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BLUSH NEW BLUSH WEBSITE LIVE NOW!

EDITOR IN CHIEF Brittany Burgos

BEAUTY W RITER Melinda Batista

ADVERTISING SALES Natalie Zisa

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Collins Nai

SENIOR PHOTO ED ITOR Daniel Marcella

ART DIRECTOR Brandon Saloy

STAF F PHOTOGRAPHERS Megan Krause, April Blum

SENIOR EDITORS Avanti Dalal, Rebecca Aschen

SENIOR DESIGNER Joyce Xu

W EB EDITORS Madelyn Adams, Mariana Suplicy Batista, Taylor Bushey, Michaela Del Viscovo, Cassandra Gagnon, Gina Gargiulo

W EB DIRECTOR Mikayla Madigan

LAYOUT Michelle Rivera, Gabrielle Chang, Kelly Washington, Sunghyun Bang, Alyssa Taylor, Dominique Hitchcock, Marti

BEAUTY DIRECTOR Cassandra Shaffer

SOCIAL MEDIA DIRECTOR Aphrodite Takos

C ON T R I B U TOR S Samantha Ayala, Sarah Michelson, Edina Szabo, Alexa Wynter, Lila Barth, Cat Carney, Eric Vosburg, Kate Sexton, Kendell Cotta, Paul & Isaac, Paulina Pikulinski, Sarah Salice, Brigitte Danyi, Amy Miccio, Carlos Montelara, David Razzano, Gaby Azorsky, Patrick Donovan, Denzel Bryan , Anike Rabiu A DV I S OR Laura Hatmaker

Rose Shanker

blushmagfit.com Check out our new site for original online editorials, videos, and articles all semester long. New articles go up throughout the week, so you’ll never miss a thing!

B L U S H C ON T R I B U TOR S S P R I N G S U M M E R 2 0 1 6

BRAN D ON S ALOY

MAJOR Communication Design H OMETOWN West Islip, NY C U RREN TLY READ I N G The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime by Mark Haddon LI S TEN I N G TO A very interesting mix of James Taylor and Paula Abdul MU S T-H AVE FAS H I ON I TEM FOR WARM WEATH ER Those Dior boots with the transparent heel? Fierce. But where would I ever wear those?

GI N A GARGI U LO

MAJOR Advertising and Marketing Communications H OMETOWN Long Island, NY C U RREN TLY READ I N G Where She Went by Gayle Forman LI S TEN I N G TO “Famous Last Words” by My Chemical Romance MU S T-H AVE FAS H I ON I TEM FOR WARM WEATH ER Victoria’s Secret swimsuit

MELI N DA BATI S TA

MAJOR Advertising and Marketing Communications H OMETOWN Manchester, NJ C U RREN TLY READ I N G The Untethered Soul: The Journey Beyond Yourself. Michael A. Singer is a cognitive genius. LI S TEN I N G TO “Culpa al Corazón” by Prince Royce, and “Love on the Brain” by Rihanna. This RiRi song brings me back to old-school R&B, and it’s on repeat. MU S T-H AVE FAS H I ON I TEM FOR WARM WEATH ER A crisp, white, button-up blouse is an absolute essential.

M ICHA ELA DEL V ISCOVO

M A J OR Fashion Business Management HOM ETOWN Springfield, NJ CURRENTLY REA DING I don’t really read actual books too much, but Refinery 29 and Business of Fashion are like my bibles.

LISTENING TO The Kooks and

Oh Wonder...nonstop....

M UST-HAV E FA SHION ITEM FOR WA RM WEATHER

Skinny scarves! (I wear them way too much.)


