Page 1


Pa u l H o l ly w o o d Photography by Peter Cassidy


Pa u l H o l ly w o o d Photography by Peter Cassidy


In tr od u ctio n I have been passionate about baking since I was eight years old. My father was a baker and I spent a lot of time in his many shops as I was growing up, helping with jobs such as jamming the doughnuts and filling scones with cream. I loved to see the professionals at work: watching the kneading of the dough was almost hypnotic and I was entranced by the way a baker would take a few simple, raw materials and use them to create a delicious and beautiful finished product. That fascination stays with me to this day. I’ve been baking for thirty years now and I’ve never wanted to do anything else. When I was seventeen, I was let loose ‘on the tables’ where the loaves and paÌries were formed, before learning the correÀ way to bake all the breads, paÌries and cakes that we sold. After serving this apprenticeshÔ with my father, I moved on to manage my own shop, then to work in the kitchens of many different eÌablishments - including The DorcheÌer, Cliveden and the CheÌer Grosvenor, as well as reÌaurants on the Continent - honing my skills all the time. I have learnt a very great deal over the laÌ three decades: not juÌ the beÌ, simpleÌ ways to do things, but the worÌ ways too. I’ve seen hard-won, age-old skills consigned to the scrap heap and traditional techniques replaced with modern, coÌ-cutting methods that save time but sacrifice flavour and quality. But I’ve never Ìopped loving baking and I’ve never loÌ faith in the truly passionate bakers of this country, whether they are professionals or home cooks. That is why, in this book, I want to celebrate and explain the techniques that lay behind really great breads and paÌries. What I also want to do is show you your own potential as a baker. There are many very good cooks who will try any number of new recÔes yet who balk at the idea of turning out a loaf of bread or a brioche because they think it’s difficult or complicated. It is not! There are all kinds of myths and myÌeries that have grown up around this branch of cookery over the years and a lot of them are utter nonsense. Yes, there are pitfalls to be avoided, and useful tricks of the trade to be learnt, but I aim to blow the lid on the secret world of baking and reveal that making fantaÌic breads and paÌries really is not hard. This book is a Ìep-by-Ìep guide, covering a whole range of different breads as well as paÌries and delicious cakes, biscuits and puddings. As a professional, I’ve had the time to really work at each part of the baking process: time to play, invent and experiment – and the benefit of that experience is contained in these pages. Each recÔe has an in-depth method that shows my own unique way of doing things, enabling you to create something perfeÀ. In effeÀ, I will be there with you in your kitchen, guiding you through the process, and solving problems before they happen. You will discover that you can, very easily, create breads, tarts and cakes at home that look every bit as good as those you’ll buy in the shops – and that taÌe better. It’s juÌ a matter of finding the right kit and ingredients

6

How to Bake

and underÌanding the techniques. I am very particular about using the right tool for the job and, if the knife I need or the tin I want is not to hand, I’ve been known to get pretty irate! Finding the beÌ ingredients, the ones you feel moÌ comfortable using, is important too. If you put rubbish in, you’ll get rubbish out. But don’t be deterred by any of this. Sourcing the right ingredients and equÔment is not hard (see Directory, page 000). You’ll find recÔes here for baked goods from all over the world, from Continental couronnes and fougasses, Ìrudels, tartes and croissants, to Indian chapattis and middle EaÌern maneesh. But I want to celebrate our own tradition of baking too. This country has some wonderful basic breads that can rival the French baguette or the Italian foccacia: breads such as the cottage loaf, the barm cake or the bloomer (yes, a really well-made bloomer is a great thing!). The way we bake has changed so much in recent decades, it’s become all about Íeed, about making a profit. Commercial bakers no longer take the time to let their doughs ferment slowly, which creates flavour, and many home bakers don’t either. Yet, if you can find that time (and moÌ of it is not hands-on work time), and if you can give a little attention to detail, then I guarantee that you can create breads, cakes and other good things that will become legendary among your own family and friends. I have given plenty of information in the introduÀion to each chapter because a little bit of knowledge goes a long, long way. If you underÌand not juÌ how to bake a loaf of bread or a cuÌard tart, but why you do things in a certain way, then you are well-equÔped to begin your own baking adventure. I want this book to be aÍirational as well as inÍirational, to send you off into your own world of baking where, because you underÌand the simple chemiÌry and the basic techniques, you can innovate and experiment and create your own delicious versions of the recÔes I’m going to share with you here. I truly believe that anyone who is prepared to put in a bit of effort can become a great baker. My advice is to always take your time, and to treat any mishap as an opportunity to learn. You will soon find yourself creating something amazing and, when you do, people will remember it. They will not only tell you it’s delicious, but they will ask you how you made it and where they can get the recÔe, and that sort of recognition will Íur you on like nothing else. I am as passionate about baking today as when I was that young lad, watching my Dad at work. I Ìill love the feeling I get from manÔulating good raw ingredients into something fantaÌic – and I hope I can pass that on to you. If I succeed, and you catch the baking bug, then reÌ assured that this book contains all you need to know in order to create a bit of magic in your own kitchen.

introduction

7


In tr od u ctio n I have been passionate about baking since I was eight years old. My father was a baker and I spent a lot of time in his many shops as I was growing up, helping with jobs such as jamming the doughnuts and filling scones with cream. I loved to see the professionals at work: watching the kneading of the dough was almost hypnotic and I was entranced by the way a baker would take a few simple, raw materials and use them to create a delicious and beautiful finished product. That fascination stays with me to this day. I’ve been baking for thirty years now and I’ve never wanted to do anything else. When I was seventeen, I was let loose ‘on the tables’ where the loaves and paÌries were formed, before learning the correÀ way to bake all the breads, paÌries and cakes that we sold. After serving this apprenticeshÔ with my father, I moved on to manage my own shop, then to work in the kitchens of many different eÌablishments - including The DorcheÌer, Cliveden and the CheÌer Grosvenor, as well as reÌaurants on the Continent - honing my skills all the time. I have learnt a very great deal over the laÌ three decades: not juÌ the beÌ, simpleÌ ways to do things, but the worÌ ways too. I’ve seen hard-won, age-old skills consigned to the scrap heap and traditional techniques replaced with modern, coÌ-cutting methods that save time but sacrifice flavour and quality. But I’ve never Ìopped loving baking and I’ve never loÌ faith in the truly passionate bakers of this country, whether they are professionals or home cooks. That is why, in this book, I want to celebrate and explain the techniques that lay behind really great breads and paÌries. What I also want to do is show you your own potential as a baker. There are many very good cooks who will try any number of new recÔes yet who balk at the idea of turning out a loaf of bread or a brioche because they think it’s difficult or complicated. It is not! There are all kinds of myths and myÌeries that have grown up around this branch of cookery over the years and a lot of them are utter nonsense. Yes, there are pitfalls to be avoided, and useful tricks of the trade to be learnt, but I aim to blow the lid on the secret world of baking and reveal that making fantaÌic breads and paÌries really is not hard. This book is a Ìep-by-Ìep guide, covering a whole range of different breads as well as paÌries and delicious cakes, biscuits and puddings. As a professional, I’ve had the time to really work at each part of the baking process: time to play, invent and experiment – and the benefit of that experience is contained in these pages. Each recÔe has an in-depth method that shows my own unique way of doing things, enabling you to create something perfeÀ. In effeÀ, I will be there with you in your kitchen, guiding you through the process, and solving problems before they happen. You will discover that you can, very easily, create breads, tarts and cakes at home that look every bit as good as those you’ll buy in the shops – and that taÌe better. It’s juÌ a matter of finding the right kit and ingredients

