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With best compliments from:

PRS Group of Concerns PRS Builders

PRS School of Nursing

PRS College of Nursing

PRS College of Engineering & Technology

Swagath Holiday Resorts

Flora Decoratives

Kalyan Hospital

Kalyan School & Daycare

Kalyan Plus The Special School Lns. Krishnammal Ratnaswamy Vocational Centre for Physically & Mentally Challenged


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Dedicated to...

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Edited & Published by Balan Thirumala, PR Manager For and on behalf of “PRS Hospital�, Killipalam, Karamana, Thiruvananthapuram - 695 002 Cover Design : Artist B.D. Dathan Design & Layout : abc color systems, Tvpm. Ph: 2473911 Printed at : Akshara Offset, Tvpm. Ph: 2471174 7th September, 2012

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Dr. Susan George

Dr. M.V. Thomas

Dr. C. Premachandran

Dr. V.P. Sarma

Dr. S. Velappan

Dr. Florence Mohana Rani

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Preface

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Hon. Chief Minister’s Message. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 09 Hon. Speaker’s Message .

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Hon. Health Minister’s Message . .

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Message from Worshipful Mayor. .

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Message from Hon. MLA: Shri. V. Sivankutty . .

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Message from Managing Partner . .

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From the desk of the Medical Administrator .

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Message from Dr. R. Anandam, Partner. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 About PRS Hospital .

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A quick glance at the milestones in the history of PRS Hospital .

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PRS Hospital Since 1986 - Silver Jubilee Year . .

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Inaugural Function of the Silver Jubilee Year Celebrations .

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Silver Jubilee Service Projects initiated by PRS Charities

Free Dialysis for 25 patients for a period of one year .

Free Cardiac Surgeries in association with voluntary organizations . .

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Adoption of Nedungad Corporation Ward .

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Financial assistance to Regional Cancer Centre “Patient Welfare Fund”. .

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Silver Jubilee Continuing Medical Education (CME) Series .

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Silver Jubilee Free Medical Camps .

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Silver Jubilee Staff Welfare Activities

One day Picnics for Staff.

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Sports Day Celebrations.

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Pookkalam Competition .

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Painting Competition for Children of Doctors & Staff. . . . . . . . . . 40

Image Gallery.

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Doctors & Staff honoured during Silver Jubille Inaugural Function .

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Literary bouquet by Management, Doctors & Staff of PRS Hospital. . . . . . . 57-96 Staff Photo Album . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97-108 5


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Preface Souvenirs are remembrances. But, as with all good remembrances, I believe they have a timeless quality and value. It is an honour and a privilege to celebrate 25 glorious years and it is therefore only appropriate that a souvenir is being released to commemorate this grand occasion. We extend our most sincere gratitude and thanks to Hon. Speaker Shri. G. Karthikeyan, Hon. Chief Minister, Shri. Oommen Chandy, Hon. Health Minister Shri. V.S. Sivakumar, Worshipful Mayor Adv. K. Chandrika and Hon. MLA Shri. V. Sivankutty who have graciously obliged us by giving their good will messages to adore our souvenir. We extend our sincere gratitude to our Managing Partner, Shri. R. Murugan, Medical Administrator, Dr. M.S. Thiruvarian MS, Partner and Consultant Neurologist, Dr. R. Anandam MD, DM and all other doctors and staff members who contributed their articles published in this souvenir. Sincere words of gratitude and appreciation is due to all members of the souvenir committee and our printers, Akshara Offset, for their sincere efforts. I record with great satisfaction that, in spite of the lack of time, the response from members of the management, doctors and staff has been so spontaneous and immense that the souvenir has become larger than what we had hoped. It is, therefore, with joy and satisfaction that we are releasing this souvenir on this auspicious occasion of our Silver Jubilee.

Balan Thirumala

Convenor, Souvenir Committee

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OOMMEN CHANDY CHIEF MINISTER KERALA

03/01/2012

I have enormous pleasure to lerarn that PRS Hospital, Thiruvananthapuram is celebrating its Silver Jubilee and bringing out a souvenir to commemorate the event. I hope the Jubilee celebration would inspire the hospital managemetnt and staff to provide dedicated service and relief to the suffering people. I wish all success for the endeavour.

OOMMEN CHANDY

Office : Secretariat, Thiruvananthapuram - 695 001 Phone - Office : 2333610, 2333812, 2333197, 233148, 2333214, 2332682, 2332184 Fax : (0471) 2333489 Resi : (0471) 2345600, 2342602 & (0481)2351135 9


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Pn. ImÀ-¯n-tIb³ kv-]o¡À, tI-c-f \n-bak` G. Karthikeyan

Speaker, Kerala Legislative Assembly 16-06-2012

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V.S. SIVAKUMAR

MINISTER FOR HEALTH AND DEVASWOMS KERALA

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Phone : off : 2322470, 2377700 2320821 extnL:404 res : 2542224 mob : 9447377477 E-mail : tvmmayor@gmail.com THIRUVANANTHAPURAM

Adv. K. Chandrika Mayor Corporation of Thiruvananthapuram

18.06.2012

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Message from Managing Partner

A quarter century of providing love, care and service - that is the first feeling that comes to my mind when PRS Hospital is celebrating its 25th Anniversary. It has been a long journey with integrity and dedication. Indeed, PRS Hospital was built by my father upon a very strong foundation and undoubtedly started on the right path and direction. From a humble beginning with just 75 beds as a mother and child hospital, our quest was to become a multidisciplinary hospital providing health care to varied sections of the community in and around the city of Trivandrum. Sometimes we have walked in sunshine and sometimes in shadow. We built additional buildings and improved upon our facilities to keep pace with the latest advances in medical science and technology .Buildings and technology, however, do not become a hospital. A hospital has to provide love, care and protection. And, those ingredients can come only from a team of highly dedicated medical professionals and staff. We have been fortunate and blessed to also have the best team possible. My father (Late) P. Ratnaswamy was just an ordinary man, but with a great vision. It was his fondest dream to establish a hospital dedicated to ordinary people. Scenes and trends have changed a lot in the medi-care sector. But still we, the Team PRS Hospital, are committed to accomplish his noble dream in its true value. I can feel his dream come true, whenever I see the smile on the face of a patient after recovery, or from the heart-throbs of a family waiting outside the ICU, Operation Theatre or Labour Room. We also remain indebted to the unstinted support of the community that we care for. On this occasion of our Silver Jubilee, the PRS Hospital family re-dedicates itself to its objectives, mission and vision.

R. Murugan 19


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From the Desk of The Medical Administrator

With PRS Hospital coming closer to the valediction of its Silver Jubilee Celebrations, it is quite satisfying to turn back the pages of history to see the thousands of smiling faces. Over these years, delivery of quality healthcare service which is in line with the ‘Quality Policy’ of the organization has been the focus area at every level. We have a highly qualified and dedicated team of medical, administrative and support staff. The consultants in various departments are from among the cream of specialists in the city. With state-of-the-art technology and qualified and trained staff, we are able to offer world class services. This whole package, among other things, is what ensures a high and assured quality of service for everyone who visits this hospital. We are constantly improving on our plans to upgrade the services and facilities that the hospital offers, both in curative and preventive healthcare aspects. Wishing you good health at all times.

Dr. M.S. Thiruvarian MS 21


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Message

PRS Hospital has a proud heritage of serving the community for over 25 years. This multi speciality hospital with 250 beds serves the culturally diverse community of Thiruvananthapuram and as well as its adjoining border areas of Tamilnadu. The hospital has been growing exponentially, bringing state-of-the-art care to an always-increasing number of patients. The hospital is noted for its devotion to patients, its motivation to the achievement of excellence, and a very caring and collaborative spirit. On the occasion of its Silver Jubilee, we look forward yet again to improve our care and service to you.

Dr. R. Anandam MD, DM

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Vision

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PRS Hospital

It is the vision of PRS Hospital to become a centre of excellence for women, children and family health, education and research and to exceed patient expectations by providing highest quality and efficient patient care in a multi disciplinary setting.

Mission To provide quality health care to varied sections of the society at competitive cost.

Quality Policy It has been, and will be, the consistent endeavour of PRS Hospital to provide personalized “Quality Health Care Service - Care Like Only A Mother Can Give� - to patients of all sections of the community for achieving total satisfaction through: - Use of evidence based medicines & excellence in clinical outcomes. - Knowledge enhancement of our Clinicians, Staff & Patients. - Delivering superior customer/patient care service & complying with statutory / regulatory requirements. We believe in, and strive, to provide for the involvement of every member of our hospital to continually improve the effectiveness of our quality management system. This quality policy provides a frame work for establishing & reviewing our quality objectives for achieving continual improvement and sustained growth. 24

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SETTING STANDARDS IN CLINICAL EXCELLENCE PRS Group has successfully carved a niche for itself in the realms of medical field, through its prime project, PRS Hospital. The group strives to constantly improve, expand and grow this institution with a view to improve quality, as a result of which it has become a fast paced organisation characterised by steady growth from 1986 till today. From a very humble beginning in 1986 with only 10 doctors, 40 staff and 75 beds, today, it has grown into a very large organisation having more than 90 consultants, 30 junior doctors and over 500 staff. From a small mother and child hospital, it has become an hospital with more than 30 clinical departments. Presently, it has got the state-ofthe-art theatre complex, labour room, Cardiac ICU, Multi Disciplinary ICU (MDICU) and HDU, NICU, 24 hours casualty, ECG, Lab, 24 hours Blood Bank with components division, Dialysis unit, Imaging services (Digital X-ray, CT Scan & USG), Video EEG & EMG, etc. Some of the speciality services include Open Heart Surgery, round the clock Angioplasty, Endoscopic procedures, Knee and Hip surgery, Key Hole surgical procedures, ERCP, 3D Trans Esophageal Echo, Pace Maker implantation, Thoracoscopic procedures, Continuous Glucose monitoring, Ambulatory BP monitoring, painless delivery etc. To add feather to the cap, it had started running a nursing school, PRS School of Nursing, approved by the Kerala Nurses and Midwives Council with an average intake of 30 students in a year. In 2011, PRS College of Nursing was established with average intake of 40 students and having approval from Indian Nursing Council, Kerala Nursing Council and all other concerned authorities. In 2002 it was awarded the prestigious ISO 9001:2000 certification. The hospital was upgraded to the latest ISO 9001:2008 standards in 2011.

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A quick glance at the milestones in the history of PRS Hospital

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New Departments / New facilities

1986

The hospital was inaugurated on 7th Sept by the then Governor P. Ramachandran.

1986

Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology and Paediatrics started functioning in full swing.

1987

Departments of General Medicine, Ophthalmology, General Surgery and Orthopaedics were commenced.

1989

Departments of ENT, Physiotherapy and Dermatology were commissioned.

1990

Department of Cardiology with ICCU was started.

1991

Department of Plastic Surgery became operational.

1994

New Out-patient Block, Sophisticated operation theatre was completed.

1996

Department of Urology started functioning. New Intensive Care Unit was inaugurated.

1997

Chest & Allergy department operational.

1999

Cardio-thoracic and Vascular Surgery unit was commissioned.

2000

Neurology department started functioning.

2000

A new 175 bed capacity in-patient block was completed.

2001

PRS School of Nursing started functioning.

2002

Hospital obtained ISO 9001:2000 certification.

2002

The PRS Hospital Blood Bank was established.

2003

Department of Medical Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Unit started.

2006

Inauguration of Dual Slice Spiral CT Scan by Smt. Lizzie Jacob IAS.

2007

Department of Podiatric Surgery was started.

2007

PRS Cardiovascular Invasive (Cathlab) and Surgical unit was inaugurated (Aug 17) by Hon. Chief Minister of Kerala Shri. V.S. Achuthanandan.

2008

Administrative block was inaugurated on 15 Dec.

2009

Cardiac Cathlab Team completed 1000 angioplasties.

2009

The Blood Components Division of the PRS Blood Bank was inaugurated.

2009

ERCP was introduced in the Department of Medical Gastroenterology.

2010

A well equipped Department of Fertility was commissioned.

2010

Digital X-ray facility was made available (24 May).

2010

Thoracoscopy was introduced (12 May).

2010

Inauguration of the renovated Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) (27 Nov).

2010

Inauguration of Multi Disciplinary Intensive Care Unit (MDICU) and High Dependency Unit (Aug).

2011

Hospital obtained ISO 9001:2008 certification.

2011

PRS College of Nursing was established.

2011

Labour room complex was fully renovated and became functional with state-of-the-art facilities.

2011

On Nov 4th, the Silver Jubilee Year celebrations was launched in Trivandrum Club by the Chief Minister, Shri. Oommen Chandy in the presence of Health Minister, Shri . Adoor Prakash.

2011

PRS ICU got National Accreditation for the first time in South India. The Department of Critical Care Medicine was awarded the prestigious ISCCM (Indian Society of Critical Care Medicine).

2012

Sewage Treatment Plant was inaugurated on 2nd of July by the Chairman of Kerala State Pollution Control Board.

2012

Block 4 building and multilevel car parking constructions nearing completion.

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PRS Hospital Since 1986 Silver Jubilee Year The realization of the dream visualized 25 years back is reflected by the faith reposed in us by over 2.5 million satisfied patients. As we celebrate our Silver Jubilee Year, we realize that our growth and planning at every stage of our development has been in sync with the pulse and need of the common man. We reaffirm our dedication and commitment to the society. We constantly strive to uphold the trust and faith that has been placed on us by the public. More than ever before, it is now that we realize our increased responsibility and commitment to the society that has placed absolute trust and faith in us. It therefore remains our obligation and duty to acknowledge and express our gratitude to the city which has accepted us with open arms, wholeheartedly and unconditionally. PRS Hospital staff and management planned a year long calendar of activities including free medical camps, adoption of residential zones, cultural programs, honouring doctors and staff who have rendered 20 years or more of continuous service, etc. In its Silver Jubilee Year, the management of PRS Hospital formed a charitable trust, “PRS Charities”, with the primary objective to assist patients who need financial assistance due to economic and other reasons. The Hospital’s Silver Jubilee Celebrations was inaugurated on Nov 3, 2011, by the Hon. Chief Minister of Kerala, Shri. Oommen Chandy.