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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

INSIDE SPRING/SUMMER 2016: FEATURES 4

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FULL BLOOM P R E S E N T

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SPRING

FROST 54

MUSE

When I first started at Blush Magazine, we were settled into the rhythm of a youthful service magazine, and our website was a sweet little blog dedicated to date-night suggestions and beauty reviews. As I worked alongside writers, editors, contributors, and my wonderful executive team, I realized that Blush could become even bigger (literally and figuratively). We started our transition in fall 2015, and we have worked tirelessly to produce something exceptional for this spring/summer 2016 issue. Our wonderful web director, Mikayla Madigan, has also revamped blushmagfit.com to make it sophisticated, sleek, and constantly updated with stories on a plethora of subjects. (Say “hello” to the 2016-2017 editor-in-chief everyone!) As we finish off the school year, I’d like to thank everyone who made this issue (and those before it) possible. I know that from this issue on, Blush will serve as an emblem of the innovation, creativity, and talent that are innate features of the FIT student body. Brittany


PHOTOGRAPHED BY LILA BARTH MODEL CAT CARNEY, APM MODELS HAIR & MAKEUP BY KENDELL COTTA STYLED BY PAUL & ISAAC

TO P Sylvio NYC PANTS Christopher John Rogers

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D R ES S Julia Emmons COAT Christopher John Rogers


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ART & CULTURE

ART & CULTURE

AR TI S T T O WAT CH:

CLAIRITY

BY

TAYLOR BUS HE Y H AVING INS P IR ED m a n y with h er tech n o -po p s tyl e a n d cl ever l yr ics , Cl a ir ity, a l s o k n o wn a s Cl a ire W il k in s o n , is m a k in g n o is e, a n d th e wo r l d is fin a l l y s ta r tin g to n o tice. Th e 18-yea r -o l d s in g er -s o n g wr iter is k n o wn to h a ve a vo ice s im il a r to Lo rde a n d H a l s ey. S h e s in g s deepl y a n d pa s s io natel y, es pecia l l y in h er m o s t fa m o us s o n g , “Exo rcis m .” Th is s o n g , l ike h er o th er s , r in g s with s el f-em po wer m en t a n d h er n eed fo r fur th er s tren g th . S h e is a bl e to m o tivate h er l is tener s a n d refres h th e m us ic in dus tr y with th e wa y s h e wr ites h er l yr ics .

It’s n o t a s ur pr is e to fin d h e r name on multip le “artists to watch ” l is ts th is yea r . H er music includes an adde d niche for th o s e wh o a re s o ul s ea rch ing and looking to work hard. I n her s o n g “D NA, ” C l a ir ity s in g s ab out the tools ne ede d to imp rove a n d un der s ta n d o n es el f. S h e rel ea s ed a l l fo ur o f h er songs for p urchase in he r first a l bum , Alienation EP, a n d they are also av ailab le to stre am on m a jo r m us ic s er vices s uch as Pandora and Sp otify .

It’s not uncommon to hear yet another music artist inching towards the spotlight, and this one is no exception.

In h er vl o g s o n Yo uTube, Cl airity sp eaks e nthusiastically a bo ut th e wo r k s h e’s do n e, and rightfully so. He r p ositive dr ive g ives m a n y a va l id reason to liste n and excitedly await fo r n ew m us ic to co m e.

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ART & CULTURE

REPRESENTATION MATTERS

“YOU REALIZE THAT YOU INHERITED YOUR VOLUPTUOUS GENES FROM YOUR GRANDMA AND NO TYPE OF DIET WILL MAKE YOU A SIZE 0.”

WE CAN ALL AGREE that women don’t have to be super skinny to be happy in life. It is refreshing to see more curvy and beautiful models like Ashley Graham in the mainstream media. Graham’s gorgeous Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue cover made history last month; she has been featured in five fashion magazines since then. You realize that you inherited your voluptuous genes from your grandma and no type of diet will make you a size 0. Mattel, the distributor of Barbie, recently developed three different body types of dolls to please a wider target audience. The media has started to open up for more unconventional beauties. Another great example is the Canadian model Winnie Harlow who rapidly changed the standard of beauty. She has a skin condition, vitiligo, that inhibits pigmentation and creates white patches on her face. She used to be called “cow” and “zebra,” but now she is the face of global fashion brands. Diversity is a huge issue, and it’s not just about shapes and sizes. A large number of minority actors decided not to attend the Academy Awards this year due its lack of nominations for people of color. The rambunctious host, Chris Rock, opened the ceremony by calling the Oscars “The White People’s Choice Awards.” He caused a controversial uproar, but he made sure he addressed the issue at hand.

