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V O L U M E E L E V E N · FA L L 2 018

AMANDA LINDROTH S P I N S M A G I C O N G R E AT C RA N B E R R Y I S L A N D , M A I N E

KITCHEN CABINET South End Townhouse by Hacin + Associates Gerald Pomeroy Transforms a Divided South End Brownstone into a Family Home


L U X U R I O U S F I T T E D C A B I N E T RY F O R E V E RY R O O M BOSTON DESIGN CENTER SUITE 635 BOSTONINQUIRIES@PEACOCKHOME.COM (888) 889-8891 NEW YORK LONDON PEACOCKHOME.COM

CANNES

JAKARTA

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BOSTON

SAN FRANCISCO

GREENWICH

SHORT HILLS


V O L U M E E L E V E N · FA L L 2 018

IN THIS ISSUE 8

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16

Bibliophile Boston

His & Hers

Design

new to the bookshelf

eric haydel & ashley whittaker

amanda lindroth

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25

31

Design

Design

showroom spotlights

hacin + associates

gerald pomeroy

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53

Design

Style

kitchen cabinet

tastemaker style

Design

Travel

antiquing the east coast

D E S I G N · S T Y L E · C U LT U R E · C U I S I N E Also in this Issue 5 A Message from Jamestown President Michael Phillips 7 Dear Readers 30 Trends: Kips Bay Decorator Show House Round-Up 57 Designer Spotlight: Lindsey Adelman 59 Cuisine: Chickadee 61 Bow Wow Blitz Recap

On the Cover · Designer Amanda Lindroth Spins Magic for Young Couple on Great Cranberry Island, Maine · Page 16

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michael phillips

Editor-in-Chief Design Editor

chesie breen

caroline sholl

General Manager, Leasing & Partnerships Market Editor

niamh o’maille | Associate Editor virginia sutton breen

Coordinator

lauren delorenzo | Showroom Liaison mary lewey

Contributing Photographers

tria giovan · julia robbs · eric roth · michael stavaridis Copy Editor

Publisher

kristan mclaughlin

©2014 Jamestown, L.P. All rights reserved.

Executive Editor

joanna boyle

kathy bush-dutton | Published by new england home · jamestown, l.p. To advertise, please email Jill Korff at jkorff@nehomemag.com.

IDBOSTONMAGAZINE.COM

ID BOSTON is the magazine of Boston Design Center, whose showrooms include: Ailanthus ANN SACKS Ardente Group Artaic

Carlisle Wide Plank Floors

Downsview Kitchens

Jewett Farms + Co.

Masterpiece Framing

Century Furniture

Duralee

Jules Place

Merida

EcoModern Design

Key Office Interiors

Osborne & Little

Charles Spada

Edelman Leather

Christopher Peacock

Eric Haydel

Blanche Field

Contract Sources

Farrow & Ball

The Boston Shade Company / System 7

Cowtan & Tout

Galerie d’Orsay

The Bright Group

Creative Office Pavilion / Herman Miller

Grand Rapids Furniture Company

Brookline Village Antiques Brunschwig & Fils

Baker Furniture

KI Kravet Fabrics Lee Jofa Lindsey Adelman Studios Liz Roache

Design Within Reach Contract

Grange Furniture

M-Geough

J.D. Staron

Market Stalls

DiscoverTile

JANUS et Cie

The Martin Group, Inc.

Paris Ceramics Phillip Jeffries PID Floors of Boston Porcelanosa Quadrille Robert Allen Romo Scavolini Kitchen & Bath

ONE DESIGN CENTER PLACE, BOSTON, MA 02210

Schumacher / Patterson Flynn Martin Scott Group Studio STARK Scalamandré Steven King Decorative Carpets Studio 534 Theo Décor Tile Showcase Waterworks Webster & Company


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PALAZZO PHILLIP JEFFRIES BOSTON • SUITE 526B BOSTON DESIGN CENTER • 857-250-4340 PHILLIPJEFFRIES.COM/PALAZZO


A MESSAGE FROM JAMESTOWN PRESIDENT

MICHAEL PHILLIPS The Innovation and Design Building is celebrating its 100th year. To celebrate this landmark occasion and Jamestown’s ongoing commitment to preservation, we partnered with the Young Advisors of Boston Preservation Alliance to host Libations for Preservation, a cocktail competition featuring bartenders from Chickadee, Tres Gatos, Yvonne’s, Stoddard’s, and Eastern Standard. Each bartender created two cocktails and our guests voted to crown a winner. Also capping off our 100 years is the completion of our extensive ground floor renovation of the Promenade. Chickadee is open, bringing new energy and food choices to our building. Finishing touches are underway at Flour Bakery in anticipation of the Fall Design Market at Boston Design Center, which has a robust line up of programming and events, including a launch party for the stunning new STARK showroom on the Promenade. We will also host the second annual dining-by-design event benefitting Heading Home, a charity dedicated to providing housing and aid to the homeless. We are pleased to accept the Corporate Sponsor of the Year award from Heading Home in appreciation of the important funds we’ve helped raise. For all inquiries, please contact me at mphillips@idbostonmagazine.com.

Michael Phillips President, Jamestown Executive Editor, ID BOSTON

Read more about Chickadee on page 59.


HIRAETH SILVER IN SILK HANDKNOTTED BROADLOOM 18’ WIDE A L S O AVA I L A B L E I N R U G S I Z E S

TIMELESS BEAUTY BE AUTIFULLY TIMED

U LT R A P R E M I U M TRADE EXCLUSIVE AVA I L A B L E I M M E D I AT E LY

THE BOSTON DESIGN CENTER 1 DESIGN CENTER PLACE FIRST FLOOR PROMENADE BOSTON, MA 02210 61 7. 3 5 7. 5 5 2 5 | S TA R KS A P P H I R E . C O M


DEAR READERS

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One of my favorite aspects of decorating is layering in antiques and decorative objects. I look at people with astonishment when they say outrageous things like “Brown furniture is so over,” and “Who wants their house to look like a grandmother lives there?” In the magazine world we are often asked to comment on trends. My definition of “trendy” is actually something that stands the test of time. After all, we are in the business of forecasting and heralding luxury design, so a well-designed room should be able to hold its own year in and year out. I compare it to raising a child who can handle themselves well in any situation—with poise, ease, and nice manners. Like children, rooms that scream “Look at me!” are the least appealing of all. I am most at ease in a room that I need to get to know and take in layer by layer, similar to the way one gets to know a person. Hopefully there is a sense of place, comfortable upholstery, curtains with dressmaker details, a beautiful mix of fabrics and textures, appealing lighting with silk shades lined in a shrimp-y pink, a polite place to place your drink and, yes, antiques. If you give it all away up front, where’s the nuance and the mystique? It has been 15 years since I decorated my own living room and I am toying with changing it up but can’t seem to motivate. In the end, I’m immensely happy in the room, as are my family and friends, so why tamper with that? I hope you will share some of your favorite antique sources and also visit our Antique Stalls at the Boston Design Center. I could get lost for hours there!

