The diversity of natural species that settle in an area says a lot about the quality of life that is prevalent there. This biodiversity should also, therefore, be a crucial component of a better life in the increasingly busy city. This graduation project is a search for a way in which the architecture of the urban landscape could be much more welcoming for the natural wilderness in order to be able to profit from each other’s presence as much as possible. The design of a guest accommodation for people, urban plant species and animal species together illustrates the opportunities and a strategy with which a building in the city could develop into a communal environment.

Graduation date 29 08 2016

96

Commission members Jan-Richard Kikkert (mentor) Machiel Spaan Dingeman Deijs

Additional members for the examination Marcel van der Lubbe Ira Koers


Murk Wymenga

97


Architecture

Amsterdam as rocky landscape

Biodiversiteit amsterdam

Biodiversiteit Oosterpark:

konijnen

konijnen

vossen

vossen

bijen en vlinders

bijen en vlinders

halsbandparkiet

halsbandparkiet

huismus

huismus bosuil

biodiversity in Amsterdam

bosuil

gierzwaluw

gierzwaluw

grote bonte specht

grote bonte specht

slechtvalk

slechtvalk

vleermuizen

vleermuizen

boerenzwaluw

boerenzwaluw

spreeuw

spreeuw

merel

merel

biodiversity around the Oosterpark

Mauritskade

Tropenmuseum

Linneausstraat

Tropen Hotel

Doubling Oosterpark: buildings become part of the park, including the Tropen Hotel not designed with that in mind

98


Murk Wymenga

Ground floor

Eastern side, ground floor, entrance

4th floor

Southern side, 4th floor, guest accommodation

9th floor

Eastern side, 9th floor, bathroom

11th floor

10th floor, roof landscape

99


0

Architecture noord

oost 12

west

zuid scholekster

+ aarde & granulaat

+ aarde & granulaat muisjesmos

+ granulaat + granulaat

11 wolfspoot

muurpeper

kronkelbladmos

+ aarde

muursla

+ zuurtegraad ph >7

eikvaren

bonte specht

straatliefde moederskruid

+ aarde & granulaat

+ zuurtegraad ph >7

groene specht

dikkopmos + aarde

+ houtblokken

8

+ aarde & granulaat

slechtvalk

torenvalk

klein graskruid

9

muurleeuwenbek

+ aarde & granulaat

muurpeper

10

+ aarde

driehoekmos

muurvaren

zwarte rotsmos

+ aarde

7

halsband parkiet

+ aarde

+ zuurtegraad ph >7 steenbeekvaren

spreeuw

6

mannetjes varen

+ aarde

+ zuurtegraad ph >7

merel stekelvaren

dooiermos

+ fruit afval & aarde

+ aarde & houtsnippers

landkaartmos + kalk

5

tongvaren

schubvaren

eikvaren

+ zuurtegraad ph >7 + houtsnippers

huiszwaluw muurvaren laatvlieger

+ zuurtegraad ph >7

4

gierzwaluw

baardvleermuis

mus + aarde + fruit afval & aarde

steenuil

koolmees

3

grootoorvleermuis

kerkuil

baardvleermuis

dwergvleermuis

pimpelmees

grootoorvleermuis

+ fruit afval & aarde bosuil

2

dwergvleermuis

+ fruit & aarde

+ grof granulaat & aarde

1

+ snoeiafval

0

+ snoeiafval

+ snoeiafval + aarde citroenvlinder

groentje

hommels wespen

wormen

+ aarde konijn

mieren

muis

+ aarde

egel egel

dagpauwoog

noord

oost

konijn

ijsvogel

muis

west

zuid

muisjesmos

clematis

blauwe regen

blauwe regen

jasmijn

dooiermos wilde wingerd

klimop

vijg

klimop driehoekmos

klimhortesia

klimop

klimhortesia

bosrank

landkaartmos

druif huisspin

blauwe regen

klimop

kamperfoelie

langpootspin

wilde wingerd kiwi kamperfoelie

braam klimop

- filter geluid en lucht linneaustraat -zichtbaar maken seizoen: verkleuring

- privacy voor Tropenmuseum -filteren lucht en geluid

druif

- filter harde wind: groen blijvend - communicatief: bloeien, geurend: verschillende seizoenen

- eetbaar: vruchtdragend - filter zon en harde wind: groen blijvend

Orientation-specific new facades and recesses in the existing building, aimed at the species that like to nest at these locations and the circumstances under which they do this.

2150+

2150+

Ground floor, eastern side, flower-filled courtyard

4th floor, southern side, camp bed

10th floor, southern side, four-poster bed

9th floor, western side, falcon ledge

100

libelle

oeverzwaluw


Murk Wymenga

10th floor, western side, recess

Southern facade: with recess and new ‘soil layers’