6

How to Bake

and underÌanding the techniques. I am very particular about using the right tool for the job and, if the knife I need or the tin I want is not to hand, I’ve been known to get pretty irate! Finding the beÌ ingredients, the ones you feel moÌ comfortable using, is important too. If you put rubbish in, you’ll get rubbish out. But don’t be deterred by any of this. Sourcing the right ingredients and equÔment is not hard (see Directory, page 000). You’ll find recÔes here for baked goods from all over the world, from Continental couronnes and fougasses, Ìrudels, tartes and croissants, to Indian chapattis and middle EaÌern maneesh. But I want to celebrate our own tradition of baking too. This country has some wonderful basic breads that can rival the French baguette or the Italian foccacia: breads such as the cottage loaf, the barm cake or the bloomer (yes, a really well-made bloomer is a great thing!). The way we bake has changed so much in recent decades, it’s become all about Íeed, about making a profit. Commercial bakers no longer take the time to let their doughs ferment slowly, which creates flavour, and many home bakers don’t either. Yet, if you can find that time (and moÌ of it is not hands-on work time), and if you can give a little attention to detail, then I guarantee that you can create breads, cakes and other good things that will become legendary among your own family and friends. I have given plenty of information in the introduÀion to each chapter because a little bit of knowledge goes a long, long way. If you underÌand not juÌ how to bake a loaf of bread or a cuÌard tart, but why you do things in a certain way, then you are well-equÔped to begin your own baking adventure. I want this book to be aÍirational as well as inÍirational, to send you off into your own world of baking where, because you underÌand the simple chemiÌry and the basic techniques, you can innovate and experiment and create your own delicious versions of the recÔes I’m going to share with you here. I truly believe that anyone who is prepared to put in a bit of effort can become a great baker. My advice is to always take your time, and to treat any mishap as an opportunity to learn. You will soon find yourself creating something amazing and, when you do, people will remember it. They will not only tell you it’s delicious, but they will ask you how you made it and where they can get the recÔe, and that sort of recognition will Íur you on like nothing else. I am as passionate about baking today as when I was that young lad, watching my Dad at work. I Ìill love the feeling I get from manÔulating good raw ingredients into something fantaÌic – and I hope I can pass that on to you. If I succeed, and you catch the baking bug, then reÌ assured that this book contains all you need to know in order to create a bit of magic in your own kitchen.

introduction

7


4

Kneadi n g As well as mixing the ingredients thoroughly together, kneading is crucial in developing the gluten in the flour in order to create a smooth, elaÌic dough. There are no hard-and-faÌ rules to kneading – how you do it is up to you. Start by learning how to simply fold the dough. You do this by tucking the top into the middle, turning the dough 45 degrees and repeating again and again. Ten minutes of this repetitive aÀion will give you soÓ, malleable dough. The other usual method is to Ìretch the dough by pushing the top of it away from you before folding it back into the middle, turning it 45 degrees and repeating, going over and over until the dough is smooth. You will get better at this as you make more bread: praÀice makes perfeÀ. It is important to knead the dough for at leaÌ five minutes – oÓen more like 10. As you work, you will see and feel the consiÌency of the dough changing. As the gluten develops, the dough will become more smooth, more elaÌic and more cogent: you will find that it wants to hold itself together in a ball, rather than Ìick to you and the work surface, and it develops a soÓ, smooth skin. As you make more bread, you will soon come to recognise that point when the dough has been kneaded suÇciently and is ready to reÌ and begin rising. You will find the consiÌency of many of my doughs, initially, to be pretty wet and Ìicky. This will give you better bread: lighter, more open-textured and altogether more delicious. As you knead, the dough should become less wet and Ìicky, but it should remain very soÓ. Kneading a soÓ dough does take a bit of confidence, but please do persevere. If you add much less water than I suggeÌ, or keep adding flour to the dough as you knead, you will end up with a Ìiff dough and a brick-like loaf of bread. That is why I advise that you 1

2

16

how to bake

3


4

Kneadi n g As well as mixing the ingredients thoroughly together, kneading is crucial in developing the gluten in the flour in order to create a smooth, elaÌic dough. There are no hard-and-faÌ rules to kneading – how you do it is up to you. Start by learning how to simply fold the dough. You do this by tucking the top into the middle, turning the dough 45 degrees and repeating again and again. Ten minutes of this repetitive aÀion will give you soÓ, malleable dough. The other usual method is to Ìretch the dough by pushing the top of it away from you before folding it back into the middle, turning it 45 degrees and repeating, going over and over until the dough is smooth. You will get better at this as you make more bread: praÀice makes perfeÀ. It is important to knead the dough for at leaÌ five minutes – oÓen more like 10. As you work, you will see and feel the consiÌency of the dough changing. As the gluten develops, the dough will become more smooth, more elaÌic and more cogent: you will find that it wants to hold itself together in a ball, rather than Ìick to you and the work surface, and it develops a soÓ, smooth skin. As you make more bread, you will soon come to recognise that point when the dough has been kneaded suÇciently and is ready to reÌ and begin rising. You will find the consiÌency of many of my doughs, initially, to be pretty wet and Ìicky. This will give you better bread: lighter, more open-textured and altogether more delicious. As you knead, the dough should become less wet and Ìicky, but it should remain very soÓ. Kneading a soÓ dough does take a bit of confidence, but please do persevere. If you add much less water than I suggeÌ, or keep adding flour to the dough as you knead, you will end up with a Ìiff dough and a brick-like loaf of bread. That is why I advise that you 1

