2022 Insight Special Issue

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COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE

JOURNAL

Special Issue, 2022

The Value of Continuing Education in CRE Page 6

Building Certifications: Keeping Our Country Beautiful Page 10

Emotional Resilience: Tips and Tactics to Help You Bounce Back Page 22

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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

Commercial real estate is a constantly evolving and growing field. Generational shifts and the pandemic are changing the ways we work, commute, and live. E-commerce is continuing to expand and grow the industrial real estate market at a rapid pace, and the pandemic only accelerated this growth. Technological innovations are pushing sustainability, access, and building designs to new heights. In the wake of all these changes, the CRE industry is evolving to face them. This special issue of CRE Insight Journal addresses a number of these changes and explores how the real estate industry will adapt. How do you foster inclusivity? How do you build value in your career? What are the benefits of building certifications and the road to achieving them? These are important questions to address in our changing industry, and CRE Insight Journal will continue to spark dialog and find answers. This issue features articles on continuing education in commercial real estate, inclusive leadership in the workplace, changes to capital improvements brought about by the pandemic, a look at the growing industrial sector, and much more. As the market and industry continues to change, CRE Insight Journal will be there to address your questions about the changing landscape of real estate. We are also proud to provide useful resources to commercial real estate professionals through the 2022 Technology Guide, as well as the nationally award-winning Structural Inspection and Repair and 2021 ENERGY STAR Month Guides. Be sure to check out these resources online at https:// creinsightjournal.com/ publications. Additionally, we are pleased to announce the inaugural winners of the CRE Insight Journal Awards program. The CRE Insight Journal Awards celebrate excellence in commercial real estate. And insight from award winning entrants is highlighted to inspire positive change within the real estate industry. Our inaugural winners were Zeller for Excellence in DEI; 100 City View for Excellence in Tenant Care; Core Property Capital and Rubbermaid Commercial Products for Excellence in Collaborative Service; and Palisades Office Park for Excellence in Environmental Sustainability. Additionally, Scott Weiland, PE, SE, and Evan Moore, PE, SE were recognized individually for their thought leadership in the CRE industry. You can learn more about this program and apply for the 2022 awards at https://creinsightjournal.com/awards. Over the past year, CRE Insight Journal has continued to expand its catalogue of on-demand webinars and other resources on important topics for CRE professionals. These include a presentation on the new cybersecurity standards built from the ground up to specifically address cybersecurity in CRE; a discussion of emotional resilience in the workplace; and numerous topics in industrial real estate such as sustainability, e-commerce, risk management, and more. All these resources are available on demand through CRE Insight 365 at https://creinsightjournal.com/ category/cre-insight-365/. Inclusivity in our changing world is integral to leadership and identifying and engaging the next generation of real estate professionals. CRE Insight Journal’s Inclusive Leadership Certificate Program features a series of highly interactive webinars designed to help individuals build essential skills to be an inclusive leader. This program is a great way to build inclusivity into your team’s foundation and has been a resounding success in its second year. If you’re interested in participating in the next session of the certificate program, email us at info@creinsightjournal.com. Our industry is changing faster and faster each year, and the team at CRE Insight Journal remains dedicated to identifying, addressing, and sharing resources that serve the needs of the real estate industry. We are pleased to share this year’s special issue with you and we are excited to serve as a valuable resource for you as we grow into the new normal that lies ahead. Stay insightful. Gabriel Eckert, FASAE, CAE CRE Insight Journal Editor-In-Chief

Gabriel Eckert, FASAE, CAE, is editor-in-chief of the Commercial Real Estate Insight Journal. He also serves as the CEO of the Building Owners and Managers Association of Georgia and BOMA Georgia Foundation. He is a certified Association Executive; Fellow of the American Society of Association Executives; and has been named by the Atlanta Business Chronicle as one of the Top 100 Who’s Who in Commercial Real Estate, a list of “leaders, deal makers, and legends.


The CRE Insight Journal Awards celebrate excellence in commercial real estate companies and buildings. Insight from award winning entrants will be shared with the CRE Insight Journal community to inspire positive change within the real estate industry. Real estate companies may apply to be recognized for Excellence in Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion. Buildings may apply to be recognized for Excellence in Tenant Care; Excellence in Environmental Sustainability; and/or Excellence in Collaborative Service.

TO LEARN MORE, SCAN HERE!

EXCELLENCE IN THOUGHT LEADERSHIP

EXCELLENCE IN THOUGHT LEADERSHIP

EXCELLENCE IN ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY

SCOTT WEILAND, PE, SE

EVAN MOORE, PE, SE

PALISADES OFFICE PARK

AWARD WINNER

AWARD WINNER

AWARD WINNER

Scott Weiland, PE, SE, President of Innovative Engineering, received the 2021 Thought Leadership Award from CRE Insight Journal. A structural engineering firm with offices in Atlanta and Seattle, Innovative Engineering specializes in parking structure and façade restoration, industrial engineering, and physical security and providing services throughout the United States and in U.S. territories.

EXCELLENCE IN TENANT CARE

Evan Moore, PE, SE, Project Manager at Engineered Restorations, received the 2021 Thought Leadership Award from CRE Insight Journal. With offices in metropolitan Atlanta and South Florida, Engineered Restorations is a specialty contracting company, providing restoration, repair, and protection services for structures of all types.

EXCELLENCE IN DEI

Palisades Office Park, managed by Atlanta Property Group (APG), received the 2021 Excellence in Environmental Sustainability Award from CRE Insight Journal. The award recognizes a building or building complex that has undertaken significant environmental sustainability efforts and/or has achieved long-term success in environmental sustainability.

EXCELLENCE IN COLLABORATIVE SERVICE

RUBBERMAID COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS AND CORE PROPERTY CAPITAL

100 CITY VIEW

ZELLER

AWARD WINNER

AWARD WINNER

AWARD WINNER

Zeller received the 2021 Excellence in Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) Award from CRE Insight Journal. The award recognizes a real estate company that has displayed excellence in fostering DEI within their organization.

Core Property Capital and Rubbermaid Commercial Products received the 2021 Excellence in Collaborative Service Award from CRE Insight Journal. The award recognizes an exemplary partnership between a real estate product or service provider and a single property or real estate management company. Building management teams and product/service providers often collaborate to improve operational efficiency, environmental sustainability, tenant care, and more.

100 City View, managed by Granite Properties, received the 2021 Excellence in Tenant Care Award from CRE Insight Journal. The award recognizes a building for excellence in tenant care, including health and wellbeing, communications, tenant engagement, and/or other activities that express care for building tenants.

The entry deadline for the 2022 CRE Insight Journal Awards is December 14, 2022, enter today at CREInsightJournal.com/awards!

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Contents SPECIAL ISSUE, 2022

6

The Value of Continuing Education in CRE

By: Patrick M. Freeman

CRE Insight Journal is published for:

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Building Certifications: Keeping Our Country Beautiful

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Evolution of e-Commerce in Industrial Real Estate

By: Dusty Muck

By: Mehtab Randhawa

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Construction, Capital and Time: Changes in Capital Improvements

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Emotional Resilience: Tips and Tactics to Help You Bounce Back By: Dr. Stevie Dawn

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Developing an Inclusive Mindset for Generations in the Workplace By: Devin Simon

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Flexing Their Muscles

By: Phil Mobley

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Fall Protection in the Workplace: Laws, Responsibilities and Best Practices By: Scott L. Weiland and James T. Boatwright

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L-Prize Concept Phase Concludes

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Product and Service Directory

By: Owen Kavanagh

CRE Insight Journal 5901 Peachtree Dunwoody Rd, NE Suite C-300 Atlanta, GA 30328 (404) 475-9980 www.creinsightjournal.com The Wyman Company Advertising Representatives: Chris Chiccarello chrisc@thewymancompany.com Justin Olson jolson@thewymancompany.com Katie White kwhite@thewymancompany.com Editor-in-Chief: Gabriel Eckert, FASAE, CAE Executive Editor: Jacob Wilder, CAE Managing Editor: Owen Kavanagh Contact us at: info@creinsightjournal.com INDUSTRY INSIGHT COMMITTEE Chair Scott Baker Vice-Chair Stephanie Scurlock Allison McLain Brittany Bobbitt Carrah Golightly Destiny Hubby Joe Murphy Josef Roberts Kinsey R. Hinkson Mike Ghinga Patti Brown

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EDUCATION

The Value of Continuing Education in CRE By: Patrick M. Freeman RPA, SMA, CPM, CCIM, LEED AP, BOM-HP, BOMA Fellow

Why Education?

Dollars. But more about that later. Education is essential and strategic. And all the other words like that. It is a tool that exponentially leverages your abilities to work quickly, accurately, profitably, easily, and happily, and then go home and play with your dog. Or cat. Have you ever purchased something you were excited about, had it delivered, realized there was “some assembly required” but discovered that the instructions were missing? After wrangling through putting it together without the benefit of the instructions, and having several pieces left over (and discovering it doesn’t work) you find the instructions hidden under a flap in a corner of the box. What was unclear is suddenly obvious. Fulfilling our responsibilities without taking advantage of educational opportunities is like constructing something without instructions – the results are poor, it’s frustrating, you’ve wasted time and money, and your co-workers (and bosses) aren’t helped (or impressed) by the outcome.

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Research for a thesis at Georgia Tech revealed a number of insights around the value of continuing education for people in the commercial real estate industry. There were over 200 participants in the research, and 78-percent of the respondents had participated in seminars of various sorts. 73-percent had taken advantage of opportunities to benefit from corporate training. 71-percent held a four-year degree, 24-percent had achieved master’s degrees, and 40-percent held various designations and certifications. Just under 15-percent selfidentified as owners, asset managers, or senior management. The research probed in a large number of areas, and respondents had opportunity to weigh in in great detail on the topic. In summary, here are some of the more material findings of the research, and they are worth considering:

1.

There is a clear return on investment on the dollars, time, and energy necessary to pursue education, i.e., you get more out of it than it takes in those three areas to obtain it. This conclusion was held by all categories of CRE respondents, regardless of level/position. In other words, education is worth it.


2.

Education is good for the profitability of an employee’s firm because it enhances the skills sets of its employees. For the individual, the research confirmed that it is also good for the personal profitability of the employee, i.e., dollars in pockets. Importantly, it also enhances the chances of an individual being hired by an employer and once hired, being promoted.

3.

Jumping to 30,000 feet, and in broad brush terms, and as the graphic below reflects, respondents indicated that learning facilitates success, and more specifically that learning is a greater contributor to success than an individual’s preexisting, inherent traits. Put another way, no matter how naturally gifted you are, education will take you further.

Let’ unpack this a bit more. To be sure, there are individuals with inherent skills that can do a good job without the additional benefits that come from education, but a key finding of the research was that even those people who are naturally gifted in any of a number of ways and make great leaders, thinkers, innovators, etc. and who may give the impression that they don’t need any sort of “formal” education are better with instruction.

Regardless of where your starting point is, additional learning can enhance what you are able to do and can take you from wherever you are to where you want to be. The only people education won’t help are those who don’t take advantage of it, or those who already know all there is to know. Raise your hand if you fall into the latter camp. A huge additional benefit to participating in live training is the opportunity for networking that occurs. Classroom training is ideal for this, because you have the benefit of engaging with both the instructors and other participants in a way that not only supports and facilitates learning, but also naturally creates relationships, and moreover, friendships. We are a friendly business and relying on relationships over the course of a career is not an option. It’s essential.

Real Estate Licensure

The Georgia Real Estate Commission requires practitioners to hold an active real estate license, and that requirement has significant implications. There are exceptions, e.g., if you are a property manager or leasing representative who works solely for the owner of the property, then you may be exempt. Generally, however, if you engage in any leasing-related activities you must hold an active license. The requirements to obtain a license are significant and will involve both time and financial commitments. A second consideration is

that the majority of the material you are tested on is related to residential real estate, not commercial real estate. In addition, you must complete at least 36 hours of approved continuing education course work during each four-year renewal period to meet the continuing education requirements. For the best information on these requirements, see https://grec.state.ga.us/obtaining-a-license/ real-estate/#salesperson. Fortunately, your local BOMA offers many courses that qualify for these continuing education credits.

CRE Educational Opportunities

So, what options exist in support of enhancing the success of you and your teammates and your firm? The following list is not comprehensive but does cover many of the primary opportunities. A disclaimer: it is important to note that all courses are under constant evaluation, both in terms of content and modes of delivery, so the best source for investigating any of these programs is directly with the developer/host. Your local BOMA (BOMA Georgia in my case) provides a robust curriculum serving its entire membership: the engineering, allied, and property management professionals. Check out the Education tab at the BOMA Georgia site here for an example of these course offerings: https://www.bomageorgia.org/. Courses from Local BOMA Affiliates: • BOMI International* (https://www.bomi.org/) offers the RPA (Real Property Administrator) designation, which is a great overview of all of the multidisciplinary facets of property management and is a very good way for someone starting out in the business to get excellent exposure to what is involved. •

BOMI’s SMA (System Maintenance Administrator) designation is a great option not only for the engineering community, but also for property and facility managers because it provides an opportunity to get a functional handle on the physical side of our business, i.e., what is above the ceiling and behind the walls.

