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V O L U M E T W E LV E · S P R I N G 2 019

EAST COAST DESIGN MEET THE BDC’S NEW E S TA B L I S H M E N T His & Hers: Pierre Frey & Bunny Williams ID Boston Travels: Shopping Magazine Street in New Orleans


L U X U R I O U S F I T T E D C A B I N E T RY F O R E V E RY R O O M BOSTON DESIGN CENTER SUITE 635 BOSTONINQUIRIES@PEACOCKHOME.COM (888) 889-8891 NEW YORK LONDON PEACOCKHOME.COM

CANNES

JAKARTA

CHICAGO

DALLAS

BOSTON

SAN FRANCISCO

GREENWICH

SHORT HILLS


V O L U M E T W E LV E · S P R I N G 2 019

IN THIS ISSUE 5

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A Message from

Dear Readers

michael phillips

chesie breen

new to the bookshelf

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18

21

His

Hers

pierre frey

bunny williams

east coast design

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Travel

Design

new orleans

nancy serafini

Bibliophile Boston

Design

Maker’s Guild

ginger lyons de neufville

D E S I G N · S T Y L E · C U LT U R E · C U I S I N E On the Cover · East Coast Design: Meet The Boston Design Center’s New Establishment · Page 21

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michael phillips

Editor-in-Chief Design Editor

chesie breen

caroline sholl

General Manager, Leasing & Partnerships Market Editor

kristan mclaughlin

©2014 Jamestown, L.P. All rights reserved.

Executive Editor

niamh o’maille | Coordinator lauren delorenzo

eric roth · jeff roberts imaging · josh gibson · michael j. lee mike casey, casey photography · nat rea photography

Contributing Photographers

Copy Editor Publisher

joanna boyle

kathy bush-dutton | Published by new england home · jamestown, l.p. To advertise, please email Jill Korff at jkorff@nehomemag.com.

IDBOSTONMAGAZINE.COM

ID BOSTON is the magazine of Boston Design Center, whose showrooms include: Ailanthus

Brunschwig & Fils

Contract

Key Office Interiors

Merida

Flynn Martin

Anees Furniture & Design

Carlisle Wide Plank Floors

DiscoverTile

KI

Osborne & Little

Scott Group Studio

Century Furniture

Downsview Kitchens

Paris Ceramics

Edgewater Gallery

Kravet Fabrics

STARK

ANN SACKS Ardente Group Artaic Baker Furniture

Charles Spada Christopher Peacock

Eric Haydel Farrow & Ball

Lee Jofa Linda Cabot Lindsey Adelman Studios

Phillip Jeffries PID Floors of Boston Porcelanosa

Blanche Field

Contract Sources

Boston Hardwood and Kitchen

Cowtan & Tout Craft & Caro

The Boston Shade Company / System 7

Creative Office Pavilion / Herman Miller

J.D. Staron

Market Stalls

JANUS et Cie

The Martin Group, Inc.

Scavolini Kitchen & Bath

The Bright Group

Design Within Reach

Jewett Farms + Co.

Masterpiece Framing

Schumacher / Patterson

Galerie d’Orsay Grand Rapids Furniture Company

Liz Roache M-Geough

Quadrille RADG Romo

ONE DESIGN CENTER PLACE, BOSTON, MA 02210

Scalamandré Steven King Decorative Carpets Studio 534 Theo Décor Tile Showcase Waterworks


THE BRIGHT GROUP E X P A N D E D N E W

L O C A T I O N

B O S T O N

C H I C A G O

D A L L A S

N E W

Y O R K ®

C O L L E C T I O N S ALTURA FURNITURE

FUSE LIGHTING

KNOWLTON BROTHERS

BRIGHT CHAIR

HELLMAN CHANG

MAXINE SNIDER

CHARLES LOOMIS

HH RUSEAU

SALGADO SAUCIER

ONE DESIGN CENTER PLACE

DENNIS AND LEEN

JIMECO FOR BRIGHT

TROSCAN

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DOUGLAS JENNINGS

JONATHAN BROWNING

TUELL & REYNOLDS

EVAN LEWIS

JOSEPH JEUP

WALLACE FINE MIRRORS

FORMATIONS

KAVANTE

BOSTON, MA 02210

T 617.345.8017

F 617.345.8019

WWW.THEBRIGHTGROUP.COM


A MESSAGE FROM JAMESTOWN PRESIDENT

MICHAEL PHILLIPS As part of the evolution of digital technology integration within our communities at the Innovation and Design Building (IDB) and Boston Design Center (BDC), we are excited to launch the BDC app. This new app will feature the 1,200 luxury product lines available through our 70 BDC showrooms, in addition to offering timely information on news and events. Last year we successfully launched the HqO tenant experience app, which has proven to be a valuable tool in creating an innovative ecosystem among tenants. The BDC app will provide a similar interactive platform within the BDC community. The Spring Market, themed “Women in Design,” presents a full calendar of events and features some of the brightest talents in the industry. We’re also pleased to report that, in an effort to continue our mission to create alliances with likeminded organizations, we’ve created sponsorship partnerships with Nantucket By Design benefitting the Nantucket Historical Association; Martha’s Vineyard Food & Wine Festival; Heading Home to Dinner; Design Leadership Network; and the Institute of Classical Architecture & Art, to name a few. These and other dynamic advancements continue to make the BDC New England’s premier, all-inclusive luxury resource for design professionals and enthusiasts. For all inquiries, please contact me at mphillips@idbostonmagazine.com.

Shop the Showrooms from BOSTO N D E S I G N C E N T E R

Michael Phillips President, Jamestown Executive Editor, ID BOSTON


MICHAEL J. LEE

introducing the Verellen Salon at Artefact Boston 1317 Washington Street, Boston, MA 857.350. 4397 1000 Pleasant Street, Belmont, MA 617.993.3347 info@ artefacthome.com artefacthome.com


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DEAR READERS

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As Mother’s Day approaches, I’m reminded of a photo shoot I did with my three daughters for Margot Shaw, the editor-inchief of Flower magazine, which has found new life in her latest book from Rizzoli, Living Floral: Entertaining and Decorating with Flowers. I love flowers and adore entertaining, but you may recall that I do not enjoy cooking. I’m a planner, so the joy for me is in the details of creating a guest list, designing an invitation, planning a menu, and laying a beautiful table. My very favorite part of entertaining, however, is welcoming people into our home.

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1 With my daughters: Virginia, Eliza, Margaret Ivy. 2 Each daughter has a different Tiffany & Co. silver pattern. 3 Our table set for Mother’s Day. 4 A table set by designer Bunny Williams. 5 A dramatic floral arrangement by designer Bunny Williams. 6 My East Hampton dining room. 7 Living Floral by Margot Shaw.

Increasingly, the world has become more casual, more relaxed, and geared towards easy solutions. Why make the effort to invite friends over when it’s easier to go out to a restaurant? For me, the answer is simple: I love my house, and my friends and family are worth the extra effort. As my friend Bunny Williams, whose book Love Affairs with Houses (Abrams) debuts this month, likes to say, “If something is worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” Working at the Boston Design Center constantly inspires me to make my house the best it can be. Sometimes good design really is about raising the bar and not settling for a quick fix. Like a well-planned party, good design is in the details and well worth the wait.