2

16

how to bake

3


Wh it e c ob l o af makes

1 loaf / prep 3 hours / bake 30 minutes

This uses the same dough as the basic tin bread but in a slightly greater quantity. The recÔe gives you the opportunity to experiment with forming your loaf by hand – something that will get easier each time you try it. 500g Ìrong white bread flour, plus a little more for duÌing 10g salt 10g inÌant yeaÌ 30g soÓ, unsalted butter 320ml cool water (see page 000) Olive oil for kneading

1. TÔ the flour into a large mixing bowl. Add the salt to one side of the bowl and the yeaÌ to the other. Add the butter and three-quarters of the water and turn the mixture round with your fingers. Continue to add the remaining water, a little at a time, until you’ve picked up all the flour from the sides of the bowl. You may not need to add all the water, or you may need to add a little more – you want dough that is soÓ, but not soggy. Use the mixture to clean the inside of the bowl and keep going until the mixture forms a rough dough. 2. Coat the work surface in a little oil then tÔ the dough onto it and begin to knead. Keep kneading for 5–10 minutes. Work through the initial wet Ìage until the dough Ìarts to form a soÓ, smooth skin. When your dough feels smooth and silky, put it in a large, lightly oiled bowl. Cover with a tea towel and leave to rise until at leaÌ doubled in size – this means at leaÌ one hour, but it’s fine to leave it for two or even three hours 3. Line a baking tray with baking parchment or silicone paper (do not use greaseproof paper, as it will Ìick). 4. Once risen, the dough should be bouncy and shiny. Scrape it out of the bowl onto a lightly floured surface. At this Ìage you have to prepare the dough for its final proving, forming it into the shape of loaf you want. Ìart by shaping the dough into a ball by folding it inwards repetitively until the dough has had all the air knocked out of it and is smooth. Then form it into a round, smooth cob shape (see page 000). 5. Put the shaped dough onto the baking tray. Put the tray inside a clean plaÌic bag and leave to prove for about one hour, or until the dough is at leaÌ doubled in size and Írings back quickly if you prod it lightly with your finger. Heat your oven to 230˚C and put a roaÌing tray in the bottom to heat up. 6. DuÌ the dough with some flour, and slash deeply with a knife. Now pour some water into the hot roaÌing tray in the oven: this will create Ìeam and give your bread a lighter cruÌ. Put your bread in the oven and bake for 30 minutes or until it is cooked through and sounds hollow when tapped on the base. Cool on a wire rack.

38

How to Bake


Wh it e c ob l o af makes

1 loaf / prep 3 hours / bake 30 minutes

This uses the same dough as the basic tin bread but in a slightly greater quantity. The recÔe gives you the opportunity to experiment with forming your loaf by hand – something that will get easier each time you try it. 500g Ìrong white bread flour, plus a little more for duÌing 10g salt 10g inÌant yeaÌ 30g soÓ, unsalted butter 320ml cool water (see page 000) Olive oil for kneading

1. TÔ the flour into a large mixing bowl. Add the salt to one side of the bowl and the yeaÌ to the other. Add the butter and three-quarters of the water and turn the mixture round with your fingers. Continue to add the remaining water, a little at a time, until you’ve picked up all the flour from the sides of the bowl. You may not need to add all the water, or you may need to add a little more – you want dough that is soÓ, but not soggy. Use the mixture to clean the inside of the bowl and keep going until the mixture forms a rough dough. 2. Coat the work surface in a little oil then tÔ the dough onto it and begin to knead. Keep kneading for 5–10 minutes. Work through the initial wet Ìage until the dough Ìarts to form a soÓ, smooth skin. When your dough feels smooth and silky, put it in a large, lightly oiled bowl. Cover with a tea towel and leave to rise until at leaÌ doubled in size – this means at leaÌ one hour, but it’s fine to leave it for two or even three hours 3. Line a baking tray with baking parchment or silicone paper (do not use greaseproof paper, as it will Ìick). 4. Once risen, the dough should be bouncy and shiny. Scrape it out of the bowl onto a lightly floured surface. At this Ìage you have to prepare the dough for its final proving, forming it into the shape of loaf you want. Ìart by shaping the dough into a ball by folding it inwards repetitively until the dough has had all the air knocked out of it and is smooth. Then form it into a round, smooth cob shape (see page 000). 5. Put the shaped dough onto the baking tray. Put the tray inside a clean plaÌic bag and leave to prove for about one hour, or until the dough is at leaÌ doubled in size and Írings back quickly if you prod it lightly with your finger. Heat your oven to 230˚C and put a roaÌing tray in the bottom to heat up. 6. DuÌ the dough with some flour, and slash deeply with a knife. Now pour some water into the hot roaÌing tray in the oven: this will create Ìeam and give your bread a lighter cruÌ. Put your bread in the oven and bake for 30 minutes or until it is cooked through and sounds hollow when tapped on the base. Cool on a wire rack.

38

How to Bake


Cran berr y an d stilt on brea d makes

1 loaf / prep 3 hours / bake 30 minutes

If you’re bored of cheese and biscuits at ChriÌmas, give this flavoursome bread a go. To be honeÌ, though, it taÌes great at any time of year, and always goes well with a cheese board. 500g Ìrong white bread flour, plus a little extra for duÌing 10g salt 10g inÌant yeaÌ 30g very soft, unsalted butter 320ml cool water A little olive oil for the bowl 100g dried cranberries 150g Stilton, crumbled