& OTHER FACTS

Aziz Ansari’s Netflix series, Master of None, captures how people of Asian descent are portrayed on television. In one episode, he auditions for a role as an Indian cab driver. The casting director expects him to speak with an Indian accent, but Aziz is unable to get it right because the only accent he has is an American one. The media tend to portray people of color as caricatures of their different races and ethnicities, which confines them to certain boundaries and expectations. BY E D I NA SZAB O

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ART & CULTURE

ART & CULTURE

by Sarah Michelson

film review: But sometimes the media do it right. Laverne Cox, a transgender actress starring on Orange Is the New Black plays an important role in TV and in real life. She became an icon for many people by showing that success and power can be achieved, regardless of difficult circumstances. Time magazine called her “America’s next civil rights frontier.” And if we get a little political, Evan Low is another person to admire — he became the youngest openly gay, Asian American mayor in the nation. Underrepresented groups deserve to have more prominent people that they can relate to displayed in the limelight. We need more realistic depictions in the media to change society’s perspectives slowly but surely.

mustang If you see one foreign film this year, let it be the tear-jerking Turkish language film Mustang, directed by Deniz Gamze Ergüven. It is a frightening account of the lives of young women repressed by old-world ideas in what is considered a fairly modern country. Nominated for Best Foreign Film at the 88th Academy Awards, the film takes place in a remote Turkish village and tells the story of five orphaned sisters growing up in an extremely conservative society. After playing in the ocean with male friends after school, the girls are beaten and imprisoned for their “improper” behavior by their grandmother and cruel uncle. They are prevented from going to school, contacting friends, and are forced into becoming housewives. As they are married off, a tragic event rips them apart forever. The film eventually comes to a bittersweet ending, but Mustang is easily one of the most heartbreaking movies you will ever see. If you are a feminist, a sister, a woman, you must see Mustang.

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ART & CULTURE

ART & CULTURE

summer Destinations Destinations by Avanti Dalal

I LLU STR ATION Kate Sexton

Le Taha’a Island Resort and Spa, Taha’a, French Polynesia

&Beyond Manyara Tree Lodge, Lake Manyara National Park, Tanzania

Exceptionally remote, and somehow both rustic and unapologetically decadent, the Le Taha’a Island Resort and Spa is the landscape out of your Polaroid picture dreams. The 57 overwater villas and suites are propped on stilts above a resplendent sea of cerulean, with ladders on each deck for easy access to a mystical sunset lit swim and personal kayaks to watch the waves crest in front of your eyes. The Relais & Châteaux resort is situated on a private islet off the coast of Taha’a—naturally blessed with sugar white sands, fringed with swaying coconut palms, and the faint smell of salt—tranquility is always in the air.

To dive into a tryst with adventure and relive the magic of childhood memories, the &Beyond Manyara Tree Lodge in Tanzania’s Lake Manyara National Park fits the bill. Built to be romantic and secluded, the ten treehouses are nestled in the leafy canopy by the lakeshore. With private verandas and wooden interiors, the treehouses blend seamlessly with the lush forests that envelop them. The drama of the spacious accommodations are complemented by the luxurious perks: soaking in the private hot tubs, waking up to blue skies and chirping birds, early morning sunrises, and catching a lucky glimpse of the famous tree-climbing lion.