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Inaugural Function of The Silver Jubilee Year Celebrations The Silver Jubilee Celebrations of PRS Hospital was officially inaugurated on Thursday, the 3 of November 2011 at Shri. P. Subramoniam Hall, Vazhuthacaud, Thiruvananthapuram by the rd

Hon. Chief Minister of Kerala Shri. Oommen Chandy. Shri. Adoor Prakash, the then Hon. Minister for Health & Coir was the Guest of Honour. Shri. Thampanoor Ravi, Ex-MLA and Smt. S. Pushpalatha, Councillor and Chairperson Health Standing Committee, Corporation of Thiruvananthapuram offered felicitations. Hon. Minister Shri. Adoor Prakash released the hospital’s Silver Jubilee brochure by handing over the first copy to Smt. S. Pushpalatha.

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Silver Jubilee Service Projects Initiated by PRS Charities Free Dialysis for 25 patients for a period of one year The number of patients with chronic kidney diseases and who require dialysis/transplant is steadily on the rise, like an epidemic. This is because some of the major causative factors for kidney disease like diabetes and hypertension (lifestyle related disorders) are on the rise. The treatment is expensive, and patients with chronic/permanent kidney failure are required to spend between ` 10,000/- and ` 15,000/- every month. This is a matter of serious concern for a developing country like India. The management of PRS Hospital initiated a project to provide free dialysis to 25 patients for one whole year. Many economically deserving patients requiring dialysis who come to PRS hospital for treatment were benefited from this project. Dr. Geetha M. Nair, MD, Chief Consultant Nephrologist of PRS Hospital spearheaded this project.

Free Cardiac Surgeries in association with Voluntary Organizations for 250 patients Statistics reveal that everyday as many as 110 people in Kerala die of some cardiac related problem. Cardiac procedures are highly expensive, to the extent that a cardiac surgery has a negative impact not only on the health of the patient and his family, but also their financial resources. The management realizes that saving one person in the family, will probably save the entire family. With this noble cause, a service project was initiated for free cardiac procedures including bypass surgeries in association with voluntary organizations for 250 economically deserving patients, and in turn, 250 families. This project is under the able leadership of Chief Consultant Cardiothoracic Surgeon of PRS Hospital, Dr. Y.A. Nazer MS; MCh. 29

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Adoption of Nedungad Corporation Ward for Free Health Screening and Medical Consultation PRS Hospital is situated in Nedungad Ward, Corporation of Thiruvananthapuram. Therefore, it is only appropriate that this ward was chosen by the management for health assessment studies. This project was initiated on 2nd of October, 2011 and PRS School of Nursing students were designated to visit the 4000 families of this ward with a population of 10,900 people and collect their health statistics. The students gave health awareness to the families while visiting their homes and conducting this assessment survey. Under this project, all members of this ward were issued PRS Hospital Health Assessment cards. The aim of this project was to identify disease patterns as well as health parameters of the families in Nedungad ward. The statistics generated were subjected to analysis by the competent team of PRS doctors and professionals. Those individuals who were identified with potential to develop diseases in future were guided on preventive care and those already having health problems will be given medical care at PRS Hospital on priority.

Financial Assistance to Regional Cancer Centre “Patient Welfare Fund” The Regional Cancer Centre (RCC), Thiruvananthapuram, was established in 1981 by the Government of Kerala and Government of India. It provides comprehensive cancer care catering to the population of the State of Kerala and the adjoining parts of Tamil Nadu and Karnataka. From a modest beginning, the Regional Cancer Centre has evolved into an internationally recognised centre for conducting a wide range of cancer research and providing state-of-the-art facilities for cancer diagnosis, treatment, palliation and rehabilitation. As most of the patients who come to this centre as their last resort and only hope belong to lower socio-economic strata, the centre has taken initiative to financially assist them through the well organized “Patient Welfare Fund”. This fund receives contributions from like minded organizations and philanthropists to achieve its goal of patient care to all. In its Silver Jubilee Year, the PRS management contributed ` One lakh to the “Patient Welfare Fund” of Regional Cancer Centre. 30

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Prs Hospital Silver Jubilee Continuing Medical Education (CME) Series CME programs help doctors and those in the medical field to maintain competence and learn about new and developing areas of their field. It was an excellent opportunity for our doctors to continue their learning by meeting with their peers. To this end, the CMEs organized by the various departments of PRS Hospital were designed to provide the most up to date information for our consultant doctors. The details of the CMEs conducted during the Silver Jubilee Year are as follows: Name of the Department Date Venue Critical Care Medicine Critical Care Medicine Critical Care Medicine Critical Care Medicine Critical Care Medicine Critical Care Medicine Critical Care Medicine Critical Care Medicine Critical Care Medicine Cardiology Urology Anaesthesia Obstetrics & Gynaecology Paediatrics Nephrology and Urology

29.03.2011 25.04.2011 26.05.2011 14.06.2011 21.06.2011 29.07.2011 29.08.2011 20.09.2011 29.01.2012 04.03.2012 30.03.2012 21.04.2012 16.06.2012 28.07.2012 23.08.2012

Hotel Residency Towers Hotel Residency Towers Hotel Residency Towers Hotel Residency Towers Hotel Residency Towers Hotel Horizon Hotel Classic Avenue Hotel Residency Towers Hotel Taj Vivanta Hotel Taj Vivanta Hotel SP Grand Days Hotel SP Grand Days Hotel Residency Towers Hotel Taj Vivanta Hotel Taj Vivanta

PRS Hospital management congratulates and appreciates all doctors and staff who took an active interest in organizing these academic programmes so successfully. The Paediatrics CME at Taj Vivanta

The Critical Care Medicine CME at Taj Vivanta

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Free Medical Camps

Held in Connection with The Silver Jubilee Celebrations of PRS Hospital World Heart Day Camp

29.09.2011

Cardiac & General Medicine Camp

23.10.2011

Diabetic Camp

14.11.2011

Nephrology Camp

02.12.2011

Medical Camp

22.04.2012

Realising the important role played by medical camps in extending medical help to the economically weaker sections of the society, PRS Hospital has been holding free medical camps on a regular basis. In its Silver Jubilee year also, PRS Hospital held several free medical camps, to serve the needy poor people. Free medical advice and medicines were provided to those who attended the camps. Several people especially from the lower income groups and those without medical insurance facilities were benefitted from these camps.

Doctors and nurses volunteering their services at Nedungad Ward, adopted by PRS Hospital in its Silver Jubilee Year.

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One day Picnics for Staff The Hospital Management, as part of the Silver Jubilee Celebrations, decided to organize one-day picnic for the staff. Hence three picnics were organized to enable maximum participation of the staff, first in October 2011, second in November 2011 and the third in January 2012. The expenses for the trip like the luxury coach and entry tickets for the picnic spots were borne by the Management. A maximum of 48 adults could be accommodated in the coach. The staff were permitted to bring their children below 10 years.

K. Perumal

The picnic was on 23rd October 2011 and the luxury coach with audio/video facility started from the hospital at 7:00 am. The first stop was at Mathur Thotti Palam at Thiruvattar, Tamil Nadu. This is the tallest as well as the longest trough bridge in Asia - height of 101 feet and length of 1 km. The canal on the bridge carries water from one side of a hill to the other side and was built in 1966. The participants enjoyed the breathtaking scenery of the mountains and the river down below. The second stop was at Thriparappu waterfalls. Here the water is falling down from a height of 50 feet, there is a small park for children and also a temple next to the waterfalls. The staff had bath in the waterfalls. After lunch, the final stop was at Kanyakumari. The staff visited the Vivekananda Mandapam and Thiruvalluvar statue. The Vivekananda Rock Memorial consists of two main structures - (1) Vivekananda Mandapam and (2) Shripada Mandapam. The Thiruvalluvar Statue stands tall at 133 feet. It was constructed on a rock and strong enough to withstand the rough weather and sea. Mr. Hariharan, Proprietor and Mr. Lakshmi Narayanan, General Manager of Hotel Sagar, who are related to our management were very helpful in Kanyakumari. The staff enjoyed the boat journey and the scenery. The spent about one hour for the shopping at Kanyakumari. In the first picnic the participants were taken to Padmanabhapuram Palace also. But due to paucity of time, same was not included in the second and the third picnic. Also, in the second picnic, the staff could not take the boat trip to Vivekananda Rock Memorial and Thiruvalluvar Statue, due to very rough weather. Needless to say, all the staff, who participated in the three picnics, enjoyed this outing from their hectic work schedule. The bus trip was lively with their songs and dances. All the staff were very appreciative of this nice gesture of the Management; while expressing their gratitude, they expressed their desire for continuation of the picnics every year.

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PRS Hospital Sports Day Celebrations For the first time in the history of PRS Hospital the management and staff jointly decided to hold a Sports Day for doctors and staff members. A sports committee was constituted and the members actively involved in organising the various competitions. Central Stadium was the venue for the sports on Saturday, the 14th July 2012. Shri. V. Sivankutty MLA inaugurated the Sports Day Celebrations by hoisting the Flag. Members of the management as well as doctors were present for the inauguration and throughout the day. A well co-ordinated marchpast and the music band by children of Kalyan School added colour to the inaugural function. Separate competitions were held for different age groups: below 30, 40-50 and above 50 years of age. Doctors and staff enthusiastically participated in various competitions like Long Jump, Shot Put, Javelin Throw, Relay Race, 100 and 200 mt Race, Discus Throw, Slow Bike Racing, Tug of War etc. It was really great to witness doctors and staff actively participating, without any inhibitions and enjoying every moment of the sports day. The day concluded with the ceremonial lowering of the flag by the Medical Administrator.

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Pookkalam Competition at PRS Hospital Onam 2012 was very special to PRS Hospital staff, being the Silver Jubilee Year. Doctors and staff volunteered to organise a pookkalam competition on 19th of August 2012. As many as 17 teams participated. Only natural flowers and leaves were used to create the beautiful pookkalams. A judging panel consisting of doctors gave their judgement. All participants enjoyed the process of creating the floral carpets. It was a great way to usher in the Onam festivities.

Administration, Accounts & HR

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Pookkalams designed & laid by various departments/units

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Biochemistry lab

Biomedical Dept.

Dietetics

Electrical Dept.

ICCU

Labour Room

Medical Store & Blood Bank

Nursing Dept.

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Cathlab

Dialysis Unit

Front Office

Haematology Lab

MDICU

Medical Records Dept.

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OP Department

OT & POW

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Painting Competition for Children of Doctors & Staff A painting competition for children of doctors and staff was held on 08.07.2012 between 9.30 am and 10.30 am at the hospital Auditorium. Separate competitions were conducted for two age groups: 0-7 & 8-15 years. The 0-7 group was allowed to draw any picture of their interest. The 8-15 age group was given a topic “Prevention of Pollution�. Shri. R.S. Madhu, the renowned artist, kindly consented to be the judge. He was personally present throughout the competition and gave his valuable judgment and advice. In all, 34 children participated in the competition. All the children who participated were given gifts as a token of appreciation. I,II,III and consolation prizes were identified. The cultural committee received huge response from doctors and staff alike, who showed active interest in getting their children to participate in the competition. The committee would like to thank all staff members of PRS Hospital for their co-operation in making this event a grand success.

Arya Madhu, D/o. Deepa (IP Reception)

Parvathy Krishnan, D/o Dr. Santhosh(Interventional Cardiologist)

Sravya Raman, D/o Mayadevi L (OP Reception)

Sooraj .S.S, S/o Sreeja (Office)

Nanditha, D/o Dr. R. Deepa

Alen R. Subhash, S/o Resmi Wills (Dialysis)

Keerthana .L, D/o Sreedevi (Laboratory)

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Gouthami S.S, D/o Santhosh (Store)

Abhinav Krishna, S/o Sajitha M.N (Nursing)


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Milestones in our growth

Inauguration of PRS Hospital on 7th September, 1986 by the then Governor Late P. Ramachandran.

The beginning was from a small Mother and child hospital with 75 beds.

Departments of General Medicine, Ophthalmology, General Surgery and Orthopaedics were started in 1987. 42


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Milestones in our growth

The first Operating Room (1987).

Departments of ENT, Physiotherapy and Dermatology were commissioned in 1989.

A brand new Operation Theatre Complex was completed in 1994 43


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Milestones in our growth

10th Anniversary Celebrations of the Hospital in 1996.

Construction of 5th Floor of Block 2 was completed in 2000.

Smt. Krishnammal Ratnaswamy receiving the ISO 9001:2000 Certification from Shri. K. Karunakaran in 2002. 44


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Milestones in our growth

Inauguration of PRS Blood Bank by Shri. Gokuldas on 12th February, 2003.

In 2004, ‘The Week’ listed PRS Hospital as one of the best hospitals in India.

Smt. Lizzie Jacob IAS inaugurated the Block 3 CT Scan Unit, Out Patient Registration Hall and Pharmacy Extension Counter in 2006.

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Milestones in our growth

20th Anniversary of the Hospital was celebrated in 2006.

In 2007 Shri. V.S. Achuthanandan inaugurated the Cardiovascular Invasive (Cathlab) and Surgical Unit.