• BOMI’s FMA (Facility Management Administrator) focuses on the facility disciplines involved with successfully managing an asset for an occupant owner. • The BOMI HP (High Performance) designation is a three-course designation that outlines how to achieve a return on investment in various sustainable initiatives.. •

In addition to hosting classes for the above designations, local BOMA affiliates are leaders in developing and providing education locally and nationally and offers several exemplary introductory educational opportunities to become exposed to/familiar with both the property management and engineering disciplines. These opportunities are excellent for individuals who are considering careers in these areas, as well as people who know that this is where they want to be and want to ramp up their continued on page 8

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knowledge of the disciplines involved prior to pursuing the deeper dive of the BOMI options. See examples above from my local affiliate, BOMA Georgia, regarding details on programs like Property Management 101 and 201, and Foundations of Building Engineering (BE 101) and Building Engineering 201 (BE 201), as well as the many additional certificates that are offered

Further, BOMA Georgia also offers ongoing seminars and webinars that address both specific commercial real estate and general knowledge needs that are frequently driven by current best practices.

IREM’s CPM (Institute of Real Estate Management’s Certified Property Manager - https://www.irem.org/) program is a financially focused designation that provides an overview of the multidisciplinary aspects before really diving into time value of money concepts. It does a great job of enabling the student to understand the property as an asset and taking the student through some very practical applications of financial analysis. CCIM Institute’s CCIM (Certified Commercial Investment Member - https://www.ccim.com/) designation is not designed to cover operational components, and addresses much of the same territory that IREM’s CPM does, but extends the process even further to give the student a broader overview of the implications of the fiscal management of an asset/investment.

Again, the above listing of programs is not comprehensive, but is representative of many of the opportunities that can be strategic in the success of your firm and your career. I hope you will make plans to pursue them! *By way of disclaimer, I have recently been afforded the privilege of serving on the BOMI International Board of Trustees, but the perspectives in this article were developed long before then and have not changed because of that involvement.

About the Author Pat Freeman Pat Freeman recently retired from Brand Real Estate Services, serving as their EVP of Property Management. He holds the RPA, SMA, CPM, CCIM, LEED AP, and BOMI HP designations. In addition, he is a BOMA Fellow and earned a Master of Science in Building Construction and Integrated Facility Management. His thesis was on the value of learning opportunities to the commercial real estate industry.

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SUSTAINABILITY

Building Certifications:

Keeping Our Country Beautiful By: Dusty Muck There are many beautiful states in this amazing country, one would be hard pressed to find more diverse and beautiful views than those found in the United States of America. Choppy waves wash along the shores of Maine. Ancient sequoias grasp at the sun in California. The Blue Ridge Mountains sit in serene sleep throughout the south. The USA is full of awe-inspiring sites and wonders. In my home state of Georgia, daffodils shine bright yellow in the morning sun like little heads looking around announcing the beginning of spring until old dogwoods and azaleas explode into whites and pinks in mature stately landscapes, our country offers some of the most beautiful sights on the planet. Keeping our country beautiful is not a passive pursuit. Actions must take place to sustain our planet and our property managers and owners, are always searching for new ways to protect our environment and reduce the impact the built environment has on our beautiful states. One of these options is through third party programs where properties can become certified for green or healthy

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building practices. These third-party certifications identify companies practicing sustainability programs such as LEED and BOMA 360 and creating healthier buildings for their prospective tenants utilizing principles from WELL and Fitwell.

Certified Excellence “It gives people confidence in how the buildings operate and that they are working in a good environment where the ownership cares,” explains Chris Lelle, portfolio chief engineer at Lincoln Properties. “They can be healthy, and they can be more productive in the building. It really does demonstrate that you are doing the right things in the building. We should always be good stewards of our environment and efficiency.” “It’s not just a marketing thing for our leasing agents. Many customers are really jumping on the sustainability bandwagon and I’ve had several customers reach out to me because they’re


implementing their own new sustainability practices and they’re looking at Portman to guide them in that direction,” says Michael Knox, chief engineer at Portman Management. “They want to know what other customers are doing in the building, in terms of sustainability and how can they be a part of it?” “I think the big thing that I’m seeing right now is the customer drive towards sustainability. The companies are becoming more involved and are looking for answers from management and building owners to see what they can do and what the property owners are going to allow them to do, within their own spaces at the properties. I think that is the big driver right now.” Knox continues. Charlie Cichetti, CEO with Green Building Education Services (GBES) explains further, “The reason you go for a LEED certification, for some of my clients, is to get that 3rd party validation that this is a Green Building and that is going to help us with our valuation, it is going to force us to reduce our operating costs, it may be more attractive to certain tenants and I know a lot of Fortune 500 companies will only lease space in a Green Building.” ”While LEED is all about how your building’s impacts the environment, the WELL certification is focused on your building’s impact on the people in the building.” Cichetti explains. “For example, the lights in the room, if it is a LEED project, we want to make sure they are energy efficient, and we reduce our carbon emissions. But if it is a WELL project, those lights can affect how we sleep tonight and circadian rhythms. A WELL certification ensures that this is a healthy space. It answers, is this a healthy building or not?” WELL philosophy would have buildings lighting systems dim as the evening hours progress to naturally help the body prepare for winding down from the day and prepare for sleep.” “Then you have BOMA 360, which compliments these other certifications. It is well rounded. BOMA 360 is a good place for a building to start in exploring different certifications.” Cichetti adds. While these certifications have become a big part of our built environment conversations in Atlanta, these designations are not as easy as signing off on a few improvements. It will take effort and most importantly, it will take a whole team doing their part. Everyone will have a unique role to play from the building owners, managers, to the engineers, tenants, and the vendors who support management team at properties.

Team Buy-In “Everybody has to buy in to it. Everyone has to buy in to the goal. And part of what we have to do to achieve that goal is to fully understand timeline for achieving it,” Knox explains. “Everyone must be aware of what resources we are going to have to pull from to ensure we meet that goals. There is a lot of information that has to be collected and everyone has to understand their role.” “Teamwork is critical to making sure that any data and information is flowing in the right direction. There needs to be a gatekeeper. Somebody who collects all the data from all the different teams and forwards that information to the certification entity. Teamwork is essential in anything we do in Property Management and this is no different,” says Knox. Lelle explains the importance of teamwork for achieving building certifications. “The certifications are really multi-faceted. They involve many disciplines to accomplish. Property management and engineering alike. Property managers work directly with the janitorial companies so you have to understand where they are getting their paper supplies, what type of supplies, and what type. That can help just as tracking your waste and understanding if they [janitorial companies] are recycling properly. They need to look at what chemicals are being utilized to clean and ensuring HEPA filters are being used on the vacuums,” Lelle says. This is where working with trusted vendors will help with understanding the products and chemicals that may affect air quality and cleaning efficacy.

Building an Environment of Excellence “Our vendors have to provide us with the products to meet these certification requirements. If they are green cleaning products; we need to make sure that [the products] follow the checklist of what chemicals are allowed and not allowed within the buildings. Vendors need to be sourcing things from environmentally or sustainable sources that we are looking for the correct recycle products.” “We need to be assured we are not just grabbing the cheapest stuff off the shelf just to save money. We are finding that mix of what is going to be affective and environmentally friendly across the board. And finally understanding the touch points they are cleaning around the building,” Lelle says.

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“Meanwhile the engineers will look at the sinks, all the flush valves, looking at the entire plumbing set up to understand usage. Are you continuously operating the HVAC systems in an efficient manner? Are you upgrading the lighting?” says Lelle. Charlie Cichetti, agrees, “Teamwork is definitely bigger than a single facility management or the property management team. And so, I think you should bring in outside vendors and consultants to coach and quarterback. Hey, here’s what we’re going to need to do. We need to do this, and this is to improve our green operation. Then we have to prove it to someone that actually doesn’t come to our building, so we have to have pictures and narratives and documentation.” “So, to the Engineer: I need you to take weekly water meter readings for this period. To the landscaping vendor: we really need you to button up your monthly reporting. Are you composting the grass clippings? Are you using low decibel leaf blowers?” Cichetti continues. “[Engineers] are doing many of these best practices and we have to display it to ownership and certification groups, so we all get credit and that’s going to help you and your company. I think you have to rally the team, realize that everybody’s going be responsible for a part of a green building or healthy building certification.” Cichetti utilizes a check-in every two weeks. This is a time to ask how those initiatives are performing. Once buildings are submitted for certification, everyone celebrates as a team. Accountability is key to this process according to Cichetti. Cichetti adds an important reminder. “Don’t forget about the tenants. There’s a lot of optional points if we do recycling audits and we look at a tenant floor and we say, you know what, this tenant is a green champion. You might find another that they’re throwing soda cans in the trash and don’t care. How do we coach them up? Ask them, are they buying ENERGY STAR rated monitors and computers? And if they are, let’s get credit for it. If they are curious, could they buy some greener office supplies? Show them that there’s a relationship we have with an office supply company. Here’s their green Office supply catalog. You might want to take a look. Education is a major part of this recognition and plays a role in these certifications.” Many of our properties here in Atlanta have already been through these certification processes, but what if you and your team have not? How do we determine what certification program is right for our building? How does one begin the process of becoming certified? What do we need to know or look at to become certified or get ready for that process?

Finding the Right Certification Cichetti answers. “What I tell people is if you are wanting to go for official LEED EB (Existing Buildings) certification, there are three things that hold up most buildings: Energy, Water, and Air. So we want to make sure our ENERGY STAR score is at 75 or higher. You have to be energy efficient at this point, and LEED won’t tell you that you have to switch your lights to LED. I It is up to the team to figure out the right combination to get to that mark.” “When it comes to water, look at the current infrastructure. You may not need to swap out every toilet and urinal fixture to reduce water consumption, but take a look what is going to get you there. The additional benefit, in Atlanta, where our sewer bill is six to seven times the water bill, is that there is a quick payback for these upgrades. With air, it is not just about installing MERV 13 Air Filters. It is about bringing in fresh air when the building is occupied and doing some testing out on the floor for other contaminants. So if you can get the energy, water and air, the rest of it is green cleaning, green pest control, recycling and the other green best practices,” says Cichetti Lelle, from an engineer’s perspective, adds, “LEED is really certifying what we are already doing in our buildings, you have to have a good preventive maintenance program in place, good filtration, such as MERV 13 Air Filters, cleaning the equipment, and make sure that your sensors and equipment are calibrated properly. Ask questions. Are you bringing in the right amount of outside air in the building? If you set up pressurization controls in the building make sure the building is operating efficiently. Engineers play a large part throughout the certification.”

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“We are going through and physically counting the number of faucets throughout the building,” explains Lelle. “We take note of the flow rate of the aerators on all of those faucets and take note of the gallons per flush on all of the toilets. We look at all of the water sources we are using.” Lelle continued, ”We take a look at design criteria on all of the design plans and look up the optimal outside air filtration rate. We check design parameters for the chillers, for the air handlers, for the cooling towers, so we can look at parts from an optimization standpoint. We have to be able to dedicate the time to locating all of the information and learning and applying it to make sure all of the building systems and equipment are operating as they’re intended to or better.” “One of the things I would do if your company has multiple properties,” Knox adds. “If you’ve got other properties that have gone for LEED certifications, look at their application, what they submitted, see what they did and then look at your property and see if you can duplicate what they did to earn those same points.” “No cost, low-cost solutions are always great. But there’s a lot of low hanging fruit in LEED certification, and a good option is to look at other projects that your company may have already accomplished and use that as a guide.” But how does one know which certification is right for their building? It takes preparation in deciding what direction you will want to take your building such as BOMA360, WELL or LEED Silver, Gold or Platinum. It takes research to investigate current practices and the improvements that will need to occur to get a certification at a particular level. “You have to ask the question to the ownership. What are the ownership goals? I’m currently in conversation with an owner about what certifications they may wish to have on their building. I had to submit pricing for LEED certification. The owners in turn are talking to the tenants and understanding their level of interest. The tenants are then seeing if this fits their business models of what they need.” Lelle stated. “In addition to owners and tenants, the others you will need buy in from are the leasing teams. Leasing agents will know if that is something that is being asked for in the market. If your market does not attach value to these certifications, it may not be worthwhile to certify. However, you can still follow all the steps and best practices for the certification itself. These sustainability measures will save money and investing in tenant and staff health through WELL certification will help retain those tenants. It’s give and take based on the market. You still don’t give up your quality of what you’re doing, you just don’t do the certification in that case,” says Lelle. Over the last few years, our industry has gone through unprecedented times, so in a post pandemic world, one must wonder what role certifications play now? Charlie answered this for me:

The Value of Building Certifications

“On the talent side, right, it is a competitive job market right now. If people are being asked to come in to work, at least a few days a week, in this post-pandemic Zoom world, folks are going to be a little more picky. They can find a career where their building is a green office. They want it to be a healthy place to work. They want their office to be incredible. They are asking themselves; why would I come in and go sit in a cubicle?” explains Cichetti. “From a talent perspective, if I am an employer, I’ve got to shout out: ‘Hey, we’re going to have a hybrid work policy. Here are our amenities. This is a green office. This is a healthy office. Here is the proof.’ As far as rent, there is a lot of things colliding on that front. In general, you know some of the premier league properties can still get pretty nice rent premiums. Between the valuation of the building and the rent formula, I think it is still clear that LEED buildings drive a premium for real estate investors.” Finding the certification that is right for your building helps create a more sustainable and healthier built environment. Certifications, and the best practices that go into them, are a great way to keep Georgia, and your own state, beautiful. LEED, ENERGY STAR, BOMA 360, Fitwell, and WELL all have their benefits. Getting tenants, engineers, managers, and ownership engaged and onboard for these improvements and changes will help ensure these certifications are put to good use so the next generation can experience the shining daffodils, old dogwoods, exploding azaleas, and the rest of the stately American landscape we all know and love.