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY PAULINA PIKULINSKI MODEL TK WHITE, APM MODELS HAIR & MAKEUP BY SARAH SALICE STYLED BY COLLINS NAI

l D RESS

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SH EER BL OUSE Kaitlin Barton

DCaption R ES S Chelsea Li

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TARTE’S SKIN REVOLUTION by Gina Gargiulo

THE OIL-FREE FORMULA WITH SPF 15 FEELS MIRACULOUS

TARTE is known for making high-performance cosmetics without the addition of sulfur and other harmful chemicals. That’s how Tarte Amazonian Clay can meet and address all of your skin concerns. Tarte Cosmetics creates makeup that wears better and is better for your skin; this full coverage foundation truly lasts 12 hours and leaves your skin looking healthy and natural. The oil-free formula with SPF 15 feels miraculous and is safe to use whenever, wherever, on any skin type. Whether you have oily, dry,

TOP

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SK IRT Chelsea Li

P H O TO G R AP H Daniel Marcella

or combination skin, the weightless fluid will sink seamlessly into your skin and blend in beautifully. With this unique formulation, you can achieve a flawless complexion by reducing the appearance of pores, discoloration, and imperfections. Finding your perfect shade has never been easier than it is with the 25-shade range. Say goodbye to cake-face and let Tarte start the skin revolution.

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Q &A with Li n dsay E lli ngso n: Th e Face Be h i n d Wan d e r Beauty by Brittany Burgos

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LINDSAY ELLINGSON, the co-founder and creative director at Wander Beauty, is a force to be reckoned with. With the beauty of a VS Angel, a genuine smile, and immense dedication to her work, she’s the girl we love to love. BB

Many aspiring and/or working models attend FIT, what is the best piece of advice you can offer them?

LE

Constantly push the boundaries of your comfort zone and be courageous! You can handle anything that comes your way, even failure. I’ve experienced difficult setbacks in my life, but with each experience comes a valuable lesson that you will never forget. I’m grateful for my career as a model and now co-founder of Wander Beauty, two jobs I would have never imagined having when I was in college. I’ve grown from a shy teenager into a much stronger, more confident woman. It’s a great feeling to continuously grow and push the boundaries. As they say, fate loves the fearless!

BB

Was it difficult to bridge the gap between successful model and businesswoman in the beauty industry?

LE

I was very fortunate because without realizing it, my ten year modeling career was preparing me for this new venture. I’ve spent countless hours in the makeup chair working with the most talented beauty experts all over the world. It was the best beauty school one could have. My passion for beauty sparked as I learned how to accentuate my features, correctly fill in my over plucked eyebrows and more. I developed many of my own beauty tips and tricks as well and learned so much about the benefit of various international ingredients - many of which we infuse into our formulas. This is such an exciting new role for me and the best part is, I am still able to model and stay ahead of the beauty trends happening all over the world.

BB

What was the inspiration for Wander Beauty?

LE

I met my Co-founder Divya Gugnani, a serial entrepreneur, at a salon opening on the Upper East Side. We quickly bonded over our love of travel and beauty! As busy women who are constantly on the go, we saw there was a gap in the beauty industry. We were craving luxurious multitasking products that we could carry with us throughout our busy days. One of the best parts about Wander Beauty is you don’t have to be a pro to apply our products, everything is fuss free and foolproof for flawless application. For example, our Exquisite Liquid Eyeshadow blends beautifully, lasts all day and you avoid powder falling all over your face leaving you to redo your foundation. This brand is made for the modern woman who’s constantly on the move and needs products that fit seamlessly into her busy day.

BB

Which three products from Wander Beauty are your must-have, holy-grail items?

LE

My go-to look, which is perfect for everything from a meeting to a red carpet event, starts with our On-the-Glow Blush and Illuminator in Coral Rose. This double duty hero item instantly brightens and beautifies my face. Next, I apply a wash of our bronze Exquisite Liquid Eye Shadow to my lids during the day and then build it up for a smokey eye at night. Last, I’m obsessed with our Up Close Kiss Lipstick in Spice, it’s a warm highly saturated shade that’s just a little darker than my natural lip color. I infused this formula with coconut oil and silk powders to make lips feel soft and supple. With these three products and a little mascara (which I’m deep in developing now!), I’m ready for my day.