On December 15th 2008 the first Phase of Block 4 was inaugurated.

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Milestones in our growth

Cardiac Cathlab Team completed 1000 Angioplasties in 2009.

In 2009 Blood Components Division of the PRS Blood Bank was inaugurated by Padmashri Dr. M. Krishnan Nair.

Inauguration of the newly renovated NICU by Dr. Sabarinath in 2011. 47


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Milestones in our growth

State-of-the-art Multidisciplinary Intensive Care Unit (MDICU) and High Dependency Unit (HDU) was inaugurated in 2010.

The Hospital obtained ISO 9001:2008 Certification in 2011

Inauguration of the newly renovated Labour Room Complex in 2011 48


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Block 3 OP Registration Hall Block 3 OP Pharmacy

Paediatric General Ward

State-of-the-art Operation Theatre

Well equipped laboratories

CT Scan

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Inauguration of Silver Jubilee Celebrations Date : 3rd November, 2011 Venue : P. Subramaniom Hall, Vazhuthacaud, Tvpm.

Hon. Chief Minister of Kerala, Shri. Oommen Chandy lighting the traditional lamp and inaugurating the Silver Jubilee Celebrations in the presence of Hon. Minister for Health and Coir, Shri. Adoor Prakash, Shri. Thampanoor Revi, Ex-MLA, Smt. Pushpalatha, Councillor, Er. R. Murugan, Dr. M.S. Thiruvarian MS, Dr. R. Anandam and Er. Sabari Rathen on 3rd November 2011. 50


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Lighter Moments

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Congratulations

Doctors who completed 20-25 years of service were honoured at the Inaugural Function Dr.(Mrs) Rajeswari Balakrishnan BSc; Mbbs; Md; Dgo

Senior Gynaecologist

Dr. Snehapalan V BSc; Mbbs;Md;Dch

Chief Consultant Paediatrician

Dr. Josemon Thomas Md

Chief Physician

Dr. S. Subramoniam Mbbs;Dlo

Chief Ent Surgeon

Dr. (Mrs)Komalam Kumar Mbbs;Dgo

Senior Consultant Gynaecologist

Dr. D.s. Mohan Md

Senior Consultant Physician

Dr. Tiny Nair Md;Dm;Facc

Chief Cardiologist

Capt(Dr)George Selvaraj Mbbs;Ms(Ortho)Amc(Retd)

Chief Consultant in Orthopaedics

Dr.(Mrs) Asha Kumar Mbbs;Ms;Dlo:dip Nb Chief Ent Surgeon

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Dr.(Mrs)Mallika Cherian Md;Dgo(Retd.)

Senior Consultant Gynaecologist

Dr.R.N.Ramesh Mbbs.Dmrd

Senior Consultant Radiologist and Sonologist

Dr.(Mrs) Usha G Mbbs

Assistant Medical Officer

Dr.(Mrs) Parvathy S Mbbs

Assistant Medical Officer


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Staff who completed 25 years of service were honoured Nagarajan R Visalakshy S Vijayalekshmi S Pitchammal .A Ambika .S.R. Prabha Kumari .S Rajasree .V.C Ushakumari .K Indira Amma .R Kalavally .M Krishnamma .C

Senior Attender Secretary - Dept. of Ultra Sound Scan Senior Nursing Assistant & Assistant OT Co-ordinator Store Assistant Nursing Assistant Nursing Assistant Nursing Assistant Nursing Assistant Hospital Aid Hospital Aid Housekeeping

Saraswathy .M Sankaravel .A Sreekumari .V Sumangi .V

Housekeeping Senior Accountant Senior Endoscopic Assistant Housekeeping

Staff who completed 20 years of service were also honoured Jayasree .S

Nursing Assistant

Ushakumari .L

Hospital Aid

Geethamony .S

Nursing Assistant

Renjitham Raju .D

Matron-Operation Theatre

Vasanthakumari .L

Hospital Aid

Pushpalekha .A

Senior Laboratory Technician

Sudharsan .K

Operation Theatre Mechanic

Mary Stephen .L

House-Keeping

Vijayakumaran Nair .M Senior Electrician

Valsala .C

X-Ray Unit In-Charge

Usha .P

House-Keeping

Lathambika .S

Public Relations Officer

Dileepkumar .S

Front Office Manager

Valsalakumari .T

Nursing Assistant

Syamala .S

Nursing Assistant

Susamma Thomas

Laboratory In-Charge

Bharathy .V

Manager Accounts

Renugadevi .S

Nursing Assistant

Sreekala .S

Manager Billing

Ushakumari .T

Nursing Assistant

Saraswathy Amma .K

House-Keeping

Baby .S

House-Keeping Executive

Harikumar .R.P

H R Manager

Latha .S

Hospital Aid

Maya .P.N

Nursing Assistant

Nandakumar .B

Nursing Assistant

Rajalekshmi .S

Nursing Assistant

Sobhana .R

House-Keeping

Anithakumari K.O

Senior Receptionist

Sasikala .B

Stores In-Charge (General Store)

Sreelatha .S

Hospital Aid

Bindhulekha .S

Nursing Assistant

Leelamma .G

Nursing Assistant

Geetha .T

Senior Pharmacy Aid

Rajan Chanda Pilla Assistant General Manager (Accounts)

Bindhum

X-Ray Technician

Padmakumari P.V

Senior Laboratory Technician

Mercy Belson

Lekshmy Perumal

Assistant Manager

Nursing Assistant

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Doctors who have completed 15-20 years of service Dr. P.V. Aysha

MBBS,MD,DGO

Consultant Gynaecologist

Dr. N. Gopakumar

MS,M.Ch(Urology) FEBU

Consultant Urologist

Dr. C.S. Krishnan Nair

MBBS;MS (Gen.Surgery)

Senior Consultant Surgeon

Dr. D. Mathew

MBBS,DO, DO(RCP&S), MC.Oph: FAMS

Consultant Ophthalmologist

Dr. K. Rajagopal

MBBS,DVD

Consultant Dermatologist

Dr. T.J. Remadevi

MBBS,MD,DNB

Consultant Dermatologist

Dr. V.G. Suresh

MBBS,DA,DFM

Consultant Anaesthetist

Dr. P.R. SyamKumar

MBBS

Registrar in Orthopaedics

Dr. K.M. Umadevi

MBBS

Assistant Medical Officer

Dr. Manimozhi Ilangovan MBBS

Junior Medical Officer

Dr. J. Padmakumar

Senior Consultant Plastic Surgeon & Reconstructive Surgeon

MBBS,MS (Gen.Surgery)M.Ch (Plastic Surgery)

Staff who have completed 15-20 years of service Latha M A

Assistant Manager

Shaji R

Hospital Aid

Sobhakumari S

Senior Receptionist/Secretary

Jayalekshmi K J

Hospital Aid

Beenu K N

Senior Front Office Executive

Remani G

Hospital Aid

Jayalekshmi S

House Keeping Executive

Santhakumari K R

Hospital Aid

Santhi M

Front Office Executive

Sreedevi B

Nursing Assistant

Padmavathy Ammal K Front Office Executive

Bindhu B S

Nursing Assistant

Mayadevi P S

Computer Operator

Kumari Shobitha S

Nursing Assistant

Anithakumari S

Cleaner

Manjusha R

Nursing Assistant

Baby C

Cleaner

Lathika K

Nursing Assistant

Santha G

Cleaner

Remanikumari R

Nursing Assistant

Meena L

Cleaner

Savithri I

Nursing Assistant

Manjula C R

Deputy Nursing Superintendent

Resmi V

Nursing Assistant

Meera P S

Staff Nurse

Sujatha V

Nursing Assistant

Bindhu P

Staff Nurse

SanthiKumari A

Lab Technician

Bindhu Vijayan S V

ANM

Anitha G

Lab Technician

Prabhakumari S

ANM

Ushakumari M

Lab Technician

Sherly R V

ANM

Mary Bindhu P V

Lab Technician

Sushama P

ANM

Sreejakumari C

Pharmacy Co-ordinator

Girijadevi S

Hospital Aid

Jayakumari P T

Records Assistant

Soudhamini J

Hospital Aid

Jayakumari N R

House Keeping Supervisor

Deepa R

Hospital Aid

Biju S

Driver

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& s e l t i T “Lost ” s e m y h R n e t t o Forg m o r f y g o l o h t n A n A H S R P m Tea

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My Story

Dr. Tiny Nair. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59

Musings from the Dialysis Room......

Dr. (Mrs) Geetha M Nair .. . . . . . . . . . . . 60

kz]v\w

tUm. Zo-]p.F . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61

God is Great

Dr. Mrs. R. Anandam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62

Glimpses through the story of Urology

Dr. N. Gopakumar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64

They too have the right to live in this world

Mrs. Priya Balan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66

kwXr]vXn

{ioaXn ]pjv-]-te-J. F . . . . . . . . . . . . 71

Diet for Hospital Staff

Mrs. Miny Mary Prakash . . . . . . . . . . . .

A Magical 25 years!

Dr. Mithun Rathen Murugan. . . . . . . . . . . 74

Usilampatty Penkutty

Dr. Subramoniam S . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Fsâ A½bv¡v

{ioaXn knan BÀ. N-{µ-³ . . . . . . . . . . . 77

More than a mother can

Dr. Anju Deepak Unnithan. . . . . . . . . . . . 78

]rY-zn-bpsS s\m¼cw / cm[mam\kw

{ioaXn ]ßIp-am-cn ]n.hn.. . . . . . . . . . . 80

An Unforgettable Journey

Mrs. Susamma Thomas. . . . . . . . . . . . . 81

The PRO Speaks....

Mrs. Anitha Manomohan. . . . . . . . . . . . 82

An Accident - A Blessing in Disguise

Mrs. Lekshmy Perumal. . . . . . . . . . . . . 83

HmÀ½-bn ambmsX

{ioaXn Cµp-teJ .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84

Btcm-K-y-cw-Ks¯ C¶-se-Ifpw \msfbpw

tUm. BÀ. A-\p]a . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85

hnt\m-Z-bm{X: Po-hn-X-¯n-se a-t\m-l-cam-b H-cp Znhkw

{ioaXn tacn Fw.sP. .. . . . . . . . . . . . 86

A journey through the history of blood transfusion

Prof. Dr. V.E. Krishna Mohan. . . . . . . . . . . 87

Organ Sharing - Myths and Facts

Dr. R. Deepa. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88

Bgv¨h« kvac-W-IÄ

s{]m-^. tUm. hn.C. Ir-jv-W-tam-l³ .. . . . . . 90

tcmKw Hcp Ipä-amtWm?

{io. _me³ Xn-cpa-e . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92

72 75

Db-c-§-fn-te¡v {ioaXn kqk-½ tXmakv.. . . . . . . . . . . 96 58


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Dr. Tiny Nair MD,DM,FACC

Chief Consultant Cardiologist

I can’t walk. Not only me but my entire clan. May be it is genetic. Most of my work is philanthropy - helping people in distress. But that’s not the problem now. The present problem is I don’t get enough sleep. May be because of my roadside location, may be the sound of traffic and wailing 108 ambulances or may be the number of people who walk around the place where I live and grew up. Particularly the 108, the siren of the ambulance makes me feel tense, I just pray that nothing bad should happen. But believe me, it was not so 20 years ago. Of course I was much young then. May be the locality was less busy, I was young and people did not need my help. I hear people lose sleep as they grow old. But I think this sleep problem was there ever since I was born, may be less in intensity. May be it is in my upbringing. I was born in the suburbs, in an area which grew paddy. My parents decided to settle there since the land there was cheap. At that time it did not really look like a part of city at all, but the air was fresh, with a smell of unadulterated nature. It seems after my birth my parents were not very sure whether I will survive at all, but I hear that’s what happens in most Indian families. Anyway, I grew up. My father was really fond of me. He was a busy person, did many things. I don’t know what was his major activity, but he did a little of everything. But I am sure he did good for lot of people, because even as a child I could see so many people come and bless my father for all the help he did for them. He was a busy man, but every evening, after he finished his work, he used to come and sit in front of me, not to play with me, not to pet me, but just sit quite and watch me. I don’t know what pleasure he got by just looking at me, but you know parents are like that. At that time I had promised myself that I would never fail him, I would attain much in life, more than what he ever dreamt of. I did that finally, but that came later. By then he was no more. I think at this time I should

tell you that I have a problem, I cannot move. You may call me handicapped or whatever but I don’t mind I have never tried a wheel chair, I think that’s not possible, but I cant move even at the age of 25. Friends and well wishers come to me. I help people. I try talking to people, But most people are unable to understand me. Initially I had few friends, but later I did get some, Cos Paul, Jiji, Suthy were more like me. (excuse me if names are not spelt properly, I am bad with spellings, I really never went to school).My friends were all born in very wealthy families, Everyone knew that they had much brighter future than me, right from the beginning they understood maths and commerce more than me. People used to laugh at me for being philanthropic and foolish. I believe that my humble beginning did help me. Then there was Chitra, with whom I had a close relation. I hear that she was almost like a daughter to my father and she considered him as a god father. But I was too small in stature even to talk to her. But you know what ? When my father was sick, Chitra wanted him to be with her, but he refused, inspite of my humble stature and lack of style. Do bless me if you pass by. I only pray that you live in good health. But any time you need me I am there, without the pomp and style, without the flashy dress. The paddy fields around me would have gone but I could still breathe the fresh air. I am happy when I see children being born and take their first breath, I cry silently when a son grieves his parent’s death, I am confused when the son says he doesn’t want to spend money for his father’s treatment. I am PRS Hospital. I wish all my acquaintances a bright future PS: I got my friends names corrected. Cos Paul - Cosmopolitan Hospital Jiji - GG Hospital Suthy - SUT Hospital Chitra - Sree Chitra Medical Centre. tinynair@gmail.com 59