1. TÔ the flour into a large mixing bowl and add the salt to one side of the bowl and the yeaÌ to the other. Add the butter and three-quarters of the water and turn the mixture round with your fingers. Continue to add the remaining water, a little at a time, until you’ve picked up all the flour from the sides of the bowl. You may not need to add all the water, or you may need to add a little more - you want dough that is soft, but not soggy. Use the mixture to clean the inside of the bowl and keep going until the mixture forms a rough dough. 2. Coat the work surface in a little flour then tÔ the dough onto it and begin to knead. Keep kneading for 5–10 minutes. Work through the initial wet Ìage until the dough Ìarts to form a soft, smooth skin. When your dough feels smooth and silky, put it in a lightly oiled bowl. Cover with a tea towel and leave to rise until at leaÌ doubled in size – this means at leaÌ one hour, but it’s fine to leave it for two or even three hours. 3. Line a baking tray with parchment or silicone paper. 4. TÔ your dough out onto a lightly floured surface and, without knocking it back, flatten it out with your hands, then roll it out using a rolling pin into a reÀangle, about 25cm x 35cm. With the long side towards you, Írinkle the cranberries and Stilton on top as evenly as you can. Roll the dough up along the long side into a sausage. Press along the seam to seal it. Roll the sausage into a Íiral and put it on the baking tray. Put the tray inside a clean plaÌic bag and leave to prove for about one hour, or until the dough is at leaÌ doubled in size and Írings back quickly if you prod it lightly with your finger. Heat the oven to 220˚C and put a roaÌing tin into the bottom to heat up. 5. When the dough is risen and feels light to the touch, put it in the middle of the oven, fill the roaÌing tray with water and bake for 30 minutes or until the loaf sounds hollow when tapped on the base. Cool on a wire rack.

flavoured bread s

111


Cran berr y an d stilt on brea d makes

1 loaf / prep 3 hours / bake 30 minutes

If you’re bored of cheese and biscuits at ChriÌmas, give this flavoursome bread a go. To be honeÌ, though, it taÌes great at any time of year, and always goes well with a cheese board. 500g Ìrong white bread flour, plus a little extra for duÌing 10g salt 10g inÌant yeaÌ 30g very soft, unsalted butter 320ml cool water A little olive oil for the bowl 100g dried cranberries 150g Stilton, crumbled

1. TÔ the flour into a large mixing bowl and add the salt to one side of the bowl and the yeaÌ to the other. Add the butter and three-quarters of the water and turn the mixture round with your fingers. Continue to add the remaining water, a little at a time, until you’ve picked up all the flour from the sides of the bowl. You may not need to add all the water, or you may need to add a little more - you want dough that is soft, but not soggy. Use the mixture to clean the inside of the bowl and keep going until the mixture forms a rough dough. 2. Coat the work surface in a little flour then tÔ the dough onto it and begin to knead. Keep kneading for 5–10 minutes. Work through the initial wet Ìage until the dough Ìarts to form a soft, smooth skin. When your dough feels smooth and silky, put it in a lightly oiled bowl. Cover with a tea towel and leave to rise until at leaÌ doubled in size – this means at leaÌ one hour, but it’s fine to leave it for two or even three hours. 3. Line a baking tray with parchment or silicone paper. 4. TÔ your dough out onto a lightly floured surface and, without knocking it back, flatten it out with your hands, then roll it out using a rolling pin into a reÀangle, about 25cm x 35cm. With the long side towards you, Írinkle the cranberries and Stilton on top as evenly as you can. Roll the dough up along the long side into a sausage. Press along the seam to seal it. Roll the sausage into a Íiral and put it on the baking tray. Put the tray inside a clean plaÌic bag and leave to prove for about one hour, or until the dough is at leaÌ doubled in size and Írings back quickly if you prod it lightly with your finger. Heat the oven to 220˚C and put a roaÌing tin into the bottom to heat up. 5. When the dough is risen and feels light to the touch, put it in the middle of the oven, fill the roaÌing tray with water and bake for 30 minutes or until the loaf sounds hollow when tapped on the base. Cool on a wire rack.

flavoured bread s

111


1

2

3

4

Sour do u g h sta rt e r prep

10 minutes

It’s important to use an organic apple for this, or the Ìarter may not ferment. I like a Cox but any organic apple will do. 1kg Ìrong white bread flour 1 organic apple, grated, skin and all 360ml tepid water

Stage 1: Mix 500g of the flour with the apple and water and tÔ into an airtight container. Cover and leave to ferment for three days. Mark the original level on the outside of the container see pics on pxxx so you can see whether the mixture has risen. Stage 2: After three days the mix should Ìart to smell quite sweet, a bit like cider, it will be darker in colour and will have Ìarted to grow (it may have bubbles). Check the level againÌ the mark you made on the outside see pics on pxxx to see how much it has grown. Discard half the mix and add another 250g Ìrong white bread flour and 170ml water (this is called ‘feeding’). Mix thoroughly in the bowl. TÔ back into the container and leave for a further two days. Stage 3: There should now be plenty of aÀivity in the dough and you should be able to see lots of small bubbles. If there is nothing happening, look at the side of the container: you’ll be able to see whether the dough has risen and fallen by the smearing on the side. If it has risen and fallen, then it is aÀive. If your Ìarter is aÀive but has sunk down in the tub and a layer of liquid has formed on top, then it is aÀually over-aÀive. Stir in some more flour to return it to a thick consiÌency and leave for a day. It should regain the thick, bubbly texture you want. If there is no sign of rising on the container, and no bubbles, leave the dough for a couple more days. Once your Ìarter is aÀive, discard half the mixture as before and mix in another 250g Ìrong white bread flour and enough water to return it to the consiÌency of a very wet, sloppy dough. This time leave it for one day. If the Ìarter begins to bubble within 24 hours then it is ready to use. Ideally, when you come to use it, you want your Ìarter to be thick and bubbly. When you shake it, it should wobble like a jelly, without dropping down, and when you put a Íoon through it, it should be like a thick batter. If your Ìarter is not bubbling, feed it again, following Ìage two, and leave it for a further two days. If you are using your sourdough Ìarter often, you can leave it at room temperature, but you will need to feed it at leaÌ every three days – and whenever you take some to make bread. Simply Ìir in some Ìrong white bread flour and enough water to return it to the consiÌency of a very wet dough– bearing in mind that you will need 500g Ìarter for each recÔe – and leave it, covered, until it achieves that thick, bubbly, jelly-like Ìage described above. If you are making sourdough less often – say, once a

128

How to Bake


1

2

3

4

Sour do u g h sta rt e r prep

10 minutes

It’s important to use an organic apple for this, or the Ìarter may not ferment. I like a Cox but any organic apple will do. 1kg Ìrong white bread flour 1 organic apple, grated, skin and all 360ml tepid water