TOCCA BEAUTY INTRODUCES NEWEST EAU DE PARFUM:

E ME LI A

TOCCA BEAUTY, an Italian fragrance brand renowned for exquisite scents, just launched their spring 2016 Tocca “girl”: Emelia. Known for capturing imagination, each of Tocca’s eau de parfums bring a distinct personality and style to the world. Attributing each individual scent with an identity and story, Emelia represents the free-spirited adventuress—calling the world her home. She is a wanderer and explorer by nature. Adventurous and curious, she can be found climbing the Western Cape Mountains, picking fresh loquat fruit, or sipping an iced maté in Paraguay. Emelia’s fresh notes and bohemian spirit enchants with crisp notes of fig and

*Wander Beauty is available at WanderBeauty.com and Sephora.com. Prices range from $20 to $45.

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watery clementine, balanced by the natural earthiness of geranium and magnolia. Each note tells the story of a distant travel destination, inspired by the stamps found in Emelia’s well-worn passport. Refreshing and vivacious, Emelia’s zest for life celebrates the spirit of wanderlust. Additional charming notes include Florentine orris, bison grass, ambrette seed absolute and coconut water. Emelia eau de parfum retails for $68 and is available at tocca.comå.

by Melinda Batista

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BEAUTY

BEAUTY

GUERLAIN’S INNOVATIVE

M É T É O R I TE S B AS E P ER F E CT I N G P E A R LS

GUERLAIN’S incandescent Météorites Illuminating Powder Pearls are among the most legendary luxury to enter the market of luminous beauty products. Guerlain’s iconic, handcrafted pearls have now been reinvented into the Météorites Base Perfecting Pearls. This essential primer is the ultimate radiance booster. Reflective silvery-pink pearls are suspended in a violet-scented gel base and presented in a sleek crystalline case. Météorites Primer is formulated with the brand’s signature Stardust Technology: a unique compression of iridescent, celestial powder that transforms light

to blur imperfections and provide exceptional brilliance to the skin. The fresh, gel texture melts with the rosy-hued pearls to give skin a glowing finish, while neutralizing excess oil for a long-lasting complexion. The highly concentrated, absorbent powders help to fade imperfections and smooth fine lines—creating an illuminating light for healthy skin that is perfect for the clean gleam of springtime beauty. Météorites Base Perfecting Pearls retails for $74 and can be found at your local Sephora or sephora.com.

READY SET BARRETTE: THE ULTI M ATE SPRI NG AC CESSO R Y

by Melinda Batista

BY RYANN C ASE Y

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY APRIL BLUM

MODEL ROXANNE AICHINGER, MSA MODELS HAIR BY BRIGITTE DANYI MAKEUP BY EMILY KEOUGH

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THIS SPRING, no look is complete until properly accessorized, and bold statement-making accessories are rising above the neckline. Throughout the spring 2016 runway shows, grungy barrettes decorated many manes on the catwalk. Whether it is a simple bobby pin from Fendi or a golden, delicate rose barrette from Rodarte, these looks are right on the ’90s trend. It’s no secret that what’s old is new again, and this nod to the ’90s is very wearable and relevant today. To get this look, part hair in a deep side part and clip back on one or both sides about two to four inches from the part. The look is super simple to achieve, wearable, and can be worn with curly, wavy or straight hair of any length. Caption

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HEATLESS HAIRSTYLE: UNDERSTATED LOW BUNS BY SAMANTHA AYALA

FASHION WEEK has shown its love for the topknot for a while, but

ponytail as desired. Next, you can braid or twist the ponytail, or

now the bun is being presented on a different level. The knot has

leave it as is for a messier appearance. Wrap the ponytail around its

been lowered down to the back of the head and it’s as effortless

base (where the hair tie is) and secure with bobby pins as needed.

and fun as the topknot, but its approach is more sophisticated than

The low knot is the understated solution to keeping hair out of your

edgy. Designers such as Marchesa, Rag & Bone, and Zac Posen have

face while running around at an internship, or for keeping the focus

displayed the low knot in their own unique ways. Not only is it domi-

on the outfit you worked hard to perfect.