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Musings from The Dialysis Room... Dr. (Mrs) Geetha M Nair

MD, DM

Consultant Nephrologist

One day in the early February of 2007, a pleasant, handsome gentleman walked into my OPD. He introduced himself as Fr. Daniel John (name changed) practising in UK. He was accompanied by his wife, an energetic young lady working as staff nurse in UK, and their two kids, 6 years and 3 months old respectively. They were like any normal young bubbling family you would come across at shopping malls, cinema halls and restaurants. After evaluation, Fr. Daniel was diagnosed with end stage kidney failure requiring haemodialysis regularly, followed by kidney transplantation. Once the diagnosis was made, his relatives comprising of brothers, uncles and in-laws met me and enquired about the prognosis. Subsequently, I started getting repeated anxious telephone enquiries about diet, life style, complications of dialysis etc. The entire family was highly supportive and was actively involved in slotting dialysis schedules, suggesting more frequent sessions so as to keep the blood parameter as close to normal as possible. They even knew his dietary pattern by heart. After a couple of dialysis sessions over 3-4 days as in-patient and creation of arterio venous access for continuing maintenance dialysis as out-patient, Fr. Daniel was discharged. Unfortunately, the story was not destined to be hunky-dory. Miseries were slowly closing in on him. The couple had no constant source of income and the maintenance dialysis with regular medication would easily cost around `10,000 to `15000 per month. Support systems offered by the friends and relatives started tapering off. After 6-8 months the couple was practically left on their own with no financial source to sustain continued treatment. Many a patient is forced to confront the same problem and there is even a saying during the rounds in the nephrology circles that kidney failure and financial crunch go hand in hand, especially among common people. Fr. Daniel was offered a referral to the Medical College Hospital to be put on its maintenance dialysis scheme but he chose not to exercise this option. This again is a common feature as the patients usually develop a good rapport with the members of staff of the dialysis unit of the hospital, whom they consider as an extended family, and fear that a change in the setting may bring bad tidings. Soon Fr. Daniel’s relatives disowned him in all respects. Finally to support her ailing husband and two kids, Mrs. Daniel John decided to go back to UK. She put their three month old baby in the care of her mother who lived in central Kerala and sent her six year old elder daughter to a boarding school in the suburbs of Trivandrum city. Fr. Daniel moved to a lodge and hired a local to take care of him. The entire family was scattered. The mental image of the young family that walked into my OPD a year back was no longer colourful and complete, but was ochre-tinged and disintegrated. The separation shattered Fr. Daniel and he 60


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kz]v\w tUm. Zo-]p.F

I¬-kÄ«â v ^n-knjy³ & U-b-_-täm-f-Pn-kväv

became mentally and physically unstable. I remember him coming in autorickshaw every night to the hospital, demanding dialysis even though he was not in need of it and used to sleep in the chairs outside the unit with some sort of impending fear of death. Ironically, after a few days he did not turn up for the scheduled dialysis sessions and there was no trace of him for about three weeks. I came to know that he was no more. Apparently, discontinuation of dialysis proved fatal to him. This is not an isolated case. Right from my postgraduate days in 2001 at MCH, Trivandrum, through my days as consultant at EMS hospital, Perinthalmanna to my present position at PRS hospital, I have come across umpteen similar instances. I presume my fellow nephrologists also have had same experiences. It was in this context that we proposed to the management of PRS hospital to take initiatives for the care of such needy patients pushed into the abyss of desperation. There is a general perception that the private sector is profit oriented and would always endeavour to maximize the

X\p-hn-se§pw IpfncptImcpw Zn\-§-sfm-¶n X\n¨p Rms\mcp ac-¨p-h-«n I\ep Iq«p¶p. I\-se-cnª s\©n-\p-Ån IhnX s]¿p-t¼mÄ Hcp a[p-c-Km-\-hp-ambv Hcp-h-sf-¯p-¶p. Hcp--Nn-cnbm Np≠nset§m Icp-Xn-sh-¨-hÄ IS-angn X³ tImWn-ses¶ XS-hn-em-¡p-¶p. ASp-¯n-cp-¯m-\-hsf DÅn XnSp-¡-ta-dp-¶p. hgn-a-d¶ ]Yn-I-\m-sb³ angn-b-e-bp-¶p. ]Xnsb s\©n-\-I-¯-f-¯n DXnÀ¶ taml-¯n³ sNdp-a-Wn-IÄ Km\-ambm sNhn-bn-temXo Rm³ Nncn-bS¡n apJapbÀ¯n AhÄ samgnbp-¶p. hcn-I- kz]v\temI-sasâ Acn-In-ep-≠tÃm DS-en-f¡n ]ns¶-b-hÄ Deªp \o§p¶p aXn-a-d¶p Rm\p-atX hgn-bn \o§p-¶p. HSp-hn-se¯o hn{`-a-¯n³ sImSpap-Sn-bn Rm³ Ah-sf-\n-¡mbv Hcp-¡n-sh¨q [hfi¿-IÄ ]cn-N-cn-¡m-\m-bn-c-ap-≠-cnsI tXmgn-IÄ hnc-e-\¡w sRmSn-bn-se¯q kpc-h-[q-Sn-IÄ ae-b-am-cp-Xsâ aW-a-en-ªq-hm-bp-hn aZ-P-e-¯n³ IWsamgpIo ac-\n-c-IÄ ]qhp-S-em AhÄ XoÀ¯ kz]v\-i-¿-bn ]qÀÆ P·-]p-Wy-saÃmw ]pÂIn-btÃm Rm³ ]ncn-ªn-Sp-hm³ t\c-sa¶v ]d-ª-hÄ t]mbn \nd-\n-em-hn-sem-gpIn \o§pw \nd-ª-ta-L-ambv angn-Xp-d-¶o-a-c-¨p-h-«n X\n-¨n-cn¸q Rm³ apI-fn-se§pw Xmc-I-§Ä Nncn-s]m-gn-¡p¶p. revenue streams. However, the hospital management was extremely receptive and permitted me to offer a discounted rate for the extremely deserving patients. During the silver jubilee celebrations of the hospital I was pleasantly surprised when the management on its own mooted the idea of totally free dialysis for the neediest 25 patients. This has proved to be a real boon to many patients though we do have an onerous task in determining the neediest 25 patients. The facility has been judiciously extended and as on date around 250 dialysis per month are now being done free of cost, and concession rates are given to the needy. I consider this initiative as one of the most satisfying moments in my professional life. Further, we are contemplating the idea of extending this benefit to a larger number of patients by broad-basing the funding streams using a charitable foundation and I do hope that we would be able to appeal to the civil society and philanthropists to associate with us and make this a more meaningful and permanent arrangement. 61


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God is Great Dr. Mrs. R. Anandam

MD, D.CH, DM (Neuro)

Consultant Neurologist & Partner

It is a known fact that adequate medical knowledge, experience in a well established hospital, senior doctors to guide, a good supporting family and above all of God’s blessings in the form of good luck are the major factors that go to the moulding of an able and successful doctor. Most often I quote this sentence “God is Great” when I achieve something, when I tide over a situation, when I make a perfect diagnosis, when my dangerously ill patient makes a good recovery from his / her illness and thus my list goes on . At times, some force beyond your clinical experience and knowledge guides you through to make a correct diagnosis at the spur of moment, to prescribe a particular investigation and to choose an appropriate drug to treat a patient. Later you may wonder what made you take such a decision. I had experienced this situation many a time in my medical practice. I feel that my Obstetric colleagues have lot of intuitions when they undertake the delivery of a newborn into this world I would like to site a few interesting incidents that happened during my medical practice spanning almost 4 decades. I started my career as a Paediatrician in 1973 and my first appointment was in VSSC in Trivandrum. In 1974, a twenty day old male baby was brought to me in VSSC clinic by parents with a history of prolonged jaundice and constipation with hoarse cry. I could make a clinical diagnosis of Cretinism (hypothyroidism) without any difficulty. I wanted to do Thyroid function tests immediately. Those days there were no private labs who could do that test. I became panicky, as any delay in starting the course of Thyroxin may result in the baby becoming mentally retarded for the rest of his 62

life. I referred him to S A T Hospital to do the Thyroid function tests and asked them to bring him for review as early as possible. After about two months, they came to me without doing the blood tests or starting Thyroxin. I started the baby immediately on Thyroxin without waiting for Thyroid function tests and demanded an explanation for the delay in coming back for the review. Subsequently I did the TFT to monitor the dosage. He improved dramatically. He was under my care for a few years. Parents named him Anand and his development and intelligence were normal. I didn’t see him later, but he continued treatment. Few years ago, one young man came to my room in P R S Hospital with a box of Swiss chocolates to invite me for his wedding. He was Mr. Anand accompanied by his parents. He has become a software Engineer, working at Bangalore and had gone to UK for some training and that box of chocolates was from UK, he said. I was jubilant. I said “God is great!, you are perfectly normal now” with lot of happiness and gratitude. I attended his marriage and blessed the couple. I left VSSC in 1975, when I got a Tutor post in S A T Hospital and started my career in Paediatrics and later in Paediatric Neurology and I could establish the first Dept. of Paediatric Neurology in Kerala state. In 1980, while I was serving day duty in S A T Hospital, one mother came to outpatient department and handed over a 3 month old male baby to nearby patient’s mother and told that she would come soon and requested her to take care of the baby for a little while. But that mother did not turn up at all. This incident created a lot of panic in the outpatient department and baby was transferred to ward No. III in a cradle in the nurses room. I had the


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responsibility of informing the Medical Superintendent and the Child Welfare Council that there was an abandoned baby. I examined the baby in detail and next day morning the baby was transferred to Child Welfare Council at Thycaud, Tvpm. Even after coming home, the child’s picture lingered in my mind and I suddenly remembered about a childless couple who wanted to adopt a child. Incidentally, I was a visiting consultant to Child Welfare Council on all Saturday afternoons. I used to run an outpatient clinic for children for immunization, child care etc. and also used to make rounds to see the health status of those unfortunate, abandoned babies who were inmates in Child Welfare Council. Those days, adoption was easier, couples could just go and choose the baby they wanted. Fair girl babies and boy babies were in great demand during those days ! I contacted the couple over phone and told them about this male baby whom I have transferred from SAT hospital. The couple rushed to the Child Welfare Council, saw the child and agreed to adopt. Every procedure happened swiftly. I could get a medical certificate to ascertain the infertility of husband and wife. I had to approach a lawyer (my classmate’s father) to issue an affidavit stating that whatever assets the couple had, would go to this adopted child. Procedures for adoption were hastened and after about eight months the couple got the same male baby transferred from SAT hospital. That baby was lucky. Parents looked after him like a prince and showered him with love and affection and educated him. I felt very happy and thanked God for being instrumental in handing over an abandoned child to appropriate hands and I wondered why I was posted as duty medical officer on that day. Was it to carry out this task ? I don’t know, I used to hear about him and later I lost contact. Few years later, I met him as a grown up young man with moustache and broad shoulders, beside his ever loving sincere parents. I never uttered a word about my role in his life. But when I saw him, I remembered the picture of the innocent abandoned baby in the cradle in ward No. III , SAT Hospital……… . In 1996, a 7 month old male baby was brought to me with history of severe myoclonic epilepsy since birth. He was treated elsewhere and I admitted the baby in SAT hospital and diagnosed him as a case of Infantile

Myoclonic Epilepsy and started him on anti convulsants including ACTH. But seizures were not controlled and after a few weeks the baby died due to severe broncho pneumonia and respiratory failure. Two years later in June 1998 same parents came to me with their 5 day old girl baby with similar myoclonic jerks. We did the routine investigations and started the baby on anti convulsants and tried almost all drugs. But there was no improvement. Mother used to visit me very often saying that there was no improvement in her jerks. A few days went by and when I was preparing for my talk on “Nutritional deficiencies affecting the CNS” in children for a Paediatric Neurology Conference it just clicked to my mind that Biotin deficiency could produce myoclonic seizures due to Biotinidase deficiency. I have not seen a child with this deficiency before and probably no other Paediatrician in Tvpm could have diagnosed such a disease in their practice. I went to ward and discussed about this with my colleagues and decided to give Biotin. The sad thing was that no Biotin preparation was available in the markets in India. Luckily the baby’s father was working in Gulf and Biotin tablet, a nutritional supplement, was sent immediately by air. There was no way to prove biotinidase deficiency at that time since there was no metabolic lab to do that estimation for me. Putting the burden on God, I gave Biotin 600 mcgms per day orally to that child from her 80th day of life. To our utter surprise, seizures stopped about 48-72 hours later. I asked for elder child’s photograph and the family brought the album. We could see alopacia, Seborrhoeic dermatitis in scalp and maculopapular rashes over the body. Oh! it was a case of Biotin deficiency in that baby too! It was unfortunate that no one thought about it at that time. If I have had that pre-thinking, I could have saved that baby too. I am following up the child for the last 14 years and she is perfectly normal, going to school. She stopped all AEDS but continues Biotin and visits me with a cake on her birthdays, clad in new birthday dress. . There are many more incidents to quote. When we doctors make a diagnosis, treat and bring recovery from illnesses one should remember that we are only instruments in the hands of God. 63


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Dr. N. Gopakumar MS,MCh (Urology), FEBU

Consultant Urologist

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GLIMPSES THROUGH THE STORY OF UROLOGY

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merican Urological Association (AUA) has several subsections and history of Urology is one among them. Celebrity Urologist Dr. Sakthidas from Los Angeles is the historian of the AUA. Why should the history of medicine or Urology be taught in the medical schools? It provides the residents with a sense of perspective and connectedness to the past, it can provide better judgment and reasoning, it can provide a more critical approach to the contemporary surgery and it can lead to deeper understanding of professionalism. The following are some of the interesting facts in the history of Urology. John F. Kennedy, President of United States of America popular as a premier statesman was bolstered by his vitality, athleticism and youth. In truth, JFK suffered from many medical issues that he concealed from the public which had tremendous impact on his presidency. Beyond his well publicized Addison's disease, JFK was bothered by Urologic symptoms originating from contracting gonorrhea and Chlamydia. He later developed post gonococcal Urethritis and chronic prostatitis. Kennedy was constantly bothered by urinary tract infections most notably during the Cuban missile crisis. During this time large doses of Sulfa drugs and penicillin were administered to control Kennedy's Urologic symptoms. However there was never any indication that JFK's judgment altered or his leadership compromised. Out of 44 American presidents, only 6 did not have children. George Washington had obstructive azoospermia due to smallpox. Andrew Jackson had the same problem because smallpox was rampant in those days. All these presidents had medical problems that could have a significant negative impact on fertility.