About the Author Dusty Muck Dusty Muck is an Account Manager for Rubbermaid Commercial Products, providing, waste/recycling, cleaning, material handling, foodservice and washroom solutions to businesses in Georgia. In addition to his work with Insight, he works as Ambassador to new BOMA Members and works on the BOMA Government Affairs Committee, assisting strategies on legislative and regulatory matters affecting the commercial real estate industry in Georgia.

Want to learn more about the certifications that can add value to your property? Enjoy this video from CRE Insight Journal on the impact of WELL certifications on Industrial Real Estate. Join Justine Zienowicz as she discusses the impact and value of this program. www.creinsightjournal.com

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INDUSTRIAL REAL ESTATE

Evolution of e-Commerce in Industrial Real Estate By: Mehtab Randhawa Over the last decade, the continued growth of the U.S. economy, alongside the fortification of the global supply chains has greatly accelerated demand for industrial real estate. Fundamental shifts in consumption patterns, specifically the remarkable growth of e-commerce and the adoption of online shopping, have transformed the way businesses establish their supply chain as well as logistics networks. These transformations have enabled the industrial market to establish historical peaks for occupancy, rental rates, and demand throughout the nation.

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e-Commerce in Industrial Real Estate The evolution of online shopping created exceptional tailwinds for the e-commerce industry and overall industrial silos. E-commerce is a business model that involves the buying and selling of tangible products and services over an electronic network, typically the internet. The industry, which barely existed a decade ago, began to surge in 2013, rapidly increasing the demand for logistics real estate due to distribution, fulfillment, and delivery of items directly to consumers.

The e-commerce industry continues to exert an outsized effect on the warehouse and distribution leasing market. Associated shelterin-place policies stemming from the pandemic further increased the need for big-box warehouse leasing across the nation. Big-box leasing transactions continues to be persistent, either through pure-play sellers or traditional retailers who are continuing to build out their footprints with new nodes across the country. Competition among e-commerce companies for industrial space remains fierce and while shelter-in-place requirements have receded, the convenience and efficiency of online shopping are likely to remain an embedded part of routine shopping for a much wider swath of the population than was the case pre-pandemic. E-commerce was remarkably resilient throughout the pandemic and accounted for 15.7% of total industrial demand in 2020, which was a record high. Much of the demand exhibited during the pandemic was largely driven by companies trying to keep pace with consumer demand and expectations. Now we are starting to see leasing level off and stabilize. While 2020 was an anomaly year, in terms of e-commerce leasing, demand remains elevated compared to historic levels.

Industrial demand during this time period also created structural uplifts for other sectors, such as retail. For niche businesses or smaller establishments, the e-commerce operating model allowed them to gain a greater market presence and supplement the brickand-mortar model with an online store. The spillover effect of businesses increasing their e-commerce exposure to capture the direct-to-consumer market also increased the durability of logistics demand. Big box retailers such as Target, Walmart, and Costco augmented competition in the digital space by expanding their online stores, particularly in response to the pandemic, which allowed customers to purchase goods right from their home and ensued impressive results for the companies.

Impacts from the Pandemic, Drivers of Growth, and Beneficiaries of e-Commerce Demand Advancements in technology and demographic shifts reshaped consumer shopping habits and pushed delivery expectations to new levels. The global pandemic further escalated the transformation of the online shopping experience, forcing traditional retailers to incorporate rapid replenishment operations to compete. During this time, many retailers who had not previously had an active e-commerce presence amplified online operations to stay on trend. In turn, this evolution accelerated leasing from the e-commerce industry and pushed fundamentals in the industrial property sector to remarkable levels.

The surge in the adoption of online shopping and insightful consumer expectations, in terms of speed and delivery of goods, has added more pressure to the supply chain. As a result, demand has spread beyond the big e-commerce players that dominated the market in 2020 to industries servicing the supply chain. 3PL and Logistics & Distribution companies such as XPO Logistics, DHL Supply Chain North America, and Ryder Supply Chain Solutions showed especially powerful momentum in response to amplified demand and supply chain disruptions. Pressed to move a record volume of goods while maintaining competitive delivery times drove 3PL as well as Logistics and Distribution users to lease aggressively to increase their networks’ capacity and efficiency. Together, these industries accounted for nearly a quarter of total leasing volume in 2021. As more companies continue to outsource their operations to meet consumer online demand, we expect these industries to flourish, especially within the 3PL sector.

Supply and Demand in the Changing Tenant Management Relationship As the demand for e-commerce rises and the supply chain develops, industrial spaces have new needs and new types of tenants. Join Emily White, Vice President - Industrial Property Management with JLL, as she discusses the strides being made in tenant relations in the industrial space. Tenants have new requirements and property managers need to be creative to capitalize on the rapid growth of e-commerce and the new tenants this growth brings.

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E-Commerce Growth and Demand in Urban Logistics Markets

E-Commerce and Industrial Space Continues to Grow

In 2022, the rise of online shopping continues to challenge logistics companies to transport goods to more addresses at faster speeds and lower costs, with hopes of shortening the last leg of their distribution network, also known as the last mile, from a facility to the customers’ doorstep. To combat these challenges, companies are shortening the last mile by opening distribution facilities in, or within, a short drive of the urban areas where their customers are concentrated.

Forecasting reports from eMarketer project e-commerce expanding by 24 percent of retail sales by 2025. With sales expected to rise, JLL experts anticipate the U.S. will need 1 billion s.f. of new industrial space this decade to keep up with the increasing demand. Though industrial demand has been robust across the board, Urban Logistics markets like New York, Bay Area and Los Angeles have posted a more pronounced spike in e-commerce demand as compared to the rest of the nation. Many of the established Urban Logistics industrial markets are seeing vacancies well below the national average, and expedited delivery expectations imposed by consumers will continue to boost demand in the future. JLL expects that logistics real estate leasing activity will increase in large “big-box” sites on city peripheries as well as urban, infill sites for ‘last-mile’ operations. With many sources projecting e-commerce to make up 40 percent of all retail sales in the next 10 years, we expect demand for all related industries and markets to continue to gain more share.

The concern with moving away from suburban big-box warehouses to smaller distribution centers that are closer to the urban populations is that they generally have less functional distribution space and there are limited undeveloped sites primed for new logistics development. According to the Industrial Tenant Demand Study Report by JLL Research, to keep pace with online shopping demand, more than half of all e-commerce requirements will occur in Urban Logistics markets.

About the Author Mehtab Randhawa

More established Urban Logistics markets such as San Francisco, Los Angeles, Chicago, Boston, New York, and Philadelphia are already seeing an immediate existing need for last-mile facilities and pushing innovative ideas to meet dwellers’ delivery needs. The increased need for e-commerce related space within and around dense metropolitan areas is expected to continue and be driven by the ongoing adoption of online shopping within urban cores and exceedingly quicker delivery speeds promised by retailers involved in e-commerce operations.

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Mehtab Randhawa is Director of Industrial Research for JLL’s Americas Region. In her role, her responsibility is to direct and implement strategy, methodology, product / platform enhancement and the firm’s overall analysis, message and outlook for the macro U.S. industrial sector. Mehtab also ensures that JLL’s research platform evolves to meet the evolving needs of JLL’s clients and prospects and proactively creates thoughtful research on a variety of topics including supply chain, manufacturing, warehouse & distribution and e-commerce that are relevant to today’s corporate real estate decision makers.


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17


CONSTRUCTION

Construction, Capital, and Time: CHANGES IN CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS In the first quarter of 2020 the construction industry was hit with extreme uncertainty as a “new normal” set upon the world due to the COVID-19 pandemic. As that uncertainty turned to recovery, the US market witnessed novel cost escalations. Through research, data collection, discussion, and analysis, the CBRE Market Trends Team is attempting to help owners and clients navigate and thrive through the uncertainty. Within this article are excerpts from some of the most trusted industry publications and sources, as well as guidance to help project costs and lead times for upcoming construction projects. The construction industry is complex and has a myriad of components: materials, supply chains, labor forces, regionalities, specialized components, and more. While the primary focus here is on the US market as a whole, some insight will also be given to regional market levels.

Material Cost Increases Research from the CBRE Market Trends Team found that the new COVID-19 variant, Omicron, upholds the continued increase on material costs causing strained manufacturing, reduced supplies, and lead time issues. Previous cost increases to commodities such as lumber and steel mill products are expected to level as high demand in certain construction sectors slows in the coming quarters. Expanding on this, CBRE reported that additional escalations influenced by recent 40-year high inflation rates may soon impact

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Insight • Special Issue, 2022

these commodity costs as well. Here are a few of the changes to building materials in 2021. (See above) According to CBRE Market Trends Research, the cost of Lumber decreased in Q3 2021 due to stabilized demand and decreased volume for residential construction and remodeling projects. Despite the sudden decrease of lumber costs between Q2 and Q3 2021,


the cost trended upwards again since Q3 2021, partially due to new COVID variants, as well as import regulations and tariffs impositions.

logistics, and manufacturing industries continue to contribute to the already existing material availability crisis.

Previously, iron and steel products had a streak of double-digit quarterly cost increases beginning in Q3 2020. Additionally, CBRE reported that these prices slowed in Q4 2021 with an increase of 6%. The US has softened its tariffs on EU steel to help relieve the skyrocketing costs and demand. Some of the remaining downward forces on iron and steel are the delay of shipments and increased global supply chain issues, which will continue to drag on the supply side of steel products. Additionally, US Steel factories are unable to fully sustain the current demand. Cement and concrete products continued slight quarterly increases in Q4 2021. CBRE explained that while construction volume stabilized since its spike in 2020 and 2021, delayed lead times, strained manufacturing, and labor shortages keep driving costs upward. With a new infrastructure bill signed and construction beginning this year, cement and concrete commodities are expected to be in even higher demand moving forward.

Supply Chain Impacts Lead Time Availability Based on research from the CBRE Market Trends Team, supply chain chaos continues throughout the industry. Product availability will continue to face challenges in production and delivery. Roofing insulation, which has been mentioned previously as an issue (along with other roofing materials), is currently experiencing some of the longest lead times in the entire construction industry at +40 weeks. Expanding on this, CBRE expressed that limited and reduced imports from overseas coupled with added volume has caused open web bar joist lead times to skyrocket to +30 weeks. Shutdowns and strained labor pools in manufacturing and shipping have led to a major backlog in the supply of wood doors, as well as hardware, and hollow metal door frames to +14 weeks. Key Factors Currently Impacting Material Availability: • Ongoing Supply and Logistics Issues • Rise in Energy Costs • Increase in Construction Project Volume • Skilled Labor Force Scarcity • Surge in Inflation Furthermore, their study shows different regions may experience different lead times, and these can change project by project and case by case, but these are some of the key items that are currently experiencing availability issues. These are not the only items markets are experiencing issues with, but simply some of the most notable at the moment. (See above right) As stated by CBRE, the supply chain remains in a fragile state with extremely long lead times for certain items. Some materials have recently become more readily available, but that is not the overall trend. Shipping, trucking and logistics remain strained at best with vaccine mandate protests slowing truck routes in North America, continued congestion at American ports, and political tensions increasing overseas. The availability and health of skilled labor in the

Labor Impacts The Market Trends Team cites data provided by the US Bureau of Labor Statistics showing that the national unemployment rate continues to trend downward each month since the beginning of last year, indicating significant recovery from the initial pandemic. According to CBRE, construction unemployment saw an uptick to start 2022 as many people left the industry despite volumes that would suggest a recovery. Residential construction saw a large drop in month-to-month volume coming into 2022 which may have contributed to this spike.