101


Architecture

Michiel Zegers Domus Botanicus Habitat introvert

Domus Botanicus is about sensory architecture. Connecting human beings with the universe in which they live once again. The reflection of the clouds on glassy water on windless days or, conversely, the dancing restlessness of the waves that seem to want to escape the water in strong winds. The dancing of the reeds. Green and full of resistance in the summer, brown and flexible in the winter. The low winter sun, the clear blue sky, tomorrow the weather will be beautiful, but tonight it will definitely be cold again. ‘The great challenge for architects is the re-sensualization, re-mythologization and re-poetization of the human domicile.’ This quote from an article by Juhani Pallasma from 2000 is the essence of my graduation project. Every decision and step taken can be traced back to this. The quote is the essence, because it appeals to that which is immaterial. It is not only about the facts of architecture, but also about its consequences. That it is not only a third skin of our bodily functions, but that it is also a materialisation of our imagination, memory and our intellect. The sensualization concerns the physical consequences of architecture. The stimulation of the senses. Making one feel what is hard and soft. The creation of a sense of security, or the glimpse of infinity instead. The shelter of a low ceiling, the sky that provides a high space. From a cold bedroom to a warm kitchen via a breath of wind and fresh air. Mythologization concerns the immaterial. Myths are stories that forge our awareness of who we are, how we ended up here and how we fit in the world around us. Stories full of symbolism and metaphors about humankind and the cosmos. Telling a story with architecture that can conjure up a world that could be ours. A world of contrasts and contradictions. The house can also be interpreted as a sequence of transitions, where the stillness and quickening of time are made tangible. Appealing to the associative power of humankind. The poetry stems from playing with the ingredients and hierarchy of architecture. The domus (home) as a poem in which details sometimes play the lead role and the main aspects serve the minor elements. A door is a door, but it can also be a passageway, or an opening. The difference between a casement and a window. A wall that borders or actually leads. Walls and spaces determine the form of the domus, the form not the walls and the spaces. The importance of levels of scale are interlinked. This graduation project was a quest for the sensitization of architecture. Making the awareness of time tangible by stimulating the senses. Connecting with the here and now. Graduation date 30 08 2016

102

Commission members Jan-Richard Kikkert (mentor) Marlies Boterman Bruno Vermeersch

Additional members for the examination Elsbeth Falk Ira Koers


Michiel Zegers

The great challenge for architects is the re-sensualization, re-mythologization, and re-poetization of the human domicile

Juhani Pallasmaa

103


Architecture

104


Michiel Zegers

105


Architecture

Making Architecture

+ 1360

+ 1360

+ 400

+ 400

+ 400

+ 600

+ 400

+ 600

+ 800 + 400

0

+ 800

+ 600

+ 400

0

+ 400

Textures

+ 400

0

1:100

1:100

106

1:100


Michiel Zegers

Diagram extroverted / introverted

Diagram programme organisation

Diagram climate zoning

Diagram floor plan

107


Arjan Klok Head of Urbanism Department


Cities for all and everything This year’s graduates, whether they graduated in architecture, landscape architecture or urbanism, are demonstrating how they see the city as their reference and habitat. Neighbourhoods improved The revival of the neighbourhood as an all-inclusive living environment seems to be the underlying goal. Working, living and logistics are not seen as a problematic combination anymore. Death, mourning, burial and justice, are reintroduced as a prominent part of urban life. Abandoned churches are repositioned in the urban tissue, organising the neighbourhood and gaining new significance. Themes like food, nature and ecology can be integrated into an urban context in exciting new ways. ‘Normal’ middle class families are aided in realizing their ideal urban existence. The graduates have also demonstrated, in a non-European context, how neighbourhoods can be pleasant, and even proud living environments for an optimal mix of social and economic classes, through typological interventions and innovation, as well as through serious consideration of financial constraints. The modernist dogma of zoning, and separating functions and users, seems to be dead and buried. Reintegrating, connecting and combining is the new mindset and likely to remain that way. Urbanism by all Due to the commitment of the current young generation of design professionals, not only the offspring from the Academys’ community, a broad spectrum of proposals to improve the city have been developed in recent years. In addition to urbanism, all disciplines, whether that be planning, landscape architecture, architecture, sociology, photography, or arts and culture, are developing proposals and programmes aimed at improving the city: to diversify it, to resocialise it, to revitalise it, to explicate it and to resensitise it. The challenge for the ‘urbanist-by-profession’ will be to capture, channel, steer, stimulate, breed, cherish, combine, coach and realize all these great ideas to create comprehensive and all-inclusive, as well as great, grand, pleasant and pleasing, cities. 109


Through being great inspirers, motivators and integrators of passions and interests, urbanists can play a key role in the development of the urban environment. The future of urbanism is bright A couple of years ago – during the economic crisis – the future of urbanism was under discussion. The belief in city development ‘by design’ was at an all-time low and the recognition of designers’ added value was absent. In recent years, the Academy’s new generations have taken up the challenge of bending all these cynical opinions in the opposite direction. Their message is: the city and urban life is worth working on, development towards a better solution is always possible with or without money, design thinking can revitalise and improve the city, and urbanists can lead the way. The production of urbanism graduation projects seems to be low this year, but will explode in the coming years. Six new young urbanists are expected to present their projects and positions in the 2017 catalogue, and this is expected to rise to 12, or maybe more, urbanists in 2018. A vast and varied new generation is rising, and much can be expected of them. The future of urbanism is bright!

110


Urbanism

Stephan Sliepenbeek The Inclusive City A transformation strategy to create a vibrant living and production cluster in the metropolitan region of Amsterdam