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The presidency of Andrew Johnson has historically been considered a failure owing in large part to his inability to compromise with congress. He was affected with kidney stones. His temperament and ability to compromise were impaired by a state of chronic pain from nephrolithiasis for which there was few effective symptomatic treatments in 1860's. President Woodrow Wilson was never able to gain ratification of the Treaty of Versailles, the peace accord to end world war I. Wilson suffered a stroke followed by life threatening urinary sepsis due to Urinary retention treated by the father of modem Urology - Hugh Hampton Young. Wilson's voiding dysfunction contributed to his inability to win peace accord to end World War I, and Europe plunged into two decades of upheaval leading to World War II. Andrew Jackson, the 7th president of the US underwent a hydrocele repair during his second year in office. He was operated by his Urologist Dr. J C Hall and billed $ 30. That was in 1831. Puncture drainage, sclerosant therapy, incision and excision were all described by them. Chester Arthur, a lesser known president of US kept his illness from the public. As historical and forgotten is Arthur, so is the disease from which he suffered. He was having Brights disease. The clinical manifestations of the disease being proteinuria, haematuria, hypertension and edema. The treatment was limited. This was in part based on the limited understanding of the pathophysiology. Finally Arthur succumbed to heart failure. The legacy of the Ludwig Van Beethoven to classical music transcends much of the art. He suffered in his early twenties from a chronic abdominal pain. Often portrayed as an eccentric Beethoven suffered essentially in silence. He wrote 'Holy Song of thanks giving to the deity from one who has been cured in the Lydian mode'. This, Beethoven wrote after he recuperated from a severe pain of colic. He was adamantly opposed to anything other than alcohol (!) that could affect his ability to create music. His autopsy revealed dark cloudy fluid in the kidneys and numerous bilateral stones each about the size of a pea. Emperor Shen-Nung is the second mythical emperor of China. Widely considered the father of Chinese medicine, he contributed substantially to the field of Urology with specific reference to his management of erectile dysfunction with the herbal root Ginseng. The management of erectile dysfunction by Emperor Shen-Nung was unique and unequivocal for its time. It has influenced urological practice to date and continues to hold many parallels as a modern day herbal aphrodisiac 5000 years on. Napoleon was the only emperor of the 2nd French empire. He was captured in the Franco Prussian war and his biographers attribute his military loss to his sufferings from stones. Sir Henry Thompson was the celebrated Urologist of those times specialized in the removal of bladder stones. Emperor consulted Thompson and he performed a lithotripsy to destroy the stone. 4 days later a second lithotripsy followed, emperor died on 5th day due to Uremia. The history always remind us how the research, development and innovations in the past and present helped us to reach the stage where we are today. 65


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I can not believe how destiny and fate bought me to a full circle. Till one decade ago I was quite content to be a perfect house wife and mother to my daughter. I was never disturbed by the thought that I was sitting idly practically doing nothing. But the change was sudden. When fate brought me back to my home town 5 years back I was happy to be in the company of infants & toddlers whose parents were working in our institutions. Coming from a family of doctors & engineers it never occurred to me that I should follow their same lineage. My interest & ideas were wide apart from what my family thought. In 2007 my link with small children began; with the setting up of day care units. My intention was to provide healthy environment to small children to grow & nurture; which I was pretty sure would be able to fulfill with a backing of a super specialty hospital; having a strong Paediatric wing. Again fate intervened. A mother came to me with a 7 year old for getting the child admitted in the KG class. At the first look I found that he was different from the other children; He neither spoke a word nor looked at my face. But physically he was like any other child of his peer group. The mother said with a heavy heart “My son Abhi is an autistic child and no school is accommodating him because of his strange behaviour.” I felt really sorry for her and promised that I would accommodate her child at any cost & reminded her of my school’s motto: “Your child is more safe on our lap” She left quite relieved. This very day way was a turning point in my life. The two things that crossed my mind. Were 1) why should I do what others do? 2) to start an institution where the children rejected from other schools simply for the reason that the child is not faring well in his academics. Thus Kalyan Group of Schools was born. KALYAN PLUS THE SPECIAL SCHOOL The 7 yrs old Autistic child open the door for a new path: facilitating an institution where INTEGRATED TEACHING TECHNIQUES (where every child irrespective of his abilities was given education according to his aptitude) was the chosen method. Today Kalyan Plus is handling children with Autism, ADHD, cerebral palsy & Down’s syndrome. Mrs. Priya Balan MA

Asst. Administrator

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What is AUTISM? Autism is development disability that typically appears during the first three years of life. It is almost common condition in a group of developmental disorders known as the Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) The three main areas that affect the person with autism are:

Besides Autism the other conditions included in the autism spectrum disorders are: • Aspergers Syndrome • Rett’s Syndrome • Pervasive Development Disorder – Not Otherwise Specified(PDD-NOS)  Autism is caused by physical dysfunction of brain

 Autism is not caused by bad parenting and or neglect  80% of those affected by autism are boys  Autism is found throughout the world in families of all economic, social and racial back ground  The disorder may occur alone or with accompanying problems such as mental retardation and seizures  All persons with Autism do not have special or savant skill. A few (10%) have unusual drawing abilities, musical talents, excellent route memory or lightening speed at mental calculation. Having autism does not affect a child’s physical appearance. He looks just like any other child, though he may communicate and behave in a manner that is different from most of the other children. It is also important to remember that all children with autism are different in the way they act and interact. No two children with autism will have the identical characteristics. The difficulties that the child with autism is facing?  Difficulty in sensory prepossessing

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 Difficultly in using and understanding languages  Difficulty in social understanding (relating to people)  Difficulty in imagining, thinking and organizing Some FAQs about autism and its reality • Will a child with autism actually learn, and is it worth the effort involved? Yes. A number of factors may impact on how well a child may respond to a treatment programme, including how severely a child is affected, the child’s age at the time of diagnosis and initial intervention, and the quality of intervention received. With appropriate intervention and teaching all children on the spectrum can show significant progress - even children with severe delays and the presence of exceptionally unusual behaviours. There are no children for whom treatment is ‘not worth the effort.’ At the same time, there is currently no reliable measure to determine how severely a child may or may not be affected and no way to predict or make a generalization about how any individual child will grow and progress. • Will a child with autism regress? In general, regression that is associated with autism may not be a true regression but in fact, is one pattern of onset that is sometimes seen. Autism manifests within the first three years of life. In some children the symptoms are evident from the first months of life. In others, the child shows some social interaction, says a few words, and appears to ‘play’ in more typical ways, though these developments are usually not age appropriate; and then around 18 months something appears to trigger a full manifestation of the symptoms of autism. This late onset autism may appear as a regression. Another time that a regression may seem to occur is during periods of stress and transition. For example, more functionally able children such as children with Asperger Syndrome, appear to do quite well until they reach middle school, when the social pressures of coping with a mainstream classroom triggers difficulties in the child’s behaviour which might manifest as a regression. Some children with autism appear to regress for a period during adolescence which is a stressful phase for most children. Lastly, children or adults with autism who experience seizures may experience a regression in some areas as a result of the damage caused by the seizure; this is 68

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related to the co-morbid seizure disorder rather than to autism specifically. • Will a non-verbal child with autism start speaking, and when? A large number of children with autism (about 3050%) do not use speech in a meaningful way. It is very difficult to say whether and when any given child will speak. Except in unusual cases, there is no physical impairment that keeps children from speaking. Some children who might have spoken as infants and then lost their speech may or may not get their speech back. Currently, it is unknown why some children develop meaningful language and others do not. Experience with children with autism has shown that if the environment is accepting, and people are aware of the kind of speech they themselves need to use with the child, it can produce positive results. In addition, current intervention techniques focusing on the teaching of communication through speech or alternative and augmentative modes of communication such as pictures, signs, alphabet boards, and other communication tools; and using the child’s wants and needs; can show quite remarkable results, particularly with very young children. • Can speech therapy help children with autism? Speech therapy can help some children through the use of oral-motor activities. It is absolutely essential for the speech therapist to understand Autism and also the individual child. Otherwise, the conventional methods of speech therapy currently prevalent in India today help children with autism very little, because as stated above, the inability to speak is not a physical problem. Many children with autism have speech but do not use the speech for communication. However, every child with autism can benefit from interventions that emphasize communication. A speech therapist who is sensitive to the needs of the autistic child and who has good understanding of the use of behaviour modification techniques and their use with children with autism can contribute effectively. In addition, a good speech language pathologist can help the functioningly able child with difficulties of sentence structure, grammar, and the social use of language • Is there a cure for autism? At this point, there is no known cure for autism.


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While we understand that there are differences in the brain that are related to autism, we cannot ‘fix’ or change these differences in a way that may be called curing autism. When a parent becomes aware that there is no cure for autism, this information can be both confusing and discouraging. However, it is important to realize that the prognosis for children with autism today is very different from that even twenty years ago. Our understanding and knowledge about what management` strategies are most effective with autistic children has increased tremendously over the past two decades, and a child diagnosed with autism today will receive different interventions and beginning at an earlier age than was possible many years ago. This means each child’s chances for learning and development are greater today than earlier. Although there is no cure for autism, there are many people or groups around the world who promote various treatments that claim to cure children with autism. Parents of recently diagnosed children with autism are naturally susceptible to such claims. Hard nosed educational intervention requires hours of one-on-one painstaking work with the child, and progress occurs incrementally. In comparison, miracle cures, whether consisting of something ingested, injected, or involving a procedure that seems like a ‘medical treatment’ - have an obvious appeal for parents. It may be impossible for a physician to understand the allure of this promise for a parent. One approach to responding to questions about such treatments is to encourage parents to be cautious of individuals trying to exploit their vulnerability, and to continue other forms of intervention. Some parents may feel obligated to try a miracle cure but will return to educational intervention when it does not work. • What are some of the treatments for autism? There are now dozens of different interventions and treatments that are used with children with autism. This does not mean, of course, that all of them are valid. The most effective treatment for all children with autism is an appropriate educational training program that is tailored to the child’s specific needs. The earlier intervention is started, the more promising the outcome. Just as each child on the autistic spectrum differs in his or her presentation of autism, intervention methodologies

have to be individualized to meet the needs of individual learning styles rather than chronological or mental age, or severity of autism. In most cases a primary intervention is selected, and other appropriate therapies are added or incorporated as required. Most interventions for young children with autism in particular are based on the principles of behaviour analysis; some programs focus more on antecedents of behaviour while others focus more on the consequences of behaviour. In their search for therapies and treatment options, it will help parents to have some information on the better known methodologies. Applied Behaviour Analysis (ABA), Verbal Behaviour Analysis (VB), Lovaas. Pivotal Response Training ABA is the process of applying interventions based upon the principles of learning theory to improve socially significant behaviours. These include social skills, communication, and adaptive living skills such as gross and fine motor skills, and academics. ABA methods are used to support persons with autism: to increase behaviours, to teach new skills, to maintain behaviours, to generalize or to transfer behaviour from one situation or response to another. VB or VBA uses behavioural principles to focus on the teaching of communication along with other socially significant behaviours. The Lovaas Method derives its name from O. Ivar Lovaas, a psychologist who gained recognition from the 1987 publication of a study he conducted with children with autism from which he concluded that early intensive behavioural intervention offered much hope for improving outcomes of children with autism. The Lovaas Method is derived from but not to be confused with the broader field of ABA. Pivotal Response Training is a naturalistic intervention model derived from the principles of ABA to focus on ‘pivotal behaviors,’ such as motivation and self management, rather than targeting individual behaviors one at a time. TEACCH (Treatment and Education of Autistic and related Communication-handicapped Children) The TEACCH approach makes use of several techniques in various combinations and includes a focus on the person with autism, understanding autism, adopting appropriate adaptations, and development 69