1 My living room in East Hampton, Long Island. 2 With my dog, Topsy. Contact me: cbreen@idbostonmagazine.com Follow me on Instagram: @chesiebreen Follow the BDC on Instagram: @bostondesigncenter

Chesie Breen Editor-in-Chief, ID BOSTON


BIBLIOPHILE BOSTON: NEW TO THE BOOKSHELF

THOMAS O’BRIEN: LIBRARY HOUSE By Thomas O’Brien Thomas O’Brien’s name has long been synonymous with vintage elegance, modernism, and warm, livable design, so it’s no surprise that his luxurious homes in Bellport, Long Island have attracted significant attention. Thomas O’Brien: Library House captures the gorgeous architecture, interiors, lush gardens, and myriad collections of the effortlessly formal and classic home and design studio (The Library) next door to his celebrated Academy house. In describing the process of imagining and building this dream project—a new house that looks as if it had been built over generations—the book also provides a view into how the author and his husband (and fellow AD100 designer) Dan Fink live and work. Published by Abrams Books, 2018 | www.abramsbooks.com

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CHARLOTTE MOSS ENTERTAINS: CELEBRATIONS AND EVERYDAY OCCASIONS

NINA CAMPBELL INTERIOR DECORATION: ELEGANCE AND EASE

By Charlotte Moss

By Giles Kime, Foreword by Carolina Herrera

To say that designer and tastemaker Charlotte Moss’s newest book on entertaining is a lush, inspiring, gracious visual feast does not begin to do it justice. Moss is a firm believer that everyday life should brim with elegance and romance; as an added treat she reports on other great style icons like Pauline de Rothschild, Marjorie Merriweather Post, and others. For all that these great ladies represent, Moss is right there with them with her impeccable style.

Calling all Anglophiles! Nina Campbell, the doyenne of English design with a strong dash of pluck, offers her newest body of work. Known for her uncanny knack for taking the tenets of classic English style and using them to create a style germane to the twenty-first century, Campbell takes us from the prestige of New York and London, a pied-a-terre in Rome, and a retreat in the English countryside to a historic German hotel and viewing pavilion at Ascot.

Published by Rizzoli, 2018 | www.rizzoliusa.com

Published by Rizzoli, 2018 | www.rizzoliusa.com

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BIBLIOPHILE BOSTON: NEW TO THE BOOKSHELF

INSPIRED DESIGN: THE 100 MOST IMPORTANT INTERIOR DESIGNERS OF THE PAST 100 YEARS By Jennifer Boles In celebration of Kravet Inc.’s centennial, they posed a question to the design industry: Who are the 100 interior designers everybody needs to know? The unforgettable designers who changed how we live? The industry has spoken and a new book, Inspired Design: The 100 Most Important Interior Designers of the Past 100 Years, offers the whole story of interior decorating in one volume—all the greats and what can be learned from them. Edited by Stephen Drucker, former editor in chief of House Beautiful and Martha Stewart Living as well as editor of the New York Times Home and Style sections, Inspired Design is written by Jennifer Boles, editor of The Peak of Chic blog. Boles is the discerning guide to this exhilarating century of design, leading readers from penthouses to palazzos, from Marrakech to Malibu, in search of the very best in inspired design. Published by Vendome Press, 2018 | www.vendomepress.com

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VEERE GRENNEY: A POINT OF VIEW By Veere Grenney, Foreword by Hamish Bowles and Ruth Guilding For someone so established in English design, it’s hard to believe that this is Veere Grenney’s first book. In it, he has compiled a dazzling album of some of his favorite projects, from London townhouses to Long Island estates. He illustrates topics such as composition and balance, his definition of “Englishness” with regards to decorating, and provides the reader with a room-by-room master class. Grenney shares how growing up in New Zealand and traveling to exotic locales like Nepal, India, Afghanistan, Turkey, Burma, Singapore, and Morocco led him to London, where he landed a plum job working at the famed house of Colefax and Fowler, before ultimately setting out on his own.

DIOR AND HIS DECORATORS: VICTOR GRANDPIERRE, GEORGES GEFFROY, AND THE NEW LOOK By Maureen Footer, Foreword by Hamish Bowles The unstoppable renowned historian Maureen Footer has turned out another tour de force in her most recent book on French fashion sensation Christian Dior and the two decorators who helped inform his inimitable style. She examines the intimate connection of couture and interiors, opening a window to the glamorous new style of interior design that emerged in Paris and New York following World War II. Published by Vendome Press, 2018 | www.vendomepress.com

Published by Rizzoli, 2018 | www.rizzoliusa.com

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ÂŽ

Saltsman Brenzel 617-350-7883 | saltsmanbrenzel.com

ÂŽ

Saltsman Brenzel


ERIC HAYDEL

HIS

Though Eric Haydel hails from Louisiana, this dapper, bowtie-embracing gentleman has taken New England by storm. The youngest person to be elected President of the Board of Governors of the American Society of Interior Designers, Haydel was recently named Creative Director of veteran BDC showroom M-Geough. Where did you go this summer? 1

This summer I decided to take advantage of the New England coastline; many places right here are worth discovering. I explored Hull and Nantasket Beach, Ogunquit Beach, Provincetown, and then took a trip to Cooperstown, New York to the Baseball Hall of Fame to watch my nephew play baseball. What is your favorite go-to fabric?

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My favorite go-to fabric is Holland & Sherry. What’s new in the world of Eric Haydel? In our world things are constantly changing. This fall we are introducing three exciting new adventures. The first is the Naturals Collection, our custom rug line with partner Dover Rug & Home. We are also launching a new furniture collection and fabric collection under the Eric Haydel brand. All three will be available starting this fall for trade purchase here in the Showroom.

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We hear you have a new title at The M-Geough Company. My new title, or relationship, at M-Geough is Creative Director. This gives both The M-Geough Company and the Eric Haydel brand the chance to collaborate and elevate our presence as a true resource for our clients in the Boston Design Center. Both companies strive to provide the best in offering, customer service, and inspiration for years to come. What better way to grow my company than to partner with a legacy brand such as M-Geough? What blogs do you follow? The Pink Clutch, The English Room, Lycette Designs, just to name a few…. Do you have a mantra? “It’s more than a bowtie—it’s a lifestyle.” #untiedbowtie

1 Eric Haydel. 2 Haydel’s bedroom in Dorchester. Photo by Michael Lee Photography. 3 Tablescape design for a New York City Hope Lodge fundraiser. Photo by Generic Brand Human Photography. 4 A sketch for Haydel’s furniture line launching this fall. 5 Living room from a recent project. Photo by Michael Lee Photography.

