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V O L U M E T H I R T E E N · FA L L 2 019

THE WELL ADORNED HOME B Y C AT H Y K I N C A I D IN BIBLIOPHILE BOSTON

Charlotte Barnes: The Queen of Interpretation Nick Olsen Turns a Stodgy Duchess County Cabin into a Fearless Blend of Inviting Pattern, Bold Color, and Plucky Geometrics Codman & Sleeper: Boston’s Interior Design Pioneers at the Dawning of Design


L U X U R I O U S F I T T E D C A B I N E T RY F O R E V E RY R O O M BOSTON DESIGN CENTER SUITE 635 BOSTONINQUIRIES@PEACOCKHOME.COM (888) 889-8891 NEW YORK

LONDON

CANNES

JAKARTA CHICAGO

NASHVILLE SHOWROOM OPENING SPRING 2020 PEACOCKHOME.COM

DALLAS

BOSTON

SAN FRANCISCO

GREENWICH

SHORT HILLS


V O L U M E T H I R T E E N · FA L L 2 019

IN THIS ISSUE 8

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Bibliophile Boston

His & Hers

new to the bookshelf

tom scheerer & lisa fine

nick olsen

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35

39

Design

17 Design

charlotte barnes

Design

Design

hickory chair

trend report

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Design

Cuisine

Travel

dawning of design

the art of the host

indagare & architectural digest

D E S I G N · S T Y L E · C U LT U R E · C U I S I N E Also in this Issue 5 A Message from Jamestown President Michael Phillips 7 Dear Readers 32 Century Furniture & Carrier and Company Collection 38 BDC & ASID Challenge Young Designers to Bring Their A Game 51 Cuisine: Flour Bakery & Café 54 Kitchen & Bath: Sarah Blank 57 Kitchen & Bath: Christopher Peacock

On the Cover · Bibliophile Boston: New to the Bookshelf — The Well Adorned Home by Cathy Kincaid · Page 8

IDBOSTONMAGAZINE.COM

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michael phillips

Editor-in-Chief Design Editor

chesie breen

caroline sholl

General Manager, Leasing & Partnerships

kristan mclaughlin

coco van der wolk | Market Editor niamh o’maille | Coordinator lauren delorenzo Contributing Photographers miguel flores-vianna · francesco lagnese · joshua mchugh · george ross Associate Editor

Copy Editor Publisher

joanna boyle

kathy bush-dutton | Published by new england home · jamestown, l.p. To advertise, please email Jill Korff at jkorff@nehomemag.com.

IDBOSTONMAGAZINE.COM

ID BOSTON is the magazine of Boston Design Center, whose showrooms include: Ailanthus

Brown Jordan

Anees Furniture & Design

Brunschwig & Fils

ANN SACKS

Design Within Reach Contract

Jewett Farms + Co.

Merida Osborne & Little

Carlisle Wide Plank Floors

DiscoverTile

Key Office Interiors KI

Paris Ceramics

Kravet

Century Furniture

Edgewater Gallery

Phillip Jeffries

Lee Jofa

Charles Spada

Eric Haydel

Pierre Frey

Linda Cabot Design

Blanche Field

Farrow & Ball

Lindsey Adelman Studio

PID Floors of Boston

Christopher Peacock

Boston Hardwood and Kitchen

Contract Sources

Liz Roache

Cowtan & Tout

Grand Rapids Furniture Company

The Boston Shade Company / System 7

Craft & Caro

Holly Hunt (temp space)

Market Stalls

J.D. Staron

The Martin Group, Inc.

JANUS et Cie

Masterpiece Framing

Ardente Group Artaic Baker Furniture

The Bright Group

Creative Office Pavilion / Herman Miller

Downsview Kitchens

M-Geough

Porcelanosa Quadrille Robert Allen Duralee Romo Scavolini Kitchen & Bath

ONE DESIGN CENTER PLACE, BOSTON, MA 02210

Schumacher / Patterson Flynn Martin Scott Group Studio STARK Scalamandré Steven King Decorative Carpets Studio 534 Surya Theo Décor Tile Showcase Waterworks

©2014 Jamestown, L.P. All rights reserved.

Executive Editor


BRIGHT

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JER DINING CHAIR by DOUGLAS LEVINE | HANDCRAFTED IN AMERICA NEW YORK

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200 Boylston St, Boston, MA 02116 | (617) 451-2212 | info@lignerosetboston.com


A MESSAGE FROM JAMESTOWN PRESIDENT

MICHAEL PHILLIPS This fall ushers in great progress at the Boston Design Center as we welcome several vibrant new showrooms to our community. Pierre Frey opened their doors on the third floor this summer, bringing to Boston their catalogue of rich designs created and manufactured in the purest French tradition. Patrick Frey will share insights about the 85-year-old family-owned brand at this year’s Boston Design Market, the BDC’s capstone event. We’re honored to welcome this Paris-based textile business to the BDC and hope you will join us in raising a glass to celebrate their rich tradition and future here. Another addition to the BDC’s third floor is another family-owned business, Anees Furniture & Design. At the forefront of custom furniture manufacturing, Anees Furniture & Design has grown immensely since their start in 1997 and we’re eager to see what they do at the BDC. Joining Anees and Pierre Frey on the third floor this fall is Surya, which aims to simplify the design process by providing coordinated accessories for any look. Surya has expanded their offerings significantly since their beginning as a small rug supplier, now offering accent furniture, pillows, decorative accents, bedding, and more. One floor up, Holly Hunt opened a temporary showroom this spring while their permanent 13,000-squarefoot showroom is being perfected for early 2020. Their custom-made products, including furniture, lighting, rugs, textiles, and leathers, are coveted by designers who will enjoy an elevated experience in their new space on the second floor. Moving down to the ground floor, we welcome two fantastic additions to the BDC promenade, Circa Lighting and System 7. Adjacent to the Chickadee restaurant, Circa Lighting’s 6,000-square-foot space offers a vast array of lighting designs in a boutique-style atmosphere. System 7, previously located on the sixth floor, provides smart home technology systems in a state-of-the-art space next to Flour Bakery + Cafe. We’re thrilled to welcome all of these showrooms to the Boston Design Center community, and invite you to explore their spaces on your next visit.