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of a program building on existing skills, emerging capabilities, and the individual person’s unique needs. Structured teaching is an important priority based on TEACCH research and experience that structure fits the ‘culture of autism.’ Addressing behavioural antecedents by organizing the physical environment, developing schedules and work systems, making expectations clear, explicit, and visual have been effective ways of developing skills and allowing people with autism to use these skills independently. Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) AAC refers to ways other than speech that is used to accompany or augment the spoken word to help the person with autism understand spoken information. There is a mistaken belief that the use of AACs will prevent the child with autism from ever developing speech. The contrary is actually true: the use of other modes has often been found to facilitate the development of speech. AACs can be signs, electronic communication tools, pictures, cards and objects. Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) is one such visually based way to help communication in people with autism. • Can children with autism go to a ‘normal’ school? In short: yes, it is possible. Many children with autism in India attend regular schools. From accounts from such children we know that children with autism often face difficulties in regular educational settings because of their very distinct learning needs. These needs may arise from their uneven profiles of skills and deficits, difficulties in processing of information, difficulties in generalization, and their unusual behaviours. All of these have important implications for educational practices. Teaching methods have to take into account these different learning styles. Where this is understood, children with autism without cognitive impairment have been successfully included into mainstream classrooms. Where this is not understood children may encounter difficulties and have to drop out, often after Grade 4 or Grade 5. Children who have coped fairly well until that point may find that the increased workload and expectations create an unmanageable level of stress. Regular schools vary in their willingness to accept children with autism and work with them to meet their needs. Some parents choose not to convey this information to the school, for fear of being asked to 70

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leave. Often, it seems that a school is more willing to take a child with global developmental delay who is slower in learning but otherwise ‘fits’ into the class, but has reservations about a child with autism who displays ‘odd’ mannerisms and behaviours despite high intellectual ability. When an appropriate arrangement can be negotiated, and with the help of a supportive teacher or school staff, the child with autism can have a very positive experience in a mainstream school and gain much both academically and socially. More importantly, the nonautistic children gain as much if not more in terms of developing more sensitive and all rounded personalities with a greater awareness of human diversity. • What kind of school is best for a child with autism to attend? In an ideal world, all children with autism as well as other special needs would attend the same schools as more typically developing children, learning and playing side by side. However, the reality is that most schools in India are not ready to accept children who are ‘different’ and this includes children with autism. Therefore, though the range of educational placements is extremely varied, the availability at this point in time is limited. This includes schools specifically for children with autism, schools that are attended by children with autism, mental retardation, cerebral palsy, as well as other disorders, mainstream or ‘normal’ schools that have separate learning centres, or schools that practice total inclusion. Which school the child attends will depend on both, the individual child, as well as the services that the child can access. The decision of where a child with autism should educate has to be based on the skills and needs of the individual student, as well as the needs of the parent. As noted above, some children can work effectively and benefit from regular education programs, while others will need special classrooms for part or all of the day where the physical environment, curriculum, and personnel can be organized and manipulated to reflect individual needs. For a child to be main streamed in a regular school, the deciding factor must be the environment of the school. The child with autism will benefit from an environment that is inclusive and that which makes accommodations for his particular needs. In every case, a parent is advised to consider all the


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kwXr]vXn \Ã-h-cmb hmb-\-¡mÀ¡p-th≠n Hcp sNdnb kvt\tlm-]-Im-c-ambn Fsâ A\p-`hw teJ-\-ambn Xmsg Fgp-Xp-¶p. Rm³ M.L.T¡v ]Tn-¡p¶ Ime¯v F¶n Hcp Xocp-am-\-ap-≠m-bn-cp-¶p. Hcp tcmKn¡v Fsâ càw Zm\w sN¿-W-sa-¶v. Fsâ ]Tn¯w ]qÀ¯n-bm-bn. AXn-\p-tijw Hcp tPmen. Ønc-ambn In«-W-sa-¦n {]hÀ¯n-]-cn-Nbw Dd-¸p-h-cp-¯-Ww. At¸Ä ASp-¯pÅ P.R.S Hospitalen F\n¡v AXn-\pÅ `mKyw D≠m-bn. AXp-I-gn-ª-t¸mÄ Fsâ {]hr¯n ] cn]pjv-]-te-J. F N-b-¯nsâ \à \S-¯n-¸n-\m P.R.S Hospital Xs¶ tPmen-X-¶p. Dt±iw H¶-c-hÀjw Ign-ª-t¸mÄ bmZr-Ýn-I-ambn Hospital tPmen-bpÅ tUmIvS-dpsS ktlm-Z-cn¡v AB+ve ko\n-bÀ em-_v sS-Iv-\o-jy³ càw Hm¸-td-j-\p-th≠n AhnsS Xnc-¡p-I-bm-bn-cp-¶p. At¸mÄ em_n Ft¶mSpw Xnc¡n. Fsâ »Unsâ {Kq¸v Adn-ª-t¸mÄ X¿m-dmtWm F¶v Hcn-¡ÂIqSn tNmZn-¨p. Rm³ Fsâ HmÀ½-I-fnse B{Klw At¸mÄ Xpd¶p k½-Xn-¨p. Ah-tcm-sSm¸w »Uv _m¦n t]mbn »Uv sImSp¯v dÌv FSp-¯-tijw XncnsI h¶v tPmen XpSÀ¶p. ]ns¶ c≠v Znhk-§Ä Ign-ªp. càw kzo-I-cn¨ BÄ Fs¶ hnfn-¸n-¨p. Rm³ Hospital dqan t]mbn Ahsc I≠p. Ft¶mSv Ipsd \µn-hm-¡p-IÄ ]d-bp-Ibpw Iq«-¯n Hcp- I-hÀ F\n¡v Xcm³ B{K-ln-¡p-¶-Xmbpw I≠p. AXv hm§msX Rm³ Fsâ cà-Zm-\s¯ al-¯-csa¶v hnti-jn-¸n¨v AhnsS \n¶v bm{X-]-d-ªp-t]m-bn. A¶p Rm³ sNbvX-Xmb IÀ½w Fsâ tPmen-bn Rm³ sNbvX al-¯mb Hcp ktµ-i-ambn C¶pw HmÀ½n-¡p-¶p.

factors involved before making a decision. It may be illadvised to suggest that a child seek attendance at an autism specific centre when it would mean a financial hardship or unmanageable commute for the parent and family. Parents should be able to freely visit schools and observe all the activities that occur in order to inform their decision about which school is best for their child’s specific needs. KALYAN PLUS AND KALYAN SCHOOL is a living solid evidence “it is possible for children with autism to go to regular school”. Kalyan schools have started taking in children with Autism, Down’s syndrome, intellectually challenge,(ADHD) Attention deficit Hyperactivity Disorders and disorders that can accompany ADHD, Reactive Attachment disorders (RAD) Opposition Defiant Disorder (ODD) and learning disabilities such as Dyslexia Dyscalculia Dysgraphia and Dyspraxia. A similar curriculum as for the other children could be followed, but with a certain amount of flexibility and adaptation according to the child’s needs Eg: Learning one language instead of two, typing answer

on the computer instead of using pencil, it depends upon the individual child diagnostic prescriptive teaching Use of certain teaching Methods adaptive curriculum it all depends on the individual child – his strengths and his needs. It is said that a human being ceases to exist once he stops venturing into new horizon true to this human nature I too started thinking in a different perspective. Education alone will not be sufficient to sustain a differentially abled person. He/She needs financial security and for that they need proper training. Rehabilitating the differentially abled and thus ensuring that they are economically secured led to the birth of Krishnammal Ratnaswamy Vocational centre for physically and mentally challenged,covering the differentially abled community between the age group 16 to 40. So in this age where human values are taking a back seat, we are trying to bring the differentially abled to the mainstream for they too have the right to live in this world. 71


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Diet for

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Hospital Staff Hospital staff are prone to both communicable and non communicable diseases. Unhealthy eating habits, irregular shifts and long working hours make them vulnerable. All are concentrating on the preventive aspects of different diseases. We can prevent, postpone or delay non communicable diseases like hypertension, diabetes, coronary artery disease, cancer etc. by proper diet. A balanced diet rich in antioxidants help to prevent many diseases. High cholesterol, obesity, acidity, low resistance and infection are the common troubles seen among hospital staff. We can come out of these problems by proper diet. Too much of cholesterol in our blood can raise the risk of heart attack or stroke. High cholesterol is seen among staff who skip their breakfast. Doctors and staff usually skip their breakfast due to lack of time. If we consume carbohydrate rich breakfast, then HMGCoA, an enzyme in our body get increased and cholesterol synthesis will reduce. While skipping breakfast the enzyme level decreases, so automatically liver will produce more cholesterol to compensate. Most of the cholesterol in our body is made by the liver. The rest comes from our dietary intake. Trans fat found in vanaspathi, chips, fried items also increase cholesterol levels. High fibre intake also helps to reduce cholesterol. Fibre act as a sponge, absorbing cholesterol in the digestive tract and carrying it out of the system. All fruits, vegetables, whole grains, oats bran, nuts, citrus fruits, beans etc. are rich in fibre. Examples of balanced breakfast are Puttu-kadalai, DosaiSambar, Appam-Egg curry. Each one should limit their consumption of coconut and oil. (Oil for cooking ½ kg and coconut 5 nos. for one person per month). 72

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Mrs. Miny Mary Prakash Chief Dietician

Contrary to popular belief, nuts are among the healthiest natural foods. However too much of anything is bad, nuts taken in excess can cause indigestion and lead to weight gain. About 20-30 gm or a handful of nuts per day is enough for a healthy diet. Nuts are rich in MUFA, Antioxidants, Calcium Magnesium, Potassium and cholane. Choline helps in preventing fat deposit in liver. Fats present in nuts and seeds are a combination of mono unsaturated fats (MUFA) and poly unsaturated fats (PUFA). MUFA have been shown to reduce bad cholesterol and increase good cholesterol levels. Obesity is another health problem seen in hospital staff. If the food intake is higher than required obesity occurs. Cutting sugar, oil, coconut and fried foods helps to reduce weight gain. If we daily have two vadai (ie 500 Kcal), then that will cause to increase 2 kgwt/month. Due to its easy availability and taste most of us have these daily. Instead of having vadai, oats porridge, veg: soup, nuts etc are the healthy options. Water is another nutrient staff miss to drink. If we don’t drink water, our stored fat won’t burn. So try to drink minimum 2-3 litres of water to reduce weight. The key to build stamina and energy is to stay active through the day. If you cannot find one hour in the morning for your exercise, you could break it up in to smaller segments one in the day and the other in the evening. Do keep in mind that being active through the day help to burn calories and keeps you healthy both in home and office. The dietary modifications serve as a guide for the obese to make healthy food choices. The daily diet plan should have an energy deficit of 500-1000 Kcal in general. If we deduct 500 Kcal from our present diet we


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will lose 2 kg wt/month. The energy requirements based on activity levels for obese, normal and underweight are given below. Energy requirements Kcal/Kg body wt/day Activity Sedentary Moderate Heavy

Obese 20-25 30 35

Normal 30 35 40

Underweight 35 40 45-50

Calorie value of some common foods Masala Dosai = 400 kcal Finger Chips = (17 nos.) 265 Kcal Veg: Cutlet = 400 Kcal Samosa = 250 Kcal Chicken Biriyani = 900 Kcal Poori 1 no. = 250 Kcal Ladoo l00g = 400 Kcal Banana Big 1no. = 250 Kcal Mango 1no. = 150 Kcal Vada 1no. = 250 Kcal Chips 200g = 600 Kcal 1 cup Rice = 170 Kcal

Bread (2 slice) = 130 Kcal Appam 1no. = 100 Kcal Idli 1no. = 65 Kcal Parotta 1no. = 275 Kcal Sugar 1tbsp = 60 Kcal Milk 1 cup = 120 Kcal Egg 1no. = 85 Kcal Coconut 15 tbs = 444 Kcal Ground nut 100g = 600 Kcal Dates 10 no. = 317 Kcal Vegetable 1 cup = 60 Kcal Arrow root Biscuits = 20 Kcal

So try to plan your diet with these. Acidity is another health problem seen in hospital staff. Frequent eating causes life style changes and work related stress. The stomach normally secretes acids (HCl) that is essential in digestive process. This acid helps in breaking down the food during digestion. When there is excess of acid produced in the stomach, it results in a condition known as acidity, heartburn, dyspepsia, bloating, nausea, etc. are the common symptoms. Simple eating can get rid of this trouble. Eat a whole some diet rich in fresh fruits, especially papaya and pineapple. These fruits are high in digestive enzymes such as papain and bromelain that aid digestion. Include vegetables, grains and high fibre foods. Use asafoetida, cumin and mint in your daily cooking for their carminative properties (improves digestion and relative gas and colic) Cabbage juice is particularly good for heartburn. It has a strong taste, so blend it with other vegetable juice. Avoid drinking water in between meals as it dilute the digestive juices produces in the stomach. Eat regular, small meals throughout the day to avoid overburdening the digestive system. Change your eating habits, do not eat on the run. Eat slowly and enjoy your food. Avoid citrus fruits, tomatoes, fried foods and spicy foods, high fat meals, foods containing caffeine (coffee and tea) as these are acidic in nature.

Hospital staff should include immunity boosters, in their daily diet to get resistance against infection. Protein rich foods are immuno boosters. Boost up your proteins by eating fish, lean meat, low fat diary products, nuts, pulses and dhals, soyabeans, rajmah etc. Vitamin C boosts immunity and also act as an antioxidant amla, citrus fruits tomatoes green leafy vegetables, lime juice etc are rich in vitamin C. Get more Vitamin A and carotene as they help to maintain the health of membranes lining your skin and internal organs. These will be your first line of defense against bacterial, parasitic and viral attacks. Dark green, yellow and orange vegetables such as carrot, sweet potatoes, apricots, mango, fish liver oils are rich in vitamin A. Vitamin E too has similar health benefits. Nuts, apple, green leafy vegetables, whole grains etc. are sources. Zinc rich foods are good for immunity, good source are nuts and whole grains. Don’t forget essential fat like omega-3 they are best obtained from nuts, fatty fish and sea food. Probiotics and pre biotics boost immunity. They play an important role in rejuvenating the digestive system by enabling better absorption of nutrients and improving immunity. Yoghurt, curd, bananas and onions are the good sources. Honey also helps to improve immunity. So try to use honey instead of sugar. Small changes in diet can make big difference. So plan your diet with healthy choices. Sample Menu for Hospital Staff (1800-2000 Kcal diet) TIME

MENU

6.00 AM

Green Tea – 1 cup With 1tbsp honey 7.30 AM Dosai/Idli 3 or 4 no. and Sambar/Peas Curry – ½ cup Tea – 1 cup Or Oats + Nuts + Porridge , Fruits – 2cup 10.30 AM Veg: Soup = 1 cup/ Tea + Biscuits/ Oats Porridge = 1 cup/ Lemon Juice = 1cup 1.30 PM Rice 1 ½ cup/Chapathy – 3nos. Veg salad + Vegetables = as desired Pulses ½ cup /fish = 2 slices, Sambar/veg. curry – 1 cup Butter milk/curd = 1 cup 4.00 PM Tea = 1cup, Nuts = 15 nos. 8.00 PM

Same as Lunch

10.00 PM Fruits = 2 nos.

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A Magical 25 years!