PHOTOGRAPHED BY MEGAN KRAUSE MODEL BAYLIE WILLBORG HAIR BY BRIGITTE DANYI MAKEUP BY EMILY KEOUGH

nating the runways, but it is as easy as it looks: simply make a low

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY AMY MICCIO

MODEL MADELINE MACIÄ„GIEWICZ, RED STAR MANAGEMENT MAKEUP BY EMILY KEOUGH

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CHANNELING THE DISCOTHEQUE by Cassandra Shaffer

THE 1970S was the decade of revolution and disco, and a time where bold and expressive makeup looks took center stage. With the rise of women’s rights and feminism, makeup became a way for women to empower themselves. Figures such as Farrah Fawcett, Diana Ross, and David Bowie’s alter ego Ziggy Stardust transformed the way society saw beauty. Over four decades later, the impact of this progressive era is evident on numerous fashion week runways. Bold lips, impactful shadows, and glistening face gems were popular trends during the ’70s that were embraced for the current S/S 2016 season. Vibrant lip colors were seen parad-

WATER C O LO R Gabrielle Chang

ing down the runways of Marchesa, Victoria Beckham, and Jason Wu. Standout shades include deep oxblood reds and vivid corals. Striking shades of eyeshadow are also trending for the S/S 2016 season. Chanel, DVF, and Giambattista Valli chose eyeshadows that pop, from neon pinks to muted blues. Face gems of all forms—pearls, sequins or gemstones—were applied to finish off the looks at Marc Jacobs, Givenchy, and Baja East. What once used to stand out at the discotheque is majorly in-style for the sunshine seasons.

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY CARLOS MONTELARA MAKEUP BY DAVID RAZZANO HAIR BY WADE LEE STYLED BY GABY AZORSKY MODEL SARAH LORENZ WITH Q MODELS

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TO P Public Caption School ALL JEW EL RY Odette NY

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IS GE N DER A MOOT POI N T I N FA SH ION ? by Cassandra Gagnon

A TREND that has been common throughout fashion’s vast history is the concept of androgyny. But is such a concept becoming obsolete when gender identities are becoming more fluid, less strict, less defined? For androgynous dress to occur, it must be a blurred line between feminine and masculine regiments and expectations. Gender conformity and binaries must exist. But as more and more individuals define themselves as nonbinary (not identifying as a particular gender) or gender fluid (where gender identity often changes), this concept may no longer exist in future years. For example, Zara recently released its first genderless line in March of this year. Titled Ungendered, it contains some “unisex” basics in neutral colors that would appeal to a whole range of people. Outside of the fashion industry we look at Target, who announced last year that it would be getting rid of separate sections for boys toys and girls toys.

Individuals like Jaden Smith are leaders of this new wave of people who refuse to let past standards dictate their attire. The looks aren’t somewhere in the middle, they are clearly out of the binary. His Louis Vuitton ad features him in traditionally feminine cuts. But he doesn’t see it that way. In an interview with GQ, Smith stated, “I feel like people are kind of confused about gender norms. I feel like people don’t really get it. I’m not saying that I get it, I’m just saying that I’ve never seen any distinction. I don’t see man clothes and woman clothes, I just see scared people and comfortable people.” This could easily be where fashion is headed. With the rise of gender-neutral restrooms, dislike for gender-specific colors, and increased knowledge of gender-inclusive terms, why would fashion, an industry known to be progressive, lag behind? A potential problem is that gender-neutral lines require more tailoring if each piece is for one body

PHOTOGRAPHED BY PATRICK DONOVAN MODEL MAX HAMILTON STYLED BY DENZEL BRYAN

shape, but then why not just create the pieces with different fits? People need tailoring anyway. Distinction of genders could disappear in the near future, pronouns may be neutral, and “M/F” questionnaire checkboxes deleted. Androgyny could be a thing of the past. So why live in the past now? Be the comfortable people Smith sees in our society and wear whatever one wants to wear; it will be quite ahead of the trend. A trend that will eventually, and finally, be considered the norm.