Michael Phillips President, Jamestown Executive Editor, ID BOSTON


Fabrics, Wallpapers, Carpets, Furniture & Accessories

Boston D esign Center SUI TE 322 - Boston, M A 02210 857 277 0376 pierref rey. com


DEAR READERS

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Welcome back from what we hope was a restorative summer full of happy times spent with family and friends. I live on eastern Long Island, and often feel like we wait all year for the few short, sweet months of summer, and would rather be here than anywhere else. After an inspiring trip to Santorini, Greece, and a friend’s joyous wedding in the United Kingdom, I found myself fully charged and ready to return to my beloved East Hampton. They say the best part of traveling is coming home. I relish the time we spend entertaining at home; friendly tennis matches and brisk swims in the Atlantic Ocean, followed by luxuriating days soaking up sun and light at the beach.

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For me the best way to get your house camera-ready for summer is to throw a party. It forces you to get everything just so and jumpstart the punch list that didn’t seem to matter in the raw months of early spring. With three teenage daughters, we see lots of swinging doors and with it, loving and well-earned wear and tear. With fall setting in and an empty nest looming large, I’m turning my attention to a few major projects which will allow me to take full advantage of the BDC’s resources. Think kitchen and bath! Stay tuned for the next chapter and as always, please be in touch with ideas and inspiration.

5 1 Strolling Kensington Gardens in London 2 Aboard the Belmond Train from London to Bath 3 Finding inspiration in Santorini, Greece 4 Santorini, Greece 5 With friends at Nantucket By Design

Chesie Breen Editor-in-Chief, ID BOSTON

Contact me: cbreen@idbostonmagazine.com Follow me on Instagram: @chesiebreen Follow the BDC on Instagram: @bostondesigncenter


BIBLIOPHILE BOSTON NEW TO THE BOOKSHELF

THE WELL ADORNED HOME

MAKING LUXURY LIVABLE

by Cathy Kincaid with Foreword by Bunny Williams & John Rosselli

Fans of Cathy Kincaid have been waiting years for her to release a book chronicling her coveted work. Kincaid’s gift for combining classic design with contemporary flourish and a highly polished, refined sensibility put her in a league of her own. Known for her carefully nuanced color palettes and attention to detail, Kincaid creates warm and gracious interiors. She brings to every room the hallmarks of her style, including her worldly knowledge of art and furnishings, her intricate layering of patterns, and customized details from trelliswork to lacquered surfaces. A variety of residences are presented in this book, ranging from a ship captain’s cottage and a 1920s Spanish Colonial, to a bucolic farmhouse and a family house in the country, in such locations as Texas, Connecticut, and Southern France. Kincaid’s career is also a testament to her commitment to historic preservation, as she has worked on many landmarked dwellings. An editorial favorite, this book is what we have all been craving. Published by Rizzoli New York, 2019 | www.rizzoliusa.com

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BIBLIOPHILE BOSTON NEW TO THE BOOKSHELF

PIERRE YOVANOVITCH

INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE

by Pierre Yovanovich with Introduction by Olivier Gabet and Foreword by Claire Tabouret

French interior designer Pierre Yovanovitch is one of the most in-demand, celebrated talents of his generation, and his first monograph takes us on a global expedition showing recent projects in New York, Paris, London, Brussels, Tel Aviv, the Swiss Alps, the Douro Valley in Portugal, and Provence. Yovanovitch’s work is a favorite with the editors of T Magazine, ELLE DECOR, and Architectural Digest, where his flair for blending contemporary art and vintage furniture with his mastery of architectural volume and proportions is championed. This body of work showcases his talent for restructuring historic spaces to fit contemporary lifestyles, calling on the finest specialty craftspeople in Europe to create custom furniture and lighting. A special treat is the addition of exclusive images of Yovanovitch’s home in Provence. Published by Rizzoli New York, 2019 | www.rizzoliusa.com

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OUR NAME IS BACK BAY SHUTTER COMPANY.

Also known as “The Only Company Where You Can Get Handcrafted, Furniture Grade, Cabinet Quality Interior Wood Shutters in New England.”

Our shutters aren’t just high quality, they’re also beautiful, timeless, block out sun and reduce noise. And these days we’re the only company to offer shutters that can do all that. We won’t change our name, but we definitely could.

Back Bay Shutter co. Inc. A DESIGNER ’S BEST FRIEND.

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HIS

TOM SCHEERER When we conjure the work of renowned designer Tom Scheerer, we picture boldly patterned, stenciled walls; natural materials and an appreciation for simple forms like bentwood chairs and Saarinen tables; arresting color combinations that offset a neutral chocolate with a Mediterranean blue; and good old-fashioned sensible interiors that never go out of style. When Scheerer revealed that he was releasing his second book with Vendome, he remarked, with trademark modesty, that he hoped it would not seem like more of the same. Dare we say, this book is even better than the first, which has itself earned a cult following. We see 16 of his latest projects, including city houses and apartments in New York, Dallas, Houston, and Paris, alongside summer houses in the Hamptons, Nantucket, and Maine. We visit tropical houses on Harbor Island, Antigua, and Abaco. Tom Scheerer: More Decorating is far more than an updated monograph from a leading decorator; it’s a master class in interior design for aficionados and design professionals alike.