The metropolitan region of Amsterdam is a resilient organism. It has always reacted to trends and movements within the social, political and spatial domain. Now and in the future, the region will be able to find answers to new developments. But not without the help of visions that give direction to trends that will shape the city’s future. One of the main qualities is the diversity of dynamics and interdependence of different systems. A guarantee of this diversity and cross-fertilization is under pressure. With the advent of the industrial revolution, production began moving outside the city. This was caused by the inconvenience of noise and odour and scale enlargement of production. During the Modernist period, with its segregation of functions , this made the mixture between producing and living even more difficult in the same environment. Add to that the enormous proliferation of rules of the past 20 years and you can conclude that producing has become virtually impossible in urban (residential) environments. The corresponding daily dynamics were largely replaced by retail, hospitality, social services and partly by functions related to leisure activities. However, in recent years we have seen a change, which was partly caused by the financial crisis. Due to the rise of the Internet, the new economic reality in which we can not count on big growth figures, scarcity and rising prices of raw materials, retail is disappearing from the streets. Neighbourhoods are becoming even more mono-functional. The corresponding dynamics, safety and socio-binding factors disappear. Another phenomenon is the high vacancy rate of office buildings. As a result of previous overproduction, the new way of working and the changing of services, many office buildings are vacant. Looking towards the future, these buildings will no longer be used in the traditional way. The geographic positioning is often concentrated around regional public transport hubs, the programme is mono-functional and the spacial quality of the area is poor. In response to globalisation and the associated products that lack identity and are purely focused on maximising profit, people are looking for alternatives. Local products are gaining popularity. At the same time, a revaluation of the arts and crafts is taking place. Connecting these developments offers the opportunity to create a ‘Manufacturing Axis’ along the ‘A10 West’ ring road in Amsterdam. This thesis proposes a transformation strategy for the area south of Lelylaan. This transformation will revitalise the area, connect it to the existing city and result into a new vibrant cluster where living and working are combined and (big) infrastructure becomes a quality for the city instead of a burden. This project will contribute to the future vitality and diversity of the metropolitan region of Amsterdam.

Graduation date 01 02 2016

112

Commission members Eric Frijters (mentor) Jeroen Geurst Maurits de Hoog

Additional members for the examination Pieter Jannink Kirsten van den Berg


Stephan Sliepenbeek

Concept building block

Gate building

Public square Bow street max. building height. 25 m

Opening in facade

Patio Square at the street

Deck with public garden Patio Inner street Public square

Inner sqaure Gate building

Bow street max. building height. 25 m Street max. building height. 20 m Deck with public square Gate building

Opening in facade

WERKEN WERKEN

WERKEN

90 80 70 60

GSI

WONEN

GSI

50 40 30 20 10

OSR

WONEN

90

80

70

60

50

40

30

20

0,1

10

0,2

0,3

0,4

OSR

GSI

WERKEN WERKEN

1

GSI

Minimum Maximum Possible ratios building block

WONEN

2 OSR

GSI

New

with existing building

with big infrastructure

OSR OSR

Functions and density building block

Building block, new, with existing buildings and with big infrastructure

Model building blocks scale 1:200

113


Urbanism Ring Noord

NDSM

Globalisation

Haven

Alkmaar

Science Park

Hilversum

Erasmus park

Sloterdijk

Housing occupancy

Start Up campus

Overhoeks

Population growth

City centre Vondelpark

Circular economy

Utrecht

Rembrandt park

Westerpark

Utrecht

South Axes/ RAI Share economy

AMC

Arena

Sloterpark

Housing stock Haarlem Nieuwe meer Manufacturing industry

Haarlem

Housing occupancy

Amsterdamse Bos

Manufacturing industry

Schiphol

2013 2025 2040

Schiphol

Harbour

Continuing the city

Hierarchy streetplan

Big east /west radial street

114

Den Haag

South Axis

Introducing grid

East / west radial streets

Small east west adial streets and north / south loop streets

Culture and recreation parc at both sides of the “Schinkel”

North / south loop streets

“Completing the grid” streets

Streets completing the grid

Streets inside building block


Stephan Sliepenbeek

Building block will be devided in plots with measurements of 40 X 40 meters with intersection streets of 15 meters

3 unbuild spaces inside building block 1 square at section inner streets 1 square at the edge of the building block

Rules: Intersection of the building block

Rules: Open space building block

15 meter zone built 10 meter zone unbuilt

Roads

Build versus open space

Buildings

Rules: Building heights outer shell building block

- building height maximum 15 meters - maximum with of building 40 meters - outer walls 20 % minimum - difference in alignmet allowed - roofs have a function or are green

built unbuilt

Rules: Zoning outer shell building block

- building height variates between 20 and 30 meters due hierarchy streets - maximum with of building 40 meters

Rules: Buildings inside building blocks

Water structure

Green and squares

Birds eye view towards Amsterdam Canal belt

115


Urbanism

Existing situation

Master plan

116

Phase 1

Phase 2

Phase 3

Phase 4


Stephan Sliepenbeek

Big radial street

Inside building block

Inside building block

117


Maike van Stiphout Head of Landscape Architecture Department


The landscape erased The countryside is shrinking and the cities are growing. As a result of both developments, the landscape that was made with human hands over the course of 2,000 years is being erased. The landscape around the cities is being developed and nature is taking over once again in the shrinking areas. The designer is a prophet who is able to visualise possible futures on the basis of thorough research and creativity. That has yielded three inspiring predictions for the future. The graduates predict that new landowners will rise who are strongly connected to the city. The agricultural activities will be combined with providing entertainment for the modern city dweller with money and free time. According to them, the revival will go hand in hand with a transformation of agriculture, crops, methods of production, owners and organisational forms. And that will produce beautiful design interventions. The agricultural area will be both a source of food production and a recreation park. The abandoned tar sands of Canada will be returned to the charismatic megafauna: oxen, cranes and deer. In this case, it will not be the farmers, but the megafauna who preserve the landscape shaped by human hands and attract recreational users. Dutch landscape architecture stemmed from creating agricultural land where there was nature, from designing polders and reclaiming land. And the transformations were uncompromising. The longest straight line was the best design. Now, we are faced with the task of shaping the landscape once again, but times have changed. We no longer want to break with the past, but instead connect with it. We cherish the history of the landscape, as a result of which more must be preserved. The nature of the question has become restoration instead of new developments. And that requires a lot of creativity, knowledge and flexibility from the designer. It is right that the landscape architects from the Academy, with their varied backgrounds, view this as their workspace.