“The labor market remains extremely tight going into 2022. Contractors will be competing fiercely for talent. Contractors should expect another year of rapid wage increases in 2022. Those rising costs, along with others, must be included in bids if margins are to be sustained.” –Anirban Basu, Chief Economist with the Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC) Elaborating on this, additional reporting from CBRE shows that both construction and private industry employment costs rose throughout 2021. Construction employment wages and salaries continued to rise due to inflation and continued labor shortages. A growing number of nationwide commercial developments, and infrastructure projects could also impact construction wages over the coming quarters. Additionally, low vaccination rates among construction workers compared to other professions (58% vs 79%, per the Center for Construction Research and Training) may have played a role in labor scarcity. continued on page 20

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continued from page 19

Construction Activity The Engineering News Record (ENR) Confidence Index measures executive sentiment about where the current market will be in the next three to six months and over a 12-to 18-month period, on a 0-100 scale. The team at CBRE found that ratings above 50.0 indicate a growing market. The ENR Construction Confidence Index shows an overall increase in the construction market since the start of the pandemic but is down 5 points since last quarter. (see graphic above) The Dodge Data and Analytics Momentum Index is a measure of the initial report for projects in planning, which have been shown to lead construction spending. This index oscillated over the past year with an overall positive momentum. 2021 had an average index score of 168 which reflects a significant amount of construction planning. Furthermore, CBRE reported that the AIA Architecture Billings Index is an economic indicator for nonresidential construction activity, with a lead time of approximately 9–12 months. The American Institute of Architects’ shows previous years spend volume and projects future years spend based on recent data. Projections for the next two years are positive for all construction types through 2023. The latest data (which was current as of December 2021) shows that the Architectural Billing Index (ABI) rose to 56.4 in the South (up from 53.7 in November), was flat in the Northeast at 45.3, and down in both the Midwest and West to 51.0 and 47.5 (57.6 and 50.9 in November) respectively. Scores over 50 indicate an increase in firm billings). Total construction volume took a significant hit in 2020 after many projects were postponed or cancelled due to COVID according to the Market Trends Team at CBRE. The report from Q3 2020 shows that construction activity started to recover. Backlogs, restarts and new construction projects resumed. Throughout 2021, total construction spending steadily increased, reflecting overall growth in the construction industry. Expanding on this, the data showed that the Commercial sector has had a slower growth rate compared to rest of the industry showing a longer recovery period. (see graphic above right)

Based on findings from the CBRE Market Trends Research, Total Office construction volume continues to trend downward from 2020 levels. Month-to-month volume continues to trend downward as well. Commercial construction growth in general is now positive compared with last year, but down on a month-to-month basis. Residential construction remains strong compared with last year’s volume but saw a sharp downward trend to round out 2021.

CBRE Findings & Analysis COVID-19 impacts in the construction market, surging inflation, supply chain headaches, ongoing confrontational international conflicts, and higher energy prices have all appeared as issues that will continue to influence the industry according to CBRE. Disruptions to Continue in the Construction Market • Supply chain interruptions continue to hinder construction projects with significant increases to costs and lead times. • High material prices and continued labor shortages will remain some of the largest obstacles to a full recovery. • Escalated commodities and inflation will continue to influence increased material costs. • Added construction volume and backlogs, new infrastructure bills, etc. will increase demand for labor and construction materials. •

Union and non-union skilled labor costs have both skyrocketed over the last 18 months, with the key word being “skilled”. Unemployment remains relatively low, but many skilled workers have left the sector entirely.

• International conflict (war, tariffs, etc.) has contributed to an already strained supply chain and may continue to do so. Construction Market Outlook • Construction markets will continue to stabilize in the coming quarters. Cancelled, and postponed projects from 2020 resumed in 2021. Volume for several construction types will remain strong through 2022 and into 2023.

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• Inflation is projected to stabilize, but a potential jump in unemployment could lead to stagflation which would be the worst-case scenario. • The current housing boom will begin to slow with other sectors recovering. Residential month-to-month volume has been trending downward since September 2021. • Data warehousing construction could be the most prominent category to grow in cost. Commercial and office construction segments are expected to rebound later in the recovery as many Owners are reevaluating their in-person needs and strategies for office space. Construction Market Recommendations • Proactive collaboration with construction partners. Open communication with developers, owners, general contractors, subcontractors and vendors is key to help avoid further disruptions. Mitigate risk through early discussion between vendor partners and project teams. • Plan ahead. Look further out to help guarantee funding and material availability if possible. • Award projects quickly after proposals are received. Many contractors and mills are holding prices for a week or less. • Allow for creative substitutions. Where applicable and advisable, allow for temporary doors, alternate designs, substitutions, open specifications for equipment, etc. • Increase the contractor pool. Expand the search for qualified contractors and subcontractors beyond current relationships.

from United States Construction Market Trends Q1 2022, March 2022 Claire Ji Lee, Dan Richardson, Omar ElSingergy, MSC. MRICS

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LEADERSHIP

Emotional Resilience:

Tips and Tactics to Help You Bounce Back By: Dr. Stevie Dawn “My friends, I have just showed you a very important lesson. No matter what I did to the money, you still wanted it because it did not decrease in value. It was still worth $20. Many times, in our lives, life crumples us and grinds us into the dirt. We make bad decisions or deal with poor circumstances. We feel worthless. But no matter what has happened or what will happen, you will never lose your value.”

Bouncing Back To me, that is what emotional resilience is all about. Being able to bounce back from tough times. Being able to handle the ups and downs of life with grace, patience, and a smile. Being able to never lose sight of your own self-worth.

A popular speaker started off a seminar by holding up a $20 bill. A crowd of 200 had gathered to hear him speak. He asked, “Who would like this $20 bill?” 200 hands went up. He said, “I am going to give this $20 to one of you but first, let me do this.” He crumpled the bill up. He then asked, “Who still wants it?” All 200 hands were still raised. “Well,” he replied, “What if I do this?” Then he dropped the bill on the ground and stomped on it with his shoes. He picked it up and showed it to the crowd. The bill was all crumpled and dirty.“Now who still wants it?” All the hands still went up.

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Here’s an exercise to illustrate emotional resilience. Take a pulse check. On a scale of 1 to 10, how are you feeling today? Right now? With a 10 being awesome and a 1 being not so hot, choose your number. Maybe it’s a Monday and the emails are piling up, so you are feeling like a 4. Or perhaps, it is Friday afternoon, and you are reading this before you shut down for the weekend, so you are feeling about an 8. Throughout the day, how we are feeling shifts moment to moment. The day can start off well and then you see just one email from that angry tenant and all of a sudden, your number drops. Having emotional resilience is being able to bounce back after those bad episodes during your day.

Have you enjoyed Dr. Dawns incredible article on emotional resilience? Want to hear more of her? Enjoy this on demand webinar through CRE Insight 365 for this engaging virtual session on emotional resilience and how to bounce back.


8 Great Traits

Your Bounce Back List

There are 8 traits of Emotional Resilience that all of us can access to bounce back faster. Take a look at the list below and ask yourself, what do you already possess?

We all encounter tough and challenging times both professionally, and personally. The key is to respond in the best way possible. In addition to utilizing the traits you already have; you can develop a Bounce Back List. This is a catalogue of activities that can help you bounce back quickly and effectively. Every person’s list will be different, but you might have things such as: • Phone a friend • Look at photos on your phone (grandkids are usually a good place to start) • Take a walk outside (sunshine and nature tend to help) • Listen to your favorite music • Meditate • Consciously Breathe • Work on a fun project • Workout

1 Emotional Reframing. This is the ability to look at the good in every situation. To not get tied down into a negative spiral. Instead of questioning your ability when you go for a promotion, reframe those thoughts to be focused on how you have the experience and talent needed to move forward. Reframing allows you to focus on the positive and have a better outlook on a situation. 2 Emotional Awareness is the ability to identify your emotions before they lead to actions. Having awareness is about identifying the emotions you are feeling and “why” you are feeling them before you take action or make statements. Awareness can help you to reframe thoughts and improve relationships. 3 Perseverance. This is the ability to just keep swimming. You see, I am addicted to sharks. In fact, I am something of an expert on them. A surprising fact about sharks is that they have to keep swimming in order to live. Swimming is how they oxygenate their bodies. This same concept applies to us as humans. Being able to just keep swimming through choppy waters is what helps us to conceptualize that it might be a bad moment, but that doesn’t mean you are heading for a bad day, week, month, or even a bad year. 4 Internal Control is a fancy phrase for knowing that you are in control of your life. Emotional resilience improves when you realize that life happens for you not to you. When you can accept that external circumstances do not dictate your internal beliefs and feelings. 5 Optimism. Having a positive outlook, seeing the good in a situation, that skill allows you to bounce back faster. 6 Support is one of the most important skills in Emotional Resilience and can be critical in your work life. Do you have people around you to support you and your success? A tribe, a group of friends, work colleagues? We all need people to help us bounce back. Going at it alone is incredibly difficult, and great support can be key in bouncing back from tough times. Remember to give others support during their tough times. Like gift giving, you receive as much as you give when you support others. 7 Sense of Humor. When you have a sense of humor, you can laugh at the difficult times which helps to disrupt the downward spiral and reframe quicker. A good laugh can light up the room, and sometimes that is all you need to bounce back after a tumble. 8 Spirituality. Having a belief in something larger than ourselves can help us overcome difficult situations. So, which of these traits do you possess? While having all 8 makes resilience and life easier, it isn’t necessary. The goal is to have at least two or three of these traits in your toolbox. To be able to use them when needed.

What would be on your list? What activities bring a smile to your face? What can raise your number and improve your day?

Finding Joy One of the most important aspects to emotional resilience is joy. Being able to find happiness and joy at work helps to navigate life’s choppy waters. In fact, five minutes of joy can give you up to sixty minutes of productive energy. This is a great use for the Bounce Back List you have developed. When things are difficult, and you start to feel weighed down by everything on your to do list, taking a five-minute joy break can be exactly what you need. These joy breaks are a great way to help you bounce that number back up and keep going through the tough days. These tactics can help you stay focused, happy, and energetic. Emotional resilience is a skill that can be developed with practice and intention. Taking a pulse check (on a scale of 1 to 10) is a great way to start identifying how you are feeling at any given moment. Being able to identify the traits that you already have, building your Bounce Back List, and taking joy breaks are all valuable tools in your emotional resilience toolkit. It all comes back to that crumpled up $20 bill. You always have value and worth. You can always straighten yourself out. No matter what trials you face, you can always overcome them because you have the skills that you need. You are worthy. You are resilient. You are unstoppable.

About the Author Dr. Stevie Dawn Dr. Stevie Dawn Carter is a sought-after speaker and coach. She is known for her ability to energize others to unleash their unstoppable success. She has created multi-million dollar success in the arenas of business, fine art, dance, and now speaking/coaching. She owned and operated her first dance studio at the age of 17 in Australia. She earned her doctorate degree in leadership, while studying emotional intelligence at Colorado State University.

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SOFT SKILLS / INTERPERSONAL

Developing an Inclusive Mindset for Generations in the Workplace By Devin Simon, RPA

George Bernard Shaw said...

“Progress is impossible without change, and those who cannot change their minds cannot change anything.” What do you think of when you hear the word mindset? What about growth mindset? Your mindset is the fixed, unconscious biased or adaptive lens. It is ideal, that we go into our workplace, with a growth mindset. People who have a growth mindset believe that even if they struggle with certain skills, their abilities aren’t set in stone. They believe that with hard work, collaboration and positivity, their skills can improve over time. People who have growth mindset believe that they can always improve something, and that perseverance, learning, and listening will help accomplish anything and that it’s never too late to acquire an adaptive lens. Developing an inclusive mindset in the workplace, and fostering that among a diverse group of employees, starts with a growth mindset. In order to learn and grow, you must first identify the fixed and unconscious lens and what you think you know about yourself and be willing to accept feedback in all forms. When people’s lenses and capacities are fixed, and rigid, they’re more likely to focus on shortterm goals, and may not be willing to give others the opportunity to present forward thinking success strategies. In other words, this can lead to people feeling excluded, less engaged, and unproductive.

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Generations in the Workplace Baby Boomers, Generation X, Millennials and Generation Z workers are filling commercial real estate establishments across cities, bringing a plethora of skills to the table, however different their vocabularies might be. Developing and nurturing the harmony among these diverse generations can be the difference between a productive corporation, to an innovative and thriving one. In other words, inclusivity is compulsory. There are defining moments that people lug around in invisible backpacks all day every day, and these moments shape who we are. Understanding and embracing the differences of those we surround ourselves with day-in and day-out is imperative to productivity and satisfaction within the workplace. When we shut one another down, and we do not consider input from the top down and likewise from the bottom up then we take away a huge component of a growth mindset lens, communication. It takes effort to understand our differences and celebrate what makes each of us unique. And when there is willingness and inclusivity, we feel seen. When we are seen, we thrive. Let’s take a look at the Baby Boomers, a group of professionals born from 1946-1964. The work ethic, ambition, and optimism they bring to the workplace is paramount. The experiences they’ve had should be respected, and we should utilize their knowledge in all areas.