TOM SCHEERER: MORE DECORATING by Tom Scheerer Photos by Francesco Lagnese. Published by Vendome, 2019.


HERS

LISA FINE Lisa Fine is a whirling dervish of energy who combines the graciousness of her Mississippi Southern roots with her penchant for travel throughout Europe and Asia, with a special love of India where she designs and produces her textiles. In her much-anticipated book, Fine invites us into her own homes in New York, Paris, and Dallas, and takes us on a head-spinning tour of the most stylish and unique homes that have inspired her designs—from the Mughal palaces and gardens of India to Svindersvik, an 18th-century rococo manor house in Sweden; from the whitewashed retreat of interior designer John Stefanidis on Patmos, decorated with a beautifully curated mix of Indian textiles, Turkish rugs, Greek embroideries, Anglo-Indian furniture, Venetian glass, and English silver, to the idyllic country house and garden of London-based designer Penny Morrison. Evocatively photographed by Miguel Flores-Vianna and with a foreword by style editor Deborah Needleman, Near & Far not only provides a trove of design ideas but offers advice for anyone interested in giving full expression to their personal style. As Lisa Fine recently told House Beautiful: “I think in everything you do aesthetically, you have to go with what you love... You just make it work—and that’s what makes it your own.” NEAR & FAR: INTERIORS I LOVE by Lisa Fine Photography by Miguel Flores-Vianna & Foreword by Deborah Needleman. Published by Vendome, 2019.

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our inspiring ArrAY of products

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at every price point f just might mAke you wAnt to give everybody in your house A bAthroom.

We hAve thousAnds of stylish bAthroom (And kitchen) products for you to choose from. And the best pArt is, we hAve A huge rAnge of prices. So, don’t be surprised if you find yourself just A little bAthroom hAppy.

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY JULIA LYNN

Holly Alderman

Designer Aaron Stewart of Stewart Rodriguez in San Juan, PR envisioned color pops we love.

Digital fine art reproduction since 2004 dm @aldermanarts | 617-733-5493 HollyAlderman.com

Imperfections are intentional, and represent the unique patina of panoramas printed by hand with wood blocks by Dufour, 1822. All new digital editions offer custom colors. Photo by Wallquest

CAY COLLECTION wallpapers, art, fabrics 20+ new editions Fine digital printing by Wallquest


A-LIST DESIGNER

NICK OLSEN TURNS A STODGY DUCHESS COUNTY CABIN INTO A FEARLESS BLEND O F I N V I T I N G PAT T E R N , B O L D C O LO R , & P L U C KY G E O M E T R I C S

words by chesie breen · photography by joshua mchugh

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Celebrated designer Nick Olsen obtained his pedigree the oldfashioned way: he earned it. In a world where many launch their business by hanging a shingle on Instagram, this recipient of a Masters of Architecture from Columbia had his eye on the end game. After seeing the work of renowned designer Miles Redd (who himself had apprenticed with the esteemed designer Bunny Williams) in fashion and design magazines, Olsen went knocking and was hired fresh out of college. While learning the business of design from Redd, Olsen simultaneously transformed his own small studio apartment, which landed on the cover of Domino magazine in its 2006 heyday. Olsen launched his firm in 2010, and great work followed, as did much editorial attention; he was named a Top 10 “New Traditionalist” by Traditional Home and invited to join the ELLE DECOR A-List in 2018. In meteoric fashion, Olsen’s projects were also swept up by magazines like House Beautiful, House & Garden

UK, Veranda, and The Wall Street Journal, and featured on the cover of The World of Interiors. For this circa 1747 clapboard homestead in Millbrook, New York, which legend says was once home to a captain of the War of 1812, Olsen took his cues from history, then turned the rules associated with traditional hunting lodges upside down. Rather than a sea of tartan and English sporting paintings, these interiors are infused with bold stripes, whimsical patterns, painted floors with overscaled geometrics, and a fearless use of color. Veranda magazine once wrote that Nick Olsen is known for turning color into an epic gesture. With these schemes firmly rooted, Olsen and his clients had fun layering in elements such as stag horns, taxidermy items, and interesting pieces from John Rosselli Antiques. The interiors are successful because they reflect the rural countryside and quirky history of the house while still speaking volumes about the modern sensibilities and flair for living of the current owners.

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Experience The Best Today’s discerning homeowners, interior designers, architects, and builders select Wolfers, New England’s premier lighting, automated shading, and complete smart home integration company, as their go-to resource. Experience the difference - from our selection of the most sought after lighting brands, such as Currey & Company, to the latest in LED technology. Our expert consultants will help bring your ideas to light.

Schedule a consultation today at Wolfers.com or stop by our Waltham showroom. Look for our new showroom at the Boston Design Center. Coming this fall.

www.wolfers.com 1339 Main Street | Waltham, MA 02451 | 781.890.5995


DESIGN: KOO ARCHITECTURAL INTERIORS DE DE KIR KIR ARCHITECTURAL INTERIORS DESIGN: KOODESIGN: DE KIRKOO ARCHITECTURAL INTERIORS PHOTOGRAPHY: LAURA MOSSMOSS PHOTOGRAPHY: LAURA PHOTOGRAPHY: LAURA MOSS

516 E. 2ND STREET, B23 | SOUTH BOSTON, MA 02127

| 617-268-2391 | DESIGNERDRAPERIESOFBOSTON.COM

516 E. 2ND STREET, B23 | SOUTH BOSTON, MA 02127

| 617-268-2391 | DESIGNERDRAPERIESOFBOSTON.COM

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DESIGNER SPOTLIGHT

CHARLOTTE BARNES

THE QUEEN O F I N T E R P R E TAT I O N

words by chesie breen photography by george ross

New England Hall of Fame Designer Charlotte Barnes is cherished by her clients for her innate ability to interpret their lifestyles into a seamlessly elegant fashion that looks timeless and collected, rather than decorated. Her interiors show an eclectic mix of contemporary and antique, with careful attention to detail blended with measured restraint. Never too much, never too little—Barnes strikes the perfect balance time and again.