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Dr. Mithun Rathen Murugan

A quarter century ago .. a time when healthcare was largely the domain of the government and private clinics.. When terms like Medi-cities and Medi-malls weren’t even coined .. PRS hospital made its humble debut, the brainchild of the visionary in Late P. Ratnaswamy, my grandfather. 25 years hence, the health scenario has turned upside down with a recent survey reporting that almost 75% Indians are dependant on private sector. With spiralling health costs and investigation-centric treatment, doctors once considered Gods, don’t get worshipped as much. Healthcare has become more glamorous with the mushrooming of “5 star” Hospitals .. Medi Cities .. and even Medi Malls! Health Tourism is big, with patients coming to India from all over the world! Health Insurance provides quality healthcare to all! The result .. Healthcare has well and truly entered its “Industrial Era”. Meanwhile, PRS hospital has established itself as one of the premier centres of affordable quality healthcare. All credit goes to the staff, doctors, and management for keeping patient satisfaction no. 1 in their priority list. My love for medicine started as a toddler during my early days in PRS, when I used to come for vaccinations, which were made a lot less painful, thanks to the smiling nurses. I was really wonder struck, how a few kind words from the doctor could cure half the illness of the patient. It was truly a treat to watch the doctors go about their work like magicians! It really moved me, and I knew from then.. I wanted to be one of those steth wielding ‘magicians’! My grandmother Late Krishnammal Ratnaswamy had always wanted me to take up medicine, and to treat her one day. Sadly, I could not fulfil the latter. From my limited experience in the field, (5 years as medical student in Amrita, Kochi, one thing that is glaring is .. its not the PET scan or the Deluxe A/c rooms that will make the patient feel better ... but a kind word .. a reassuring gesture .. will make a lot of difference! Health care might be in the industrial era, but hospitals can’t be mere factories and doctors & staff just machine operators ... its a lot more than that .. PRS hospital was born at a time when, values and compassion were a bigger part of healthcare than CT scans and PET scans! 25 years hence.. PRS continues to care like only a mother can give, bringing smiles to patients .. my grandfather would be smiling .. up there ..

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A Short Story

Usilampatty Penkutty Scene at HEATHROW Airport, A cold Sunday morning Dr. Arumugam known as Aru to friends and family about to board a nonstop flight to Bombay en-route to Chennai. His mobile rings "Hello Elu I will reach tomorrow night by Vaigai Express. Pick me up. OK" "Aru don't forget to bring your Computer Accessories and of course my Blue Label from Duty free" replies Elu. "OK OK" Aru says Aru and Elu (Elango) are thick friends. They were classmates at Madurai Medical College. Both were roommates too at "C" Block of MMC Hostel. Aru hailed from Nagercoil and Elu from Usilampatty. Both had very few qualities in common. Still their bondage was very strong. Even 33 years of time and tide had not eroded the intensity of their friendship. Aru was brilliant, gold Medalist and had migrated to UK to pursue his pet specialty of Oncology. But Elu took nearly 10 years to complete MBBS. He had then happily settled as a GP in his home town of Usilampatty. As Aru took his aisle seat in executive class of his aircraft his mind was filled with fond memories of Elu. Elu would drag him to LH campus (Ladies Hostel campus) fortified with barbed wire and two entrances guarded up fierce looking sentries. As sun sets the area would be slowly taken up by couples, some of them seeking refuges in remote, dark corners. "Waa da, lets go to LH". Elu would say. "No no, why disturb genuine lovers". "Poo da. Who said they are genuine lovers. Rani is Badris Medical Sister (slang used in MMC for girls pretending as sisters but having fun) "Let us see what she is up to. Good view from 1st floor of Pharmacology block". And the day scholars room which turned into Blue Bird

Dr. Subramoniam S

Chief Ent Surgeon

Dance Club with Ra Ra Rasputin blaring and Elu dancing with a bottle of Kalyani. Aru and Elu where permanent members of Dance club until it was banned by the vice principal. “Shall we attend Hussaini’s Karate class”. “Look Elu, Veerakumar (Prof. Microbiology) gives only 50% pass. You go. Micro is tough for me”. Elu would sacrifice. But he was full of energy. “At least why don’t we go to Reghurams Yoga class. It will improve your concentration and memory”. Elu would persists. Aru agreed on condition that Elu would complete the course which he never did. Aru completed basic course and is religiously practicing yoga until date. Elu had to dropout in the middle after suffering a neck sprained sustained by trying to enjoy the soft curves of the next girl during Sheersasana (Head stand). He could not help laughing aloud. “What’s amusing?”. The person by his side intruded into his thoughts. “Nothing” His mind went back to college days. One day he was woken up by the loud banging of his room door. “Dai, open the door or I’ll burn down the room”. A mob was outside his room. Inter caste fights were common in hostel. Sometimes it turned out to be very brutal. At individual levels there were no problems. But a minor incident could provoke a mob reaction. This was such a incident. Aru and Elu belonged to opposite warring castes. Today Elu’s people were the attackers. “Don’t open the door” Elu said “No let them come”. Aru said Finally the door was broken open. They were 10 of them dark, unruly and drunk. “Vettu da” screamed the leader. Elu jumped between the gang and Aru. “Hit me first” shouted Elu. 75


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“Don’t you know what the Nagercoil fellas did to our Somu”. “No, I won’t let you touch Aru. You will have to kill me first”. Arus eyes moistened. Tears welled up. If not for that unflinching loyalty Aru would not have been alive today. His heart brimmed with emotion. Even during his numerous visits to Elus house at Usilampatty he was treated like a son of the soil. Both slept on the same cot. Elu’s mom used to cook pongals and vadas - Arus favourite. Their visits to Cinema Talkies (rustic cinema theatre) was memorable. Elu used to exhaust his meager pocket money for tickets, crisp murukkus and black tea. It was there Aru first met her. Mullai! A village beauty. She was sitting on the next bench. He could not take his eyes off her. She was also reciprocating his glances. Next day they met at the village temple. She was alone. “What is your name?” “Mullai” “What’s yours?” “Arumugam. They call me Aru”. Gradually Aru’s visits to Usliampatty increased and the relationship blossomed into intimated love. Elu came to know of this much later. He opposed the affair tooth and nail. “She’s from Thevar community. You are a Chettiyar. This will never work.” “I will make it happen” argued Aru. “It’s dangerous. This is a village. They will finish you” “I am Arumugham - SIX FACES. They will see a different Aru”. By this time Aru had to prepare for Final MBBSMedicine/Surgery and OG at one sitting. The load was heavy. This kept him away from Usilampatty for nearly six months. 10 days prior to final year exam he heard from Elu that Mullai was married off to her maternal uncle, who accepted her though he knew she was pregnant. Aru’s life turned into hell. Still he wrote the exams. He passed with flying colours, became the gold medalist and left the country for good. His thoughts were interrupted by the person beside. “What’s your line?”. “Dr, Oncologist ie Cancer Specialist”. “Oh. In UK?”. “Yes was practicing for nearly 25 years. Now diversified into research” “Oh, research in Cancer treatment”. “Yes the in thing is Gene Therapy, ie Cancer is caused 76

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by a particular gene called Oncogene which gets activated resulting in cancer. So we are trying to deactivate or modulate this gene” “So you are expecting to a cure for cancer?” “Exactly”. “How successful is it?” “Still in experimental stage. We need human trials which is difficult in UK. In India there are many volunteers. They come to us as a last resort”. “Do you use medicines to deactivate”? “No, we use computer aided RF pulses (Radio Frequency pulses) which is sent into human body. Harmless to the volunteers. Same thing as in MRI.” “OK I get it”. Their conversation was interrupted by announcement for landing. Arus itinerary was tightly planned. Finally he was in Chennai from Bombay and caught Vaigai on time. Elu received him at Madurai Junction. “Tiresome journey”? “Yep” “Booked a deluxe suite at Pandian. Our 1st volunteer will arrive at 11 am tomorrow” “Fantastic” They reached hotel, gulped down a couple of Blue Label, had dinner and hit the bed. Next day the entire programming had to be completed before 11 am. Before that all computer fittings, accessories, RF pulse generator etc. had to be checked and put in place. As was Arus normal style of functioning he went through the case file of first volunteer. Name : Mullai Krishnan Age : 40/F Address : No. 17, Marketplace, Usilampatty. The name rang a strange bell in Arus mind. He showed the address to Elu and gave a questioning look. “Yes, the same Mullai”. “My God!” exclaimed Aru. Before they could talk further a frail looking woman was wheeled in by an elderly man. She was emaciated, head hung low and shoulders dropping. She was not in touch with the surroundings. Mere vegetative existence. “My wife, Mullai. Please save her” pleaded the elderly man. Mullai was in advanced stage of leukemia. Local


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PohnXw I\-embn Fcn-bp-t¼mÄ F³ ap¶n At½ \n³ apJw am{Xw B angn-I-fn \n¶p-sa-¶n-te-¡q-dp¶ Imcp-Wy-hm-ln\n kv]Àiw arZp-hmÀ¶ ssII-fm Fs¶ Xtem-Sp-t¼mÄ apÖ· _Ô-¯n³ kpIrXw F³ \mhn Fs¶¶pw Aar-Xmbn amdn-b, s\©n \n¶q-dnb £ocw Fs¶ Rm\m-¡p-hm-s\¶pw {]b-Xv\n¨ kvt\l-¯n³ aqÀ¯n-aZv`mhw kz´-ambv \oÀÖew tXSm-sX-sbÃmw \o F¶n-te-s¡¶pw sNmcn-ªp. B Ime-Sn-I-fn Hcp a¬X-cn-bmbn amdn-bm-se³ P·w k^ew F´p Rm³ sNmtÃ≠p, F¶t½ Rm³ \nsâ A{Io-X-Zm-kn-bm-Wn¶pw F³ at\m-tIm-hn-en Rm³ {]Xn-jvTn¨ s]m³ tZh-X-bm-sWsâ A½ sNmcnbmw Rm³ F³ Poh-càw \n³ Imev¡-embv \n³ kvt\l-sa¶pw e`n-¡m³ Cà Rm\n-sÃsâ A½-bn-Ãm-sb-¦n F³ kzXzw A¶p \in¡pw.

doctors have given 3 months time. Desperately they had approach Elu who in turn refered to Aru. Aru’s assistant plugged all the wires, turned the computer on to give the first dose of Radiofrequency pulse (RF Pulse). Computer Screen blinked. SYSTEM ACTIVATED. Aru was tense. His pet project was about to take off. His eyes were fixed on the TV monitor. CHROMOSOME TRACKED DOWN Beep beep ONCOGENE LOCATED Beep beep DEACTIVATION COMPLETE Aru jumped up with joy. He looked at the patient. There was no change in her. “Did it work?” “Don’t know” said Elu. While they were engaged in this conversation, Arus Assistant said: “Sir”. No words were coming from him but he was lifting the patient face. Aru could see tears rolling down her face. In

a few minutes she wept inconsolably. “Mullai, Mullai what happened”. Krishnan was asking with his hand on her shoulders.” “Don’t touch me” she said. “Look, Mullai is talking.” Krishnan shouted, “Aru, where were you for so many years”. Mullai asked in between her sobs”. It was then Aru knew that Mullai had jumped off the terrace on her wedding night. She had suffered serious head injury. She had survived only to be left with Post Traumatic Amnesia and Aphasia. Lo and behold! Arus RF pulse had activated the damaged memory and speech centres in the brain during the process of deactivating the oncogene. Aru walked towards Mullai and placed his hands gently on her head. Involuntarily she leaned towards him, her head resting on his mid torso. 77


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Hospital, since its inception in 1986, has been a busy centre of excellence for patient care, and it has grown as one of the largest among the private hospitals in Thiruvananthapuram. Every day, hundreds of patients stream in, not only from nearby places, but also from places beyond the southern boundaries of Kerala. It appears that people have confidence in its imaginative slogan: "Care like only a mother can give". An imaginative patient management system starting from a warm and helpful reception, rewards the hospital more than the patient and earns a place in the minds of the public, as hospital has the facilities and know-how on care for the afflicted - more than a Mother can give!