Stage 1: Mix 500g of the flour with the apple and water and tÔ into an airtight container. Cover and leave to ferment for three days. Mark the original level on the outside of the container see pics on pxxx so you can see whether the mixture has risen. Stage 2: After three days the mix should Ìart to smell quite sweet, a bit like cider, it will be darker in colour and will have Ìarted to grow (it may have bubbles). Check the level againÌ the mark you made on the outside see pics on pxxx to see how much it has grown. Discard half the mix and add another 250g Ìrong white bread flour and 170ml water (this is called ‘feeding’). Mix thoroughly in the bowl. TÔ back into the container and leave for a further two days. Stage 3: There should now be plenty of aÀivity in the dough and you should be able to see lots of small bubbles. If there is nothing happening, look at the side of the container: you’ll be able to see whether the dough has risen and fallen by the smearing on the side. If it has risen and fallen, then it is aÀive. If your Ìarter is aÀive but has sunk down in the tub and a layer of liquid has formed on top, then it is aÀually over-aÀive. Stir in some more flour to return it to a thick consiÌency and leave for a day. It should regain the thick, bubbly texture you want. If there is no sign of rising on the container, and no bubbles, leave the dough for a couple more days. Once your Ìarter is aÀive, discard half the mixture as before and mix in another 250g Ìrong white bread flour and enough water to return it to the consiÌency of a very wet, sloppy dough. This time leave it for one day. If the Ìarter begins to bubble within 24 hours then it is ready to use. Ideally, when you come to use it, you want your Ìarter to be thick and bubbly. When you shake it, it should wobble like a jelly, without dropping down, and when you put a Íoon through it, it should be like a thick batter. If your Ìarter is not bubbling, feed it again, following Ìage two, and leave it for a further two days. If you are using your sourdough Ìarter often, you can leave it at room temperature, but you will need to feed it at leaÌ every three days – and whenever you take some to make bread. Simply Ìir in some Ìrong white bread flour and enough water to return it to the consiÌency of a very wet dough– bearing in mind that you will need 500g Ìarter for each recÔe – and leave it, covered, until it achieves that thick, bubbly, jelly-like Ìage described above. If you are making sourdough less often – say, once a

128

How to Bake


Sour o live b r e ad makes

2 loaves / prep 18 hours / bake 40 minutes

Olives and coriander is a favourite combination of mine (see the delicious Cypriot-Ìyle loaf on page xxx). This is a deeply flavoursome loaf which is wonderful simply toaÌed and trickled with olive oil. 750g Ìrong white bread flour, plus a little extra for duÌing 500g sourdough Ìarter (page xxx) 15g salt 300–400ml tepid water For the filling 200g good quality black olives, pitted but whole 100g good quality green olives, pitted but whole 1 large bunch coriander (about 100g), Ìalks removed, roughly chopped

142

How to Bake

1. Put the flour, Ìarter and salt in a large bowl. Add 300ml water and begin mixing with your hands, adding more water if you need to, until you have formed a soft, rough dough, and picked up all the flour from the sides of the bowl. TÔ on to a lightly oiled surface and knead for 5–10 minutes. Work through the initial wet Ìage until the dough Ìarts to form a soft, smooth skin. When your dough feels smooth and silky, put it into a lightly oiled bowl, cover with a tea towel and leave to rise at about 20˚C (no less than 15˚C and no more than 25˚C) for five hours or until at leaÌ doubled in size. 2. Cover two trays with cloths and duÌ them heavily with flour or prepare two proving baskets (see page 000). 3. Add all the olives and the coriander to the dough and knead them in by hand for several minutes until they are well diÍersed. TÔ the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and divide it into 2 pieces. Flatten each piece out and roll up into a sausage. Roll each sausage out to 30cm in length. Put each loaf on to a cloth, seam side down. Alternatively, shape the dough to fit your baskets. Rub flour all over the top of each loaf, put inside a clean plaÌic bag and leave to rise at about 20˚C for 12 hours or until the dough has doubled in size and Írings back when gently poked. 4. Heat the oven to 190˚C. Line two baking trays with baking parchment or silicone paper. Transfer the loaves to the baking trays. Make a heavy cut down the middle of each loaf and bake for 40 minutes. When the bread is ready it should sound hollow when tapped on the base. Cool on a wire rack.


Sour o live b r e ad makes

2 loaves / prep 18 hours / bake 40 minutes

Olives and coriander is a favourite combination of mine (see the delicious Cypriot-Ìyle loaf on page xxx). This is a deeply flavoursome loaf which is wonderful simply toaÌed and trickled with olive oil. 750g Ìrong white bread flour, plus a little extra for duÌing 500g sourdough Ìarter (page xxx) 15g salt 300–400ml tepid water For the filling 200g good quality black olives, pitted but whole 100g good quality green olives, pitted but whole 1 large bunch coriander (about 100g), Ìalks removed, roughly chopped

142

How to Bake

1. Put the flour, Ìarter and salt in a large bowl. Add 300ml water and begin mixing with your hands, adding more water if you need to, until you have formed a soft, rough dough, and picked up all the flour from the sides of the bowl. TÔ on to a lightly oiled surface and knead for 5–10 minutes. Work through the initial wet Ìage until the dough Ìarts to form a soft, smooth skin. When your dough feels smooth and silky, put it into a lightly oiled bowl, cover with a tea towel and leave to rise at about 20˚C (no less than 15˚C and no more than 25˚C) for five hours or until at leaÌ doubled in size. 2. Cover two trays with cloths and duÌ them heavily with flour or prepare two proving baskets (see page 000). 3. Add all the olives and the coriander to the dough and knead them in by hand for several minutes until they are well diÍersed. TÔ the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and divide it into 2 pieces. Flatten each piece out and roll up into a sausage. Roll each sausage out to 30cm in length. Put each loaf on to a cloth, seam side down. Alternatively, shape the dough to fit your baskets. Rub flour all over the top of each loaf, put inside a clean plaÌic bag and leave to rise at about 20˚C for 12 hours or until the dough has doubled in size and Írings back when gently poked. 4. Heat the oven to 190˚C. Line two baking trays with baking parchment or silicone paper. Transfer the loaves to the baking trays. Make a heavy cut down the middle of each loaf and bake for 40 minutes. When the bread is ready it should sound hollow when tapped on the base. Cool on a wire rack.