119


Landscape Architecture

Astrid Bennink The Small Economy Landscape

The manufacturing industry as motor for landscape development

Assignment Many Southern European regions are in a deep crisis, both ecologically and economically. In those places where agriculture was the only means of existence, all hope seems to have vanished. People are moving to the city and are abandoning rural areas. The Italian coastal region Le Marche has unique origins with a small-scale, agricultural landscape that was cultivated intensively by the inhabitants. Fruit, olives, cereals and vegetables were grown together in strips. Traces of the old cultural landscape are still clearly visible, such as the structure of old country roads and historic farms on foothills. With the disappearance of the age-old mezzadria sharecropping system, things have changed. Agricultural companies are growing substantially every year, while at the same time they are still doing a lot as in the past. The reality is becoming increasingly evident: empty houses and the grave consequences of erosion are clearly visible. There is a lack of cohesion between old and new. If the current trends continue and no clear future prospects for the landscape are created, the value of the region will decrease even further. Opportunities In Le Marche, the manufacturing industry is an important part of the local economy. There is global demand for distinctive (quality) products, such as hand-made shoes or musical instruments. This manufacturing industry consists of family companies of various sizes and has been traditionally intertwined with the agricultural industry. Individual family households formed closed economies, in which the family members made almost everything - from food to clothes to furniture - themselves. Tradition and craftsmanship emerged in the countryside. The connection with the land has remained intact due to unchanged types of ownership. That means that a strikingly large amount of young people are engaged in (sustainable) agriculture, as opposed to their parents who - due to stories about poverty - were actually opposed to the farming life. The project In this graduation project, the active, local manufacturing industry is deployed to put the landscape into use (once again). In addition, I see the increasing interest in sustainable agriculture among the younger generation as the motor that will set those new developments in motion. Through directing the existing forces and processes, a vibrant and future-proof region can emerge within decades that also offers recreational prospects, and which will also see the return of the natural diversity. A region that can be seen as an example instead of lagging behind. The small economy landscape is a development strategy that avoids the impending demise of the landscape and instead explores its opportunities. Not so much through the arrival of newcomers, but by telling the story behind the landscape. And by utilising the strengths of the people and the local economy.

Graduation date 07 06 2016

120

Commission members Karen de Groot (mentor) Harro de Jong Silvia Lupini

Additional members for the examination Mirjam Koevoet Saline Verhoeven


Astrid Bennink

PRODUCTION DISTRICTS IN LE MARCHE

clothing, textile wooden furniture leather, shoes mechanics musical instruments

45

km

121


Landscape Architecture

The landscape structure in the past, now and in the future

improve the accessibility of the

repair broken

lanes

banks

combat erosion

connect companies through landscape

The traditional casa colonica is the centrepiece of the landscape development

122

S

M

freelancers / self-employed people

collectives / start-ups

AGRICULTURAL SECTOR

reinforce historic country

MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY SECTOR

region

The players / users

companies that aim for quality improvement

L

large companies

large-scale companies


Astrid Bennink

1

3

2 4

5

Example elaboration development property

2 1

3

4 5

The five brick structures

1. The hybrid property

2. Strong rural network

B

A=B B=A

A

3. Terrace farming

4. The multifunctional planting structure

5. The adventurous stream valley

123


Landscape Architecture

fruit trees sandy path recreational use Vitis

Olea europaea

Malus domestica

Pyrus

Prunus persica

Prunus domestica L.

Prunus avium L.

Prunus armeniaca L.

Prunus dulcis

Ficus carica L.

Juglans regia

Morus L.

Prunus avium L.

Olea europaea

Malus domestica

low crops

terrace border (brick)

ap p ro

x. 3 m

Accessible small-scale farming Two-sided planting at the highest point of the road Species include: - Morus alba - Prunus - Olea

Verges for the reinforcement of the road

Shadow

ap pr ox

. 7. 5 m Morus L.

Inviting country roads

Species include: - Quercus pubescens - Quercus ilex - Ostrya carpinifolia - Ulmus minor - Fraxinus ornus - Acer campestre - Spartium junceum - Crataegus monogina

Sandy path

Steep edge 1:1

app rox . 6 me tre s

The multifunctional green structure

124

Fraxinus ornus

Acer campestre

Spartium junceum

Crataegus monogina

Quercus pubescens (roverella)

Quercus ilex (leccio)

Ostria carpinifolia

Ulmus minor


Astrid Bennink

The new landscape structure

Maintenance path / walking route

White road crosses the valley

Stream valley

In repairing the stream valley, initial attention will be paid to crossings with roads and paths