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HERS

A S H L E Y W H I T TA K E R

Ashley Whittaker is the design version of Mary Tyler Moore, captivating the world with her charm and great style. A self-described “neo-traditionalist,” Whittaker was recently named to the ELLE Décor A-List and has been featured on the covers of House Beautiful and VERANDA. Where did you go this summer? My family and I just completed construction on a new Greek Revival farmhouse in Millbrook, New York. I am looking forward to spending a lot of time in Dutchess County this summer, nesting and enjoying the views (and wine) from my new loggia. I’ll be spending a few long summer weekends with my mother in Watch Hill, Rhode Island. I have a four-yearold son and he loves time with his “BarBar” and ice cream in town after a ride on the historic 150-year-old Flying Horse Carousel. We always take a few hours to see my great friend and photographer Read McKendree for some fun snaps of “the baby” and a lot of catching up. What is your favorite go-to fabric? After completing my own house, it’s confirmed: I gravitate towards the classics. I have a lot of fun mixing in new textiles, trims, and wallpaper, but when it comes to something I am going to live with for the next 20 years, I am drawn to the tried and true. Best carpet for families? I love a woven wool carpet. They are so forgiving because of the pattern

and they clean beautifully. I always get the call from my client a month after install, “Help! I spilled an entire glass of red wine.” We send someone over the next day to clean and it’s like it never happened. Until it does—the next time.

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Favorite hardware, faucet, tile? We are loving cement tiles for kitchens, bathrooms, and floors. I promised myself that I wouldn’t get caught up in the trend but they are too beautiful and functional to pass up. That said, the fact that they are both beautiful and functional is the first sign they are probably not just a passing fad.

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Do you have a mantra? Yes, my friends tease me about it: “Done and done!” Make a decision and stick with it. Decorating is not about one perfect choice. It’s about 1,000 small decisions that make up the whole. Not every single one has to be the showstopper. It’s about the sum of the parts. As Albert Hadley said, “Make your home as comfortable and attractive as possible and then get on with living.” That’s what makes for the most beautiful home.

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1 Ashley Whittaker. Portrait by Thomas Loof. 2 Millbrook loggia. Photo by Francesco Lagnese. 3 Whittaker’s son Andrew on the beach. Photo by Read McKendree. 4 Go-to fabric “Bird & Thistle” by Brunschwig & Fils. 5 Family-friendly wool rug by Stark Carpets. Photo by Read McKendree. 6 Favorite cement tiles by Waterworks. 7 Hadley’s own dramatic New York living room. Photo by Dennis Krukowski, image © Albert Hadley, by Adam Lewis, Rizzoli New York, 2005.

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DESIGNER

AMANDA LINDROTH SPINS MAGIC FOR YOUNG C O U P L E O N G R E AT C RA N B E R R Y I S L A N D , M A I N E

words by chesie breen · photography by tria giovan Interior designer Amanda Lindroth is no stranger to the Boston Design Center—she helped design the public spaces with fellow interior designer John Fondas, also of Quadrille Fabrics. This month, Vendome Press will publish Lindroth’s first book, Island Hopping: Amanda Lindroth Design, which features this charming project on the rugged coast of Maine. “When we got a call to meet with a young couple to discuss designing their new house on Great Cranberry Island in Maine, we had no idea that a week later we would be on a ferry, braving sub-freezing temperatures and a stiff wind in the middle of winter to make the crossing from Northeast Harbor to Spurling Point,” giggles Lindroth in her charming nonchalance. Upon arrival, she was swept away by the magic of the location, even in the dreary mid-winter setting. She shares that the house is quite famous; the previous owners had entertained abundantly and thrown legendary dinner parties. “Even I had heard about them in Nassau. The interior was appointed with beautiful polished chintz fabrics, shirred polished-cotton lampshades, and charming wallpapers,” says Lindroth.

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A Native American warrior holds court over the dining room with wicker chairs surrounding an antique mahogany pedestal table.


1 A corner table in the great room optimizes the ocean view. 2+3 Library walls are covered in Nobilis faux-bois wallpaper and a Moroccan rug covers the floor to create warmth.

1 The clients wanted to respect all of these legendary aspects, so Lindroth’s mission was simply to “make it wonderful for them and their beautiful young children, all three under six!” She went about repurposing furniture, scoured for treasures online, and reserved splurges for fabrics which included the cottons of Les Indiennes, Pierre Frey, Carlton V, and Peter Fasano. “Using these hand-printed fabrics seemed like just the right way to freshen a grand dame whose previous attire had been polished chintz,” explains Lindroth.

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2 “We also had a bit of fun finding a pair of fiddlehead wicker chests of drawers and then matching headboards. The fiddlehead motif just feels so right for a children’s attic dorm room in Maine. It is our hope that this young family will have years of delight at Spurling Point.”


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EXPLORE MORE ISLAND OASES IN LINDROTH ’S NEW BOOK ISLAND HOPPING Amanda Lindroth Design — By Amanda Lindroth Photographs by Tria Giovan Illustrations by Aldous Bertram Published by Vendome Press

1 The pine ceiling in the master bedroom was painted a fresh, glossy white and a chaise looks out to the water. 2+3 A pair of fiddlehead chests of drawers and matching fiddlehead headboards in the attic bedroom of the family’s two young girls.

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GP & J BAKER X H&M

G R O U N D W O R K S , K E L LY W E A R S T L E R & L E E J O FA

ANN SACKS & VEDERE


SHOWROOM SPOTLIGHTS NEW COLLECTIONS

N E W & E X PA N D E D S H O W R O O M S

ANN SACKS AND VEDERE INTRODUCE SHIMMERING COLLECTION

KI: KRUEGER INTERNATIONAL

BRIGHT GROUP

Suite 514

Suite 339

21 Drydock Avenue

Established in 1941, KI is a trusted industry resource for contract furniture solutions. Whether designing for business, university, educational, healthcare, or government clients, KI provides superior advice and quality configurations adapted to meet the needs of the targeted market sector.

The Bright Group has more than doubled the size of their showroom, and welcome new lines like Formations and Dennis & Leen.

ANN SACKS unveiled Vedere, a remarkable mirrored-glass tile handcrafted by gifted artisans from Siena, Italy. The tile, which is exclusive to ANN SACKS, gives the appearance of aged mirror, its shimmering face shifting in varying soft color, with a surface broken by contrasting mottling and flecking. GROUNDWORKS INTRODUCES NEW KELLY WEARSTLER AT LEE JOFA Suite 300 Groundworks has launched Kelly Wearstler at Lee Jofa. The collection includes fabric, trimming, wallcovering, and leathers. In her fourth collection with Groundworks, Kelly Wearstler introduces luxurious velvets, intricate embroideries, beautiful jacquards, and printed and laser-cut leather in bold colors. Wearstler looked to the Bauhaus and Vienna Secession movements when designing her collection. GP & J BAKER X H&M Suite 300 Iconic British interiors brand GP & J Baker has collaborated with clothing giant H&M on a womenswear collection. The womenswear collection features cherished GP & J Baker archival prints in fashionable designs by the H&M in-house team and will be available in select stores worldwide, as well as online. “We are thrilled and honored to be collaborating with H&M. The prints selected are part of GP & J Baker’s unique DNA. They are some of our most iconic and most treasured designs, so to see them continuing their journey into a new arena in such an innovative and interesting way in the world of fashion is a wonderful prospect,” says Ann Grafton, managing director and creative director of GP & J Baker in the United Kingdom, which is distributed by Lee Jofa in the U.S.

THEO DÉCOR Suite 526 The BDC welcomes Theo Décor, purveyors of luxury furniture, fabric, and leather. The brand is rooted in the belief that luxury and value should combine to become the dual virtues of design. They are focused on providing fresh inspiration, enabling their clients to design with confidence.