It’s no surprise that Barnes started her career designing Ralph Lauren womenswear with stints in New York and London. She began working on friends’ houses, and her own, and before long developed a robust business now based in her Greenwich, Connecticut, design studio. Her work has been published internationally and she has created a 30-piece furniture collection aptly named Collection Charlotte Barnes.

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G R E E N W I C H, C T For London-based clients with a house in the back-country section of Greenwich, Connecticut, the first order of business was to fill their desire for an abundance of light. Barnes worked with architect Judy Larson to add a kitchen and open up the 1960s house, allowing light to stream throughout. With the shell in place, Barnes designed an entire house in carefully nuanced shades of white as only a true expert can. The only exception was the library, which was the palest shade of gray with small details of white. The clients had a number of very fine paintings which were shipped from London, and Barnes collaborated with art consultant Julie Reid to round out their collection. True to form, Barnes mixed beautiful antiques with contemporary pieces from her own collection. The result was a stylish and inviting house where her expat clients can enjoy summers and holidays soaking up light.

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MATUNUCK, RI

For another family, long-standing friends with several shared collaborations, Barnes was determined to give them exactly what they wanted in their Matunuck, Rhode Island, summer house—a place where they could simply arrive and immediately enjoy themselves and each other without any fuss. The mandate was to create rooms that were oldfashioned and collected—not decorated. A decisive moment was a trip to the Quadrille outpost in Hudson, New York, where they hit pay dirt and chose every single fabric for the house. With that behind them, Barnes spun her signature magic and layered in comfortable upholstery and quirky antiques, many of which she picked up at antiques shops in Locust Valley, New York. What has transpired are magical moments where this family with three grown children, dogs, and friends, gather to simply be together in this charming house.

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MATUNUCK, RI

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MICHAEL J. LEE

Visit the Verellen Salon at Artefact Boston 1317 Washington Street, Boston, MA 857.350.4397 1000 Pleasant Street, Belmont, MA 617.993.3347 info@ artefacthome.com artefacthome.com


CENTURY FURNITURE JOINS FORCES WITH MARA MILLER & JESSE CARRIER TO LAUNCH CARRIER AND COMPANY COLLECTION Century Furniture recently launched the debut of the Carrier and Company Collection in partnership with husband-and-wife duo Jesse Carrier and Mara Miller of acclaimed interior design firm Carrier and Company. Known for creating impossibly chic and inviting interiors, Miller and Carrier often design custom pieces for their A-list clientele, which includes Vogue editor-in-chief Anna Wintour and Oscar-nominated actress Jessica Chastain. This collection is their first foray into creating furniture for the masses. The line includes over 50 designs for bed, dining, and living rooms. Inspired by pre-war European details, scale, and finishes, the furniture’s sleek lines and clean colors give the collection a sense of understated glamour that blends uptown refinement with downtown cool. A third-generation, family-run company, Century has been making luxurious residential furniture for over 70 years, and every piece has a promise of charm, quality, and craftsmanship. The partnership between Carrier and Company and Century represents the merging of two industry leaders that together not only ensure each piece is elegant and impeccably built, but also establishes a chic approach to comfort. The result is a series of blessings for a beautiful home, from their families to others.

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY JULIA LYNN

Designer Alaina Michelle Ralph envisioned the Hamlen Collection in the new master suite. Imperfections are intentional to preserve the patina of original silk hand painted c.1840. New editions offer bespoke color matches. Fine art digital printing by Wallquest.

What color is your mood today? Print to order Lilac, Peach, Clouds, Mint, Navy, Magenta, Chartreuse, Teal, Grape, Coral, Red & More

Call Holly Alderman | 617-733-5493 | dm @aldermanarts | HollyAlderman.com HAMLEN COLLECTION® LLC, BOSTON. COPYRIGHT ©2019 BY DEVENS HAMLEN. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.


HICKORY CHAIR

I N T R O D U C E S N E W C O L L E C T I O N W I T H D E S I G N E R RAY B O O T H Hickory Chair Furniture Co. has introduced a new collection of inventive furniture with celebrated interior designer Ray Booth. Offering pieces for bedrooms, dining rooms and living rooms, the line includes modern iterations of classic forms. It questions the assumed role of furniture, rethinking structures and functions, while offering visual hints of familiarity. For example, the handsome Scalloped Anegre Chest blends inspiration from a Biedermeier chest and antique continental furniture, while incorporating slick lines and two top drawers lined for jewelry and watches. The collection combines luxury with utility and endurance.

In terms of color, the pieces rely heavily on neutrals, so shapes and textures fully garner attention. The restraint allows for the contrast in materials used, such as steel, bronze, and soft upholstery, to come into focus, creating tension and a quiet sense of disruption. The Ray Booth collection for Hickory Chair is versatile. Pieces are at home in both modern or more traditional rooms and settings. It not only speaks to craftsmanship and quality, but also reflects on past design tropes while encouraging the evolution of furniture.