Choc ol a te a nd ap r icot sour dough makes

2 loaves / prep 19 hours / bake 35 minutes

I have done several bread recÔes using chocolate and this one works particularly well. You can subÌitute canned morello cherries for the apricots but use only 200g and drain them well firÌ. 750g Ìrong white bread flour, plus a little extra for duÌing 500g sourdough Ìarter (page xxx) 15g salt 250g dark chocolate nibs (or chopped dark chocolate) 300g organic dried apricots, chopped 350–450ml tepid water Olive oil for kneading

1. Put the flour, Ìarter, salt, chocolate and apricots in a large bowl. Add 350ml water and begin mixing with your hands, adding more water if you need to, until you have formed a soft, rough dough, and picked up all the flour from the sides of the bowl. TÔ on to a lightly oiled surface and knead for 5–10 minutes. Work through the initial wet Ìage until the dough Ìarts to form a soft, smooth skin. When your dough feels smooth and silky, put it in a lightly oiled bowl, cover with a tea towel and leave to rise at about 20˚C (no cooler than 15˚C and no more than 25˚C) for five hours or until at leaÌ doubled in size. 2. Cover two trays with cloths and duÌ them heavily with flour or prepare two proving baskets (see page 000). 3. TÔ the dough out onto a lightly floured work surface. Fold it inwards repetitively until the dough has had all the air knocked out of it and is smooth. Divide into two. Shape each piece into a ball. Put a loaf on each tray or into the baskets. Put inside clean plaÌic bags and leave at about 20˚C for 13 hours or until the dough has doubled in size and Írings back when gently poked. 4. Heat the oven to 200˚C. Line two baking trays with baking parchment or silicone paper. 5. Transfer each loaf to a baking tray. Flour the top of each loaf well, rubbing it gently into the skin. Cut 4 or 5 Ìraight lines across the top of each loaf, then turn the trays 90 degrees and repeat the cuts to make a diamond pattern. Bake for 35 minutes or until the loaves sound hollow when tapped on the base. Cool on a wire rack.

146

How to Bake


Choc ol a te a nd ap r icot sour dough makes

2 loaves / prep 19 hours / bake 35 minutes

I have done several bread recÔes using chocolate and this one works particularly well. You can subÌitute canned morello cherries for the apricots but use only 200g and drain them well firÌ. 750g Ìrong white bread flour, plus a little extra for duÌing 500g sourdough Ìarter (page xxx) 15g salt 250g dark chocolate nibs (or chopped dark chocolate) 300g organic dried apricots, chopped 350–450ml tepid water Olive oil for kneading

1. Put the flour, Ìarter, salt, chocolate and apricots in a large bowl. Add 350ml water and begin mixing with your hands, adding more water if you need to, until you have formed a soft, rough dough, and picked up all the flour from the sides of the bowl. TÔ on to a lightly oiled surface and knead for 5–10 minutes. Work through the initial wet Ìage until the dough Ìarts to form a soft, smooth skin. When your dough feels smooth and silky, put it in a lightly oiled bowl, cover with a tea towel and leave to rise at about 20˚C (no cooler than 15˚C and no more than 25˚C) for five hours or until at leaÌ doubled in size. 2. Cover two trays with cloths and duÌ them heavily with flour or prepare two proving baskets (see page 000). 3. TÔ the dough out onto a lightly floured work surface. Fold it inwards repetitively until the dough has had all the air knocked out of it and is smooth. Divide into two. Shape each piece into a ball. Put a loaf on each tray or into the baskets. Put inside clean plaÌic bags and leave at about 20˚C for 13 hours or until the dough has doubled in size and Írings back when gently poked. 4. Heat the oven to 200˚C. Line two baking trays with baking parchment or silicone paper. 5. Transfer each loaf to a baking tray. Flour the top of each loaf well, rubbing it gently into the skin. Cut 4 or 5 Ìraight lines across the top of each loaf, then turn the trays 90 degrees and repeat the cuts to make a diamond pattern. Bake for 35 minutes or until the loaves sound hollow when tapped on the base. Cool on a wire rack.

146

How to Bake


Ra spberr y Danis h makes

28 / prep 3 hours / bake 20 minutes

Good raÍberries should have a deep flavour to Ìart with and when baked, this intensifies even further, making them really wonderful on a paÌry. Enhanced with a trickle of lemony icing, these are among my favourite Danish – and the recÔe is easy to adapt for other fruit too (see variations, below). 1 quantity Danish paÌry dough (page 000) Flour, for duÌing 250g raÍberries, plus extra to finish if you like 1 quantity crème patissiere (page 000) 2 medium eggs, beaten with a Ílash of milk 150g sieved apricot jam For the lemon water icing 200g icing sugar 40ml water 1 lemon, zeÌed

1. Line four or five baking trays with baking parchment or silicone paper. 2. Remove the dough from the fridge and, on a lightly floured work surface, roll it into a reÀangle juÌ over 30cm x 53cm and about 7mm thick. Trim it so it has neat edges, then cut the reÀangle into 7.5cm squares. On each square, make 2.5cm cuts from each corner going diagonally almoÌ to the centre. Fold four of the corners in to the centre on each to make a Ìar shape. 3. Put the Ìars onto the baking trays – six on an average tray is ample. Put each tray inside a clean plaÌic bag and leave to rise at cool room temperature (18–24˚C) until at leaÌ doubled in size – around 2 hours. 4. Heat the oven to 200˚C. 5. Put a tableÍoon of crème patissière into the middle of each paÌry and top with three or four raÍberries. Brush the exposed dough with the egg wash. Bake for 15–20 minutes until golden brown. 6. While the paÌries are baking, put the apricot jam into a small saucepan with a Ílash of water and warm gently, Ìirring occasionally, to thin it down. While the Danish paÌries are Ìill hot, brush them with the apricot jam. You can, if you like, add more fresh raÍberries at this point too. 7. When the paÌries are cooled, make the icing by putting all the ingredients in a bowl and Ìirring them together. DÔ a paÌry brush into the icing and dab around the edges of each paÌry.

bl ue berr y Danis h Use 500g blueberries in place of the raÍberries. Press four blueberries into the crème patissière on each paÌry before baking. Add the remaining raw blueberries once the paÌries have come out of the oven. Glaze and ice as for the raÍberry Danish.