FARROW & BALL Suite 208 Farrow & Ball, leading craftsmen in paint and paper, is moving to the second floor. This iconic British brand, synonymous with superior quality and a commitment to refined craftsmanship, will triple their square footage in a beautiful new showroom flooded with natural light. STARK 17 Drydock Avenue There are few brands with the heritage of STARK, who recently acquired the venerable house of Scalamandré. To celebrate and accommodate this new alliance, they will open a stunning new showroom this fall. Committed to transparency and consistency, STARK is now three generations strong with cousins Chad and Ashley Stark working with their fathers. Their motto of “If you can dream it, we can weave it,” has never rung more true.


INTERIOR DESIGN

WINDOW TREATMENTS

WALLPAPER

SHOWROOM

And much more...

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SOUTH END TOWNHOUSE BY

HACIN + ASSOCIATES

interior design by rebecca rivers & kate kelley construction by the holland companies photography by michael stavaridis words by chesie breen

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“Boston townhouses are often updated, modernized, or furnished in a more contemporary style; the goal of this project was to do something special— to make it theirs by infusing the home with the spirit and energy of its owners and their young children, focusing on their contemporary art collection, their family heritage, and a playfulness with color and space. I know it was successful because the house bursts with positive energy every time I walk in!” DAVID HACIN

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Built in 1890, this six-story townhouse in the historic South End was reimagined for a family with two young boys, seeking a new home in which to grow and establish community roots. Purchased as two separate units, H+A restored the townhouse to its original use as a single-family home. In addition, the design team introduced an in-law suite for multi-generational living, reconfigured the top floor into an airy master suite, and incorporated personalized features, such as a wine cellar and dance studio to celebrate the couple’s passion for wine and ballroom dance.

While the client was interested in preserving some of the historic character that originally drew them to the home, they also desired a modern, casual interior catered to their active family lifestyle. With this in mind, the design team set about creating a dynamic dialogue between the newly introduced contemporary furniture forms and the home’s existing ornate architectural details. Modern interpretations of traditional furniture and decorative elements are woven throughout, recalling the home’s historic past in a tongue-in-cheek manner.

PAGE 19 FAMILY ROOM DETAIL Chair, Moroso; Artwork, Yuko Nishimura 1 PARLOR LEVEL Geometric bookcases, B&B Italia; Custom cowhide rug, Kyle Bunting; ‘Halo’ chandelier, Roll and Hill. Design Notes: The formal living room features a traditional symmetrically balanced layout. A pair of geometric bookcases flanking the fireplace interjects a sense of casual whimsy. A streamlined modern chandelier is paired with an existing ornate ceiling rose. 2 DINING ROOM Artwork, Julian Opie; Custom wallpaper, HuxHux Design; Dining table, B&B Italia. Design Notes: An intricate, heavily geometric custom metallic wallpaper recalls the traditional damask wallpapers typically seen in a formal dining room, but with a modern spin. Similarly, the ornate dark wood dining table of the past has been lightened up and reinterpreted. The B&B Italia dining table features a sleek interpretation of a traditional cabriole leg molded in Corian, a distinctly modern material. 3 FAMILY ROOM Low seating group and table, Ligne Roset; Artwork by Sheila Gallagher; Custom stair runner, Hokanson via Scott Group Studio. Design Notes: The family room has a casual, asymmetrical layout, featuring a seating group with a low table designed as a breakout space for homework and craft activities.

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“When the client first approached us with the idea of restoring the divided townhouse back to its former singlefamily glory, they also asked us to help make it feel lighter, fresher, and more modern. As a modern architecture and design firm, this request is one we often hear from clients and is a task we are used to taking on.

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What made this project special is truly what makes all of our projects special: the clients! This young family’s joy and energy is contagious and I think it shows up in every aspect of the home. I knew it was successful the minute the clients’ two young boys ran in to see their newly completed bedroom and immediately sat down in the oversized chair to read a book together. They couldn’t wait to start using their new room!” REBECCA RIVERS

1 KIDS’ ROOM Bunk bed, Duc Duc; Chair and ottoman, Ligne Roset; Custom area rug, Flor. 2 KIDS’ ROOM Custom wallpaper, Minakani; Wall shelves, Dune; Side table, Kartell. 3 MASTER BEDROOM Artwork, client’s own artwork featuring a Japanese torii; Bed, Poliform; Nightstand, Jesse; Side table, Knoll. 4 MASTER DRESSING ROOM Rug, The Rug Co.; Pendant light, Moooi; Custom drapery in Romo Fabric. 5 MASTER BATHROOM Tub, Wet Style; Tile, Mutina; Bath accessories, Lekker.

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CURVED S O FA S 3 1 Sitting room by David Netto 2 Salon by Drake/Anderson 3 Interior Design by Bunny Williams and Elizabeth Swartz

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TRENDS K I P S B A Y D E C O R AT O R S H O W HOUSE ROUND-UP

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Each year, celebrated interior designers transform a luxury Manhattan home into an elegant exhibition of fine furnishings, art, and technology. This all began in 1973 when several dedicated supporters of the Kips Bay Boys & Girls Club launched the Kips Bay Decorator Show House to raise critical funds for much needed after-school and enrichment programs for New York City children. Two trends in particular caught our eye this year: sensuously curved sofas and pretty rooms still rule the day. There was definitely a return to pretty decorating—especially with bedrooms. Mark D. Sikes and Brian del Toro created masterful bedrooms with chinoiserie walls and kept them feeling fresh and modern with crisp color combinations. Alessandra Branca embraced classic chintz, but again made it modern with painted blue ceilings and grass cloth covered walls. 4

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4 Bedroom by Mark D. Sikes 5 Bedroom by Brian del Toro 6 Bedroom by Branca Inc.

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY NICKOLAS SARGENT (1, 3–4, 6) & MARCO RICCA (2, 5)

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DESIGNER

GERALD POMEROY T RA N S F O R M S A D I V I D E D S O U T H E N D B R O W N S T O N E I N T O A FA M I LY H O M E

Receiving room of main living space on the parlor/entry level. Custom millwork and furnishings. Artistic Frame chairs. Rose Tarlow stool, Vaughan sconces, Arteriors chandelier. Custom-mixed peach lacquered ceiling.

interior design by gerald pomeroy, gerald pomeroy interiors, boston, ma 路 architecture by ruth bennett, rba architecture, belmont, ma 路 construction by preston lemanski, lemanski construction, marblehead, ma 路 photography by eric roth 路 words by chesie breen

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On a quiet leafy street next to a playground in the South End of Boston sat a stately five-floor brownstone in need of revival. A family with two young daughters living in the lower three floors decided it was time to return the building to its single-family glory. Along came the seriously talented and unflappable Gerald Pomeroy, who worked with a team of architects and builders to restore the building over a period of three years. “Years after owning the bottom three floors of a row house in Boston’s South End 8 Streets Neighborhood, our clients got the opportunity to purchase the top two floors and return their building back to a single home for their family of four. After more than two years of planning and the total interior demolition and rebuilding of the five-floor residence, the family is now enjoying their new home. The interior rooms have been designed in keeping with those of a South End single-family row house built in 1899—with the twenty-first-century upgrades needed to adapt to the needs of a modern family,” says Pomeroy. The parlor/entry level contains the gracious foyer and the floorthrough receiving/drawing rooms, while the garden level is the family living space—kitchen, sitting area, dining, and a powder room. The second floor is a floor-through master bedroom suite, complete with a dressing room for the lady of the house. The third floor is devoted to bedrooms for the two young girls, their bath, and a laundry room. The fourth floor has a den, guest bedroom, and bath. “One thing I endeavored to do was to put together a team that would work well with long-standing clients,” says Pomeroy. With painstaking care, a façade of bay windows at the back of the house were restored and the building’s interior was totally gutted and rebuilt, one layer at a time. The house now sits proud in all of its glory.