125


Landscape Architecture

Esther Brun MIN(e)Dscape

The transformation of Canada’s future industrial heritage

MIN(e)Dscape offers a strategy for the reclamation of the oil sand mining landscape in the north of Alberta, Canada. The main objective of the strategy is the preservation of Canada’s future industrial heritage by means of transformation of the landscape into nature with significant ecological value and diversity. The strategy proves the expediency of the mining landscape as a proficient base for nature development. MIN(e)Dscape is founded on two pillars, Culture and Nature, merged together in an overall framework. The cultural frame is focused on education, information and the experience of the mining landscape. The current image of the oil sands is extremely negative due to the impact of the industry on nature, the climate and the landscape. This negative image is mainly based on the campaigns of environmental organisations and is not based on personal experience. My assumption is that by increasing the accessibility and knowledge of the landscape the greater public will attain a different connection with the landscape. As a old Dutch saying goes: ‘unknown, unloved’. The Cultural Frame consists of three elements: the (already existing) Oil Sand Discovery Centre in Fort.McMurray, de ‘Drilling Tower’ look-outs and the ‘Timeless Quarry’ museum park with educational route ‘Timeline’. At the discovery centre, the public will learn all about the theoretical side of the oil sand mining process, the emergence and discovery of the material and of course existing reclamation methods. The ‘Drilling Towers’ are introduced to let visitors become acquainted with the landscape. It is a network of 13 look-outs, strategically placed within the area. From each lookout, a different stage of the mining landscape can be witnessed. This gives you the opportunity to observe the theory becoming reality and observe the transformation of the landscape. ‘Timeless Quarry’ museum park offers a view into the future. The park is situated in an old open pit mine and showcases all the possible reclamation landscapes from the start up to the state after natural transformation. The park also provides the opportunity to experience the extreme scale and size of the mining landscape from a human perspective. In summary, the cultural framework will introduce the public to all aspects of the oil sand industry and show the magnificence of the mining landscape and the opportunities it provides for the future. The Natural Frame focuses on the future by preserving parts of the existing boreal landscape in the present day. By maintaining a zone of old growth boreal forest, a life seed bank will be secured for the pollination of adjacent reclamation sites in the future. The Natural Frame also incorporates a ecological corridor that can be used by the highly endangered Woodland Caribou amongst others. The completion of the frame is focused on the transformation of the former mining landscape into nature, specifically designed for three target species which are: the woodland caribou, the wood buffalo and the whooping crane. All of these animals are endangered or affected by the oil sand industry. This results in also three different landscape typologies native to the area; mixed forest, open plains of grasses and sedges and wetlands. These nature typologies will be set on the mining topography. In this way, each characteristic element of the mining landscape will transform into its own new natural landscape. The open pit is provides an eloquent base for the open grass fields, the overburden hills will transform into mixed forests and the tailing ponds offer a sufficient topographical base for the transformation into secluded wetlands. The remaining infrastructure and building sites will be allocated to either open plains or mixed forest, according to their location within the total area. In this way the MIN(e)Dscape strategy and design presents an alternative to traditional reclamation methods that erase the typical mining landscape and thereby the future industrial heritage of Canada. Implementing the MIN(e)Dscape strategy will involve people with the industry and the landscape in particular; slowly conquering a place in society and culture, and hopefully also their hearts. Graduation date 30 06 2016

126

Commission members Gloria Font (mentor) Mirjam Koevoet Rik de Visser

Additional members for the examination Rob de Leeuw Berdie Olthof


Esther Brun

127


Landscape Architecture Canada

Area where oil sand can be mined using open pit method; 4,750km2. In comparison the Provice of Gelderland measures: 4,975km2.

Impression of the oil sand mining landscape, nearly 750km2 has already been mined. Context.

before

Boreal landscape; micro topography, very wet soil profile during

Mining landscape

during

after

during

after

Traditionally reclaimed landscape

Concept: Now/During Active Mining Create the initial framework of broadend boundaries for the cultural and natural framework. Future/After Active Mining Nature development based on typical mining topography and characteristic elements.

Vision MIN(e)Dscape; preservation of the characteristic topography and elements of the mining landscape

basic frame -100 mtr wide START

TRANSFORMATION BY NATURE

overburden = mixed forest minimum width to keep dark core of 20 m due to edge effect.

Basic frame 100m wide: • life seed bank; pollination of adjacent reclaimed landscape • during mining; shelter for small animals

elements of the mining landscape: • overburden • open pit • tailing pond

open-pit = grass & sedges

open pit becomes lake/wetland

tailing pond = wetland

wetland becomes wet forest

infra = grass & sedges/mixed forest

new landscape Ecological corridor min 500m wide: • preserves habitat of woodland caribou for the future when the mined landscape is being reclaimed • provides connection between adjacing habitats

transformed landscape

Rules for transformation of the characteristic mining elements and landscape

Natural Framework

Reclaimed landscape - start

128

Mixed forest - habitat woodland caribou

Wetland - habitat whooping crane

Grass and sedges- habitat wood buffalo


Esther Brun Oil Sand Discovery Centre - Suncore Tour - Mining Giants; educational fascilities already available = theory and proces 8. 55 KM 7. 48 KM

9. 55 KM

MINING GIANTS

6. 65 KM

10. 48 KM

5. 60 KM

4. 30 KM

3. 35 KM

11. 38 KM

12. 28 KM

Cultural frame: • education • experience • research • provide acces • no more secrets • love for the landscape

MIN(e)Dscape - ‘Drilling Tower’- look out- see the actual mining landscape transform

13. 15 KM

2. 20 KM

14. 20 KM

1. 15 KM

DISCOVERY CENTRE

N Location of ‘Drilling Towers’ within the Cultural frame

Cultural Framework; 25 m zone added to the basic framework MIN(e)Dscape - ‘Timeless Quarry’- landscape museum; experience the size and scale of the landscape in a setting of reclaimed landscape of the future

Plan mixed forest

grass

wet grass

wet forest

wetland

lake

Impression of the ‘Timeless Quarry’ landscape museum

129


Landscape Architecture

Location of the path; narrowest point of the museum park - 1.3km

Inspiration for museum path

Concept; large metal tube that transforms in relation to the landscpae, open/enclosed, raised or embedded in the landscape. A long ‘silver snake’ that takes you on a journey through the museum park, showing all the aspect of the reclamation landscape.

section and plan of ‘Timeline’ museum route

Impression of ‘Timeline’ museum route; tree top look-out

Model

Section

Impression of ‘Timeline’ museum route; mixed forest landscape

Model

Section

Impression of ‘Timeline’ museum route; grass and sedges landscape

Model

Section

130


Esther Brun

Impression of ‘Timeline’ museum route; start of the route with parking and info pannels