Chesie Breen Editor-in-Chief, ID BOSTON

Contact me: cbreen@idbostonmagazine.com Follow me on Instagram: @chesiebreen Follow the BDC on Instagram: @bostondesigncenter


BIBLIOPHILE BOSTON NEW TO THE BOOKSHELF


NOTES ON DECOR ETC. By Paul Fortune

British-born design legend Paul Fortune came to the States in the late seventies and built a career designing for clients like Sony, MGM, Virgin, Warner Bros., and CondĂŠ Nast, along with celebrated clients in film, fashion, and publishing in Los Angeles, New York, and Europe, including Marc Jacobs, Sofia Coppola, and David Fincher. Notes on Decor Etc. is not your typical book on interior design, but rather a ribald account of the life and path of a man who had worked as a cook, a graphic artist, an MTV music video art director, and even a night club owner before becoming an established designer. It is a wickedly funny chronicle that will make you rethink your lighting scheme, rearrange your furniture, and much, much more. Published by Rizzoli New York, 2018 www.rizzoliusa.com

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BIBLIOPHILE BOSTON


STEVEN GAMBREL: PERSPECTIVE By Steven Gambrel Photography by Eric Piasecki

Steven Gambrel disciples will be over the moon with his second tome, filled with projects ranging from his nineteenth-century townhouse in New York City’s West Village, to an estate in Zurich, to the luxurious Astor Suite in Manhattan’s Plaza Hotel. Each chapter reminds us why Gambrel is considered a master colorist, historical preservationist, and one of the most accomplished designers working today. Published by Rizzoli New York, 2018 www.rizzoliusa.com

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BIBLIOPHILE BOSTON


DISTINCTLY MODERN INTERIORS By Emily Summers

In her first book, AD 100 designer Emily Summers presents a range of inspiring work that beautifully defines and illustrates American modernism. Each project thoroughly proves that the interior should reflect the setting and demonstrates how to best combine fine art with design. Whether modernizing a traditional home or restoring an existing house, this book is sure to be a touchstone for modernism and minimalism devotees. Published by Rizzoli New York, 2019 www.rizzoliusa.com

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ELMS INTERIOR DESIGN MICHAEL J. LEE PHOTOGRAPHY

ENCHANTING ONLY CUMAR The preferred choice of designers, architects, developers, and discriminating homeowners, Cumar is New England’s preeminent source, fabricator and installer of the finest marble, granite, limestone, and exotic stones.

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BECAUSE YOU’RE NOT

a cornice, valance, drapery kind of person.

Lutron’s new Palladiom Shades feature a seamless and sophisticated bracket that hides all the wires, so you don’t have to. And we’re the only authorized window treatment company to offer them.

Back Bay Shutter (& S hade !) co. Inc. A DESIGNER’S BEST FRIEND.

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Museums are an endless source of inspiration. In Paris, the Musée des Arts Décoratifs is close to where I live, and they have great exhibitions. Right now, there is a Gio Ponti exhibit that is not to be missed. When I travel to other cities, I always try to make time to visit a local museum. I think it’s a must for people who work in a creative field such as ours.

HIS

PIERRE FREY

I have been Creative Director for the Boussac brand in our company for a few years now. You can directly see the influence of art in these collections. This year, the inspiration for the Imagine collection is from an obscure 1970s art movement called Supports/Surfaces. The free expression of the artists is completely inspiring. My favorite fabric from this year’s collection is called Fever. It is a celebration of the brush stroke in vivid colors.

The House of Pierre Frey was founded in France in 1935 and has remained a treasured family business representing superior quality, pristine design, and French heritage. Throughout its rich history, the house has drawn inspiration from eighteenth-century French design, contemporary art, and various world cultures. Today, Pierre Frey, grandson of the founder and eldest son of Patrick Frey, helps run this venerable textile company and acts as Creative Director for Boussac, acquired in 2004. Frey splits his time between Paris, New York, and his family retreat in Normandy.

About two years ago I purchased a country house in Normandy. I knew it would be a welcome break from life in Paris, but I didn’t realize quite how much we would love being in nature. The atmosphere is charming; the food is amazing. We always have lots of friends and family visiting. My wife and sons love to be there, too. The house has become like another member of the family. We miss it if we’re not able to visit for too long.

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We recently sat down with Frey to preview three boldly stunning collections from Pierre Frey, Boussac, and Braquenié that have the design world buzzing. “Collection Tribu” for Pierre Frey, inspired by South Africa, is teeming with boldly-colored geographic motifs that exude freedom of interpretation, playing off the rhythms and associations of contrasting colors. Jacquards, embroideries, and stripes intermingle in unexpected ways. “Collection Imagine” for Boussac conjures a 1970s vibe and was largely inspired by the Supports/Surfaces movement. The colors are deep, bright, and sensual with geometric patterns and prints inspired by abstract expressionism. “Collection Comptoir d’Orient” for Braquenié is a luxurious ode to exoticism inspired by eighteenth-century decorative arts. The collection is a virtual symphony of luscious silk embroideries, jacquards, woven textiles, and prints.

COLLECTION TRIBU Curtains: Zimbabwe in Tutti Frutti

COLLECTION IMAGINE Top: Janis in Exotique Middle: Jam in Arc-en-Ciel

COLLECTION COMPTOIR D’ORIENT Left: Kontori in Rose Right: Kalamkar in Petal

Right: Ziggy in Prune


HERS

BUNNY WILLIAMS Renowned designer and industry leader Bunny Williams has already accomplished so much in her legendary career that it’s hard to imagine what she could possibly do to turn heads next. Few people have contributed as much to the design industry as Williams, who is in the AD 100 Hall of Fame, the Interior Design magazine Hall of Fame, the ELLE DÉCOR A-List, and much more. She sits on the board of the Institute of Classical Architecture & Art and has received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the New York School of Interior Design. In the past year alone, she received the Groundbreaker Award from Housing Works and chaired the Kips Bay Decorator Show House and President’s Dinner for the sixth year. She still found time to design the living room at the Show House and fostered a new era for Kips Bay by chairing the launch of a sister Show House in Palm Beach. This month she releases a much-anticipated tome of new work, Love Affairs with Houses (Abrams). This spring, Williams will celebrate the 18th annual Trade Secrets Garden Show at her home in Falls Village, Connecticut, before traveling to Los Angeles to receive the first ever “Living Legends” award at La Cienega Design Quarter. Williams also designs and produces handcrafted furniture and accessories under Bunny Williams Home and has licensed collections with Ballard Designs, Century Furniture, Currey & Company, and Dash & Albert.

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1 Bunny’s garden in Falls Village, Connecticut. 2 Love Affairs with Houses by Bunny Williams. 3 A dining room in Southern Florida. 4 A detail from the Kips Bay Decorator Show House. 5 A weekend retreat on Long Island, New York.

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NOT YOUR AVERAGE BARGAIN. #BrooklynDesignDistrict

abc carpet + home outlet Design Within Reach Outlet Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams Outlet Restoration Hardware Outlet + many more industrycity.com/design-district


THE LIST 1 LIZ CAAN Liz Caan & Co. lizcaan.com @lizcaan

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2 MICHAEL CARTER Carter & Company mcarterandco.com @carterandcompany 3 NINA FARMER Nina Farmer Interiors ninafarmerinteriors.com @ninafarmerinteriors

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4 LEANDRA FREMONT-SMITH Leandra FremontSmith Interiors leandradesign.com @lfremontsmith 5 ERIC HAYDEL Eric Haydel Design erichaydel.com @erichaydellshowroom

EAST COAST DESIGN MEET THE BDC’S

6 VANI SAYEED Vani Sayeed Studios vanisayeedstudios.com @vanisayeedstudios

NEW ESTABLISHMENT

7 CECILIA WALKER Cecilia Walker Design ceciliavwalker.com @ceciliawalkerdesign

As editor of ID BOSTON, I’ve had the opportunity to personally get to know the brightest design talents in New England. What impresses me most about the group featured here is that each individual built a robust business early in their careers. These are not rising stars as much as they are the new establishment. They are the new guard fueling the industry and breathing energy into the Boston Design Center. They are wicked smart and adept at building a brand. They are talented, bold, stylish, fun, and committed to supporting the industry. Join us in saluting these creative, business-oriented designers who are defining the landscape of design not just here in New England, but nationwide.