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Family sitting room with direct access to their private garden. Sofa, chairs and ottoman, Kravet Furniture. Lee Jofa carpet. Fireplace Delft tiles, Tile Showcase. Table, Rose Tarlow Melrose House. Spatter table lamp, Bunny Williams Home.


1 1 Custom cabinetry painted Farrow & Ball Drawing Room Blue with brass hardware, trim and faucet. Kravet counter stools, lights above counter from Urban Electric. 2 Banquet seating for family dining. Antique blue and white plates mixed with Christopher Spitzmiller Delft blue marble plates accent the walls. Table is Eero Saarinen by Knoll. Buffalo check fabric, Kravetz. Pendant, Neirmann Weeks. 3 Her desk. Custom pin board, striped fabric, Manuel Canovas. Chair, McGuire.

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5 1 Master bedroom. Custom headboard, bedskirt and curtain fabric Schumacher Sarawak Paisley/Alabaster. Stark carpet. Vintage chandelier, Niermann Weeks. Bedside lamps, Vaughan. French chairs, Charles Spada. Gilded stack tables, Vaughan. Table lamp, Rose Tarlow. Wallcovering, Phillip Jeffries. 2 Master bath. Trim and cabinetry paint, Farrow & Ball All White. Floor tile, Tile Showcase. Sconces and pendant, Vaughan. 3 Youngest daughter’s bedroom. Wallpaper, Willowbrook by Jane Churchill. Carpet, Landry & Arcari. Lantern, Circa Lighting, custom painted. 4 Second floor landing to the master bedroom. Urn, Charles Spada. 5 Oldest daughter’s bedroom. Wallpaper, Iconic Scalamandré zebra in periwinkle. Lantern, Circa Lighting, custom painted.

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KITCHEN CABINET

ID BOSTON QUERIES TOP DESIGNERS AND KITCHEN E X P E R T S O N T H E L AT E S T TRENDS IN KITCHENS

Christopher Peacock Kristen Rivoli Scavolini Boston Jewett Farms + Co.


Boston Design Center

CHRISTOPHER PEACOCK

Suite 630

ID BOSTON sat down with Christopher Peacock—the legendary kitchen designer who began his career at the iconic British furniture retailer Terrence Conran, then crossed the pond to work as a designer at the Boston Design Center, followed by the Architects and Designers Building in New York City. What followed? The 1992 launch of Christopher Peacock Cabinetry out of a tasteful showroom in Greenwich, Connecticut. The rest is history. The brand has enjoyed a meteoric rise with showrooms worldwide, and established itself as the paradigm of beautiful, hand-crafted classic British cabinetry infused with modern American sensibility. Here’s what this visionary beacon in kitchen design had to say. Christopher Peacock made its mark by reinvigorating the look of the stainlesssteeled 1930s kitchen by infusing it with sexy hardware, gutsy lighting, and crisp white surfaces, transforming a sterile look into one that is visually bold and conducive to family living. How have you continued to improve upon and evolve this look that still reigns supreme? I am always exploring different materials and finishes. White kitchens are attractive because they are safe, and look good in almost any environment. I am always looking to mix it up with clever decoration, which could mean a special wall tile, wallcovering, counter material, and mixing exotic woods in with the white. Many white kitchens are actually not pure white; we often use a pale dove grey and toneon-tone colors that soften the look. Mix in some beautiful custom hardware and you have a classic, timeless appeal that is anything but sterile. Does the white kitchen still rule the day? What other colors are you introducing? We are known for creating the white kitchen, but honestly if you visit one of our showrooms you will see so much more. In Boston we have a deep blue kitchen and a black-and-oak modern kitchen on display. People are drawn to these rich colors, and more and more we are seeing the trends change. I am installing a new black kitchen collection in New York later this year, which promises to be stunning. I am

using a new rose gold hardware collection I designed to accent it. Can’t wait! What is the best advice you could give someone when designing a kitchen? Find someone who really knows how to design properly and with practical experience on what works and what doesn’t. We pride ourselves on only hiring the best. Our team in Boston have a track record of many years in the business and really know their game. The relationship between client and designer is everything and working with a true cabinet designer is paramount. Look at their resume, at their portfolio, and the type of projects they work on and decide if it’s a good fit. What are the focal points in the kitchen that one can use to really make a statement? A great sink, a boldly-colored oven and stove? A chrome hood? It depends on the room shape and layout. I’m not a fan of overblowing a big section of cabinetry because balance in the room design is key. We certainly will use a signature element, like a metal hood, a fabulous stove, or a mix of materials to emphasize a space, but the rest of the room must be in harmony with it. Not every room calls for a single focal point, but when it does it’s a great opportunity to bring attention to the symmetry of the space and how it relates to adjoining rooms.

What features in a kitchen are most utilized but often overlooked in the design process? Floors and ceilings. The color and texture of the floor adds a significant amount to the overall surface area of the room décor, so it should be carefully thought out with the other material selections in the room. Similarly, the ceiling is an opportunity to do something special. It doesn’t have to be flat white! What are creative solutions to command centers? Are large islands still the trend? Command centers are a thing of the past for me. In the current digital world, we are disconnected and can roam free, bringing our command center with us on a laptop or tablet. The island is the new work center and with that in mind I have never liked islands that are too big. The room scale should dictate the size, but make sure you can reach across it and serve someone, or wipe up a spill.


KRISTEN RIVOLI

Invites Us for Lunch at a Hilltop Residence Overlooking Boston

Boston-based interior designer Kristen Rivoli is known for her ability to seamlessly bring the mash-up of traditional and modern styles full circle. In this hilltop kitchen overlooking downtown Boston, she created an open, modern space in a saturated sky blue, juxtaposed against warm walnut cabinetry with a live-edge counter top and Moroccan-style tile floor. We asked her what clients today are looking for and what makes for a successful kitchen. She invited us to stay and gave us a tour. What are your clients looking for in kitchen design today? My clients continue to want a highly functioning cook’s kitchen that looks stylish and timeless. They love to cook so want durable finishes, but because they are spending most of their time in the kitchen they want it to look as beautifully designed as the rest of their home. Often times the kitchen opens to a family room, so the level of finish and design needs to be there too. What are your favorite finishes for cabinets? I love color played against natural wood. There is something to be said for adding warmth to the kitchen through wood. I’ve also seen a lot of metals for cabinet panels that are really chic, like an antiqued brass. Favorite hardware, tile sources, countertops? For tile, I love Ann Sacks for their breadth of tiles, from boutique bespoke to standard classics. For countertops I love working with Cumar for their huge selection of natural and manmade stone and a full-service team and I love going into Raybern’s for hardware, they have so many styles to choose from. What are your favorite showrooms at the BDC? There are so many for kitchens… Ann Sacks, Waterworks, Tile Showcase, Jewitt Farms, Paris Ceramics, Christopher Peacock, Scavolini Kitchen & Bath…it just depends on what style my clients are looking for. Where do you turn for inspiration? I’m on Instagram a lot for interior design inspiration, there are so many feeds for anything you’re interested in…all you have to do is search a hash-tagged keyword and you’ll have so much to scroll through. Pinterest is always a good resource if a client is trying to figure out what style they want to have in their new kitchen; they’ll have thousands of pictures to search through.