Impression of ‘Timeline’ museum route; wet grass landscape

Model

Section

Impression of ‘Timeline’ museum route; wet forest landscape

Model

Section

Impression of ‘Timeline’ museum route; wetland landscape

Model

Section

Impression of ‘Timeline’ museum route; lake landscape

Model

Section

131


Landscape Architecture

Antoine Fourrier A Vegetable Garden for Paris Le Plateau de Saclay: designing with agriculture

In the last years, the urban sprawl phenomenon has particularly affected our peri-urban agricultural areas. Due to the growth of our cities and consequent strong demand for housing, farmland is disappearing more and more each year. This has become a source of growing social, ecological and cultural concern. The case of the peri-urban farmland of Saclay in France is a good example of this problem. Located on top of a plateau, Saclay is one of the largest agricultural areas within the outskirts of Paris. The area is part of the Grand Paris urban plan and will become the ‘French Silicon Valley’, a cluster of research and science, in the near future. This is a place of both agricultural and heritage significance. Despite their industrial practices, the farmers of Saclay has been seeking to get closer to the consumer. They have formed community-supported agriculture associations and are greatly appreciated by people. They have also been protesting against the urbanisation of their fertile lands with the support of public opinion. If people are keen to protect Saclay, it is because this place is a heritage landscape. Indeed, the water system of Saclay and its aqueduct used to provide water to the fountains of Versailles in days gone by. The ambition of this project is to transform Saclay into a meaningful agricultural landscape for the metropolis, instead of it being a building reserve. This project will investigate how fresh food production can be a driving force for peri-urban areas. Sustainable and intensive agriculture The future of farming begins with the landscape. We should use all aspects of the landscape to produce more and better food. Nowadays, a new kind of agriculture is being developed together with precision farming, agroecology, and high-tech farming techniques. These new technologies use all the aspects of the landscape to produce food in an optimum way, according to the climate, soil, water or topography of the place. This project develops a strategy to encourage the farmer to work together with the scientific cluster Paris-Saclay and cooperate with the locals in order to produce fresh food. Consequently, instead of being a threat, the urban development of the new scientific cluster is a great opportunity for farmers through the sharing of knowledge and competences. Furthermore, the rationality and the functionality of the agriculture in Saclay can lead to a poetic landscape. Among other things, contemporary farming can create new landscapes and regenerate old structures. For example, clumps of trees can grow in the corners not accessible by automated agricultural machinery, in evocation of wood once used for hunting. Moreover, this wood can be used for other agricultural purposes (mulching, animal feed, etc.). Typical tree alignments from the 17th century can also be brought back with a new agricultural and recreational infrastructure. Finally, the old water system can be used for high-tech aquaponic farming or for more traditional watercress and snail farming. New connections are proposed between the villages and the metropolis. The future metro station Paris-Saclay can be a great location for an agro-logistic hub. Here, people can buy fresh products and see how food is produced and processed. Saclay has remained a curiosity in the French landscape due to its innovative water system from the 18th century. Tomorrow, the technology of the 21st century will transform this place again. This technological revolution will also result in a landscape revolution. Saclay will shift from a monotonous, large-scale landscape to a deeply diverse and subtle landscape. Agriculture can become highly meaningful for the metropolis by connecting the farmers and the people with the beauty of an innovative agricultural landscape. Graduation date 06 07 2016