Apr ico t Danis h Use 3 x 220g tins apricot halves in place of the raÍberries. Drain the apricots well and place one half in the centre of each paÌry, on top of the crème patissière, before baking. Glaze and ice as for the raÍberry Danish.

C roi ssant s, dani sh & brioc h e

179


Ra spberr y Danis h makes

28 / prep 3 hours / bake 20 minutes

Good raÍberries should have a deep flavour to Ìart with and when baked, this intensifies even further, making them really wonderful on a paÌry. Enhanced with a trickle of lemony icing, these are among my favourite Danish – and the recÔe is easy to adapt for other fruit too (see variations, below). 1 quantity Danish paÌry dough (page 000) Flour, for duÌing 250g raÍberries, plus extra to finish if you like 1 quantity crème patissiere (page 000) 2 medium eggs, beaten with a Ílash of milk 150g sieved apricot jam For the lemon water icing 200g icing sugar 40ml water 1 lemon, zeÌed

1. Line four or five baking trays with baking parchment or silicone paper. 2. Remove the dough from the fridge and, on a lightly floured work surface, roll it into a reÀangle juÌ over 30cm x 53cm and about 7mm thick. Trim it so it has neat edges, then cut the reÀangle into 7.5cm squares. On each square, make 2.5cm cuts from each corner going diagonally almoÌ to the centre. Fold four of the corners in to the centre on each to make a Ìar shape. 3. Put the Ìars onto the baking trays – six on an average tray is ample. Put each tray inside a clean plaÌic bag and leave to rise at cool room temperature (18–24˚C) until at leaÌ doubled in size – around 2 hours. 4. Heat the oven to 200˚C. 5. Put a tableÍoon of crème patissière into the middle of each paÌry and top with three or four raÍberries. Brush the exposed dough with the egg wash. Bake for 15–20 minutes until golden brown. 6. While the paÌries are baking, put the apricot jam into a small saucepan with a Ílash of water and warm gently, Ìirring occasionally, to thin it down. While the Danish paÌries are Ìill hot, brush them with the apricot jam. You can, if you like, add more fresh raÍberries at this point too. 7. When the paÌries are cooled, make the icing by putting all the ingredients in a bowl and Ìirring them together. DÔ a paÌry brush into the icing and dab around the edges of each paÌry.

bl ue berr y Danis h Use 500g blueberries in place of the raÍberries. Press four blueberries into the crème patissière on each paÌry before baking. Add the remaining raw blueberries once the paÌries have come out of the oven. Glaze and ice as for the raÍberry Danish.

Apr ico t Danis h Use 3 x 220g tins apricot halves in place of the raÍberries. Drain the apricots well and place one half in the centre of each paÌry, on top of the crème patissière, before baking. Glaze and ice as for the raÍberry Danish.

C roi ssant s, dani sh & brioc h e

179


Lemo n m e ri n g u e pi e Serves

8 / prep 1 hour, plus cooling / cook 1 hour

This is a good, old-fashioned lemon meringue, with a nice sharp lemon curd filling and clouds of billowing meringue. 1 quantity sweet paÌry (page xxx) For the lemon curd 6 large lemons 230g caÌer sugar pinch of salt 80g cornflour 12 medium egg yolks (keep some of the whites for the meringue topping) 230g unsalted butter, softened For the meringue 6 medium egg whites 280g caÌer sugar 1 teaÍoon cornflour 1 teaÍoon lemon juice

278

How to Bake

1. Roll out the paÌry to a circle about 3mm thick. Don’t worry if it crumbles or breaks on the firÌ roll – juÌ press it together and re-roll. Use it to line a buttered, 25cm, loose-based tart tin, leaving the excess paÌry hanging over the edge. Using a fork, prick it all over then chill it for 30 minutes. Preheat the oven to 180˚C. 2. Line the paÌry with crumpled greaseproof paper or foil and fill with baking beans. Bake the paÌry blind for 15 minutes, then remove the paper and beans and bake for a further 5–8 minutes until juÌ golden at the edges and dry-looking in the centre. Trim off the rough edges. 3. Reduce your oven to 140˚C. 4. Finely grate the zeÌ of two of the lemons. Mix the zeÌ with the sugar, salt and cornflour in a saucepan. Squeeze the juice from all the lemons, Ìrain it in to the saucepan and beat with the sugar mixture. Heat gently, Ìirring often, until thickened. Take off the heat and beat in the egg yolks, then return to the heat and cook gently again, Ìirring, until thick. Take off the heat and whisk in the butter until melted. Pour into the baked paÌry case. 5. Beat the egg whites until they are holding soft peaks. Now beat in the sugar one tableÍoon at a time. Once it is all incorporated, carry on beating for 3–4 minutes until really glossy. Add the cornflour and lemon juice. Spoon over the lemon curd mix in the tart. Bake for about an hour, until criÍ on top and golden. Leave to cool completely before serving.


Lemo n m e ri n g u e pi e Serves

8 / prep 1 hour, plus cooling / cook 1 hour

This is a good, old-fashioned lemon meringue, with a nice sharp lemon curd filling and clouds of billowing meringue. 1 quantity sweet paÌry (page xxx) For the lemon curd 6 large lemons 230g caÌer sugar pinch of salt 80g cornflour 12 medium egg yolks (keep some of the whites for the meringue topping) 230g unsalted butter, softened For the meringue 6 medium egg whites 280g caÌer sugar 1 teaÍoon cornflour 1 teaÍoon lemon juice

278

How to Bake

1. Roll out the paÌry to a circle about 3mm thick. Don’t worry if it crumbles or breaks on the firÌ roll – juÌ press it together and re-roll. Use it to line a buttered, 25cm, loose-based tart tin, leaving the excess paÌry hanging over the edge. Using a fork, prick it all over then chill it for 30 minutes. Preheat the oven to 180˚C. 2. Line the paÌry with crumpled greaseproof paper or foil and fill with baking beans. Bake the paÌry blind for 15 minutes, then remove the paper and beans and bake for a further 5–8 minutes until juÌ golden at the edges and dry-looking in the centre. Trim off the rough edges. 3. Reduce your oven to 140˚C. 4. Finely grate the zeÌ of two of the lemons. Mix the zeÌ with the sugar, salt and cornflour in a saucepan. Squeeze the juice from all the lemons, Ìrain it in to the saucepan and beat with the sugar mixture. Heat gently, Ìirring often, until thickened. Take off the heat and beat in the egg yolks, then return to the heat and cook gently again, Ìirring, until thick. Take off the heat and whisk in the butter until melted. Pour into the baked paÌry case. 5. Beat the egg whites until they are holding soft peaks. Now beat in the sugar one tableÍoon at a time. Once it is all incorporated, carry on beating for 3–4 minutes until really glossy. Add the cornflour and lemon juice. Spoon over the lemon curd mix in the tart. Bake for about an hour, until criÍ on top and golden. Leave to cool completely before serving.