SCAVOLINI BOSTON ID BOSTON Sits Down with Showroom Owner Alisha Serras to Learn about the Latest in Kitchen Design

Founded in 1961, Scavolini is widely considered to be the industry leader in Italian kitchen design. Known for their use of only the most exceptional materials and their application of exclusive finishes that are both sleek and sexy, their kitchens, baths, and now living spaces are unsurpassed when seeking a modern and contemporary kitchen with clean lines that embodies the Italian sense of beauty. Here’s what Alisha Serras had to say. Tell us about the special features, exclusive finishes, and custom hardware for which Scavolini is so revered. The Mood kitchen is designed with Saxony Walnut cabinets, lacquered doors in Stained Aluminum, and a modern 18.5 cm extra white porcelain stoneware countertop on the island. The hardware throughout is Satin Nickel and the bookcase is created out of our Fluida Wall System in Iron Grey. Diesel Open Workshop is a partnership between The Diesel Living Team and Scavolini. The cabinets are a mix of Dove Grey matte lacquer and Soft Steel Frames with Ribbed Glass. The Floating Stock Rack System above completes the space. The Carattere Kitchen is Iron Grey matte lacquered framed cabinet doors with an integrated groove handle and Anthracite Fabric interiors. Velo LED lights are vertically built into the glass wall units and Extra White Porcelain Stoneware is continuous on the countertops and wall panel which houses the steel hood. The Liberamente kitchen is designed in a Stained Steel lacquer finish with open tall units. The island cabinets are Light Grey matte lacquer doors, complete with stainless steel countertops.

What are you seeing trend-wise in kitchen design? Pops of color and two-tone, dark, moody, and dramatic colors in cabinetry, open shelving, texture and non-formal living. What are the most important things to consider when designing a kitchen? Functionality, efficiency, luxury, comfort, investment, and knowing how the client lives within the space. What is the best way to update a kitchen? The best way to update a kitchen is to not update a kitchen. Investing in a full renovation complete with new cabinetry, countertops, and appliances is always the way to go. How does Scavolini incorporate technology in kitchen design? Scavolini is constantly updating their product using nanotechnology as well as eco-friendly and non-toxic materials. Scavolini offers motorized cabinetry, mechanized hinges, and sensor lighting. The factory is also 100% reliant on solar-powered electricity.


PHOTO : BRIAN VANDEN BRINK

P O L H E M U S S AV E RY DA S I LVA

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What makes an exceptional design and building experience? Find out at psdab.com/why


Boston Design Center

JEWETT FARMS + CO.

Suite 626

We love the story behind Matthew Lord and Mike Myers, who started a small woodshop on a dirt road in Maine back in 1999 and through hard work, passion, and commitment to quality built it into a thriving business with a gorgeous showroom at the Boston Design Center. The two have worked tirelessly to create a culture of quality and craftmanship, finding creative and sustainable ways to grow a traditionally rooted business in a modern economy. Curious about their story, we asked them for more insight on what it means to have a Jewett Farms + Co. kitchen. Jewett Farms + Co. is dedicated to craftsmanship and passionate about quality; tell us about your process for hand selecting the wood you use? When Matthew Lord decided to open a cabinet shop in 1999, he was inspired by the craftsmen furniture makers he had worked for and learned from in Northern New Hampshire. He wanted to bring the elements of traditional craftsmanship into modern-day kitchen construction to create functional and beautiful kitchens that would stand the test of time. Our process in the cabinet shop is based around our skilled team of cabinetmakers; they are charged with seeing through a project from start to finish. This begins with the selection of materials; wood is chosen by hand and planned out to ensure that it best represents the beauty of the timber and fits the space it’s being built into. They look at the pattern of the grain and the way it will match up along the length of a cabinet run. This is of particular importance when we are working with reclaimed wood where the character of each plank will vary, and the selection process is critical to the overall look of the finished project. How is the cabinetry constructed? The key part of our cabinetry construction is our team of craftsmen. When a project enters the build phase it is assigned a small team of cabinetmakers who construct every piece. It is not assembly-

line production; our team builds every piece of the project, from doors to drawers. One of our specific construction standards is to lock miter all our corners, a highquality building method that creates strength and stability as well as making corner seams invisible. We build single face frame cabinetry, extending the face frame as far as possible, just as cabinetmakers did in the past when cabinets were built in place in the kitchen. Face frames that butt against one another to create a seam will never be found in a Jewett Farms + Co. kitchen. Our doors, drawer fronts, and face frames are built from one-inch solid wood so they are strong and durable and will last for generations of kitchen use. What are your preferred finishes? Our commitment to our environment as well as to the health of our team and our clients has led us to almost exclusively use water-based and low/non-VOC finishes. The Jewett Farms + Co. finish team blends all our colors to match in-house. All projects that are spray finished use an Italian water-borne paint and are sprayed by our team. Hand-painted projects are primed twice and painted once in the shop and then given a final finish coat on-site after installation. Over the past five years or so we have been increasingly using a Danish product called Rubio, a non-VOC oil that

protects wood and can be tinted with different colors. Rubio was developed as a hardwood floor finishing oil, but its application in cabinetry is a beautiful way to add stain to wood while allowing the natural grain to shine. Tell us why your soapstone counters are special. Soapstone is a unique and interesting countertop material. Because it is nonporous, it is naturally antibacterial and can withstand hot or cold (no trivets needed!). It doesn’t require chemical sealants, so it doesn’t have any off-gassing and it can be re-sanded periodically to repair any scratches and bring it back to looking new. The quality of our stone slabs is exceptional; they are sourced from Brazilian quarries, where the workers are paid fairly and have safe working conditions. Do you get involved in actual kitchen design and layout? What inspires this process? Our in-house designers truly love what they do. Our involvement in the design of a kitchen runs the gamut from full design of an empty space including hardware, color scheme, and lighting, to creating a layout from architectural plans, to merely tweaking a designer’s plan to fit our building methods.


ANCIENT MEETS MODERN Revolutionizing an age-old craft, our Tylist™ designers and robotic manufacturing create remarkable works of art. Inspired by your concept or our collections, Artaic delivers. Tour our design and manufacturing studio at the Boston Design Center, suite 644.