Creating the opportunities to listen to who came before you, will help you to get where you want to go. And honoring the history Baby Boomers have shared is a way to do that. Diversity and inclusion committees have a responsibility to recognize the important days of remembrance that span throughout all our generations. Letting us pause and learn the past, what each generation has learned independently in real time, allows us to expand our thinking, which only increases our ability to be empathetic. For example, using Black History Month to highlight the key moments in the Civil Rights Movement, can create a dialogue worth having. Listening to those who have experienced the pain and triumph from this time has many advantages. One, we must not let what was unjust be repeated. Knowledge gives us that power. And the stories from those who lived during that time of protest and change, can see themselves in those now, who are still looking to be seen. Many are still fighting, and when we learn about each other, and from one another, we might see our differences are not so vast. How do we not overlook generational similarities? One of the many generational activities I participated in while receiving my Inclusive Leadership Certificate through CRE Insight Journal that created an unknown connection with other CRE colleagues was name the movie, music and games played when we were younger. We cannot be ageist and assume technological advances will be over the heads of some. There is value to creating a variety of solutions to meet the different needs of all of us. Mentorship amongst generations creates inclusivity. The mentor and mentee working together increases employee satisfaction and talent retention. Mentors can also provide psychological support for their mentees and offer another moment to view the CRE environment from a different lens. Mentorship engages and motivates employees and enhances leadership skills in current and future managers. Accountability strengthens from mentorship, as does teamwork, time management and internal networks. In turn, the mentee is beneficial to the mentor. Mentees can help to develop ideas and look at situations from a different perspective. The mentee might be more willing to take risks, which can create exciting opportunities in the workplace. It’s important to remember that diversity doesn’t always mean inclusivity. Creating an inclusive environment takes time, buy-in and should be implemented from a leadership team. This team can create professional development that is worthwhile for all employees. One of the challenges of that team is to model inclusive language across all generations. For example, let’s not use the word wife or husband, but spouse or partner. Let’s put pronouns in our email signatures. An inclusive leadership team must build trust, and check-in with employees often. Is everyone feeling heard? Respected? Valued? Employees should feel safe to have a dialogue about their generational experiences they’re having together and independently in the workplace. Creating a way to allow for feedback is extremely important. And as important as the feedback is, the same goes for what to do when an employee isn’t experiencing the inclusive environment that is deserved.

Being inclusive means expanding the company holiday calendar. Diversity and inclusion committees should be celebrating and acknowledging all our histories. Juneteenth, Ramadan, and Diwali are just as valuable as Christmas and Hannukah. Creating events and initiatives surrounding this calendar is also important. For example, celebrating Pride Month in June by having a mixer or asking a guest speaker to come in during lunch fosters inclusivity. Celebrating performance and recognizing employee engagement each quarter increases productivity, too. Earning small incentives is rewarding and fun for all. Inclusivity means having a building that is ADA-compliant. Employees and visitors with disabilities should feel safe and welcome in all areas of the workplace. Our goal is to make sure assistive technology is available if needed, and all employees should learn the rights of one another in order to build awareness and equality.

An Inclusive Mindset While we learn about our generational differences, it is important to stay away from stereotypes and generalizations. That only creates intergenerational conflict and misunderstandings. Employees must fight unconscious bias and be willing to view others from an unfixed lens. Identifying generational gaps and unconscious bias can be measured by using the Harvard implicit bias test. Only when we are honest with ourselves, can we then change for the better, and learn from one another. Baby Boomers might think Millennials are techobsessed, and Millennials might think Generation Z employees are inflexible. To create inclusion, we must accept individuals based on their merits. The commercial real estate industry needs all of us: property managers, C-Suite, accountants, HR, leasing agents, electricians, engineers, janitorial, security, plumbers, parking managers, general contractors, tenants, architects, and I could go on. All of us have a shared purpose in the workplace no matter which generational age group we are defined under. That purpose should be communicated often, while fostering a culture of acceptance, focusing on individual strengths, and reducing barriers to communication. Differentiating communication styles is key, and adapting to the needs of employees, while still prioritizing a shared purpose. We all have something important to add. We all have a story worth telling. And we all have a story worth hearing.

About the Author Devin Simon Devin Simon is the property manager for Zeller at the Resurgens Plaza Building in Atlanta, GA. She has been at the property for almost 3 years & began her career within commercial real estate six years ago. Devin is an active member of BOMA Georgia since 2019, has recently been appointed to the BOMA GA Board of Directors, and serves as the co-chair for Zeller’s Diversity & Inclusion Committee (ZDIC). She is also an active member of Commercial Real Estate Women (CREW) of Atlanta and is a member of the Diversity & Inclusion Committee. www.creinsightjournal.com

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WORKFORCE

Flexing Their Muscles

By: Phil Mobley As tenants struggle to fill literal and figurative seats, their expectations for landlords are changing We are now about a year into The Great Resignation, a period of unprecedented voluntary job quitting. The trend emerged last spring in overworked, understaffed sectors like logistics and hospitality. By the end of 2021, it was rippling through the knowledge workforce (see Figure 1), with quits exceeding historical norms in professional services, finance, information, and even government. The battle to attract and retain talent is impacting organizations across the economy as wages grow rapidly and office-using employment is back to normal.

Workplace environment now plays a key role in this battle. Specifically, knowledge workers now demand the flexibility to spend at least some working days at home (or at another remote location). Even some who were initially skeptical of the “hybrid” model have now accepted it as a new reality. A year ago, for example, JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon was a prominent supporter of the 5-day, in-office workweek. But in April, he acknowledged that “working from home will become more permanent in American business.” Going forward, roughly 40% of the firm’s employees will work some form of a hybrid schedule.

Figure 1

Persona-based Flexibility Dimon and others are acquiescing to a desire that has been expressed in innumerable surveys of workers over the past two years. “The data we have collected suggests that 75-85% of employees across all industries want some degree of flexibility to work remotely,” says Rick Ybarra, Principal, Americas Consulting at Avison Young. The challenge for employers is to adapt their policies and workplaces to keep these workers both happy and effective. Ybarra says it begins with employee personas: “As we have engaged with clients on understanding the mobility and activity profile of their employees.” Note: Seasonally adjusted Source: US Bureau of Labor Statistics, Avison Young Insight

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Once employee mobility and activity profiles are established, the next step is defining the appropriate policy. Ybarra stresses that no single


arrangement will be best for all companies, or even all groups within a company. Still, some general patterns have already emerged: “There has been some consistency across companies starting to define 2 or 3 days a week for the hybrid employee, as well as targeting TuesdayThursday as these in-office days.” Hard data now show that this type of hybrid arrangement is effective in retaining employees. Stanford economist Nick Bloom recently directed a formal study comparing a flexible model (with 3 days in the office and 2 at home) with a fully inoffice model at Trip.com, an online travel company based in Shanghai. The researchers found that the rate of employees leaving their jobs was 35% lower in the group with the 3/2 schedule—with no difference in employee performance or likelihood of being promoted. Policy is only part of the equation. Offices themselves also need to adapt to accommodate hybrid workers. The consulting team lead by Ybarra helps clients implement dynamic work environments (DWE) that support both the individual and collective activities of teams. The concept of DWE has been around for a while, especially in the technology, media, and information sectors. Over the past two years, however, it has gained broader adoption. “There has definitely been a recognition that the places and spaces employees desire is materially different than what it was pre-pandemic,” comments Ybarra.

Flexibility is More than “Hybrid” If workers are demanding personal flexibility around where to work, then their employers will need to adapt to provide it. This means flexibility in the types of space they occupy and the way in which they acquire it. Employers who can bridge the gap between the centralized office and the work-from-home (WFH) experience will be the winners in the end. So says Charlie Morris, Practice Leader – Flexible Office Solutions at Avison Young. “We need to stop believing we can provide companies a single solution that will work for all employees,” states Morris. “Some of our largest enterprise clients are exploring an entire ecosystem of flexible workplace solutions when making real estate decisions today to satisfy the particular needs of individuals or specific business units.” That ecosystem is evolving and expanding. Even within serviced office offerings (like Regus executive suites or WeWork coworking spaces), there is a wide variety. Typically purchased via a license agreement on terms of 12 months or less, options in these spaces might include hot-desking, dedicated individual offices, or private team suites. Sometimes the flexible provider leases the space from the building owner; but in other cases, they might enter into an agreement to manage the space on the owner’s behalf, effectively sharing the revenue with the landlord. While serviced offices took a hit at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, it is now surging back. By the end of March 2022, the FlexIndex, a measure of the sector’s health published by the flexible space platform OfficeRnD, had almost fully recovered to 2019 levels. In response, OfficeRnD, CEO & Co-founder Miroslav Miroslavov pointed out that, while desk occupancy has recovered fully, “What’s also very exciting is the fact that the meeting room utilization is also gaining momentum and reaching pre-pandemic levels!”

The flexible ecosystem includes options beyond serviced offices. On one end of the spectrum are agile suites, also known as managed or flex suites. These are private, secure spaces intended for use by a single organization. For occupiers, agile suites offer a step up from shared spaces. For owners, they can be a way to differentiate their existing spec suite program that, for various reasons, might have difficulty competing in the flexible leasing market. With their offerings HQ and Canvas, the flex giants WeWork and Industrious, respectively, both offer their own branded versions of agile suites. Owners, too, are getting into the game. Bridge Commercial Real Estate now offers Abridge as a more flexible solution. Similarly, Granite Properties has introduced Evolve. Both seek to fill the market’s need for dedicated space with shorter-term commitments. At the other end of the spectrum are on-demand spaces designed for single purposes, such as meetings or events. These can sometimes be booked directly on proprietary technology platforms for as little as an hour at a time. For companies leaning into remote work, ondemand spaces meet a need for occasional gatherings, as well as the opportunity to explore a wider variety of property classes and geographic locations. For landlords, they offer an opportunity to maximize both utilization and value. “These flexible solutions have become a key topic of conversation in almost every enterprise occupier presentation we have been involved in over the past 6-8 months,” explains Morris, adding that it is a trend that he fully expects to continue.

The Amenitized, Experiential, Tech-enabled Workplace In a workplace universe with so much flexibility, choice is the crucial element. When employees make the commute to a corporate office in the middle of town, it is because they have chosen to do so. Rather than the default, a “day at the office” is now an experience intentionally sought. If building owners, property managers, and tenants want their spaces to attract workers, they must cooperate to deliver that desired experience. Randel Waites, Principal & Managing Director, Real Estate Management Services for the U.S., sees amenitization as an important element in providing this experience. “We are seeing amenities moving closer to workers,” he explains. “Closer to the buildings, inside the buildings, and from the common areas to inside the suites.” The trend toward amenity spaces was in continued on page 28

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full bloom before the pandemic and included everything from coffee bars and fitness centers to state-of-the-art video arcades and climbing walls. But with people coming to the office less frequently, landlords need to think more creatively about amenities. “We know the things that help employees do their best work,” says Waites. “Access to natural light and green spaces, high-quality food, and customizable furniture all contribute to a productive, collaborative, and relaxing environment that is good for workers and their employers too.” Technology allows landlords to offer these things and more to their occupants, even when they may not all be available inside the building’s walls. “There are abundant cost-effective technologies to pull in services like food trucks and yoga classes, as well as to convert under-utilized spaces into areas for art exhibits or meditation,” he says. The growth in tenant engagement platforms is one example of the explosion in PropTech that has only accelerated during the pandemic. According to CB Insights, investment in PropTech increased from $9.0 billion in 2019 to $9.5 billion in 2021. Aside from experiencefocused offerings, there has also been greater interest building access and reservation systems and tools to operate more efficiently and sustainably. This last point has particular resonance with Gen Z, the newest generation of workers. According to a Deloitte survey, more than three quarters of adults currently aged 25 and under say it is important to work for an organization whose values match their own, and climate change tops their list of important issues.

A Chain of Experience This underscores a key point in the battle for talent. Ideally, a company wants its brand identity to resonate through its employees to customers. To do this effectively, employees need to be on board not only with the mission of the company, but also with the way it does

business. The workplace—including both remote work and the in-office experience—remains one of the most powerful mechanisms available for organizations to demonstrate its identity authentically. And now, real estate plays a more important role than ever in this chain of experience. No one wants a scenario The Economist recently called “the worst of both worlds,” where employees commute downtown only to sit miserably at their cubicles on video calls with distributed coworkers, thus missing out on all the benefits of an office. But the risks of this scenario are all too real, and avoiding them means changing the way commercial buildings work. Delivering a highperforming ecosystem of workplaces will require tighter alignment among a growing number of constituents, including building owners, property managers, flex space providers, technology companies, and tenants themselves.

About the Author Phil Mobley Phil Mobley has served the commercial real estate (CRE) industry as a researcher and consultant for over 15 years. He specializes in providing analyses that help the industry deliver high-value workplaces for tenants, a need that continues to evolve. As Director of US Occupier Research at Avison Young, Phil shapes and leads the firm’s approach to understanding occupiers’ businesses and their dynamic need for commercial space. His work supports multiple service lines by identifying new ways to meet both landlord and occupier client needs.

n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n

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In property and facility management the level of success is commonly attributable to an understanding of building systems by property professionals. This knowledge is required to manage operating expenses, support capital planning, ensuring tenant satisfaction, optimizing operations and supporting energy conservation and sustainability efforts. It is common for property and facility managers to rely on operating engineers and contractors to assist in the decision-making process when it comes to building systems. BOMA's Building Systems Desk Reference provides a comprehensive guide to the equipment associated with various building systems, including: • HVAC • Electrical • Plumbing • Elevator • Fire and Life Safety • Preventative Maintenance • Energy Conservation • And More! Need to know the difference between a Bus Bar and a Bus Duct? How about a Traction Elevator versus a Hydraulic Elevator? The Building Systems Desk Reference is an excellent entry level guide for anyone entering building operations and management, and it features more than 600 images illustrating the more than 500 terms associated with these systems. This reference is an essential publication for anyone involved in building operations and management. https://www.techstreet.com/boma/

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SAFETY

Fall Protection in the Workplace: Laws, Responsibilities, and Best Practices By Scott L. Weiland PE, SE, James T. Boatright PE, OSHA Qualified Person Falls are the leading cause of preventable death and lost day injuries in the workplace. While most falls are from a higher to lower level, the majority of fatalities occur from heights of between 11 ft. and 20 ft., and most ladder fatalities occur from heights of 10 ft. or less. Knowing these statistics, having a managed fall protection program not only helps satisfy the law, but it is the right thing to do to protect yourself, your workforce, property owners and property managers.