8 TILTON FENWICK Anne Maxwell Foster & Suysel dePedro Cunningham tiltonfenwick.com @tiltonfenwick

So often we’re tasked with critiquing work. In each of these instances the work speaks for itself so we asked the designers to share their personal perspective.

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LIZ CAAN LIZ CAAN IS REVERED FOR HER BOLD USE OF COLOR, IRREVERENT STYLE, AND ABILITY TO BLEND EVERYTHING TOGETHER INTO SYMPHONIC DESIGN MASTERPIECES. “Great design is an exchange of ideas. When clients are engaged in the design process, it becomes a creative dialogue that is alive with possibilities, leading to fresh, unexpected, and individualized solutions. The end result is a beautiful home highly attuned to who you are and how you live.” – Liz Caan

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CAAN TAKES US INSIDE HER EVER-EVOLVING FAMILY HOME

words by liz caan · photography by eric roth This is our family home in Chestnut Hill. It’s more of an evolution than a re-decoration. My home is my laboratory, the place where I can be me, and play with the things I collect, and experiment with new treasures. I don’t have to answer to anyone except my wallet, and rarely have to compromise, thanks to a very accommodating family that embraces my ideas and puts up with my hammering and moving furniture around. I believe we should practice what we preach and that it’s important for a home to have a distinct personality that isn’t always so perfect. If it feels right, it probably is right and if it doesn’t feel right anymore, it should change.

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1 ENTRY The light fixture is by Urban Electric, the dining room rug is by Madeline Weinrib and the yellow dining chairs are by Schumacher. The pink ball lamps are by Joe Cariati in Los Angeles. The lampshades are custom from Blanche Field.

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2-3 LIVING ROOM In the living room, a zebra and mountain goat taxidermy hang on the gallery wall. This room has pieces we’ve inherited, pieces we’ve commissioned, and pieces I’ve purchased over the years. It’s stuffed to the gills, but every piece is something I love. The antique secretary has been turned into a bar; the curly lamb chairs in front of the fireplace are custom-made by Kevin McLaughlin; the camelback sofa is vintage and recovered in a Schumacher Gainsborough velvet. The grey hair on the hide stools is by Flair in New York City. The apple green lamps are by Christopher Spitzmiller. The gallery wall is filled with pieces I’ve acquired over the years, including the silver gilt frame from The Art of Antiquing, an amazing little shop in Round Pond, Maine. I have many works of art by Mary Maguire, and some special needlepoint pieces that Don Carney’s mother made from PATCH NYC. The wool and sisal rug is by Merida. 4-5 FAMILY ROOM The family room is where we build fires, watch television, and hang out. It was recently painted a deep blue; previously it was emerald green and before that it was light and bright. The ceiling is wallpapered in a Cole & Son Fornasetti paper. The yellow bunting tables are vintage Bungalow 5; the sofas are by Kevin McLaughlin; the ottoman is upholstered in a Schumacher Mohair and the matching chairs are Oly Studio in a Kirk Brummel fabric by Brunschwig & Fils. The emerald green stools are from Schumacher and are covered in an emerald green silk velvet. A vintage Swiss Objet poster by Peter Birkhäuser (circa 1943) hangs on the back wall above a comfortable loveseat. 6 BEDROOM This is my eldest son’s bedroom on the third floor, inspired by a room Mark Sikes did in a show house. My challenge was to conceal all of the quirky attic angles in the ceiling to make the room feel more cocoon-like, so we took a Romo buffalo check fabric in black and white, had it paper-backed, and applied it to the walls. The bedding is by Leontine Linens and the bed is made of black cane by CB2.

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LIZ CAAN

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DESIGNING A HOUSE TO REFLECT OUR CLIENTS’ PERSONALITIES

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words by liz caan · photography by eric roth This project is located just outside of Boston, and the clients were incredibly trusting. They allowed us the freedom to create a home that was reflective of their personalities—young, vibrant but down to earth, sporty, well read, and well traveled. They are adventurous, with busy and active children and pets, and they let us be adventurous as well. This lively house welcomes all with good quality finishes and furnishings to stand the test of time.

6 1 & 5 LIBRARY We worked with the firm Abeles & Associates Architects to custom design a two-story library for these well-read clients. We tried to keep the furnishings quiet to show off the architecture and the clients’ art collection. 2 ENTRY The historic home is a mix of old and new furnishings. The stair runner is Antelope by Stark. 3 LIVING ROOM In the living room, we kept the walls and floor neutral so the colors of the window treatments, fireplace surround, and selected furnishings would start to sing a little. Selective color distribution, per se. The lighting is vintage; the porter chairs are by Coup D’Etat in San Francisco; the coffee table is vintage and made of goatskin. The lamb stool is by Jean de Merry. 4 DINING ROOM The dining room, hand lacquered in a dark berry color, is one of my all-time favorites. The table is custom by East Groundworks and the lights and sconces are vintage. We custom designed the ceiling paper that was made by Porter Teleo to look like reflections of the vintage starburst lights. I love this moody and glam room. 6 FAMILY ROOM The family room mixes bold, bright colors with classic black and white. It’s a happy space connecting to the kitchen.

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MICHAEL CARTER IS NO STRANGER TO RECOGNITION FOR HIS STELLAR INTERIOR DESIGN WORK. HE WAS INDUCTED INTO THE NEW ENGLAND DESIGN HALL OF FAME IN 2016 AND HE RECENTLY RECEIVED HIS SECOND BULFINCH AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING INTERIOR DESIGN WORK. “I believe the design process is fundamentally about listening and respecting the client’s wishes. Above all, it must be a place you love to come home to. Our goal is to take all the worry and stress out of the creative process. We want the entire experience of realizing your dream home to be a joy.” - Michael Carter

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BROOKLINE words by michael carter · photography by michael j. lee These young and attractive Brookline clients sought me out because their previous designer was too trendy—I was both pleasantly surprised and very encouraged. They wanted a timeless look to complement the architect’s interpretation of a handsome Georgian revival home. They were completely fearless in terms of fully gutting and re-inventing an existing home. Neither did they shy from custom finishes and unique architectural details. The husband is the ultimate connoisseur and gravitated naturally to fine wine, cigars, art, and antiques. We designed a marvelous wine room with hand-cut stone walls (that he found!) and we all traveled to Atlanta—my favorite city for buying antiques. As for his wife, I think I finally encountered the closest thing to a saint a designer has known, as her graciousness and kindness brought beauty and style to every corner we planned.

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1 We commissioned a custom mural in the dining room by artist Susan Harter. 2 The powder room started with an antique Chinoiserie console originally housed in London’s Grosvenor Hotel, which we converted into a vanity sink ahead of planning the de Gournay wall coverings to coordinate with the console. 3 The husband’s wine cellar. 4 The foyer with honed oak floors, something they had seen in their travels and were eager to try in this house. 5 Comfortable seating flanks the fireplace in the formal living room. 6 The master bedroom suite is one of the most serene rooms I’ve ever designed. We used built-in moldings playing off the crown of the ceiling to create the structure for the bed hangings. 7 A mahogany-paneled library.

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WELLESLEY words by michael carter · photography by michael j. lee & sabrina cole quinn photography If Brookline was defined with a capital “C“ as in Connoisseur, then my Wellesley client would be defined with a capital “C” as in Colorful. Also well-versed in the art of working with a designer, my savvy and sophisticated and, above all, fun mother of two brought an energy and joy both personally and aesthetically to the drawing board. What she already understood intuitively was her own distinct style and palette, and my job was to interpret. She was also willing to travel to benefit the success of the project, so we headed to New York, where she had lived before coming up to Boston. We took the city by storm and came back with great ideas and inspiration for her Wellesley home. So much of what we then developed together was based on her personal, youthful lens on traditional taste, where norms were challenged with vogue colorations and an artful mix of chic and charming art and furnishings.