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TASTEMAKER STYLE

One of the most rewarding aspects of working at the Boston Design Center is being surrounded by gorgeous and visually stimulating fabrics. In anticipation of Heading Home to Dinner which will take place at Fall Market, we decided to start staging some of our own inspired table-top moments.

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EVERYDAY ELEGANCE AT Y O U R S E R V I C E

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Enter into the world of Everyday Elegance, carefully crafted by the incredibly gifted and renowned decorator Alex Papachristidis, along with his dear friend and collaborator Lisa McCarthy. What started as a mutual interest in creating beautiful tablescapes for their own dinner parties blossomed into Everyday Elegance, a platform where one can purchase the carefully curated looks. The work of interior decorator Alex Papachristidis has been described as thoughtful, personal, sophisticated, and eclectic. Mario Buatta calls Papachristidis “one of today’s eminent tastemakers, known for arresting, elegant interiors that meld classical motifs with a modern perspective and sophisticated details.”

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Lisa McCarthy spent the last six years as President of Bernard Maisner Studio. The collection of stationary and gift products is carried in Bergdorf Goodman, Neiman Marcus and numerous high end specialty stores across the country. Besides creating beautiful tablescapes, McCarthy and Papachristidis share a passion for animals. They both sit on the Animal Rescue Fund of the Hamptons, where McCarthy currently serves as the President and Papachristidis is intricately involved with the Designer Show House.

PAGE 47 “Kalamkari” Border on Ivory Linen from Home Couture at QUADRILLE. PAGE 48–49 1 “Bellecombe” from Manuel Canovas and Timberline print from Lee Jofa. 2 “Solanum” embroidery and Bokhara Susani from Brunschwig & Fils. 3 Xian Linen print from Brunschwig & Fils. 4 “Kalamkari” in multi reds from Home Couture and “Talitha Embroidery” from Schumacher. 5 “Maupas” in Cerise and “Ambroise” in Tomate from Manual Canovas. 6 “Kalamkari” in Royal Blue from Home Couture and “Bunny” in delft from Schumacher. 7 “Paloma” woven in marine blue and “Mariga” plaid in delft. 8 “Aurimont” in Corail and Gramont in Tomate from Manuel Canovas. LEFT 1 “Nancy” chintz and Gainsbourg stripe from the Vogue Living Collection for Schumacher. 2 ”Gloria” print and Horst Stripe from the Vogue Living Collection for Schumacher. 3 Bold graphics from China Seas and Alan Campbell at QUADRILLE.


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ANTIQUING THE EAST COAST These Are a Few of Our Favorite Things

GRAY ANTIQUES Baltimore/Mount Vernon, Maryland We first came across Gray Antiques on Instagram (@grayantiques) and are now both obsessed and impressed by their highly unique and sophisticated mix of fine antiques and vintage pieces. Located in the historic district of Mount Vernon in Baltimore, Maryland, the shop was started by Carol L. Vargo and Katherine Behrens Crosby. Their work combines Vargo’s keen eye and retail experience with Crosby’s interior design background and knowledge of antiques from stints at Sotheby’s and Christie’s in New York and Boston. They offer, by appointment only, a range of antiques and decorative pieces in their shop, including continental antiques from the nineteenth century, twentieth-century pieces from Maison Jansen and Paul McCobb, as well as handmade lamp shades from Massachusetts-based Perrotine Co. and decorative tabletop accessories from Aerin. They believe today’s most modern and fresh homes are layered and personal, blending timeless pieces with new items to create an environment unique to the owners’ personalities. While you can certainly shop their well-edited website (www. grayantiques.com), the real payoff comes when you work directly with this duo to source your design needs. Most of their pieces are acquired through auction, and they are experts at navigating this process and assisting designers and their clients with finding that perfect piece.

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LUSSIER LAJOIE CUSTOM FRAMING Market Stalls, Boston Design Center 2nd Floor West Wing, Suite 203 Anyone who visits the Market Stalls at the Boston Design Center knows that the secret weapon for spotting great finds with pedigree is Joe Didonato. This month he has his carefully trained eye on a new dealer: Lussier Lajoie Custom Framing. Along with exquisite and customdesigned framing, owner Daniel Lajoie sources a selection of rare and one-of-a-kind antique prints and reproductions. Adhering to museum conservation standards, products, and techniques, Lussier Lajoie Custom Framing designs and creates tailormade frames that beautifully showcase each piece.

TRADE SECRETS Falls Village, Connecticut When interior designer Bunny Williams founded Trade Secrets with her husband, antiques dealer John Rosselli, from their home in Falls Village, Connecticut in 2001, their mantra quickly became, “If something is worth doing, it’s worth overdoing!” Today, Trade Secrets is a must-visit destination every May for everyone from garden aficionados and collectors to anyone just interested in spending an afternoon supporting their community. “We’ve grown by leaps and bounds and raised a lot of important funds for Women’s Services. We’ve had all sorts of weather over the years, including snow on the ground, but it doesn’t dampen the joy that comes from a stroll through a beautiful country garden and shopping for rare plants and garden antiques,” says Williams. This year, guests toured the couple’s gardens in Falls Village and were able to see Williams’s new creative studio for the first time. Also on tour was architect Gil Schafer’s garden, Middlefield, which he designed in collaboration with landscape architect Deborah Nevins. Rounding out the triangle was Wethersfield Estate, about which architectural historian Henry Hope Reed, Jr. wrote, “The inspiration is grand, the tradition noble, and the vision all-seeing.”

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KINSEY MARABLE & CO. PRIVATE LIBRARIES Charlottesville, Virginia What do designers, past and present—from Albert Hadley and Mark Hampton to Steven Gambrel, David Kleinberg, Charlotte Moss, and Richard Keith Langham—have in common? When the need arises to help a client curate and build a unique library, they all turn to Kinsey Marable for his highly coveted, distinctive expertise. Located in Charlottesville, Virginia, Kinsey Marable & Co. specializes in furnishing distinctive libraries from New York and California to London and Paris. Seventeen years ago, Kinsey, then an investment banker at Goldman Sachs, gave up securities trading to deal in a more exotic commodity: rare and out-of-print books. Today, he is widely considered the premier American source for libraries. Though subjects such as architecture, fine arts, gardening, and design usually anchor his commissions, his knowledge is vast and versatile; for Oprah Winfrey he assembled a complete collection of first-edition Pulitzer Prize winners. Another service he provides is cataloging and organizing your existing collection, as well as providing conservation services and meticulous binding and leatherwork. Buying an entire collection and selling it intact is another forte—he cites the libraries of Nancy Lancaster and David and Evangeline Bruce as examples.

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DESIGNER

SPOTLIGHT

LINDSEY ADELMAN

Lindsey Adelman has elevated lighting design to an art form akin to important works of sculpture. Known for mixing unconventional metals with handblown glass, she is changing the way we think about illumination. Her fixtures, with their shape-shifting forms in clever mixes of raw materials, are often the focal point of the room. Adelman began her career in 1999 after interning at the Smithsonian and studying at Rhode Island School of Design. In 2006 she opened her studio and launched the now iconic “Branching Bubble” chandelier, which unleashed her aesthetic for creating industrial modular systems that capture the ephemeral, fleeting beauty of nature. Adelman’s work has been exhibited at the Cooper-Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, Design Miami, Nilufar Gallery, and most recently at Salone del Mobile in Milan, Italy. With studios in New York and Los Angeles, we are happy to welcome Lindsey Adelman Studio to the Boston Design Center.