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SLIP AWAY TO T H E MA JO R IT Y, T HR OW I NG ON A SI LK, LACE -ADORNE D SLI P D R E S S SC R EA MS S EN S U A LI TY. BUT TO THE FASHI ON CONSCI OUS, T H ESE SL IP D R ES S ES C ARRY A DI FFE RE NT CONNOTATI ON, ONE T H AT IS C L A S S IER A N D M ORE FUNCTI ONAL FOR E VE RYDAY W E AR.

B Y M IC H A EL A DEL V IS C OVO

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FOR SPRING 2016, designers decided to embark on this trend in a variety of ways. We have calvin klein’s creative director francisco costa who (not surprisingly) took a minimal approach to the slip dress look, deciding to stick with an extremely loose silhouette and neutral colors. However, costa did inject a bit of an offbeat vibe by adding chain detailing to a few of the looks. Then we have rag & bone’s take on this trend, which consists of a similarly simple silhouette, the only difference is that the ubiquitous silk is swapped out for some good ol’ edgy leather. It definitely evoked the most city-gal feel out of all the collections. Riccardo tisci at givenchy undoubtedly added the most pizazz and detail to the slip. Between sequins, layers and layers of lace, and double strapping, the man definitely knows what he’s doing. If you don’t feel comfortable solely wearing a slip dress, these styling tricks are easy to pull off and won’t leave you feeling overexposed. - Make it casual by wearing your favorite t-shirt underneath. - Tuck the dress into a pair of high-waisted jeans or shorts. - Throw a jacket on top of it to keep you a bit more covered. - For maximum comfort and cover, throw a sweater over the top. But if modesty is not your top concern, wear any slip dress that catches your eye and get ready to stop traffic in its tracks.

LI NGE RIECaption Jenny Seo

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TH E DA N G E ROU S PAC E O F FAS H IO N By Cassandra Gagnon

The concept of fast fashion challenging the industry is hardly novel. It’s a repetitive conversation, but the question still remains: Does it have a positive impact? From ethics and sustainability to the impact on the economy and even emerging designers, the subject has been on the lips of everybody and anybody. To begin with, fast fashion has its own place in the market. It’s constantly described as accessible trends from the runway, released at a near ridiculous pace. Fashionista reported in December that Boohoo releases up to 300 new products a day and can identify a trend within two weeks. With this sort of competition, it’s no wonder that a major brand such as Burberry will show a collection in the same season that the products will be available, instead of six months prior. However there is a certain distinction between fast fashion and runway, a dividing line between commercialized clothing and art. If high-end labels want to degrade themselves by participating in the race to market, as a ploy for more sales, they should be classified as something else. Brands need to be more transparent and more Caption

open about what they intend to accomplish. Accessibility is a huge part of every brand’s maneuvers. In considering the future of the industry, there is less and less room for young or up-and-coming designers. As discussed on Dazed online, these emerging designers don’t have the funds or workforce to produce mass collections available the next day; buyers and runway shows are still a huge part of how they become well known, not just a formality. Meanwhile, H&M will open more than one store a day this year, according to Fashionista. Although fast fashion is discussed often, there’s still a lot of confusion around the subject. Even designer Anna Sui reported to Women’s Wear Daily, “But I don’t know really what we can do at this point because it’s where we’re at right now. It’s not just fashion, it’s everything. It’s the movie industry, the music industry; it’s sports. Everything has gotten to this point and celebrity, too. It’s all so immediate, all so in your face, you can’t calm it down anymore.”