Laws

Until 1970, all states had their own safety regulations. However, as result of protests for the improvement of worker safety, President Richard M. Nixon signed into law the OSH Act. The Act was the culmination of almost a century of endeavors by the states and the federal government to mitigate the vulnerabilities of employees exposed to the hazards of the Industrial Age. The Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) was officially formed as an agency of the U. S. Department of Labor on April 28, 1972, the date that the OSH Act became effective. Shortly thereafter, thousands of its first consensus standards were published.

OSHA is charged with assuring safe and healthful conditions for working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, outreach, and education and compliance assistance. In addition, the OSH Act’s general duty clause requires every employer to provide every employee with a place of employment free from recognized hazards. Among additional workers’ rights created by the OSH Act, employees are to be kept informed of workplace hazards, be allowed to report hazards to either the employer or OSHA without retaliation, and to receive training to minimize the exposure to known hazards.

The Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) are the published federal laws of the United States. Of the 50 Titles contained within the CFR, Title 29 – Labor includes Part 1900 that deals with OSHA. Part 1910 – General Industry is a catch-all of Occupational Safety and Health Standards that cover all workers unless they are covered by a more specific regulation such as those for Shipyard, Marine Terminal, Long Shoring, Construction, and Agriculture work.

To better protect workers from falls, OSHA issued a significant update and clarification to its Walking-Working Surface standards in 2017. This update was based on advances in technology, industry best practices, and national consensus standards from American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE), American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and International Window Cleaning Association (IWCA). The primary intent of the update was to provide more flexibility and options for fall protection so there would be no excuse for not using it. Additionally,

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fall hazard training of all workers exposed to a fall was mandated, and limitations were placed on fixed ladders over 24 ft. tall and use of Rope Decent Systems (RDS) over 300 ft.

Responsibilities

Voluntary ANSI/ASSE Z359 Fall Protection Standards help to fill in the gaps within the OSHA regulations. Of the 17 standards, Z359.2 Minimum Requirements for a Comprehensive Managed Fall Protection Program is a good comprehensive aid to developing a Fall Protection Program.

Additional roles include Competent and Authorized Rescuer, and Trainer.

Best Practices

Hazard Survey - Prior to assigning workers (Authorized Person) to a particular assignment, a hazard Survey should be conducted by the Foremen or Supervisor (Competent Person) to look for and address fall hazards among others. This survey should include 100% coverage including access and egress from the work area. Triggers requiring fall protection include: • Aerial lifts • Working above dangerous equipment • Fixed ladders over 24 ft. • Holes (including skylights) • Scaffolds over 10 ft. • Unprotected edges and wall openings above 4 ft. to a lower level for general industry and 6 ft. to a lower level for construction.

ANSI/ASSE Z359.2 requires a policy and commitment set by top management to provide a safe work environment for all employees working at height in any situation. OSHA Regulations are minimum requirements, and it will not take long for a managed fall protection program to far exceed the safeguards provided by OSHA.

Maintaining equipment is generally considered to fall under 29 CFR Part 1910 General Industry. Replacement could be considered to fall under 29 CFR Part 1926 Construction. However, it is best to follow the stricter requirements when in doubt. Fall Protection Options - The pyramid below demonstrates the most effective to least effective forms of fall protection.

The roles outlined by the ANSI/ASSE standard include the following: Employer – Generates the policy, consequences for noncompliance, and appoints a Program Administrator. Program Administrator – Develops, implements, monitors, and evaluates the fall protection program. The administrator also verifies training of Qualified, Competent, and Authorized Persons. Qualified Person – An engineer who supervises the design, selection, installation, use, and inspection of certified anchorages and horizontal and vertical lifeline systems. The qualified also participates in investigation of all fall related incidents, actual or near misses. Competent Person – Provides immediate supervision (usually a foreman or supervisor) of authorized persons in the implementation, use, and monitoring of the fall protection program. The competent person also prepares, updates, reviews, and approves written fall protection procedures and rescue plans, verifies training of authorized persons, and participates in investigation of all fall related incidents, actual or near misses. Authorized Person – A worker trained to follow the employer’s policy, fall protection program, and competent persons instructions regarding the use of fall protection and rescue systems. The authorized person is also responsible for inspecting fall protection systems prior to each use and notifying the competent person of any unsafe condition(s).

Eliminate - Of the many options, complete elimination, or minimization of the hazard through safe building design is the most consistent form of fall protection. This can be accomplished by placing equipment on the ground or within the building as opposed to on the roof. Guardrails – The use of guardrails provides a passive form of fall protection. Guardrails can be permanent or mobile and can be utilized on elevated platforms, aerial and scissor lifts, scaffolds, and around openings. Safe Design should make perimeter parapets a minimum of 42” above the roofing to provide a permanent guardrail. Fall Restraint – A travel restraint utilizing an anchor, lanyard, body belt or harness can be used to limit travel in the direction of an unprotected edge.

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Fall Arrest – A fall arrest system can include an anchor, shock absorbing lanyard or self-retracting lifeline, and harness. However, everything must work perfectly to prevent injury and death while or after the fall is arrested. First, sufficient clearance is required to avoid striking an object during the fall, and once your fall has been arrested utilizing a harness, the harness straps crush your femoral vein which in turn slows blood circulation and pressure. Abruptly, your body slows your heart rate, blood pressure, and oxygen delivered to your brain and other vital organs. Symptoms are evident within 10 minutes, and you could die in less than 30 minutes if the blood circulation is not restored. Assuming the victim is conscious, blood flow can be restored with the use of footholds from optional trauma straps added to your harness or the provision of a ladder. Otherwise, rescue is required in as little as 6 minutes to avoid severe injury or death. Therefore, it is important for workers utilizing fall arrest harnesses to have a buddy system and not be allowed to work alone. Additionally important, a rescue plan needs to be in place in the event of a fall so rescue can be implemented immediately.

About the Author Scott L. Weiland Scott L Weiland, PE, SE is a Principal with Innovative Engineering Inc. Email him at sweiland@ieiusa.com Scott is a graduate of the University of Michigan and attended graduate school at both San Jose State University and Georgia Institute of Technology and is a registered engineer in 39 states. Scott has over 41 years’ experience as a structural engineer in both design and construction, and has specialized in providing fall protection safety, structure design, and OSHA guidance for more than 2 decades.

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Other Acceptable Systems – OSHA recognizes the use of Warning Systems at leading edges of low slope roofs when it can be documented that the use of conventional fall protection is infeasible and/or creates a greater hazard. As the lowest form of fall protection, a warning system relies on worker behavior and human nature in order to successfully protect workers from a fall hazard. A specific fall protection plan is required that is prepared by a Qualified Person and implemented by a Competent Person. A warning system ether utilizes a suspended and flagged warning line placed 6 ft. to 15 ft. minimum from the leading edge, depending on the activity, and/or a Safety Monitor that is a Competent Person who warns workers of fall hazards. A managed fall protection program is continually updated and will soon far exceed the minimum fall protection requirements of OSHA. Not only does a fall protection program protect yourself, your workforce, property owners, and property managers, it is simply the right thing to do.

About the Author James T. Boatwright James T. Boatright PE is a Senior Engineer with Innovative Engineering Inc. and an OSHA Qualified Fall Protection Engineer. Email him at jboatright@ieiusa.com James is a specialized Fall Protection Engineer for Innovative Engineering Inc. He is a graduate of the Virginia Military Institute (VMI) with a degree in Civil engineering. At VMI, he was a four-year starter on the offensive line for the Keydets football team. James is a certified OSHA/ANSI Qualified Engineer as well as an OSHA certified Competent Person Trainer, a qualification which authorizes him to train and prepare workers for fall protection safety.


STRUCTURAL INSPECTION AND REPAIR WEBINAR SERIES FROM CRE INSIGHT JOURNAL STRUCTURAL INSPECTION AND REPAIR WEBINAR PART ONE Many commercial property owners and building management staff are considering the important topic of structural inspection and repair. This is part one of the two-part webinar on structural inspection and repair. In this video, Scott Weiland, PE, SE with Innovative Engineering focuses on inspections and tips for consistent maintenance on commercial structures.

STRUCTURAL INSPECTION AND REPAIR WEBINAR PART TWO Many commercial property owners and building management staff are considering the important topic of structural inspection and repair. This is part two of the two-part webinar on structural inspection and repair. In this webinar, Evan Moore, PE, SE, with Engineered Restorations discusses how to navigate the correction and repair work of commercial structures.

RESOURCES FOR STRUCTURAL INSPECTION AND REPAIR Evan Moore, PE, SE, of Engineered Restorations Inc., describes four resources for building owners and managers on structural inspection and repair as well as their format, use, and how to incorporate them into your maintenance schedule.

CRACKING CONCRETE – A VISUAL REVIEW Evan Moore, PE, SE with Engineered Restorations Inc., describes the many different ways concrete can crack, what to look out for as concrete cracks, when to engage building engineer and contractor, and a few ways to repair cracks.

WHEN TO ENGAGE A STRUCTURAL ENGINEER Brian Rivers, PE, with PM&A details some of the damage requiring an inspection from a structural engineer and contractor, as well as when to inspect mid-rise buildings, high-rise buildings, and parking structures.

USING LEAKS TO IDENTIFY STRUCTURAL ISSUES Water is the number deteriorator of structures. Scott Weiland, PE, SE, with Innovative Engineering Inc. explores how water affects different structural

elements, the tests to locate water damage, and how leaks can aid in the identification of issues, and what to do when they are found.

View all this content and more in the award-winning Structural Inspection and Repair Guide from CRE Insight Journal. https://creinsightjournal.com/structural-inspection-and-repair-guide/ www.creinsightjournal.com

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TECHNOLOGY

L-Prize Concept Phase Concludes By: Owen Kavanagh The first stage of the United States Department of Energy’s Lighting Prize (or L-Prize) competition concluded on Feb. 3, 2022. Four groups were awarded $20,000 each for their Solid-State Lighting (SSL) design concepts and the prototype phase will begin soon. With the first L-prize stage complete, the commercial real estate industry has moved one step closer to the next generation of LED lighting.

The L-Prize

The L-Prize is a contest held by the US DOE to encourage innovation in the lighting industry. The previous L-Prize competition held in 2011 (discussed in this CRE Insight Journal Article) was won by Philips 940 lumen, 10-watt LED bulb. The DOE began a new L-Prize competition in 2021 with three main phases. • Phase 1: Concept – The first phase of the 2021 L-Prize competition rewards concept systems that meet energy efficiency, lighting quality, connectivity, and product life cycle requirements that exceed currently available commercial products. Up to 10 entrants win $20,000 for their designs. Four groups won. • Phase 2: Prototypes – The second phase of the L-Prize competition seeks technological innovations through product prototypes. Entrants are encouraged to think outside the box and look at novel forms and materials in their designs. Phase 2 has a $2,000,000 prize pool for up to 3 winners. Phase 2 is anticipated to open Feb. 15, 2022, with an anticipated deadline of Dec. 15, 2022. Phase 2 winners will be announced Feb. 2023. • Phase 3: Manufacturing & Installation – The third and final phase of the L-Prize competition rewards entrants based on U.S. manufacturing, installations, and additional life cycle and operation considerations. Phase 3 will award up to two entrants from a $10,000,000 prize pool. The 2021 L-Prize competition is meant to usher in the next generation of LED lighting and has brought a few incredible design concepts to the forefront. Teaming opportunities will start in Phase 2 and will connect researchers and product developers with manufacturing partners, energy service companies, utilities, contractors, and other groups interested in the production and installation of lighting systems meeting L-Prize standards. Entrants do not need to participate in the concept phase to enter the prototype phase. Four groups won the Phase 1 of the L-Prize, Quarkstar, Orion Energy Systems, Smash the Bulb/Bridgelux, and Papaya. Each winner received $20,000 for their designs.

QuarkStar

Operating out of Las Vegas, Nev., QuarkStar sits at the bleeding edge of solid-state lighting. QuarkStar’s founders include the creator of Haitz’s Law, a former CTO of Philips Lighting, and the founder of Strategies in Light. Their L-Prize submission, Project Tango, is an innovative solid-state lighting source built on Surface Mounted Filaments™. Project Tango uses materials from QuarkStar’s L-Prize partner Nichia to overcome compromises and tradeoffs that have previously limited lighting systems. Project Tango features a networked, white-tunable luminaire (a complete electric lighting unit) based on QuarkStar’s Edge-X™ optics with class-defining uniformity and shaping in a networked, ultra-high-efficiency LED. This luminaire uses the Edge-X™ technology to provide 96 percent optical efficiency and light distribution in the smallest size system solution.