132

Commission members Ruut van Paridon Gianluca Tramutola Jana Crepon

Additional members for the examination Harm Veenenbos Niké van Keulen


Antoine Fourrier

133


Landscape Architecture FISH

BEETS

CHICKEN

THEA

COCONUTS SUGAR

CHICKEN

CACAO COFFEE

TEA SUGAR

SUGAR

BANANA

APPLE PEARS

ORANGES

ORANGE APPLE

SHEEP

DAIRY PRODUCT KIWI APPLE

GRAPES

ONION

COFFEE

CACAO

SUNFLOWER

BEAN ORANGE SOY

STRAWBERRIES

OIL BEEF

COFFEE

SUGAR

PEANUT

THEA

COFFEE

CABBAGE

SOY BEAN

PEANUT

TEA

PEPPER

COFFEE

APPLE

MANGO

RICE

THEA

TEA FRENCH BEANS

CITRUS CASHEWS

TEA COFFEE MAIZE

COCOA

PORK

CHICKEN

FISH

COFFEE

CACAO

FRENCH BEANS

COFFEE

COFFEE

COFFEE

OIL CACAO

COFFEE

CACAO

MANGO

COFFEE CACAO

ORANGE

COFFEECOFFEE

BERRIES BERRIES COFFEE COFFEE

CABBAGE CHICKEN POTATO RICE ONION CABBAGE PORK CHICKEN ONION

FISH

WHEAT

MELON

GRAPE

KIWI

BEEF

WHEAT CORN MILK PRODUCTS

OAT WHEAT

CARROTS

SUNFLOWER OIL WATER MELON STRAW STRAWDATE FIG

CACAO

OAT

POTATO

WHEAT RYE POTATO WHEAT

BANANA MILK

MANGO

CACAO COFFEE

CABBAGE

CORN APPLES

VODKA

BARLEY

POTATO

FISH

CITRUS

CACAO

CACAO

MILK

COFFEE

CACAO

COFFEE

EGGS

CACAO

BANANA

COFFEE ASPERGE

CHICKEN

CACAO

KIWI

FENCH BEANS

FENCH BEANS

ORANGES

FISH

SUGAR CACAO

WINE

DATE

FISH

COFFEE

BANANA

Location of Saclay

KIWI

SUGAR

BANANA

Saclay

FRENCH BEANS

SUGAR

TOMATOES

SUGAR

OAT RYE SUNFLOWER OAT

APPLE EGGS MILK BEEF

LETTUCE

ORANGE

COFFEE

Versailles

CUCUMBER

CORN BARLEY CABBAGE

LETTUCE MILK CARROTS WHEAT TOMATO PORK CARROTS BARLEY

PORK

OAT

ORANGES

APPLE

MILK

WHEAT STRAWBERRIES

Paris

MILK

FISH

FISH POTATO

CORN BEEF BARLEY MILK

An unsustainable food system - where does our food come from? Marshlands

Paris

Se

FISH PRODUCTS

MILK

FISH SHELLFISH MAPLE SYRUP SOY

Versailles

ine

Se

1300

Fresh food production

Defence line 1814-1870

ine

Se

Saclay Saclay

Saclay

18th century

20th century

Fresh food production

Se

ine

ine

Saclay

Today

Paris grew in tandem with its agriculture

Ditch 1

Underground aqueduct

2

Underground aqueduct

Lake of Saclay

3

1 Ditch

5 Versailles 4 Acqueduct of Buc

Yvette river

La Bièvre

Saclay, a heritage landscape: a landscape to provide water to the fountains of Versailles by using the swamps and the lakes of Saclay

Urban area Built-up area New metro line Water

Agriculture & research

Existing water New water Landscape structure Path along ditch Agri-infrastructure Historical tree alignment Fort Path Combined metro line & agri-infrastructure

A vision for Saclay: creating an attractive and diverse landscape through innovative agriculture

134

Aquaculture Wetland agriculture Fruit contour farming Fruit polyculture Tomatoes & cucurbitaceae polyculture Root crops & legumes contour farming Root crops, legumes & nuts contour farming Leaf vegetable polyculture Fields for research


Antoine Fourrier I - Conditions

II - Landscape framework

III - Farming typology

IV - Ownership

Polyculture

Big farm (more than 300ha)

Agroforestry

Medium farm (100 - 300ha)

Contour farming

Small farm (50 - 100ha)

Topography

Contour farming + agroforestry

Cooperative farming

Hydrometry

Niche farming

Municipality, Private & Science Cluster

°C

Climate Use

Cultural history

Water

Pedology

Nutrients

NO3 Landscape structure

Strategy and design principles

Silt contour farming: root crops and legumes

Silt poly culture: fruit & leaf vegetables, legumes

Silt poly culture: fruits & condiments

Clay contour farming: fruits

Sand Contour farming: root crops & nuts

Shallow waters: watercress & condiments

Lakes & ponds: fish & leaf vegetables

Wetland: sheep & amphibians

‘Foodscapes’ according to the different conditions of the landscape

Innovative agriculture generating a new landscape structure - Location: Orsigny area

135


Landscape Architecture

Farm entrance

Farmer route through the fields

A multifunctional farmer infrastructure

A diverse and attractive agricultural landscape - Location: North of Saclay village

A new water system for agricultural irrigation - Location: West side of Saclay Lake

A water structure upgraded for new use for recreational purposes - Location: Orsigny ditch

136


Antoine Fourrier

DGA thrusters trials, Military Base

Nature reserve

N118 motorway Rare connections Bird reserve to the landscape

An isolated landscape monument - Location: Lake of Saclay (existing)

Buc

Experimental fields

Aquaponic Farm entrance

Aquaculture

Tree alignment along new agricultural infrastructure

Route along the ditches Ditch for water storage & watercress culture

A productive water system - Location: Lake of Saclay (proposal)

Biochemistry

Enclaved farm

Experimental fields Seed research

Valley

Research centre

Farmer infrastructure

Guyancourt

Connection from the city to the research fields Connection to the farm

An enclave experimental field - Location: La Minière (existing)

An agri-research park - Location: La Minière (proposal)

New path ‘Designed by agriculture’

New tree clumps for wood production Fruit polyculture Contour farming Agriculture

Connection to the valley Vegetable polyculture

Modern and diverse agriculture - Location: Orsigny

137


Archiprix 2017 Nominations Madeleine Maaskant Director Amsterdam Academy of Architecture


The Archiprix is an annual prize for the best graduation work stemming from Dutch study programmes in the fields of architecture, urbanism and landscape architecture. Each of the 9 study programmes may submit a number of plans in proportion to the size of the school, which amounts to four nominations out of a total of 28 submissions in the case of the Academy. It is a prize that has already existed almost 40 years and can serve as an important step for the nominees, and obviously the winners in particular, at the beginning of their careers. The list of nominees and prizewinnners from the past four decades demonstrates that the Archiprix has been extremely successful at this. Many laureates have made their voices heard through leaving their mark on the city and the landscape with their unique realized designs or through playing an important role in the debate on architecture, urbanism and landscape architecture. This year once again, it has been a pleasant, but also difficult, task for the jury to select four plans from the graduation class of 2015-2016. On an overcast Sunday morning, the jury met at the Academy when the building had only just been opened; a jury which consisted this year of the heads of the study programmes, namely Jan-Richard Kikkert (Architecture), Arjan Klok (Urbanism) and Maike van Stiphout (Landscape Architecture). This jury was supplemented by Floris Alkemade – architect, professor of Architecture at this Academy and Chief Government Architect – and Madeleine Maaskant, director of the Academy and chair of the jury. The graduation plans were hanging throughout the entire building, as a part of a beautifully designed Graduation Show, and the ideas were represented and expressed through the use of panels, scale models, films, books and mock-ups; a masterpiece at the Academy of Architecture is literally a masterpiece! The jury walked through the exhibition, curious and concentrated, standing still at each plan in order to share their thoughts with each other about the quality, originality, chosen theme and the authenticity. The variety and richness of this graduation exhibition is impressive. In total, 18 graduation plans were assessed: 14 in architecture, 1 in urbanism and 3 in landscape architecture. After walking through exhibition, the jury retired to the boardroom in order to arrive at a final decision behind closed doors. All the plans were laid out on the table and considered once again, with the jury’s discussion focusing on the designs of: (in alphabetical order) Tjeerd Beemsterboer, Michael van Bergen, Bram van den Heuvel,