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BDC & ASID

CHALLENGE YOUNG DESIGNERS TO BRING THEIR A GAME AT D E S I G N S H O W D O W N

Design Showdown was hosted by the Boston Design Center with the New England Chapter of the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) & Artaic on March 29, 2019. Design Showdown is a competition in which design students are challenged to imagine a showroom of the future in the BDC that combines innovative design, functionality, and elements of social responsibility. From the many entries received, five students were selected to present their designs during the event. A panel of design professionals judged the competition. Congratulations to this year’s winners, Maria Markova and Haley Jackson.

WINNERS MARIA MARKOVA of Boston Architectural College HALEY JACKSON of the University of Massachusetts

JUDGES BRENT ZEIGLER President, Dyer Brown GAIL RAVGIALA Design Editor SAM AQUILLANO Founder/Executive Director, Design Museum Foundation JENNIFER BARDSLEY Owner, Jennifer Bardsley Interior Design LARISSA COOK Executive Vice President, FBN


TREND REPORT STEPPING INSIDE A WORLD OF

INSPIRATION AT THE

KIPS BAY DECORATOR SHOW HOUSE

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The Kips Bay Decorator Show House is a rite of passage for talented and aspiring designers looking to make their mark in the design world. Thousands visit daily—from the most established designers, editors, and bloggers in the industry to eager students and haute society—to get lost in a world of inspiration and trend forecasting.

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1 WANDERLUST

1+2 Charlotte Moss 3 Young Huh LLC

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1 Paloma Contreras Design 2 Peter Pennoyer Architects

2 LEMON SQUEEZE

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TREND REPORT 1

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1 Corey Damen Jenkins & Associates 2 Robert Passal Interior Design

3 FIRST BLUSH


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MOODY BLUES

1+2 Pappas Miron Design 3 Cullman & Kravis Associates 4 Dove Design Studio

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5 T H E AT R E I N THE ROUND

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4 1 Eve Robinson Associates 2 Cullman & Kravis Associates 3 J Cohler Mason Design 4 Vicente Wolf Associates

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6 LOOK UP

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4 1 Sarah Bartholomew Design 2 Gluckstein Design 3 Katherine Newman Design 4 Corey Damen Jenkins & Associates


7 SALONE DEL MOBILE

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1+2 Jeff Lincoln Interiors 3 Katherine Newman Design

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Edgewater gallery

Vermont | Boston | Montana

contemporary & traditional ďŹ ne art established & emerging artists from vermont & beyond

edgewatergaller y.com


Henry Davis Sleeper

BEAUPORT

Ogden Codman

Michael Carter at Beauport

THE GRANGE


CODMAN AND SLEEPER: B O S T O N ’ S I N T E R I O R D E S I G N P I O N E E R S AT T H E

DAWNING OF DESIGN As we move now into the second century of the design profession, Boston designer Michael Carter reminds us that the genesis of American interior design as we know it today has its earliest roots right here in New England. words by michael carter · photography courtesy of historic new england According to a quick Google search, there are approximately 80,000 interior designers practicing in the U.S. Regardless of accuracy, it’s a sizable number worth noting as we round the corner of our profession being in existence for just over 100 years. As a Boston designer with a lifelong love of history, I ask you to take a moment to both wonder and imagine: how did we get here… from virtually zero to 80,000? Who led the way? What was the environment that gave birth to interior decorating? Where did this first happen? First, let’s erase the internet and inspirational tools like Instagram and Pinterest, get rid of design magazines and design centers, forget all attributions and contributions to the interior design universe à la 2019, and then plunge yourself into the late 19th century. What we designers do today in terms of a professional service and expertise did not exist then—period. As for the state of the American interior, homes of the wealthy were overflowing with bric-a-brac, often dark, gloomy, and oppressive. It was the last years of the Victorian era, and there was a sudden visceral reaction and philosophical shift away from the prevailing aesthetic. Interior decorating as a craft and a business emerged out of this cultural, economic, and aesthetic revolution and it did so with a very profound message: Please, no! With the dawn of the 20th century, which ushered in everything from the automobile to the telephone, there came an innovative new spirit in America that was willing to challenge the status quo. Bubbling up from this brave new world, in terms of interiors, was a call for the lightening and brightening up of spaces, as well as a plea for order. The younger aesthetes were virtually all in agreement, having now much greater access to the architectural wonders of Europe. They fully embraced the virtues and tenants

of classical design as dictated by the ancients. It was clean. It was noble. To use a phrase that’s common today, less was more. Young and well-bred, this first generation of American tastemakers discovered that their newly well-traveled and discerning eye was not only socially advantageous, but it could earn them a living as well. Virtually all credit goes to Elsie de Wolfe as the great trailblazer of modern interior design. As a member of New York and Paris’s café society, she used her position to set up shop and herald the new age of good taste via “simplicity, suitability and proportion,” the mantra of her legendary 1913 publication The House in Good Taste. But take a step backwards from Elsie de Wolfe, who first rose to fame decorating the Colony Club in New York, and the path will lead you to Boston. Two incredibly critical figures not only made their mark here prior to de Wolfe, they left their mark permanently in the form of their own homes, completely intact today, now part of the remarkable collection of historic structures under the care of Historic New England. Ogden Codman’s family estate, The Grange, and Henry Davis Sleeper’s Beauport are completely unique as living monuments to the careers of these two highly important and often overlooked interior designers. Beauport and The Grange are anomalies. Nowhere else outside of New England can you find not one but two interior design masterpieces that are permanently encapsulated as intended by the designer. Decorated not for a client but for themselves, both houses offer a delightful, engaging glimpse into the earliest years of design and spotlight two extremely important and equally colorful figures who were among the first in this country to hang out their shingle out as professionals of the trade.