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1 The living room palette is fresh, and a natural place for my client to retreat and be surrounded and inspired by beauty. 2 A beautifully proportioned hallway. 3 The breakfast room with playful curtains. 4 In the dining room, we kept antique elements but gave the room a new spirit with bold modern artwork. 5 A comfortable family room for the active family. 6 A pair of red lanterns adds a pop to the kitchen.


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NINA FARMER BOSTON-BASED DESIGNER NINA FARMER HAS BEEN TURNING HEADS WITH HER SERENELY NUANCED INTERIORS THAT EXUDE SOPHISTICATION “I feel so honored to be able to work on the amazing homes that my clients build and renovate. One of the guiding principles of my design aesthetic is that projects remain contextually rooted to the time and place in which they were built. Whether working on a historic brownstone in Beacon Hill or a contemporary beach house on Martha’s Vineyard, I always remain true to this paradigm.” - Nina Farmer

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FARMER HELPS CLIENTS MAKE A CAPE COD SUMMER HOUSE THEIR OWN

words by nina farmer · photography by eric roth · contractor wellen construction My clients had rented this summer house before they decided to purchase it, so they knew it well. They fell in love with the views, but it became clear that the house needed a total gut renovation. My clients wanted to create a house that would offer refuge from their hectic lives in the city, so we deliberately went with a very soft and soothing palette for the interiors. The views of the water are really changeable depending on the time of day, and we didn’t want any bold patterns or color to interfere with that serenity. We selected easy-to-maintain surfaces like quartzite countertops and used a lot of indoor/outdoor fabrics so their use of the house could be as carefree as possible.

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1 LIVING ROOM Sconces: Urban Electric. Stone: Cumar. Custom ottoman with Jerry Pair Leather. Chairs in Rose Tarlow fabric. Woven Chair: John Himmel. Rug: Steven King. 2 DINING ROOM Table: Keith Fritz. Chairs fabric: Perennials. Pendant: O’Lampia. 3 KITCHEN Island pendants: Remains. Chairs: McGuire. Stone: Cumar. 4 MASTER BEDROOM Rug: Steven King. Custom bed upholstered in Rose Tarlow fabric. Nightstands: Made Goods. 5 POOL Furniture: JANUS et Cie. 6 GIRLS BEDROOM Window Fabric: Lee Jofa. Floor Pillows: Galbraith & Paul. Bed: Restoration Hardware. 7 BOYS BEDROOM Windows: Schumacher. Custom Chair upholstered in Lee Jofa. Rug: Steven King. 8 MASTER BATHROOM Floor: Waterworks. Counter tops: Cumar.

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FARMER RESTORES 1870S WEST NEWTON GEM FOR MODERN-DAY USE

1 ENTRY Sconce: Lucca. Rug: Steven King. Table: Baker. 2 KITCHEN Island pendants: Urban Electric. Table pendant: Urban Archaeology. 3 LIVING ROOM Sofa: Dmitriy & Co., fabric by Holland & Sherry. Coffee Table: Formations. Rug: Steven King. Benches: Paul Marra. 4 FAMILY ROOM Custom Upholstery. Chairs: Rogers & Goffigon and ZAK+FOX. Sofa pillows: Holland & Sherry and Hermès. 5 POWDER ROOM Wallpaper: Holland & Sherry. Pendant: Remain. 6 DINING ROOM Walls: Holland & Sherry. Bench Fabric: Hermès. Lamps: Rose Tarlow.

words by nina farmer · photography by michael j lee contractor youngblood builders This house was originally built in 1870, so it had great old bones. Our goal was to honor the original architecture while updating it for its new owners, a family of five. The flow of some rooms on the first floor was shifted a bit to make it work better for a young family, but the original architecture was replicated so it felt like a seamless transition. The dining room was one of the harder spaces to conceptualize because of the large scale of the room; the combined tables could seat 24 people. When my clients purchased the house, this room was bright red, with heavy velvet drapes. We freshened things up by putting in a printed grass cloth and upholstered the ceiling in wool.

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FREMONT-SMITH GIVES A FRESH UPDATE TO SHINGLE-STYLE

HOUSE ON THE COAST OF MAINE

LEANDRA FREMONTSMITH MAINE-BASED DESIGNER LEANDRA FREMONT-SMITH IS PUTTING HER FRESH SPIN ON PROJECTS UP AND DOWN THE EASTERN SEABOARD. THIS HARVARD GRADUATE, WHO STUDIED ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN AT THE AMERICAN UNIVERSITY OF PARIS AND BOSTON ARCHITECTURAL CENTER, SHARED WITH US THE DETAILS ON A RECENT PROJECT IN PROUTS NECK, MAINE. “I work with my clients to completely learn about their lifestyle, interests, and travels, and then infuse my energetic perspective into their project. The best projects are ones inspired by collaboration. It’s my job to take their dreams for how they envision living and translate them into stylish rooms that mix classic design with splashes of color and a mix of old and new.” – Leandra Fremont-Smith

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words by leandra fremont-smith photography by jeff roberts imaging Our clients, who otherwise reside in Chicago, escape to this house to play tennis, swim, and ride their bikes in the close-knit summer community of Prouts Neck. The husband’s two sisters have homes on either side of this house, and the families enjoy raising their children together in this special neighborhood. We began by introducing a neutral palette, painting the living room, kitchen, and stairway Farrow & Ball’s “Wimborne White.” This provided a clean backdrop for introducing soft blues and greens in curtains, cushions, and other decorative items, anchored by neutral grey upholstery and textured sisal rugs. In the dining room, we installed Phillip Jeffrie’s “Agate” wallpaper above the beadboard. The wallpaper mimics the flagstone on the exterior of the house while also adding visual interest to the space. In the sunroom, the beadboard walls were painted “Alaskan Husky” by Benjamin Moore, and the window mullions were painted “Green Black” by Sherwin Williams. An elegant sectional sofa from Charles Stewart in a Thibaut Crypton fabric with a contrasting “Flanders” Samuel & Sons tape along the skirt was placed in the corner, creating a comfortable nook for reading. The kitchen, which originally contained more cottage-style cabinetry with cranberry and sage accents, was completely remodeled, in collaboration with Conrad Arseneau from Kitchen Cove Cabinetry & Design in Portland, Maine. The crisp, white cabinets provide contrast to the playful herringbone-tile floor, and the brushed-brass hardware pull in the brass and gold tones in the light fixtures from Visual Comfort.


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1 The clients’ existing dining chairs and chandelier were lacquered in grey hues from Benjamin Moore, and the window treatments were removed to bring more natural light. 2 In the butler’s pantry we installed a soapstone-mimicking granite countertop which blends elegance with durability. 3 Rattan and woven leather chairs add a natural element to the space, contributing to the feeling of being outdoors. 4 The sectional throw pillows fabric, “Miro” from Cowtan & Tout, reflect the shimmering ocean water just behind the home.


F R E M O N T- S M I T H


Directly off the bright white kitchen is a butler’s pantry, which we lacquered in “Regatta Blue” by Pratt & Lambert. A playful roman shade fabric, “Plaisirs de la Chine” from Schumacher, captures the cabinets’ peacock blues as well as the green tones from outside the window. Our clients requested a serene and calming bedroom, with a connection to the greenery and ocean nearby. We designed a custom headboard in a soothing blue Jane Churchill fabric, with euro pillows in a sophisticated stripe and embroidered fern-print pillows from Cowtan & Tout.

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The new screened-in porch was created to give the expanding family a place to gather for their annual lobster dinners, or simply to relax together by the large flagstone fireplace.