139


Archiprix 2017 Nominations

Kristina Petrauskaite, Ramon Scharff, Jasper Smits, Sweder Spanjer, Pim van Tol, Murk Wijmenga, Hans Maarten Wikkerink and Michiel Zeegers. During a following round, the assignment, and in particular the relevance and topicality of the assignment, was assessed. But also the interdisciplinarity, the development of a plan on various scale levels and the way in which research formed part of the entire process were aspects that played a role in the final verdict of the jury. The following 4 graduation projects were unanimously nominated for the Archiprix 2017 (in alphabetical order): Â Michael van Bergen New Life for the Dead This project demonstrates how we, as a society, can deal with death and burial in a modern way. The concept is a combined crematorium, above-ground cemetery and interactive meeting place. The jury noticed the richness of its spatial organisation and the tactility of the materials. And the jury respected the high level of the research, and the idea of incorporating the farewell ceremony of our beloved ones into the city. Ramon Scharff The House of the City In this project, the Royal Palace on Dam Square gets new public functions that are linked to functions from the past, thus becoming a House of the City once again. The former closed central location becomes a public place for the people and visitors of Amsterdam. The jury appreciated the high level of research that led to minimal but convincing interventions. Sweder Spanjer Forever Travelling With this project situated on the island of Terschelling, an accommodation is created where death and commemoration are united in one place. The jury was struck by the sensitive approach of such a loaded subject. The way the building connects to the landscape is very subtle and strong at the same time.

140


Archiprix 2017 Nominations

Hans Maarten Wikkerink Marcy Houses This project is a case study of social housing projects in New York City, featuring the Marcy Houses in the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighbourhood of Brooklyn. The project impressed the jury due to the smart approach of showing the potential of a neglected area, bringing new life to a dense neighbourhood through further densification. Audience Award Votes could be cast for the Audience Award once again this year. The winner of the Audience Award 2016 is Laura van de Pol, with the graduation project Urban Mangrove: how food ecosystems can revitalize cities. Laura van der Pol Urban Mangrove (P54)

141


Archiprix 2017 Nominations

Michael van Bergen New Life for the Dead (P24)

Ramon Scharff The House of the City (P66)

142


Archiprix 2017 Nominations

Sweder Spanjer Forever Travelling (P78)

Hans Maarten Wikkerink Marcy Houses (P90)

143


Colophon Amsterdam Academy of Architecture Waterlooplein 213, 1011 PG Amsterdam, The Netherlands T +31 (0)20 531 8218, info@bwk.ahk.nl, www.academyofarchitecture.nl Advisory Board Jan-Richard Kikkert, Maike van Stiphout, Arjan Klok, Madeleine Maaskant Editor-in-Chief Klaas de Jong Translation Richard Glass Text corrections Nik Berkouwer Social photography and models Inge Hoogland Graphic design Studio Sander Boon, Amsterdam Printing Giga Print, Almere Š 2016 Amsterdam Academy of Architecture


Amsterdam Academy of Architecture

Architects, urbanists and landscape architects learn the profession at the Amsterdam Academy of Architecture through an intensive combination of work and study. They work in small, partly interdisciplinary groups and are supervised by a select group of practising fellow professionals. There is a wide range of options within the programme so that students can put together their own trajectory and specialisation. With the inclusion of the course in Urbanism in 1957 and Landscape Architecture in 1972, the Academy is the only architecture school in the Netherlands to bring together the three spatial design disciplines under one roof. Some 350 guest tutors are involved in teaching every year. Each of them is a practising designer or a specific expert in his or her particular subject. The three heads of department also have design practices of their own in addition to their work for the Academy. This structure yields an enormous dynamism and energy and ensures that the courses remain closely linked to the current state of the discipline. The courses consist of projects, exercises and lectures. First-year and second-year students also engage in morphological studies. Students work on their own or in small groups. The design

projects form the backbone of the syllabus. On the basis of a specific design assignment, students develop knowledge, insight and skills. The exercises are focused on training in those skills that are essential for recognising and solving design problems, such as analytical techniques, knowledge of the repertoire, the use of materials, text analysis, and writing. Many of the exercises are linked to the design projects. The morphological studies concentrate on the making of spatial objects, with the emphasis on creative process and implementation. Students experiment with materials and media forms and gain experience in converting an idea into a creation. During the periods between the terms there are workshops, study trips in the Netherlands and abroad, and other activities. This is also the preferred moment for international exchange projects. The Academy regularly invites foreign students for the workshops and recruits wellknown designers from the Netherlands and further afield as tutors. Graduates from the Academy of Architecture are entitled to the following titles: Architect, Master of Science; Urbanist, Master of Science and Landscape Architect, Master of Science.

145


2015-2016 Graduation Projects features the work of students who earned their degree during the 2015-2016 academic year at the Amsterdam Academy of Architecture. The projects by the 19 Masters of Architecture, Urbanism and Landscape Architecture are introduced by visiting critic Floris Alkemade.

Amsterdam Academy of Architecture, Graduation Projects 2015-2016  
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