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CODMAN Ogden Codman, Jr. was born into Boston society around the time of the Civil War. He spent much of his youth in France before returning to Boston in 1884 to study architecture at MIT. His uncle was John Hubbard Sturgis, the architect who designed, among other things, the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, and Codman was much influenced by him. After a few short-lived apprenticeships, Codman opened his own office in Boston in 1891 and a few years later expanded his practice to New York and Newport, Rhode Island. It was in Newport where he was introduced to novelist Edith Wharton, who commissioned him to do the interiors of her Newport “cottage,” Land’s End. In her autobiography, A Backward Glance, Wharton wrote, “We asked him to alter and decorate the house—a somewhat new departure, since the architects of the day looked down on house decoration as a branch of dressmaking.” The success at Wharton’s Newport home led to a significant commission, the private rooms on the second and third floors of Cornelius Vanderbilt’s The Breakers. If you visit The Breakers today, you can clearly sense the lighter touch Codman employed as you go from the heavy-handed Beaux-Arts style of the firstfloor rooms to the airy, clean spaces upstairs. Codman’s section of the house feels more restrained and in harmony with the ocean views, which Codman complemented with painted Louis XVI-style furniture, a signature element frequently seen in his decorating.

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The Codman-Wharton collaboration would ultimately have its greatest impact with the 1897 publication of The Decoration of Houses, their groundbreaking book that would go on to influence generations of designers, including Elsie de Wolfe. The “bible” that they co-authored became an American standard for the profession as well as for society as a whole, as it addressed how to live in a home as much as to how to build and decorate it. It preached against excess and clutter, and embraced the idea of designing spaces based on how they related to the functions and rituals of daily life, “le décor de la vie.” In terms of Codman’s personal life, it is well known from personal letters and accounts that he was homosexual. Nevertheless he married Leila Griswold Webb in 1908, who was six years older than him and the widow of railroad magnate H. Walter. It’s hard not to draw conclusions, yet when Leila died six years later, she did in fact leave Ogden a massive fortune. Socially and financially, Codman had now reached a station above and far beyond his Boston Brahmin peers. Although he continued to practice as an architect and designer for another 10 years before relocating to Europe, it seems clear that at this point Codman had little interest (or need) in selfpromotion, and no real desire to further his career. Projects later in his life mainly consisted of ones that interested him on a personal level, and were mostly within his own circle. Consequently, it’s


hard to credit Codman with being nationally prolific. But his legacy, beyond The Decoration of Houses, lives on in the significant and voluminous archives of magnificent drawings and juicy and personally insightful letters, and of course The Grange, now owned by Historic New England.

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Pauline Metcalf begins her exceptional treatise on Codman by reminding us that his ideas and ideals of architecture, landscape, and decoration were ultimately embodied in the two houses he held so dear: The Grange, his family’s New England country estate, and Villa La Leopolda, the classical villa he built with his fortune on the French Riviera. La Leopolda was his “consummate creation”—in essence, his dream house. It was built between 1929 and 1931 on an estate originally owned by King Leopold of Belgium, hence the name. Here he was able to fully implement the philosophy of design and decoration that he and Edith Wharton had promoted in The Decoration of Houses. As an aside, La Leopolda went on to be owned by Gianni and Marella Agnelli of Fiat and fashion fame, and later billionaire banker Edmond Safra, whose murder in Monaco in 2000 was a huge scandal. To fully appreciate the value of Codman’s masterpiece today, it’s interesting to note that Safra’s widow negotiated a sale of the property in 2008 to a Russian billionaire for $370 million dollars, although the deal ultimately fell through after years of legal entanglements. As for The Grange, the Codman family seat in Lincoln, Massachusetts, was significant as the emblem of his distinguished ancestry, the source of his good taste, and his “aristocratic sensibilities and of all that was best in the restrained yet refined 18th-century Anglo-American tradition,” according to Metcalf. Even after retiring to France, Codman remained dedicated to the preservation of his home, including the “correcting” of things he deemed unfortunate that had been done to the house years before he was the family steward. He urged his family to retain important heirlooms, which he then combined with his own collection of antiques. The intentional result was the house we see today when we visit The Grange. Ancestral portraits, artwork, and furnishings are mixed with signature Codman touches like toile fabrics for curtains and painted French furniture. The result underscores the Codman family’s rich cultural heritage and Ogden’s ability to edit and refine the collection to its best effect. Reflecting on his life’s work, Codman attributed the 18th-century atmosphere of the house with its restrained and understated architecture as the environment that most influenced his style, and always held him in check when tempted to go overboard as a designer. Throughout his life, it was his touchstone regarding taste and his aristocratic heritage.