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Opposite We designed a custom built-in bench in a hexagonal grouping of windows, perfect for the overflow of family and friends. 1 The screened porch is perfect for cool summer nights on the Maine coast. 2 The kitchen nook was expanded to include a breakfast bar and built-in banquette with bulletproof faux-leather cushions, another casual retreat for the large family. 3+4 Dark walnut lower cabinets by Kitchen Cove Cabinetry & Design draw attention to a statement hood, and a solid slab backsplash with sliding panels reveals spice racks behind. 5 The swing arm sconce shades were custom-made by Blanche P. Field with a Samuel & Sons gimp along the base. 6 The entry features a hand-painted mural depicting a coastal Maine beach. 7 The home’s hallways are now filled with the clients’ collection of large Audubon prints.

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ERIC HAYDEL IN A WORLD WHERE STORY-TELLING IS THE EDITORIAL BUZZWORD BOSTONBASED DESIGNER, SHOWROOM OWNER, AND FORMER PRESIDENT OF THE NEW ENGLAND CHAPTER OF ASID ERIC HAYDEL IS DELIVERING QUITE A PUNCH. THE ROOMS THAT HIS DYNAMIC TEAM CREATES ARE STUNNING BACKDROPS WHERE STORIES ARE NOT JUST TOLD, BUT WHERE THEY COME TO LIFE. “We take a very hands-on approach with our clients and apply our expertise to design stylistic and functional spaces that set the stage for your story to be told. We believe your environment should reflect your style, function, and personal story.” - Eric Haydel

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HAYDEL CREATES STYLISH INTERIORS FOR AVID ART

COLLECTORS ON BEACON HILL words by eric haydel · photography by michael j. lee This project in Beacon Hill was one of our most rewarding and challenging projects over the course of this last year. The client, an avid art collector, understands style, function, and form more than most of the clients we have traditionally worked with. Many of the pieces are original Robert Motherwell paintings and print-made art pieces. At the start, the challenge was to “refresh” and highlight the strong primary coloring of Motherwell’s work. The space has both north- and south-facing windows, which complicated the goal of creating a controlled balance of light throughout the space. Since the building was constructed in the ’70s, the condo’s mechanical systems needed to be updated and mold needed to be removed. We chose to smooth the walls and ceilings, paint them with a crisp white tone in the main living area, and then add drama and depth to the bedroom with blue linen paper from Phillip Jeffries. As with many condos in the city, concrete ceilings create a challenge with height, lighting, and a decorative finish. In the bedroom, we created a fake tray ceiling, using Pebble in Blue from Maya Romanoff. This allowed a ceiling fan to be installed and the electrical work to be concealed. The living room curtains are an artist’s dream; they are from Scalamandre and embroidered to look like splattered paint. The sofa is upholstered in tone-on-tone high-performance 100,000 double rub velvet from Dogwood Fabrics, and the pillows are Robert Allen.

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ERIC HAYDEL

HAYDEL PULLS OUT ALL OF THE STOPS FOR HOLIDAY HOUSE IN NEW YORK words by eric haydel ¡ photography by alan barry photography Portugal was an integral part of shaping the world as we know it today. In the Middle Ages, Moors from northern Africa conquered Portugal, setting a precedent for maritime and trade accomplishments. Vibrant textiles, brightly colored spices, shiny metals, and fine wine became sought-after commodities in the Western world. Inspired by the Tilton Fenwick Collection, available through the Robert Allen Duralee Group, the family game room I created for Holiday House in New York is a nod to a well-traveled and well-lived life. Assigned the largest room in the show house, I had a modest budget and mere weeks to pull together a team. One hundred yards of fabric were printed for the walls with an additional 50 to line the trays on the ceiling. The experience and outcome was more than I could have imaged or expected. Holiday House has an incredible reputation. You are surrounded by a well-curated and extremely talented group of peers. Sponsors and vendors pour in from all over to lend a helping hand, offer product, or even provide dinner and drinks when you’re working longer than expected. Holiday House is truly a blessing in my life, and through the funds raised, provides blessings and care to many others.

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DESIGN: TYLER & SASH PHOTOGRAPHY: SEAN LITCHFIELD

INTERIOR DESIGN

WINDOW TREATMENTS

WALLPAPER

SHOWROOM

880 MAIN STREET, WINCHESTER, MA • 540 WASHINGTON STREET, WELLESLEY, MA 781-729-6639 • INFO@TYLERANDSASH.COM • TYLERANDSASH.COM


VANI SAYEED NEWTON-BASED DESIGNER VANI SAYEED, WHO EARNED A BFA IN INTERIOR DESIGN AT THE ESTEEMED SIR J.J. SCHOOL OF ART IN MUMBAI, INDIA, FOLLOWED BY AN MFA IN DESIGN FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, IS, FORTUNATELY FOR US, NO STRANGER TO THE BDC. ALWAYS A WILLING PARTICIPANT AT BDC EVENTS AND AN ACTIVE VOLUNTEER FOR ORGANIZATIONS LIKE HEADING HOME TO DINNER, SAYEED ALSO ENJOYS COLLABORATING WITH SHOWROOMS AS SHE DID HERE WITH ALISHA SERRAS AT SCAVOLINI. “The kitchen design was a wonderful collaboration with Alisha Serras from Scavolini Store Boston. Alisha understood the historic nature of the property and at the same time absorbed the asethetic of the client and delivered a bespoke kitchen. The updated Shaker style cabinets by Scavolini in a neutral color set the tone to showcase the clients’ art and antique collections.” - Vani Sayeed

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SAYEED WORKS WITH

SCAVOLINI TO DESIGN STYLISH KITCHEN IN CHESTNUT HILL

words by vani sayeed · kitchen design by scavolini boston photography by nat rea photography contractor casla construction We started this project by creating a complete schematic for the entire house, knowing all along that we would do the work in phases, beginning with the kitchen redesign and renovation. As I often do when designing a kitchen, I went to see Alisha Serras at Scavolini. These were young clients with three small children, who had moved from a small city apartment to a larger home in the suburbs. This project was a collaboration between client and designer, based on a mutual love of beautiful old homes and architecture with character. The house was an elegant Chestnut Hill colonial in need of updating. The challenge was to preserve the fine architectural detailing of the residence while meeting the needs and aesthetics of a young and active family. To achieve this goal, we opened up and re-configured a series of rooms on the first floor by removing and relocating walls. We designed the interiors throughout the first floor of the house to reflect the personal style of the clients, who have a penchant for the old and the new—a transitional design sensibility, which we incorporated into the interior design. We utilized their burgeoning collection of antique dinnerware as a jumping off point for the overall design vision, which is a multilayered expression.


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CECILIA WALKER WE FIRST MET THIS MOTHER OF FOUR, THREE OF WHOM ARE TRIPLETS, AT THE HEADING HOME TO DINNER GALA DINNER, WHERE SHE HAD TURNED OUT A STUNNING TABLE COMPLETE WITH TEXTILES FROM HER CALIFORNIA-INSPIRED TEXTILE COLLECTION. “California’s 1970s skateboard culture was a part of my youth. My younger brother was a skateboarder and had no fear. Near the bottom of the hill on Royal Boulevard, one of our neighbors had built a halfpipe at the end of their driveway. When we got older my family relocated halfway across the country, but thanks to the Desmond family, my brother experienced yet another neighborhood driveway thrill. The only halfpipes I encounter nowadays are in terrain parks at ski mountains. I can barely maneuver a snowboard, but my brother continues to attempt McTwists.” - Cecilia Walker