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1 Cherry Bomb Cage CBC.36.01 2 Cherry Bomb Fringe Installation 3 Branching Bubble BB.08.03 4 Drop System DS.79.01

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CUISINE

CHICKADEE The Innovation and Design Building has broken into full-on birdsong with the opening of Chickadee Restaurant under the ownership of culinary veterans, by way of No. 9 Park, Ted Kilpatrick and Chef John DaSilva. Open Monday through Saturday from 11:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m., the restaurant serves lunch and dinner; the bar features a curated wine list, unique beers, artisanal cocktails, and bar snacks. The restaurant seats accommodates 60 while the bar sits about 30, with an additional 30 seats available on the Promenade Patio. Kilpatrick holds court at the front of the house while DaSilva brews culinary magic in the kitchen. The two are extremely dedicated to using local ingredients and blending them in unexpected ways, and they’re focused on creating a stylish gathering place for IDB tenants to share ideas and food.

“The chickadee is a small and mighty animal that will sit next to any other type of bird, unafraid, and willingly eat and share anything. The little bird is social, approachable, and playful, and that is precisely the type of restaurant Ted and I wanted to create,” says DaSilva. What can we look for on the menu? House-made pastas in both half and full orders are popular. There is an excellent selection of fresh vegetables prepared with tantalizing rubs and spices, and fun bar snacks like dips and spreads with house-made pita feel contemporary and modern. The reviews are in and Chickadee delivers everything promised and then some. Chirp away!

And, what’s with the name? The chickadee is the Massachusetts state bird, and DaSilva became intrigued by it during a poignant time in his life spent at his wife’s family home in Lexington.

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BOW WOW BLITZ RECAP Last spring, the Boston Design Center brought back a time-honored tradition and hosted the Bow Wow Blitz, a celebration and silent auction benefitting the Second Chance Animal Shelter, a no-kill, non-profit organization. Designers and BDC showrooms collaborated to create wildly inventive dog beds and houses that awed partygoers and raised important funds for Second Chance. Marquis sponsor Peter Fasano worked alongside the BDC creative team to transform the second floor Gallery. Take a look!

THANK YOU TO COMMITTEE OUR HOST COMMITTEE COMMITTEE

SPONSORS

SHOWROOMS

DESIGNERS

Stacey Bewkes

Erin Gates

Susan M-Geough

Elizabeth Benedict Kristin Paton

Ailanthus

M-Geough

Peter Fasano

Quintessence

Elements of Style

M-Geough

Susan Burt

Susan Philbin

ANN SACKS

Blue Edge

Chesie Breen

Eric Haydel

Kristin Paton

Editor, ID Boston

Eric Haydel Design

Kristin Paton Interiors

Liz Caan

Platemark

Charles Spada

The Martin Group

Liz Caan

Cathy Journalist

Gerald Pomeroy

Kristina Crestin

Susan Reddick

Cowtan & Tout

Quadrille

Liz Caan & Co.

Cowtan & Tout

Gerald Pomeroy Interiors

Lisa Fine

Kim Roberts

Duralee

ROMO

Lisa Fine

Cathy Kincaid

Susanna Salk

Cean Irminger

Roomscapes

Edelman Leather

Scalamandré

Lisa Fine Textiles

Cathy Kincaid Interiors

Design Author & Stylist

Cathy Kincaid

Renée Rucci

Eric Haydel

Schumacher

Gary Fisher

Stacy Kunstel

Vani Sayeed

Dunes and Duchess

Vani Sayeed Studios

Bill Lewis

Vani Sayeed

Farrow & Ball

Studio 534

Duralee

Tonia Galeno

Kristan McLaughlin

Nancy Serafini

Sean Matijevich

Nancy Serafini

J.D. Staron

Tile Showcase

Ailanthus

General Manager, BDC

Nancy Serafini Interior Design

Dan Moon

Scott Sloat

Waterworks

Jane Morrison

Gregory Van Boven

Jewett Farms + Co. Lee Jofa

Emergency Production The Leading Edge Drapery


M I C H A E L S TAVA R I D I S P H OTO G R A P H E R

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ARCHITECTURE + INTERIORS S TAVA R I D I S . C O M M @ M I C H A E L S TAVA R I D I S . C O M

Townhouse / Boston, MA Hacin + Associates / Boston, MA


PHOTOGRAPHY CREDITS cover Photo by Tria Giovan page five A Message from Jamestown President Michael Phillips Portrait by Garrett Rowland Photography Photos by Kristin Teig Photography page seven Dear Readers

Page 11 right photos by © Sabine Weiss (top) and © Alain Lonchampt / Centre des monuments nationaux (bottom) pages fourteen & fifteen

Pages 40–41 photos by Greg Premru Photography Page 43 photos courtesy of the showroom Pages 44–45 photos by Eric Roth

His & Hers

pages forty-seven to fifty

Photos courtesy of each designer with credits noted on page

Tastemaker Style

pages sixteen to twenty-one Amanda Lindroth

Photos by Julia Robbs Page 50 photos courtesy of Everyday Elegance pages fifty-three to fifty-five

Portrait and photo by Julia Robbs

Photos by Tria Giovan

pages eight to eleven

pages twenty-two & twenty-three

Bibliophile Boston

Showroom Spotlights

Covers courtesy of Abrams Books, Rizzoli, and Vendome Press

Page 55 photo by Julia Robbs (bottom right)

Photos courtesy of each showroom

pages fifty-seven & fifty-eight

Page 8 photos by Francesco Lagnese

pages twenty-five to twenty-nine

Page 9 left photos by BFA Images (top) and © Charlotte Moss (bottom)

Photos by Michael Stavaridis

Page 9 right photos by Joshua McHugh (top) and Paul Raeside (bottom)

Travel: Antiquing the East Coast Photos courtesy of each vendor

Designer Spotlight

Hacin + Associates

page thirty Trends: Kips Bay Round-Up

Photos courtesy of Lindsey Adelman page fifty-nine Cuisine: Chickadee Photos by Kristin Teig Photography

Photo credits noted on page page sixty-one

Page 10 photos by Pieter Estersohn Photography (top) and Jaime Ardiles-Arce / © 2015 The Condé Nast Publications (bottom)

pages thirty-one to thirty-seven

Page 11 left photos by David Oliver

pages thirty-eight to forty-five

Gerald Pomeroy Photos by Eric Roth

Kitchen Cabinet Pages 38–39 photos courtesy of the showroom and © Kevin Nixon Photography

Bow Wow Blitz Photos by Caitlin Cunningham Photography


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ID Boston: Volume 11  

ID Boston is the bi-annual magazine of the Boston Design Center with readership of over 10,000 through digital and print editions. Content f...

ID Boston: Volume 11  

ID Boston is the bi-annual magazine of the Boston Design Center with readership of over 10,000 through digital and print editions. Content f...