SLEEPER As The Grange was a monument to a designer’s family heritage, Beauport was a monument to America’s colonial heritage, romanticized and visually reinterpreted in a most fantastical way by Boston native Henry Davis Sleeper. The house was so original and extraordinary that it was written about as early as 1915 in House Beautiful, even as the house was only midway through its countless remodels and additions. What began in 1907 as a rather modest Queen Anne summer cottage on the Eastern Point of Gloucester, Massachusetts, became over the next 27 years a labyrinth of rooms and passageways that were devised using pieces and parts from colonial rooms that were being rapidly demolished at that time all over New England. He cleverly employed architectural fragments such a pedimented doors and gothic windows to create a maze-like arrangement of rooms, which served as a backdrop for his dazzling collection of objects with which he composed highly personalized and dramatic spaces with various and colorful themes. It’s not so much the individual objects that are particularly important at Beauport, but the ingenious way in which Sleeper arranged them that still captivates and bewitches. A recent visitor from Architectural Digest left saying that every American designer should see Beauport, a sentiment that I share and advocate. The fact that it

1 Double stair case at The Grange, Lincoln, Massachusetts 2 Paneled Room, The Grange, as decorated by Codman c. 1897 3 Beauport, The Golden Step Room 4 Passageway at Beauport illuminated by a gothic window showcasing amethyst glass

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to his close friendship with A. Piatt Andrew, also a confirmed bachelor and presumably his lover, who had already established himself at his home Red Roof, which was adjacent to Beauport. The two were part of a close circle of unconventional socialites, artists, and intelligentsia that included Isabella Stewart Gardner. There are photographs from 1907, documenting an outing to nearby Essex when Andrew and Sleeper drove their friends Mrs. Gardner and Miss Davidge in a convertible automobile to see the Cogswell House, which was about to be torn down. Much of the paneling from Cogswell was rescued by Sleeper and used to create some of the first additional rooms at Beauport.

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is one of the most widely published houses of the 20th century should be evidence enough to entice every design professional and enthusiast to visit. The late legendary designer Mario Buatta adored Beauport and was a great supporter. And as recently as 2006, it was featured in The World of Interiors and even made the cover. I like to think of the Beauport today in the same way it was 100 years ago—as an important interior design mecca. Especially during the years between the great wars, Beauport’s reputation as a “must see” attracted attention from the elite circle that Sleeper belonged to and beyond, eventually launching his career as an interior designer. Like Codman’s The Grange, the creation is as much about the creator, and Sleeper was a man whose world was as fascinating and colorful as the rooms and objects inside his dream house. Like Codman, Sleeper was a Boston Brahmin and similarly, he was gay. His reason for building Beauport was largely in part

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Many from within Sleeper’s inner circle also built homes in the same area, establishing a colony-like enclave of eccentric artists, entrepreneurs, and bon vivants. The costume and dinner parties were legendary and attracted fascinating characters as diverse as Eleanor Roosevelt and Henry du Pont, the latter eventually engaging Sleeper as his interior designer. It was du Pont’s love of Beauport that inspired him, with the help of Sleeper, to create Winterthur, the renowned house museum of the American decorative arts outside of Wilmington, Delaware. Sleeper was plagued much of his life by ill health, and he died rather prematurely of leukemia at the age of 56 in 1934. The significance of Beauport was understood even then, and there was a great relief for those concerned when the house was purchased by Mr. and Mrs. Charles McCann of the Woolworth fortune, who wished to keep Beauport in tact as their summer residence. The McCann children kept their parents’ wish after they died and donated the house to the Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities, known today as Historic New England. Many, including myself, consider Beauport the crown jewel in the organization’s collection.

1 Alcove in the Belfry Chamber at Beauport 2 Henry Davis Sleeper with Isabella Stewart Gardner in Piatt Andrew’s convertible visiting Cogswell House, Essex, Massachusetts. Photograph by A. Piatt Andrew, 1907.


CUISINE

FLOUR BAKERY + CAFÉ Restaurateur and entrepreneur Joanne Chang seems to know no limits. An honors graduate of Harvard College with a degree in Applied Mathematics and Economics, Chang left a career as a management consultant to enter the world of professional cooking and we’re all better because of it. She is the chef and coowner of Flour Bakery + Café, with eight locations in the Boston area, and Myers + Chang along with her husband and business partner Christopher Myers. She is the 2016 winner of the James Beard Award for Outstanding Baker, as well as a best-selling cookbook author. For her BDC location, she chose Alina Wolhardt from Wolf in Sheep Design to create plucky interiors that are the perfect mix of retro and futuristic.

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CUISINE

THE ART OF THE HOST Many of you already know and love Alex Hitz’s recipes from his best-selling cookbook My Beverly Hills Kitchen (Knopf), so you will be thrilled by the release of his newest cookbook, The Art of the Host, which is so much more than a cookbook. It’s filled with invaluable entertaining advice and 100 timeless, tried and true recipes for signature dishes, but what grabbed our attention were the countless anecdotes behind them, amplified by Hitz’s gift for nostalgia and storytelling. Hitz’s menus range from holiday-specific to general seasonal offerings, and the recipes are sophisticated yet approachable, familiar but with flair. They have a relaxed, unassuming elegance and many are designed to be prepared ahead of time, allowing hosts to enjoy time with their guests. Alongside the many recipes, the book is chock-full of beautiful imagery; tablescapes of Leontine Linens and Quadrille fabrics, enviable bites, and Hitz’s personal photos splash across the pages. From the food to the presentation and ambience, Hitz’s goal as host is to not only to impress, but, most importantly, make others feel welcome and joyous. Visually, this translates into a cookbook so handsome it seems just as at home on a coffee table as in a kitchen. In today’s digital world, The Art of the Host at its core celebrates the ritual of bringing people together and telling our stories through the food and experiences we create for others. As Hitz reflects on the people who inspired his cooking, from his family cook Dorothy to Audrey Hepburn by way of friend Connie Wald, we are encouraged to do the same. “Take what you’ve learned and make it your own,” Hitz advises, “but if you can’t, just make it mine.” And that doesn’t sound too shabby to me.