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WALKER SPINS MAGIC IN BURROUGHS WHARF DUPLEX

PENTHOUSE WITH 270-DEGREE VIEW OF BOSTON HARBOR words by cecilia walker · photography by mike casey, casey photography interior designer by architectural elements: victoria wood · builder/contractor: fbn construction My clients, a young family with two children under the age of 11, had just completed a renovation on the fourth and fifth floors of a building in 2016 and were still unpacking boxes when the penthouse in the same building became available. This was an opportunity that would not come up again, so my clients contacted Victoria Wood, the project architect, and myself for our opinion. We both asked if they really wanted to go through another two-year gut renovation and the answer was a resounding yes. The opportunity was too tempting to resist so we embarked on the journey of creating a two-story penthouse with a 270-degree view of Boston Harbor. Everyone was pleased with the renovation we had just completed so the design direction was the same—a coastal, modern beach house vibe in the middle of an urban city. We used a lot of the same finishes. The kitchen finishes were almost identical except they took on a more chunky, durable, and family-friendly approach. White marble bathroom floors from Phase 1 were replaced with faux-wood porcelain tiles, and white oak flooring from Phase 1 became wire-brushed white oak. We wallpapered walls that were previously painted white with textured vinyl wallcoverings from Thibaut and Phillip Jeffries. A stair wall clad with nickel groove, custom quarter-sewn cerused white oak millwork by Jewett Farms is a standout moment in the penthouse and is a departure from the grey-washed woods that have become so popular. I wanted to give the house a warmer, natural toned wood inspired by Ralph Lauren beach homes of a decade ago. The mudroom or main entrance is custom v-groove, painted a high gloss navy with walnut pulls, with a faux crocodile custom bench cushion and a sliding barn door with a ceiling mount. They now have a very sophisticated space, filled with light and endless harbor views.

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CECILIA WALKER

DINING/KITCHEN Dining Table: Custom – live-edge table top by Lighthouse Woodworks, base by Julian Chichester. Dining Chairs: Custom – Lee Industries with Kravet Nuostritch. Dining chandelier: Arteriors Home Geoffrey Chandelier. Kitchen Pendants: Cisco Brothers hand-blown Globe Pendants. Custom Shiplap: Quarter-sewn cerused white oak by Jewett Farms. Stairs: Herringbone runner by Colony Rug. Art: Libby Silvia Art Style. LIVING ROOM Chairs: Kravet Furniture. Pillows: Kravet. Fireplace Stone: Tile Showcase. Tufted Ottoman: Kravet. Sectional: Cisco Brothers. Rug: STARK. DECK Outdoor furniture: Kingsley Bate. POWDER ROOM Custom Millwork: Chris Rice. Wallpaper: Thibaut. Lighting: Visual Comfort. MASTER BATH Tile: Porcelanosa. Stone: Cumar. Lighting: Visual Comfort. Mirrors: Made Goods

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CECILIA WALKER TEXTILES photography by sarah winchester & mike casey, casey photography The fabrics are available in the following Massachusetts stores: Casita, Sudbury; Elizabeth Home Decor & Design Studio, Chestnut Hill; Kelly Mcguill Home, Walpole; and Water & Main, Medfield.

“Royal Boulevard is a beautiful palm-tree-lined street into my childhood neighborhood in Los Angeles. Driving through it feels very majestic. So the “Royal Blvd.” pattern is my interpretation of trees with the dotted street lines. Halfpipe Two is is the original sketch I drew when I was conceptualizing the Halfpipe pattern. The outline of the design shows the hand-drawn quality with its variations—each halfpipe is different from the one next to it in the repeat.”

“Halfpipe was designed as homage to my California upbringing and the skate culture from the ’70s. It’s so graphic and translates differently in the one-color pattern vs. the two-color pattern. For my second collection I wanted more organic looks and muted colors, so I pieced together one of my college drawings (originally created with watercolor, charcoals, and ink) and the organic lines took the form of leafs. I also studied shading and shadows with a line technique in my drawing classes. The Line Study pattern comes straight out of my college art portfolio and looks leafy and textured as well. The organic patterns mixed with the graphic sit well together, and as an interior designer, that was important to me.”

“A glimpse from my work table and process from drawing to finished print.” IDBOSTONMAGAZINE.COM

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TILTON FENWICK ANNE MAXWELL FOSTER & SUYSEL DEPEDRO CUNNINGHAM

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TILTON FENWICK: ANNE

MAXWELL FOSTER & SUYSEL DEPEDRO CUNNINGHAM words by chesie breen I was first wowed by the dynamic and winning partnership of Anne Maxwell Foster and Suysel dePedro Cunningham when they launched their first collection with Duralee at the BDC. This plucky, unstoppable duo launched their own business, Tilton Fenwick, on Instagram, so it was with a Blackberry in hand that I upgraded my thinking and joined the tidal wave of social media. Shortly thereafter, I had fun watching them create an imaginative and memorable landing-cum-sitting room for the Kips Bay Decorator Show House in New York, which helped cement them as editorial darlings. Their boutique design firm was also recently added to the ELLE DÉCOR A-List. Even though these two always keep us guessing with their creativity, I’m never surprised by how fabulous their work is, and their second collaboration with Robert Allen Duralee is no exception. Known for using exuberant color and lively patterns to spice up traditional styles, their latest collection, Tilton Fenwick 2.0, showcases textiles influenced by the flora, fauna, and architecture of Portugal—a country known for its gutsy palette and fanciful patterns, especially those found in the ornate tiles that pave its building facades, streets, and squares. The line features a mix of strong statement prints and wovens, all meticulously coordinated. “The second collection of Tilton Fenwick for Duralee (fondly tagged on social media as #TFDuralee) is a wonderful continuation and further development of our first collection. Embracing our unique vision of color combinations and bold patterns, the fabrics were developed to be effortlessly mixed and matched by the RADG customer to create wonderful, whimsical, and harmonious spaces. Inspired by our travels to Portugal, patterns in the collection may recall the vibrant tile façades from the streets of Lisbon or a feeling conjured by the exotic sounds of Fado music,” say Maxwell Foster and dePedro Cunningham. Patterns include an abstract floral design reminiscent of puzzle pieces, an arch motif inspired by the architecture of the Jerónimos Monastery in Lisbon, and a wave design based on the famed tiles in Lisbon’s Rossio Square. Colors range from cool blues and emerald greens to warmer beet reds and soft terracotta. While many of the new patterns were designed to seamlessly work with the first collection, this collection introduces a fresh take on patterns that can stand alone as statement fabrics.

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T I LT O N F E N W I C K

T H E T I LT O N FENWICK PAT T E R N G U I D E 1

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1 POMBAL This geometric print with a tribal feel was inspired by the Azulejo tiles found in Portugal. Modern yet whimsical, Pombal is available in four brightly colored hues. 2 FLOREBELA A statement chintz print with an array of flowers. Florebela means “beautiful flower” in Portuguese and is available in four impactful colors. 3 SOLDO The pièce de résistance of the collection, Soldo, represents the serpentine lines in the architecture, tiles, and countryside of Portugal. This harmonious design of snakes and flowers is available in three colorways.

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4 BRUNO Inspired by the tiled floor pattern found in Rossio Square in Lisbon, Bruno was designed to mimic the movement of these gorgeous tiles. This statement pattern is available in four colorways. 5 CHIADO This print represents an explosion of the bountiful flora and fauna of the Sintra region of Portugal. Chiado is available in four saturated colorways.

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6 ALFAMA Alfama’s design was inspired by some plates that Maxwell Foster and dePedro Cunningham saw at their favorite restaurant in Lisbon. They re-imagined these plates as an intricate stripe-like pattern that is ideal for window treatments. Alfama is available in five colorways. 7 MADELENA A “granny chic” moment in the collection, Madelena is reminiscent of classic Tilton Fenwick. This print is perfect as a supporting fabric but can also make a standalone statement. Available in four fresh colorways. 8 ANGELINA The inspiration for this statement print comes from the repetitive arches of the Manueline architecture found in the Jerónimos Monastery in Portugal. The design was softened with a floral motif and gradation of color. Available in four colorways.