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This holds merit, especially as social media and the celebrities attending a show are becoming just as important as the clothes themselves. As the market’s desire for leisurely attire grows and the desire for couture lessens, bloggers walk away satisfied by street wear, and the designers walk away richer, but perhaps with less pride. Some brands such as Marc Jacobs and Alexander McQueen have stayed true to brand, producing innovative and artistic lines that tend not to be as accessible as consumer-driven brands. They reserve the more wearable, fast fashion designs for their sub-lines, such as McQ By Alexander McQueen. There needs to be a clear division between the capitalistic fast fashion trend sweeping America and haute couture art. Individualistic fashion starts with the designers themselves, but fast fashion is focused on business. Fast fashion has its place, but it needs to be kept off of the runway.


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FASHION

FASHION

PIONEERING

BY A L EX A W YNTE R

FASHION

FILM

IN FASHION, A DIVERSE FORM OF FILM HAS BEEN ADOPTED, WHICH IS COMPRISED OF “SHORT,” “INTENSE,” AND “NON-NARRATIVE” FEATURES, OFTEN RANGING FROM ONE TO FIVE MINUTES IN LENGTH. THESE SHORT FILMS ARE CREATING A NEW VISUAL LANGUAGE WITH UNPRECEDENTED VIGOR, DISPLAYING AND PROMOTING FASHION LIKE NEVER BEFORE.

BEFORE FILM, one of the earliest forms of fashion communication was illustration. In fact, illustration has been around for more than 500 years, often used to translate a loose representation of a garment in order for the designer to see what the garment would look like prior to production. A turning point in fashion communication was Vogue’s July 1932 edition, photographed by Edward Steichen. This particular publication is often regarded as marking the death of fashion illustration, and the birth of fashion photography. For the next 20 years, photography was the preferred medium used in fashion communication, but now once again, it is being replaced with a more contemporary medium of expression: film. The emergence of fashion film is a response to the unavoidable spatial and temporal confinement of the photographic image. A pioneer of this movement is Erwin Blumenfeld, who, in the late 1950s, conducted “film experiments” by animating still photographs to create a “rhythmic fusion” of the visual and aural, similar to performance art. By the 1970s, a number of other pioneering artists, including Guy Bourdin and Richard Avedon, like Blumenfeld, wanted to expand beyond the photographic image to encourage holistic representations of garments. Today, the subgenre of fashion film is a force to be reckoned with. To immerse yourself in fashion film, the annual New York Fashion Film Festival is a testament to the importance of the evolving genre, and a celebration of all that it entails.

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DEPARTMENT NAME

DEPARTMENT NAME

PHOTOGRAPHED / STYLED BY COLLINS NAI CO V E R LOOK : BU STI ER Grace Kim

GU IP URE LACE BRA AND PANTY W ITH M E S H CA PE Laura Leong SH OES Aquazzura

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MODEL CIARA MOORE MAKEUP BY EMILY KEOUGH HAIR BY ANIKE RABIU

PHOTO ASSITANTS MEGAN KRAUSE, ABIGAIL SLIDER

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DEPARTMENT NAME

BUSTIER Anton Hรถrnfeldt

D R ES S Augusto Manzanares

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BR A W ITH WAIS TED BR IEF AND C O VERUP Yohely Salazar


DEPARTMENT NAME

D R ES S Kelly Tucker

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DEPARTMENT NAME

DEPARTMENT NAME

BUS TIER Yohely Salazar Caption S H O ES Gianvito Rossi

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DEPARTMENT NAME

Caption Kelly Tucker DRESS

DEPARTMENT NAME

BLAC K CR O P P ED BUS TIER TO P AND W H IT E P LEATED TULLE S KIR T Jenny Seo S H O ES Barney’s New York

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DEPARTMENT NAME

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Profile for Blush Magazine

Blush Magazine - Spring 2016  

Blush magazine is the Fashion Institute of Technology’s first student-run beauty and fashion publication.

Blush Magazine - Spring 2016  

Blush magazine is the Fashion Institute of Technology’s first student-run beauty and fashion publication.

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