THE ART OF THE HOST Recipes and Rules for Flawless Entertaining — By Alex Hitz Photography by Iain Bagwell Published by Rizzoli New York, 2019


PEEKING INTO THE CUPBOARD WITH A-LIST K I T C H E N & B AT H D E S I G N E R A N D S E C R E T W E A P O N

SARAH BLANK Sarah Blank has been a luminary in the world of kitchen design for over 35 years. She earned her stripes working for Richard Sammons of Fairfax & Sammons Architects in Palm Beach in the early 1990s, as well as studying at the Institute of Classical Architecture & Art. She has an innate knack for integrating expertly functioning design for the kitchen, pantry, and bath into the house’s architecture. Blank has collaborated with some of the top names in design and architecture including Bunny Williams, Gil Schafer, Thomas Jayne, Brian McCarthy, and Mark Ferguson of Ferguson & Shamamian Architects.

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CHRISTOPHER PEACOCK TURNS HEADS WITH S T U N N I N G M I X O F M AT E R I A L S AND FINISHES

What must it be like to be Christopher Peacock, and to be continuously challenged to surprise, impress, and blaze the trail in kitchen design? Their creativity and flair is unsurpassed, and this year’s kitchen design for the Kips Bay Decorator Show House was no exception. Open, floating shelves; warm woods used in unexpected ways; back-paneled, glass-faced cabinets and stunning hardware blend seamlessly with highly functioning stateof-the-art lighting and kitchen design to create a perfect symphony. IDBOSTONMAGAZINE.COM

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T RAV E L

A MARRIAGE OF MAVENS Indagare and Architectural Digest Partner for Global, Design-Centric Excursions words by coco van der wolk First launched in 2007, luxury travel platform Indagare has recently teamed up with Architectural Digest, offering design enthusiasts one-ofa-kind trips to far-flung locales, such as Stockholm, Lisbon, Beirut, and Marrakesh. The Insider Journey trips are hosted by Indagare founder Melissa Biggs Bradley as well as AD editors, who together provide unmatched insight and access to some of the world’s most enchanting destinations. From a private tour of Yves Saint Laurent and Pierre Bergé’s Villa Oasis in Morocco to pre-dinner drinks in one of Beirut’s most historic palaces, each itinerary grants an in-depth look at the local cultures, sites, and experiences. A Beirut 2019 Insider Journey attendee said of their trip abroad, “It was a dream… a journey that I couldn’t have had traveling with anyone else—much less on my own.” Each trip has limited availability, as the groups are deliberately kept small, allowing fellow travelers to fully appreciate the country of focus and bond with one another. A traveler on the recent trip to Beirut said, “Traveling with others who share similar interests was so easy, and it made for the opportunity to make friendships that will extend long past the end of the trip.” The partnership between Indagare and Architectural Digest benefits more than just the travelers; it informs and educates the design community, as tastemakers and industry mavens immerse themselves in foreign destinations and meditate with one another on different modes of design. The mission of the Insider Journeys is to inspire each participant, and there is no telling how they will further shape the design world around them. 59


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MARRAKESH


PHOTOGRAPHY CREDITS cover Photo by Miguel Flores-Vianna

pages twenty-five to thirty

7. Salone del Mobile: Page 44 Photos by Nickolas Sargent

Nick Olsen pages forty-six to fifty

page five

Portrait by Neil Landino Jr.

A Message from Jamestown President Michael Phillips

Photos by George Ross

Portrait by Garrett Rowland Photography

pages thirty-two to thirty-three

Photos courtesy of Historic New England

page seven

Carrier and Company Collection at Century Furniture

Pages 49+50 interiors by Eric Roth

Dear Readers

Portrait by Sang An

Photos by Chesie Breen

Photos courtesy of Century Furniture

pages eight to eleven Bibliophile Boston Covers courtesy of Rizzoli Pages 8–9 photos by Miguel Flores-Vianna Page 10 photo © Jean-François Jaussaud/ LUXPRODUCTIONS Page 11 photos © Jérome Galland (top) and © Jean-François Jaussaud/ LUXPRODUCTIONS (bottom)

page fifty-three

Hickory Chair

Cuisine: The Art of the Host

Photos courtesy of Hickory Chair

Cover courtesy of Rizzoli

pages thirty-nine to forty-four

page fifty-four

Trend Report 1. Wanderlust: Page 39 Photos 1+2 by Nickolas Sargent Photo 3 by Ngoc Minh Ngo 2. Lemon Squeeze: Page 40 Photos by Nickolas Sargent 3. First Blush: Page 40

page fourteen

Photo 1 by Marco Ricca Photo 2 by Nickolas Sargent

Hers: Lisa Fine

4. Moody Blues: Page 41

Cover courtesy of Vendome

Photos by Nickolas Sargent

Photos by Miguel Flores-Vianna

5. Theatre in the Round: Page 42

pages seventeen to twenty-two

Photo 1 by Marco Ricca Photos 2+3 by Nickolas Sargent Photo 4 by Vicente Wolf

Nick Olsen Photos by Joshua McHugh

Cuisine: Flour Bakery & Café Photos by Kristen Tieg

page thirteen

Photos by Francesco Lagnese

page fifty-one

pages thirty-five to thirty-seven

His: Tom Scheerer Cover courtesy of Vendome

Dawning of Design

6. Look Up: Page 43 Photos 1–3 by Nickolas Sargent Photo 4 by Marco Ricca

Photos by Iain Bagwell

Sarah Blank Left photo by Stacy Bass Center photos (top to bottom) by Stacy Bass, Nancy Hill, and Neil Landino Right photos (top to bottom) by Stacy Bass, Stacy Bass, Curtis Lewis, and Nancy Hill page fifty-seven Christopher Peacock Photos courtesy of the showroom pages fifty-nine to sixty-one Travel: A Marriage of Mavens Photos courtesy of Indagare


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