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Join the Conversation and Viewing on April 2! New panoramas at the Tennis & Racquet Club, 939 Boylston Street

Info & RSVP: BostonDesignWeek.com

Hamlen Walls in Bloom

®

C O L L E C T I O N®

Antiques Anew, Wallpaper, Fabrics, Framed Art, 8 Custom Panels HollyAlderman.com | 617-733-5493 © 2019 Devens Hamlen, all rights reserved


I D B O S T O N T RAV E L S

SHOPPING MAGAZINE STREET IN NEW ORLEANS

New Orleans, Louisiana has always loomed large in my memory bank. I first visited the Crescent City with iconic cookbook writer Lee Bailey, and was graciously welcomed and entertained by Ella Brennan and her extended family when we celebrated the launch of Lee Bailey’s New Orleans: Good Food and Glorious Houses (Clarkson/Potter Publishers) at Commander’s Palace, where Chef Jamie Shannon had just ascended to the throne of the legendary kitchen. Originally from Mississippi, Lee was raised knowing that food, hospitality, and a well-appointed home went hand in hand; each chapter of recipes was photographed alongside a remarkable house. Hence, I had the opportunity to visit landmarks like the cathedral at Jackson Square in the Vieux Carre; former boucheries and garçonnières like the Badia-Fagaly House; the LaBlanche-DeSalvo-James House where a young William Faulkner once took up residence; and many more which have since changed hands and are now occupied by a new group of luminaires and preservationists. Chief amongst them are Jane Scott Hodges, the founder of Leontine Linens; Ware Porter, who skipped over from his ancestral roots in Birmingham, Louisiana, to open his eponymous antiques shop; and Melissa Rufty and Adrienne Casbarian, partners at Malachite Home. This chic trifecta shares a courtyard at 3806 Magazine Street, which could quite possibly have been your first and last stop, had Rebecca Vizard not opened B.Viz down the block (3506 Magazine Street), showcasing her exquisite antique textiles, appliqués, and one-of-a-kind finds. In a world where antiques are becoming scarcer, I’m reminded of how lucky we are here in Boston to have the Antique Stalls at the BDC. So, you should certainly treat yourself to an excursion to New Orleans, dive into the world-class cuisine and hospitality; but rest assured that there’s more to shop upon your return.


B.VIZ DESIGN 3506 Magazine Street

MALACHITE HOME 3806 Magazine Street

WARE AND CO 3806 Magazine Street


N O L A

LEONTINE LINENS 3806 Magazine Street #3

Lee Ledbetter’s The Art of Place: Architecture and Interiors (Rizzoli) is required reading for anyone planning a trip to New Orleans. His work represents a one-of-akind combination of traditional details and chic modernism. Ledbetter is appreciated for his ability to incorporate historical precedent with regional and environmental context. The book takes you inside some of New Orleans’s most stylish residences and opens the doors to the sense of place he has created for his A-list clientele.

In this romp of a book, Julia Reed’s New Orleans: Food, Fun, Friends, and Field Trips for Letting The Good Times Roll (Rizzoli), consummate hostess and lifestyle expert Julia Reed shares her favorite New Orleans recipes and ideas for entertaining that exude the city’s warm hospitality. Peek inside courtyards and beautiful interiors, where dishes like grillades and grits and seafood are served alongside cocktails like Sazeracs and Satsuma Margaritas. Reed also advises on iconic watering holes and local specialties to try.


At the height of Nantucket’s summer season, the NHA

Design Luncheon

Thursday, August 1, 2019, 11 a.m. Champagne reception and lunch with keynote presentation by Bunny Williams, known as one of the most talented names in design

celebrates the island’s unique influence on American design with engaging lectures,

Summer Antiques Show Preview Party

Thursday, August 1, 2019, 6 p.m. 32 Fine antique dealers from the US & abroad

previewing an antique show, lively panel discussions, and both intimate and grand

Design Panel

Friday, August 2, 2019, 2 p.m.

Lively panel discussion on the latest design trends with moderator Steele Marcoux, editor-in-chief of Veranda Magazine

gatherings.

All-Star Private Dinners Phoebe Tudor, Chair 2017–19

Friday, August 2, 2019, 7 p.m. Intimate candlelit dinners featuring design luminaries

Night at the Museum

Saturday, August 3, 2019, 6:30 p.m. Fabulous party surrounded by Nantucket’s history

Don't Miss April 24, 2019 NANTUCKET BY DESIGN Kick-off Event at Boston Design Center TICKETS AND INFORMATION ONLINE AT NHA.org


N A N T U C K E T- B A S E D D E S I G N E R

NANCY SERAFINI

GOES SOUTH FOR THE WINTER

words by nancy serafini · photography by josh gibson architecture by joel newman Imagine the movie Prince of Tides and the incredible natural beauty of the “Low Country” of South Carolina. The pale mauve sweet grasses sway slowly on a warm spring day. The sky is a cloudless, vivid blue. The sun is beating down on the lime-green marsh at high tide. Multitudes of crisp white herons are squawking in the trees surrounding a pond. Envision driving onto an island that is a 3,500-acre nature preserve. There are no street lights nor sidewalks, but there are two allées lined with 100-yearold Spanish oak trees dripping with moss. One allée guides you to the main house. The other, however, is my heart’s delight. The oak trees are underpinned with hundreds of yellow jonquils and frame the entrance to the Tabby Ruins, the original plantation on the property. Each night you are lulled to sleep by a symphony of nature—the herons, the egrets, and wood storks sing their magnificent songs. There is little wonder why my husband and I started a 15-year-long love affair with Spring Island, where we escape to every winter from New England. The timing wasn’t quite right when we were first introduced into this amazing world. In the summer of 2015, we made a totally spur-of-themoment decision to purchase a lot. We were besotted and bewitched by this particular piece of property as it had been owned by the legendary golfer Arnold Palmer, and enjoyed a view of the 18th hole of the community’s course, but, more importantly, a spectacular 180-degree view of the Callawassie River and marsh. The sunrise is truly indescribable, and the parcel afforded us the opportunity to build a true “Low Country” home. We enlisted an architect from Beaufort, Joel Newman, who was recognized for his distinctive ability to design a home that fit right in with the environment. The tin roof, dark brown cedar shingles, and old tabby brick combined with huge windows to accent the view were the perfect components for our dream cottage. Three bedrooms and baths were artfully designed to capture views from every vantage point. People often remark that our home reminds them of an old Adirondack-style house; I personally think it looks like a tree house nestled in among the pines.

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Never have I enjoyed building a home more. The contractor had an amazing sense of humor, and the crews, although they could not speak a word of English, were able to communicate with us in a perfect way. Their attention to detail and perfection made it a joyful and memorable experience. The South has such a distinctive culture that takes some adjustment for us Bostonians. Often labeled the “slow country,� we learned to be patient; and it was well worth the wait. As I began to think of the interior spaces and how they would be designed, my prerequisite was to choose colors from the outdoors so that there would be a seamless flow from inside to out. Rich browns, coppers, muddied yellow, and aged green formed the basis of the color palette. Accents of blue were thrown into the potpourri along with my trademark mixture of patterns and texture. The living room is low country traditional with a contemporary twist. Shiplap walls throughout the entire house were coupled with square ceiling coffers lined with shiplap and simple moldings. An old Lee Jofa hand-blocked linen was the core of the fabric scheme. Beautiful pheasants are partnered with a lovely forest scene. Colefax and Fowler and Jane Churchill provided the rest of the fabrics. Antiques are intermixed with new furniture and the room is finished with both exotic orchids and a multitude of green plants, as well as books and my low country treasures mixed with my beloved China collections. Decorating has always been my passion, but our home on Spring Island has captured our souls. It is a place of tranquility, an opportunity to commune with nature, to coexist with Elvis our neighborhood alligator, to forge new friendships, learn new skills, and improve old ones. Most of all, it is a place called home.