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Orion Energy Systems

Orion Energy Systems (or Orion) operates out of Jacksonville, Fla., and is an innovator in LED lighting systems. Orion provides LED lighting systems with enhanced optical and thermal performance; ease of installation; IoT controls and systems; ongoing system maintenance and program management; and industry leading energy-efficiency. Their L-Prize submission, the Sustainable and Connected Troffer Retrofit, is designed to retrofit an existing fluorescent luminaire to LED technology in less than two minutes. Orion’s Sustainable and Connected Troffer Retrofit has an estimated life span of over 50,000 hours at 85 lumens. These luminaires are tunable from 2700 – 6500K (to learn more about lighting quality check out this CRE Insight Journal article) and feature a programable Application Programming Interface (API), 180 lumens per watt (LPW) efficacy, wireless connectivity, and extensive future proofing in its design.

WANT TO LEARN MORE ABOUT SUSTAINABLE OPTIONS? The ENERGY STAR Month content guide showcases the articles and videos released throughout last October’s award winning ENERGY STAR Month campaign. From ENERGY STAR® benchmarking testimonials to the many ways you can save, this guide is a gateway to the information and expertise needed to help you build value and save money at your buildings.

Smash the Bulb/Bridgelux

Impact on CRE

Smash the Bulb’s concept utilizes a 3D-printed semi-indirect luminaire concept to deliver high efficacy and lighting quality. This luminaire is built around a high-performance light engine that does not require secondary optics and produces highly uniform light. Its innovative optical design simultaneously reduces loss and mitigates glare. This design features plug and play capabilities for easy configuration and has a guaranteed efficacy of over 160 LPW.

In 2011, the winning Philips LED bulb reshaped commercial lighting. The innovations occurring in today’s L-Prize competition will enhance lighting quality and efficiency well beyond the capabilities of today’s commercially available LEDs.

This Mountain View, Calif. based team is a partnership of startup Smash the Bulb and Bridgelux Inc, a lighting company with offices across the globe. Smash the Bulb and Bridgelux L-Prize submission is the Laterally Symmetric Level-3 Ending for 3D Printing. This concept design works as a stand-alone light source for hidden, non-aesthetic, applications.

Papaya

The final Phase 1 L-Prize winner hails from Evanston, Ill. The Papaya team submitted the Papaya Modular Lighting Ecosystem, which is an integrated solution for modular luminaries and includes mounts, controllers, sensors, and software. The Papaya Modular Lighting Ecosystem features an impressive 5,183 lumens per device with brilliant color rendition, tunable color temperature, and a dimmable, low glare, flicker free module. The system produces high-quality light in an open source, future-proof, package. The Papaya Modular Lighting Ecosystem focuses on a unique community-based approach for its design. All aspects of the system are open source and offer opportunities for a diverse group to innovate in this ecosystem over time. This system has free technical training material and courses, a low cost to entry, and customized community-manufactured accessories.

The L-Prize and its ensuing designs will have massive impacts on the commercial real estate industry. Orion’s design could make the switch from fluorescents to LED quicker and easier than what was previously thought possible. QuarkStar’s Project Tango enables high-quality lighting in a tiny package on any mountable surface. Smash the Bulb’s undercarriage lighting could significantly enhance the backlighting in numerous built environments, both for aesthetics and in safety. Papaya’s open source and community driven system will continue to grow and innovate beyond the scope of the L-Prize.

Sources: • About - QuarkStar: A Brighter Idea • About Bridgelux | Bridgelux, Inc. LED Lighting • About Us - Orion Energy Systems, Inc. • Teams | Lighting Prize (L-Prize) | HeroX • L-Prize Official Rules_ Aug. 2021 Revisions

About the Author Owen Kavanagh Owen Kavanagh serves as the Government Affairs and Communications Coordinator for BOMA Georgia and Managing Editor for CRE Insight Journal. He enjoys reading, writing, painting, and learning more about sustainable technology and innovations. You can read more of his articles at https:// creinsightjournal.com/tag/owen-kavanagh/

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PRODUCT AND SERVICE DIRECTORY

AIR FILTRATION

FilterPro USA LLC................................(256) 767-4158

AIRDUCT CLEANING

Ductz Of Greater Atlanta...................(770) 631-2424 APPRAISAL CONSULTING Fellers, Schewe, Scott & Roberts, Inc....................................... (770) 621-9548

ATTORNEYS

Andre Kill & McCarthy LLP.............. (404) 653-3005 AUDIO VISUAL SERVICES Vertical AVTV........................................(404) 352-2488

Eckardt Group......................................(678) 249-4954 Martin Technical, Inc........................... (770) 590-7449 Mayberry Electric, Inc..........................(404) 991-7007 Prime Power Services Inc.................(770) 739-2300 Titan Electric Georgia LLC............... (470) 275-9404

ELEVATORS/ESCALATORS

Fujitec America Inc..............................(770) 209-0322 Phoenix Elevator of Georgia..............(678) 574-2447 TK Elevator.............................................(770) 250-6482

ENERGY

HqO.......................................................... (404) 403-1850 Wtec Inc..................................................(470) 628-7270 Yardi Systems.......................................(805) 618-5422

Baker Engineering LLC...................... (404) 307-3237 Mallory & Evans Service.....................(478) 747-0551 McKenney’s Inc.................................... (404) 635-4710 Tecta America........................................(404) 392-1367 Trane.........................................................(678) 775-4302 Yancey Power Systems..................... (518) 651-6353

BLDG SERVICES

ENGINEERING

BLDG MGT CONSULTANTS

CBM Atlanta Inc...................................(770) 988-9001 Century Fire Protection LLC............(678) 775-4870 Eastern Glass & Aluminum...............(404) 904-6537 Engineered Restorations Inc...........(770) 682-0650 IA INTERIOR ARCHITECTS...........(404) 504-0297 Painters on Demand........................... (813) 498-9751

BUILDING AUTOMATION CONTROLS

ENTEK......................................................(678) 910-1326 Hoffman Building Technologies....... (470) 387-1619

CARPET/FLOOR

Atlanta Flooring Design Centers Inc......................................(770) 476-8306 Mad Matter GA..................................... (678) 361-6704 ServiceMaster Cleaning & Restoration......................................... (770) 514-1789 SOLID Surface Care, Inc................. (404) 804-4335

Harbin’s Mechanical Services, Inc..(770) 914-7060 IES Mach................................................(404) 759-5391 Innovative Engineering Inc................(678) 883-5868 Martin Technical, Inc........................... (770) 590-7449 Mayberry Electric, Inc..........................(404) 991-7007 NOVA Engineering & Environmental....................................(770) 570-9171 PENTA Engineering Group Inc........(678) 282-1999 PM&A....................................................... (770) 480-7452 S&ME, Inc.............................................. (770) 919-0969 Sustainable Investment Group LLC (SIG).......................................... (404) 310-9971

ENVIRONMENTAL

Ben & Jerry’s..........................................(404) 666-2232

Aquascape Environmental................(678) 445-0077 IES Mach................................................(404) 759-5391 S&ME, Inc.............................................. (770) 919-0969 Sustainable Investment Group LLC (SIG).......................................... (404) 310-9971 The Morley Companies.......................(770) 569-1100

CHEMICALS

EQUIPMENT RENTALS

CATERING/FOOD SVCS

Spartan Chemical Company...........(843) 789-9821

COMMUNICATIONS

Kings III Emergency Communications............................. (678) 438-1965

Stone Mountain Access Systems.. (612) 670-8930 Sunbelt Rentals Inc..............................(404) 525-1919

FACILITY SUPPORT

COMPUTER RECYCLING

Ecycle Atlanta........................................ (678) 324-9760

Conger Electrical Services............. (678) 690-0038 Fleetwash Inc..........................................(770) 417-1382 PENTA Engineering Group Inc........(678) 282-1999 Stone Mountain Access Systems.. (612) 670-8930

CONSTRUCTION PRODUCTS

FINANCIAL SERVICES

The Home Depot Pro.........................(704) 305-2881 Precision Concrete Construction...(770) 751-3887 Yancey Power Systems..................... (518) 651-6353

CONTRACTORS

Centennial Contractors Enterprises Inc......................................................... (770) 613-2999 Double T Contracting, Inc................. (770) 489-7772 Eastern Glass & Aluminum...............(404) 904-6537 Gray Contracting.................................(678) 530-9700 Innovative Engineering Inc................(678) 883-5868 Nova Commercial Interiors Inc........(770) 592-0260 PKS Paving & Concrete Construction..................................... (404) 401-8551 Rand Construction Company........... (770) 777-4177 SterlingView Contractors.................. (678) 612-0831 Western Specialty Contractors...... (678) 553-0170

ELECTRICAL

Allison-Smith Company.....................(404) 351-6430 Austin Technology Group.................(770) 356-4460 Conger Electrical Services............. (678) 690-0038

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Graham Group.....................................(404) 634-4652 Moore Colson CPAs and Advisors.................................... (678) 671-3794

FIRE PROTECTION

ADT Commercial, LLC / Critical Systems............................................... (770) 612-9172 AFA Protective Systems Inc.............(770) 794-9000 Basesix Systems LLC.........................(678) 833-8351 Century Fire Protection LLC............(678) 775-4870 International Fire Protection.............(770) 745-4530 Life Safety Solutions Plus LLC........(770) 843-3671 Mitec Controls Inc............................... (770) 813-5959

FIRE/WATER/MOLD RESTORATION

American Property Restoration Inc................................(770) 733-3584 BELFOR Property Restoration....... (770) 939-0128 BluSky Restoration Contractors.....(770) 904-6494 BMS CAT................................................(770) 614-3248 Capital Restoration..............................(770) 973-1666 EPIC..........................................................(770) 516-3491

Full Circle Restoration, A Cotton Company............................................ (770) 232-9797 Parker Young Construction, A RESCON Company...................(678) 634-8538 Paul Davis of Central and Southern Georgia...................................................(770) 450-0495 Remediation Group/RGI Commercial........................................ (404) 214-1470 ServiceMaster Cleaning & Restoration........................................(678) 766-0909 SERVPRO Disaster Recovery of North Atlanta.........................................(404) 902-5688 SERVPRO Of Decatur.......................(404) 378-9998 SERVPRO of Norcross.....................(770) 858-5000 SERVPRO of North Lilburn, SERVPRO of North Lawrenceville.(770) 997-5689 SERVPRO of Panthersville.................(470) 257-1716 Waterproofing Contractors Inc.......(770) 449-5552

GENERATORS

Ultimate Service Associates............ (918) 836-8701

GLASS

NGS Films and Graphics..................(404) 360-7866

GUARD SERVICES

Allied Universal Security Services.(678) 923-5775 GuardOne Security.............................. (470) 543-1157 Marksman Security Corporation.... (678) 923-5775 Prosegur..................................................(404) 312-6162 Securitas USA.......................................(404) 633.1140

HEALTH & HYGIENE PRODUCTS

Essity Professional Hygiene.............(678) 642-6042 GOJO Industries..................................(330) 819-0044 Life Safety Solutions Plus LLC........(770) 843-3671 Rubbermaid Commercial Products............................................(470) 356-5088

HVAC

Addison Smith Mechanical Contractor Inc..................................(770) 832-9006 Axis Portable Air....................................(718) 213-3148 Capital City Mechanical Services Inc......................................(770) 449-0200 Daikin Applied....................................... (404) 831-9277 Ductz Of Greater Atlanta...................(770) 631-2424 EMCOR Services Aircond...............(404) 430-5941 Harbin’s Mechanical Services, Inc..(770) 914-7060 Legacy Mechanical Services Inc..... (770) 432-1171 Mallory & Evans Service.....................(478) 747-0551 Maxair Mechanical LLC...................... (678) 940.7413 McKenney’s Inc.................................... (404) 635-4710 Shumate Mechanical, Inc................. (678) 584-0880 Southeast Pump & Equipment Inc..(770) 329-1417 Trane.........................................................(678) 775-4302

INSURANCE

USI Insurance........................................ (470) 428-9754

INTERIOR DESIGN

IA INTERIOR ARCHITECTS...........(404) 504-0297 Nova Commercial Interiors Inc........(770) 592-0260 paulaproduct.........................................(404) 578-8665

JANITORIAL

Able Services........................................(215) 764-9083 ABM.........................................................(678) 245-3273 Allied International Cleaning Services, Inc..................................... (770) 426-8779 BCJ Building Services....................... (770) 601-4880 Building Cleaning Solutions, Inc....(770) 833-4385 Building Maintenance Services Inc..................................... (770) 218-2993


CBM Atlanta Inc...................................(770) 988-9001 Constant Contract Services, LLC....(404) 583-8514 Distinguished Properties Cleaning USA Inc...............................................(404) 418-1443 Environmental Service Partners.....(404) 500-2488 General Building Maintenance Inc..(770) 457-5678 Georgia Pacific Corporation............ (770) 815-9552 HTH Building Services Inc...............(770) 988-0084 Kimberly-Clark Corporation............. (678) 327-9041 Planned Companies............................ (571) 220-7475 Pritchard Industries SE.......................(404) 231-1430 Pro Squared Janitorial Services..... (678) 905-8885 Rubbermaid Commercial Products............................................(470) 356-5088