Poa c her’ s pi e Serves

8 / prep 45 minutes / cook 1 hour, 20 minutes

Pies like this were served to Henry VIII and were the centrepiece of the dining table in Georgian times. They look and taÌe great, can be served hot or cold, and the beÌ thing is, they aÀually require very little preparation. I like to make this in an old-fashioned, hinged pie mould which I found in a junk shop – it’s well worth looking out for something similar at boot fairs and antique Ìalls. 175g lean Ìeak, cubed 100g lean cooked ham, chopped 225-230g cooked pheasant, pigeon, partridge or chicken breaÌ, chopped 350g pork sausagemeat 300ml good quality beef Ìock (not from a Ìock cube) 1 egg, beaten, for glazing For the hot water cruÌ paÌry 265g plain flour 55g Ìrong white bread flour 55g unsalted butter, cubed 65g lard 135ml boiling water 1 tÍ salt

1. Heat your oven to 220˚C. 2. Combine the Ìeak, ham and the pheasant, pigeon, partridge or chicken in a bowl. Season and set aside in the fridge while you prepare the paÌry. 3. Combine the flours in a bowl. Add the butter and rub in with your fingers. Place the lard in a pan and heat until it melts. Dissolve the salt in the boiling water then add to the lard. Pour this liquid into the flour. Mix with a Íoon then, as soon as it is cool enough, tÔ the dough onto a lightly floured surface and work together into a ball. Be careful that the dough is not too hot when you Ìart to work it. When the dough ball has been formed, leave it to cool slightly. If it’s Ìill lumpy, work it a minute or two longer. 4. Put your pie mould (mine is 45cm) on a baking tray, or use a 1.5-litre capacity oven dish. Take two-thirds to three-quarters of the paÌry (depending on the dimensions of your dish), roll it out to fit the pie mould or dish and press it in carefully over the base and sides, leaving a neat 5mm above the rim. Season the sausagemeat, then press it into the bottom and sides of the pie. Add the other mixed meats. Roll out the remaining paÌry to make a lid. Damp the edges of the pie with a little of the beaten egg then position the lid over the filling. Pinch the edges of the dough together to seal. Work as quickly as you can because, as the paÌry cools, it Ìiffens and becomes more brittle. Cut a small hole in the centre of the pie. Brush with more beaten egg. 5. Bake the pie for 20 minutes, until the paÌry is golden brown, then turn the oven down to 180˚C and cook for another hour. Using a skewer poked through the hole in the top, teÌ to see if the filling is tender. You can also use a meat thermometer to check that the filling is cooked through. If you are using a pie dish, remove the pie from the oven now. If you are using a mould, you can remove the sides, brush the paÌry all over with more beaten egg and bake for an extra 20–30 minutes to brown it. 6. Heat the Ìock to simmering then pour it into the hole in the paÌry lid. Serve hot, or leave the pie to cool completely and serve with new potatoes, a green salad and chutneys. tart s & p ie s

297


Poa c her’ s pi e Serves

8 / prep 45 minutes / cook 1 hour, 20 minutes

Pies like this were served to Henry VIII and were the centrepiece of the dining table in Georgian times. They look and taÌe great, can be served hot or cold, and the beÌ thing is, they aÀually require very little preparation. I like to make this in an old-fashioned, hinged pie mould which I found in a junk shop – it’s well worth looking out for something similar at boot fairs and antique Ìalls. 175g lean Ìeak, cubed 100g lean cooked ham, chopped 225-230g cooked pheasant, pigeon, partridge or chicken breaÌ, chopped 350g pork sausagemeat 300ml good quality beef Ìock (not from a Ìock cube) 1 egg, beaten, for glazing For the hot water cruÌ paÌry 265g plain flour 55g Ìrong white bread flour 55g unsalted butter, cubed 65g lard 135ml boiling water 1 tÍ salt

1. Heat your oven to 220˚C. 2. Combine the Ìeak, ham and the pheasant, pigeon, partridge or chicken in a bowl. Season and set aside in the fridge while you prepare the paÌry. 3. Combine the flours in a bowl. Add the butter and rub in with your fingers. Place the lard in a pan and heat until it melts. Dissolve the salt in the boiling water then add to the lard. Pour this liquid into the flour. Mix with a Íoon then, as soon as it is cool enough, tÔ the dough onto a lightly floured surface and work together into a ball. Be careful that the dough is not too hot when you Ìart to work it. When the dough ball has been formed, leave it to cool slightly. If it’s Ìill lumpy, work it a minute or two longer. 4. Put your pie mould (mine is 45cm) on a baking tray, or use a 1.5-litre capacity oven dish. Take two-thirds to three-quarters of the paÌry (depending on the dimensions of your dish), roll it out to fit the pie mould or dish and press it in carefully over the base and sides, leaving a neat 5mm above the rim. Season the sausagemeat, then press it into the bottom and sides of the pie. Add the other mixed meats. Roll out the remaining paÌry to make a lid. Damp the edges of the pie with a little of the beaten egg then position the lid over the filling. Pinch the edges of the dough together to seal. Work as quickly as you can because, as the paÌry cools, it Ìiffens and becomes more brittle. Cut a small hole in the centre of the pie. Brush with more beaten egg. 5. Bake the pie for 20 minutes, until the paÌry is golden brown, then turn the oven down to 180˚C and cook for another hour. Using a skewer poked through the hole in the top, teÌ to see if the filling is tender. You can also use a meat thermometer to check that the filling is cooked through. If you are using a pie dish, remove the pie from the oven now. If you are using a mould, you can remove the sides, brush the paÌry all over with more beaten egg and bake for an extra 20–30 minutes to brown it. 6. Heat the Ìock to simmering then pour it into the hole in the paÌry lid. Serve hot, or leave the pie to cool completely and serve with new potatoes, a green salad and chutneys. tart s & p ie s

297


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HOW TO BAKE by Paul Hollywood  

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