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Saltsman Brenzel 617-350-7883 | saltsmanbrenzel.com


G I N G E R LY O N S D E N E U F V I L L E

MAKER’S GUILD Ginger Lyons de Neufville is a stall holder at Boston Design Center’s Market Stalls, selling antique and modern textiles. She has collected antique textiles for 40 years, sourcing them in the United Kingdom, Europe, India, and Southeast Asia. Last year she decided to open a stall and sell textiles at the BDC. Her collection includes Provençal quilts, Indiennes, Alsatian kelsch, suzanis and ikats from Uzbekistan, and antique French sheets. She recently added pique quilts and pillow covers by Jaipur’s Brigitte Singh, the best hand-block producer in the world. Exhibitions such as Interwoven Globe at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Fabric of India at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, and Asia in Amsterdam, presented jointly by Salem’s Peabody Essex Museum and Amsterdam’s Rijksmuseum, have created a new interest in collecting and using antique textiles. They have influenced modern textile and clothing designers worldwide. We asked de Neufville to share her expertise.

1 Bed dressed with Brigitte Singh’s Mughal Poppy pattern pique quilt and pillows. Other patterns of Brigitte Singh’s work are shown and available as pique quilts and pillows. 2 An antique ikat with two modern handembroidered Indian pillows. 3 Brigitte Singh clothing, all hand-block printed, pique coats, an Elizabethan jacket, baby shoes, covered boxes, and table covers. 4 An assortment of antique ikats, hand-dyed linens, pelmets, and quilts.

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Background Indiennes quilts and a handembroidered suzani from Uzbekistan.

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CARE & COLLECTING

HOT CATEGORIES FOR COLLECTING

It’s a quest to find antique textiles, just as with all antiques. There are now two antique textile dealers in the Market Stalls at the Boston Design Center, selling to the public: Carolann Burke and myself. Feeling the fabric (“the hand”) and seeing the condition of the piece up close is so important, especially when starting out as a collector. It’s also good to talk to dealers about their wares.

Natural indigo-dyed fabrics: European, African, and Chinese are coveted by collectors, and never go out of style. Ikats, suzanis, Indian handblock prints, eighteenth-century Indiennes and toiles, Indian Kanthas, and embroidery are also being shown by many designers and decorators and being purchased by avid collectors. There are some modern textile designers such as Christopher Moore and Nicole Fabre who are reproducing beautiful versions of Toile de Jouy, Nantes, and Indiennes, made in India with traditional techniques to very high standards. Hand-dyed antique sheets in indigos and madder are prized.

In New England, you can find textiles at antiques fairs and shops, especially at the Brimfield Antique Show in Massachusetts in May, July, and September, as well as online. There are specialized textile markets and fairs abroad, particularly in England and France. The Decorative Antiques and Textiles Fair is held three times a year in Battersea, London and there are lots of fairs, brocantes, and flea markets in France. Keep old fabrics out of the sun to prevent fading. If storing, buy acid-free paper and boxes to protect them. Be careful about washing antique fabrics; they may run or shrink. If washing is needed, it’s better to do it by hand, if at all. If in doubt, don’t do anything.

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Learn more about antique textiles—where they come from, their history, cultural significance, and different national preferences. The Boston Museum of Fine Arts, Peabody Essex Museum, and Rhode Island School of Design Museum have large textile collections, important exhibitions, and expert curators. London’s Victoria and Albert Museum and Paris’s Musée de la Toile de Jouy both have antique textiles on permanent display. The Victoria and Albert Museum had a knockout exhibit, The Fabric of India, with textiles assembled during the Raj and never before displayed. Catalogues from exhibits are fantastic sources of information. There are many books written by textile experts such as Rosemary Crill, Kathryn Berenson, Rebecca Vizard, and collectors such as Karun Thakar.

WHERE TO SOURCE I have collected antique textiles for 40 years. Initially, I collected American patchwork quilts which I found in antique shops and specialty stores such as America Hurrah (now closed). I travel a lot and found many dealers abroad, in England, France, Turkey, India, Singapore, and Southeast Asia. Portobello Road Market and Alfie’s Antiques in London are good sources. I bought and still buy mostly from small dealers at fairs, small shops, and flea markets. In the spring of 2018, I travelled to small towns in Provence and Languedoc, searching for antique textiles. In my collection I have eighteenth-century French linens and Indiennes, Toile de Jouy and Nantes, and many newly hand-dyed pieces. My earliest pieces are from the sixteenth century. I love Indian hand blocks, especially those made by Brigitte Singh in India. Her hand-block prints are the best in the world, with prints based on Mughal designs and the eighteenth-century Indiennes adored by the French. I am thrilled to offer some of Brigitte Singh’s clothing and soft furnishings in my Market Stall. Contact me at glyondeneufville@gmail.com or follow me @ginger_lyons_deneufville.


PHOTOGRAPHY CREDITS cover

pages eighteen & nineteen

Vani Sayeed: 42–43

Photo by Eric Roth

Hers: Bunny Williams

Portrait by Roger Farrington

Portrait by Peter Murdock

Photos by Nat Rea Photography

Cover courtesy of Abrams

Cecilia Walker: 44–47

Photos 1 & 5 courtesy of Bunny Williams

Portrait and photos by Mike Casey, CaseyPhotography.net except page 47, top two photos by Sarah Winchester

page five A Message from Jamestown President Michael Phillips Portrait by Garrett Rowland Photography page seven

Photos 3–4 by Francesco Lagnese

Dear Readers

pages twenty-one to fifty-one

Photos 1–3, 6 by Brooke Slezak

East Coast Design

Photos 4–5 by Erik Kvalsvik Cover courtesy of Rizzoli

Liz Caan: 22–25 Portrait by Karin Dailey

pages eight to thirteen

Photos by Eric Roth

Bibliophile Boston

Michael Carter: 26–29

Covers courtesy of Rizzoli

Portrait courtesy of the designer

Pages 8–9 photos by William Abranowicz (top, right) Francois Halard (bottom)

Photos by Michael J. Lee except page 29, photo 5 by Sabrina Cole Quinn Photography

Pages 10–11 photos by Eric Piasecki Page 12 photos by Nikolas Koenig (top) and Eric Piasecki (bottom) Page 13 photo by William Abranowicz

Nina Farmer: 30–33 Portrait by Stephen Kent Johnson Page 30–31 photos by Eric Roth Page 32–33 photos by Michael J. Lee

Tilton Fenwick: 48–51 Portrait and photos courtesy of the designers and Robert Allen Duralee Group pages fifty-three to fifty-five ID Boston Travels: Shopping Magazine Street in New Orleans Photos courtesy of each store Covers courtesy of Rizzoli Art of Place photos by Pieter Estersohn Julia Reed’s New Orleans photos by Paul Costello pages fifty-seven & fifty-eight Design: Nancy Serafini Photos by Josh Gibson

pages sixteen & seventeen

Leandra Fremont-Smith: 34–37

His: Pierre Frey

Portrait courtesy of the designer

Maker’s Guild

Portrait and fabric samples courtesy of Pierre Frey

Photos by Jeff Roberts Imaging

Photos by Jenna Faden

Page 16 photos by © Alfredo Garcia Saz / Shutterstock.com (top) and courtesy of Pierre Frey (middle + bottom)

Eric Haydel: 38–40 Portrait by Caitlin Cunningham Photography Page 38–39 photos by Michael J. Lee Page 40 photos by Alan Barry Photography

pages sixty & sixty-one


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244 Needham Street, Newton, MA 800.696.6662 Appointments welcome

Affiliated showrooms Clinton, CT

Providence, RI Middletown, CT

SPLASHSPRITZO.COM

Saco, ME Worcester, MA Vernon, CT


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ID Boston Volume 12  

ID Boston Volume 12