LAKE MANAGEMENT

Aquascape Environmental................(678) 445-0077

LANDSCAPING-EXTERIOR

Arborguard Tree Specialists............(404) 299-5555 BrightView Landscape Services..... (678) 441-4170 Chapel Valley Landscape Co..........(470) 244-0980 Color Burst............................................. (770) 822-9706 Crabapple LandscapExperts........... (770) 740-9739 Cumberland Landscape Group.......(470) 423-4105 Gibson Landscape Services............(404) 991-1864 Greenwood Group Landscape.......(404) 886-6104 HighGrove Partners............................(678) 626-3469 LandCare LLC.......................................(678) 475-1780 Landmark Landscapes...................... (678) 812-9858 Landscape Workshop.........................(678) 714-5100 Nature Scapes Inc............................... (770) 923-7023 Ruppert Landscape............................ (770) 931-9900 Russell Landscape Group................(404) 520-7903 Southern Landscapes And Designs.............................................(708) 602-0959 The GreenSeason Group, Inc.......... (678) 714-4114 Yellowstone Landscape.................... (404) 668-4508

American Painting & Renovations Inc...............................(770) 995-8787 Atlanta Painting Company................(404) 550-0101 Burke Painting, Inc..............................(770) 582-0847 CertaPro Painters of Atlanta............(404) 548-7940 Certapro Painters of Duluth & Norcross..........................................(678) 895-5730 CertaPro Painters of Roswell..........(678) 878-4088 Freeland Painting.................................(770) 289-0887 Horizon Painting and Renovations Inc...............................(404) 447-0385 Integrity Finishes Inc...........................(678) 401-8969 Oakcliff Painting................................... (404) 867-3707 P3 Painting & Renovations............... (470) 350-2452 Paint Applicators.................................. (404) 487-5257 Painters on Demand........................... (813) 498-9751 Sherwin-Williams..................................(678) 951-3214 Spectrum Painting Inc.........................(770) 497-0101

PAPER PRODUCTS

Atlantic Paper & Packaging............ (404) 388-2939 Essity Professional Hygiene.............(678) 642-6042 Georgia Pacific Corporation............ (770) 815-9552 Imperial Dade........................................(404) 279-0109

PARKING

Kaney & Lane, LLC..............................(404) 892-8246 LAZ Parking...........................................(404) 942-3900

Legacy Parking Company................. (404) 317-0638 ParkSimple..............................................(404) 217-4024

PARKING DECK

Amano McGann....................................(678) 897-1734 Ecosweep............................................... (404) 904-1003 Spectrum Painting Inc.........................(770) 497-0101 Universal Parking & Transportation..................................(404) 798-6327 Wildcat Striping, Sealing & Paving.................................................. (678) 937-9525

PARKING EQUIPMENT/ACCESS CONTROL

Amano McGann....................................(678) 897-1734

PAVING PRODUCTS

ASCON Paving & Concrete............. (404) 379-3218 Benning Construction Company..... (404) 792-1911 Georgia Paving, Inc.............................(770) 623-0453 GWP Paving........................................... (678) 377-3113 Miller Brothers Paving........................ (770) 491-3090 PKS Paving & Concrete Construction..................................... (404) 401-8551 Rose Paving Company.......................(678) 303-2500 The Surface Masters Inc................... (404) 821-2388 Wildcat Striping, Sealing & Paving.................................................. (678) 937-9525 continued on page 38

LANDSCAPING-INTERIOR

Foliage Design Systems.................... (770) 451-0885 Life on Earth, LLC................................ (404) 630-9611 Plant Peddler, Inc................................. (770) 432-2649 Sedgefield Interior Landscapes, Inc.............................. (770) 984-0171

LEASE ABSTRACTING

LEASIE.................................................... (770) 878-0012

LIGHTING

Blue Frog Lighting...............................(404) 569-7995 E. Sam Jones Distributor Inc............(404) 307-8504 Voss Lighting.........................................(770) 438-8557

LOW VOLTAGE SYSTEMS INTEGRATION

Austin Technology Group.................(770) 356-4460

MANAGED SERVICES

Kastle Systems..................................... (404) 272-4765

MARBLE RESTORATION & MAINTENANCE

ADDCO Metal Maintenance Co.... (770) 985-5611 Mid America Specialty Services....(800) 544-4576 Natural Stone Services......................(404) 255-8133

METAL FINISHING

ADDCO Metal Maintenance Co.... (770) 985-5611 Mid America Specialty Services....(800) 544-4576

OFFICE FURNITURE

Atlanta Office Liquidators Inc..........(404) 505-9623

PAINT/WALLCOVERINGS

A & D Painting Inc................................ (404) 376-7076

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PEST CONTROL

Bug Busters, Inc...................................(770) 517-0200 Northwest Exterminating Co., Inc............................................... (770) 713-5064 Orkin Inc................................................ (404) 609-9550 Peachtree Pest Control..................... (770) 931-9099 Pest USA................................................(770) 985-4444 Rooter Plus!............................................(770) 888-1931

Alscan Inc...............................................(813) 486-2853 Basesix Systems LLC.........................(678) 833-8351 DataWatch Systems...........................(470) 503-6077 GuardOne Security.............................. (470) 543-1157 Hexagon Security................................(866) 855-2838 International Fire Protection.............(770) 745-4530 Marksman Security Corporation.... (678) 923-5775 Mitec Controls Inc............................... (770) 813-5959 Planned Companies............................ (571) 220-7475 Prosegur..................................................(404) 312-6162 Securitas USA.......................................(404) 633.1140 Walden Security.................................... (404) 937-1748

WASTE REMOVAL

American Disposal Services............ (678) 736-0140 Waste Pro/Atlanta................................ (770) 777-1447

WATER DAMAGE/STRUCTURE DRYING

Ecosweep............................................... (404) 904-1003 Everclear Enterprises Inc..................(404) 876-9408 Kaney & Lane, LLC..............................(404) 892-8246 SunBrite Services................................ (770) 277-6363 Top Of the Line High Rise Service LLC............................(404) 569-9544 Valcourt Building Services LLC.......(770) 971-2000

PODS for Business............................ (470) 367-9595

BELFOR Property Restoration....... (770) 939-0128 BluSky Restoration Contractors.....(770) 904-6494 BMS CAT................................................(770) 614-3248 Capital Restoration..............................(770) 614-3248 EPIC..........................................................(770) 516-3491 Full Circle Restoration, A Cotton Company............................. (770) 232-9797 Parker Young Construction, A RESCON Company.......................(678) 634-8538 Remediation Group/ RGI Commercial................................... (404) 214-1470 SERVPRO Of Decatur.......................(404) 378-9998 SERVPRO of North Lilburn/ North Lawrenceville............................ (770) 997-5689

TAX CONSULTANTS

WATER LEAKAGE PROTECTION

Fellers, Schewe, Scott & Roberts, Inc....................................... (770) 621-9548 Graham Group.....................................(404) 634-4652 Windham Brannon, LLC.....................(678) 510-2735

The Detection Group.......................... (470) 488-5106 WaterSignal LLC..................................(626) 222-7370

PUMP SERVICE AND REPAIR

TENANT AND WORKPLACE EXPERIENCE SOFTWARE

WATERPROOFING

Monumental Equipment, Inc............(770) 490-4001

HqO.......................................................... (404) 403-1850

RELOCATION SERVICES

TRANSPORTATION

PLUMBING

Addison Smith Mechanical Contractor Inc..................................(770) 832-9006 Art Plumbing Company.....................(678) 486-2525 HM Plumbing..........................................(770) 792-1200 Keever, Dalton, & Johnson, Inc......... (770) 717-1945 Legacy Mechanical Services Inc..... (770) 432-1171 Southeast Pump & Equipment Inc..(770) 329-1417

PRESSURE WASHING

PODS for Business............................ (470) 367-9595

RENOVATION

Cornerstone Renovation Group LLC......................................... (678) 925-7598 SterlingView Renovations................. (678) 612-0831

RESTORATION

Addco Restoration and Preservation Group, LLC........................................ (770) 688-5419 American Property Restoration Inc.................................(770) 733-3584 Cornerstone Renovation Group LLC......................................... (678) 925-7598 Southern Preservation Systems..... (770) 982-9970

RISER MANAGEMENT

IMG Technologies, Inc.......................(630) 737-9800

ROOFING

All Roof Solutions Commercial Inc.................................(404) 697-9294 Ameristar Roofing................................(470) 680-9330 ApolloPrimm Commercial Roofing................................................ (770) 751-6191 C.L. Burks Construction....................(706) 372-0509 Commercial Roofing Group LLC... (770) 831-9440 Core Roofing Systems........................(678) 514-2846 Empire Roofing Company Inc......... (770) 948-7663 ENCORE Roofing Inc........................(770) 945-0100 Innovative Roofing Group................. (404) 351-8797 Parsons Roofing Company..............(678) 294-0002 Roof Partners LLC...............................(404) 490-4647 Tecta America........................................(404) 392-1367 Tower Roofing.......................................(770) 592-9889 Zurix Roofing Systems....................... (706) 587-2009

SEALCOATING

The Surface Masters Inc................... (404) 821-2388

SECURITY

ADT Commercial, LLC / Critical Systems................................. (770) 612-9172 Allied Universal Security Services..... (678) 923-5775

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Insight • Special Issue, 2022

SIGNAGE

NGS Films and Graphics..................(404) 360-7866 Riot Creative Imaging......................... (404) 797-6785 Sign Systems........................................(678) 765-8290

STORAGE

Universal Parking & Transportation..................................(404) 798-6327

TREE CARE/TREE SERVICES

Arborguard Tree Specialists............(404) 299-5555 BrightView Landscape Services..... (678) 441-4170 Jarvis Tree Experts...............................(678) 430-6216 SAVATREE.............................................. (470) 694-1198 Sesmas Tree Service LLC................(770) 655-9257

TROPICAL PLANTS

Foliage Design Systems.................... (770) 451-0885 Life on Earth, LLC................................ (404) 630-9611 Plant Peddler, Inc................................. (770) 432-2649

WATER TREATMENT

Blackmore Enterprises Inc............... (404) 474-4352 Engineered Restorations Inc...........(770) 682-0650 Everclear Enterprises Inc..................(404) 876-9408 Southern Preservation Systems..... (770) 982-9970 The Morley Companies.......................(770) 569-1100 Waterproofing Contractors Inc.......(770) 449-5552 Western Specialty Contractors...... (678) 553-0170

WINDOW CLEANING

Top Of the Line High Rise Service LLC...........................................(404) 569-9544 Valcourt Building Services LLC.......(770) 971-2000


ADVERTISERS ON THE WEB ASPHALT PAVING

PAVING

BUILDING SERVICES & MAINTENANCE

PLUMBING PRODUCTS & SERVICES

COMMERCIAL CLEANING

PRESSURE WASHING

PKS Paving & Concrete Construction www.pksasphaltpavingatlanta.com PKS Paving & Concrete Construction www.pksasphaltpavingatlanta.com Pritchard Industries, inc www.pritchardindustries.com/

CONCRETE/MASONRY/ STRUCTURAL REPAIRS

Engineered Restorations Inc. www.er-inc.net Everclear Enterprises Inc. www.everclearenterprises.com PKS Paving & Concrete Construction www.pksasphaltpavingatlanta.com The Morley Companies www.morleycompany.com/ Western Specialty Contractors www.westerngroup.com

CONSULTING

Fair Assessments, LLC www.fair-assessments.com/

CONTRACTORS

Cork Howard www.corkhoward.com

DEMOLITION

The Morley Companies www.morleycompany.com/

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS

Eckardt Group www.eckardtgroup.com/ Mayberry Electric, Inc www.mayberryelectric.com

ELEVATORS

Phoenix Elevator of Georgia www.phoenixelevatorofga.com/

ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTANTS

NOVA Engineering & Environmental www.usanova.com

ENVIRONMENTAL PRODUCTS & SERVICES The Morley Companies www.morleycompany.com/

LANDSCAPE

North Georgia Landscape Management www.northgeorgialandscape.com/

Georgia Paving, Inc www.georgiapaving.com Art Plumbing Company www.artplumbing.com

Specialty Roofing & Coatings, Inc. www.src-roofing.com Top of the Line High Rise Service www.highriseservice.com/ Western Specialty Contractors www.westerngroup.com Everclear Enterprises Inc. www.everclearenterprises.com

PUMPING EQUIPMENT

Monumental Equipment Inc www.monumentalequipment.com

RESTORATION & PRESERVATION

Everclear Enterprises Inc. www.everclearenterprises.com The Morley Companies www.morleycompany.com/ Western Specialty Contractors www.westerngroup.com

SEALCOATING

PKS Paving & Concrete Construction www.pksasphaltpavingatlanta.com Wildcat Striping & Sealing www.wildcatstriping.com

TREE CARE/TREE SERVICES

Arborguard Tree Specialists www.arborguard.com/

WATERPROOFING

Engineered Restorations Inc. www.er-inc.net The Morley Companies www.morleycompany.com/ Top of the Line High Rise Service www.highriseservice.com/ Waterproofing Contractors www.wcinc.com/ Western Specialty Contractors www.westerngroup.com

WINDOW CLEANING

Everclear Enterprises Inc. www.everclearenterprises.com Top of the Line High Rise Service www.highriseservice.com/

PAINTING

Top of the Line High Rise Service www.highriseservice.com/

PARKING DECK MAINTENANCE

PKS Paving & Concrete Construction www.pksasphaltpavingatlanta.com The Morley Companies www.morleycompany.com/ Western Specialty Contractors www.westerngroup.com

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