\\ Patient Management: A patient is any person - a child, adult or the aged who is receiving healthcare services for whatever length of time it may be. The word patient has come from patios in Latin and is akin to the Greek word pathos, meaning 'one who is suffering'. So when a patient who is either ill or injured enters a hospital or a clinic, he is weak, afraid, confused and sometimes even immobile and expects the ambience of the hospitalfrom reception and registration to discharge and beyond - to be highly conducive, soothing and all the more reassuring. It is the attendants, nurses and the Registrar who put up the image of the hospital's service excellence before the searching eyes of the patient and the by standers. Next the specialist doctors attend to him, about whom his expectation is nothing less than that of a miracle man or wizard who can assure him, whatever the condition, the best of services. And possibly, the doctor can take away the remnant anxiety and confusion from the minds of the patient. The patient management in a hospital - be it outpatient or inpatient - is a broader team work. Any kinks in this team work at any level will disappoint the patient and the attending relative or his friend. The treatment thereafter, even if given free, only alienates him from the hospital he is in. \\ Positive First Impression: First impression is said to be the best impression. The patient registration activity is often an entry-level phase with a major 78

Dr. Anju Deepak Unnithan

Consultant Paediatrician


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impact on the popularity of the hospital and in turn the turnover. The success or failure depends on the first impression. It is the first face of a hospital to the patients, who expect answers to all kinds of questions, sometimes even trivial. The first impression thus, is the scale with which the Patient Management activities are measured by the user community. \\ Interfacing with Hospital Management Systems: In many hospitals in these days of IT intrusion, hospital management systems are interlinked and any doctor or healthcare professional within the hospital system can find out which all services are up and running, what all stages and items of care are already rendered to any patient, and whether he can prescribe any further service within or outside the hospital to the needy patient. The Management is also informed and alerted on the current demands from patients and doctors for service. The Hospital Information System and any other ancillary systems, if enabled to receive the information forwarded by the Patient Management system on all admissions, discharges and transfers, can help in making the patient and the doctor comfortable. \\ Accessible Patient information is what the Doctor needs: Patient Management system providing a variety of look-up queries to help the related staff in determining if the patient has previously visited any of the wings of this hospital or to their own department or testing facility are now common in developed countries. Look ups such as name, medical record number, patient status, and attending doctor are used most often in the registration area. With Kerala in the forefront of developing IT applications, there is no reason why we cannot evolve from the partially computerized systems, an interlinked and comprehensive Patient Information system which is accessible to all.

impending expenses the party is expected to incur on further stages of treatment/surgery etc. Patients generally need this kind of assistance in knowing their entitlements, concessions and rewards etc. \\ Patient Satisfaction: Satisfaction of the patients on his encounter with the healthcare system is dependent on the duration and efficiency of care, and how empathetic and communicative the hospital's patient management machinery is. A good doctorpatient relation will result only if the system is well oiled and functioning smoothly. Also, patients who are well informed of the necessary procedures in a hospital and the time it is expected to take are seen to be more satisfied even if there is a longer waiting time. No set up is at any point of time perfect. A healthcare system which says that we have nothing more to improve is a dead one. The system should be a living one which is growing continuously like a money plant, taking moisture from the environs that it serves.

\\ More authentic Medical claims: In a well coordinated facility, the proper admission/OP registration data and subsequent information gathered can help in best opportunities for the patient's insurance claims and based on treating doctor's suggestion about the

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]rY-zn-bpsS s\m¼cw ]¨-¸p-anà ac-hp-anà Hcp ]pÂs¡mSn t]mse§pw ImWm-\nà ImgvN-I-tf-sd-bp≠o \K-c-¯n ImWp-hm-s\m-«pta {XmWn-bnÃm. Noä-sb-¡mfpw thK-¯n-etÃm Nodn-¸m-bp-¶Xm hml-\-§Ä hoSp-IÄ \o§n tdmUp-I-fmbn tdmUp-IÄ sIm¨p Ipf-§-fmbn ag t\m¡n \nevIpw thgm-¼-ep-t]m Zml-P-e-¯n\p Iyq \nev]q amÀX-yÀ HmW-¨´-hsc \os≠mcp Iyq thsdm¶p ]ns¶bpw ImWp-¶tÃm am\-y-·m-cp-ap≠p Iyq-hn-embn _oh-tdPv tjm¸n-te-¡m-sW¶p am{Xw! Nn§hpw h¶p s]mt¶m-W-sa¯n ]q¡-f-ap-≠tÃm \m«n-se§pw Xp¼-bp-anà ap¡p-än-bp-an-Ã, ¹mÌn-¡n³ ]q¡-fm-sW¶p am{Xw! HmW-¡-fn-bq-ªm-enÃm Duªm-ep-sI-«m³ ac-hp-an-Ãþ HmW-¡m-gvN-I-fn-sXms¡ Xs¶ amth-en-t]mepw \mWn-¨p-t]m-Ipw. \·-\n-d-sªm-sc³ sIm¨p-{Kmaw F{X [\-y-amWp Rmt\mÀ¯p-t]mbn Iq«-¯-ÃnÃm Imip-anÃm tImem-l-e-§-tfm-«p-anà CÃm-bva-bn-Ãm, h¿m-bvI-bn-Ã,

FÃmcpw IqsS-¸n-d-¸p-IÄ t]m ]Xn-ap-J-an«p Xnf-¸n-¡m-\mbn IpSn-sh-Å-¯n\p Iyq \n¶n-tS≠m. Cf-\oÀ t]mepÅ sXfn-\o-cp-≠tÃm Zmlw ian-¡m-\n-\n-sb´p thWw. sImän-IÄ Hä-¡m-en \nev¡th ]qhm-en-IÄ ]pÃptaªnSp-t¼mÄ CfwsX¶-ep-ta-än-cp-¶n-Sp-hm³ F´p-ckw F´p kpJ-am-sWs¶m F³tUm-kÄ^ms\ t]Sn-th-≠tÃm.

]ßIp-am-cn ]n.hn.

ko-\n-bÀ em-_v sS-Iv-\ojy³

]g-§-sfÃmw ]cn-ip-²-atÃm F®n-bm Xocm¯ \·-I-f-Wmþ sW{X ]d-ªmepw XoÀ¶n-SnÃm sX¨n, sN¼-c-¯n, aµm-chpw ]mcn-PmXw ]ns¶ ]hn-g-aÃn Xpf-kn-IÄ Xs¶-b-sX-{X-bn\w FÃm-sa-Ãm-saÃmw CjvSw-t]mse tX³Ip-Sn-¡p-hm-\m-sb-¯o-Sp¶p h≠p-IÄ, Xp¼n-IÄ, tX\o-¨-Ifpw X¯I-sf-¯p¶p s\·Wn¡mbv t]c-¸-g¯n\mbv hmh-se¯n A®m-c-¡-®-·m-sc-{X-sb®w am¼-g-¯n-\m-bn-t«m-So-Sp¶p. hrµm-h-\-s¯-sh-Ãp-s¶mcm sIm¨p {Kma-a-sX-{X-`wKn ssZh-¯n³ kz´w \mS-hn-S-sÃtbm þ At¸mÄ ssZh-§fpw ]ns¶ Ahn-Ss-Ã-tbm!

cm[mam\kw ImWp-¶-sXm-s¡bpw \n³ cq]w am{Xw-þ-Rm³ tIÄ¡p-¶-sXÃmw \n³ \mZw am{Xwþ IrjvWm \nt¶m-S-¡p-g hnfn-\mZw am{Xw \o tIfn-bm-Snb eoe-I-tfm-tcm¶pw tI«p-tI-«-§n-cp-¶o-Sp-t¶cw Adn-bmsX Rms\mcp tKm]n-I-bm-bvþ a\ sa¯pw \n³ hrµm-h-\-¯n-embn. ]qX-\bv¡pw \evIo tam£w \o ]ns¶bm Imfn-b-t\mSpw IcpW Im«n Cs¶³ I¬a-j-sam-s¡-b-Iäq \o 80

Fs¶bpw \nÀ-½-e-bm¡q I®mþ Cs¶sâ bo P·hpw [\-y-am¡q tKmhÀ²-\s¯ Xm§nbm ssII-fn sh®-X-c-masÃm th≠p-thmfw AI-Xm-cn-se¶pw hnf-t§Wsa\nþ ¡m{ibw F¶pw \o \evIo-SWw. hmgvXp-hm-\m-hnà hm¡p-I-fm \ns¶ IcpW \o \evInbX{X am{Xw tIim-Zn-]mZw Rms\¶pw kvacn-¡p¶p \n³ Ir]-bvs¡m-¶n\p th≠n am{Xw Cu IrjvWIr]-bv¡mbv am{Xw!


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An

Unforgettable Journey Leaving aside the hectic activities of hospital life, PRS Hospital family went for a one day picnic which was a blessed unforgettable experience. We took picnic on Oct 23rd 2011 to our neighbouring state, Tamilnadu. A group of 48 members from PRS Hospital family started the journey at 7.00 am towards Kanyakumari. We spent most of our journey time singing our favourite songs and sharing jokes. At first we reached the famous tourist centre Thottipalam at Thiruvattar. The glamour and scenic beauty of the place can be enjoyed only by experiencing it, and cannot be described in words. The narrow bridge has a width of hardly a walkable space for two persons. It is the tallest as well as the largest trough bridge in Asia having a height of 101 feet and a length of one kilometer. The beautiful sights we observed from the bridge still stays fresh in our minds. Our next destination was Thripparappu which is also a famous tourist place. Here, a very ancient Siva Temple is situated on the banks of Kothayar River. This place is 56 km to the south of Thiruvananthapuram. Here we can see a very beautiful waterfall which is comforting to the eyes. The cool breeze blowing strongly from all directions made us unsteady and we struggled for balance. We bathed in the water falls. After having breakfast we left for the next tourist spot. We reached ancient Padmanabhapuram Palace, a ruling center of erst while Travancore. With great enthusiasm we roamed and examined the wide narrow corridor of the palace. The palace is famous for its rare paintings and exquisite sculpture. The oldest building here is the Thai Palace, which is filled with ancient engravings in wood. Another important feature of this palace is the attractive

Susamma Thomas Lab-in-charge

Manimalika. The clock in this Malika is still working and shows the sharp timings. The four walls of the main Uppirika malika is full of ancient paintings of historical importance. The ‘Kedavilaku’ and the ‘Vadaval’ (sword) are kept in the fourth floor of this palace. In this hall there is a wonderful cot made out of 64 medicinal woods. There is also an underground passage to reach the chariot palace. After having a delicious meal from Nagercoil we headed for Kanyakumari, our main destination. After taking tickets for boating we reached Vivekananda Rock, situated 200 meter away from sea shore. This is the place where Swamy Vivekananda had his spiritual enlightening in 1892. A statue of Vivekananda, 8 feet tall made of copper & nickel is erected on this rock. Close to it, a famous hall stands as a memorial of Swamy Vivekananda. It is also delightful to see the statue of ‘Thiruvalluvar’ which is situated very close to this rock. After an enjoyable boating we returned to the seashore of Kanyakumari and waited to watch the beautiful sunset. Later, we visited the holy temple of ‘Devi Kanyakumari’ during the Deeparadhana time and obtained her abundant blessings. And now, it was time for us to depart and reluctantly we returned to our bus. Then we had our food from a near by restaurant. With great energy we spent the rest of our time engaging ourselves in songs and other games and finally we returned back to our home and daily routine. This journey had been a wonderful experience to each one of us and we shall always cherish it.

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The PRO Speaks.... Mrs. Anitha Manomohan Public Relations Officer

PRS is a multi specialty hospital situated in the heart of Thiruvananthapuram. Patients with various illnesses approach the hospital seeking medical help. In a busy hospital like ours, the medical staff may not be able to address the non-medical issues of the patient due to time constraints. Though great emphasis is given to patient care, patients are often left confused with queries about various issues like the cost of treatment and the psychological burden of the illness. Multi specialty hospitals cater to thousands of patients every day. However, each patient visits the hospital very few times in a lifetime and deserves personalized care. This is where the PRO desk comes in. We try to address each concern of the patient and relatives and thereby aid in optimizing medical care. We try to make the patient feel at home even in the busy hospital atmosphere. Our work is a form of art and science and consists of interplay between philosophy, sociology, language, economics, psychology and communication skills. We strive to promote and maintain mutual understanding between the hospital and the public. Thus the PRO desk acts as the bridge between the hospital and the community. Though every hospital employee plays a role in public relations, the PRO desk specializes in providing individualized supportive care. The PRO desk takes special interest in the following areas: The Outpatient Department: This is one of the most sensitive areas of the hospital having maximum number of patients entering the hospital. Thus most of the confusion and delays occur here. Here the PRO desk plays a vital role in guiding the patient to the appropriate doctors and medical facilities and also help with the proceedings for hospital admission. An elderly patient who had presented to the outpatient department with a long-standing history of abdominal pain and headache was confused as to which department to consult in. As per the PRO’S recommendation, the 82

patient consulted with the physician and surgeon and was diagnosed to have gallstones and hypertension. The patient was started on treatment for the same and expressed his gratitude to the PRO in the feedback form. Accident and Emergency Department: Role of the PRO deserves special mention because patients and relatives entering here are very often highly charged with emotions and have a heightened sense of anxiety and urgency. Prompt attention right from the ambulance and sympathetic behavior by the PRO provides great relief to patients and relatives and also helps to increase the efficiency to the hospital. We also help in keeping the relatives informed about the condition of the patient and also provide psychological support and counselling to the relatives. In a recent mass casualty incident at our hospital, 4 polytrauma victims were simultaneously brought in to the hospital casualty following a road traffic accident when a truck collided with a car. The PRO was available right at the casualty entrance and rushed to the ambulance with stretchers and received all the victims and made sure that all of them received medical attention without delay. Casualty duty doctor gave the best care possible. The PRO was also able to console, comfort and advise the family members. All four victims subsequently recovered and were profusely thankful to the PRO and also mentioned their appreciation of the PRO in the feedback forms. Reception, Enquiry and Admission Office: The communication skills of the PRO play a significant role in these areas. We guide patients to the appropriate departments, wards. Information regarding the hospital, various departments and hospital protocols is also provided here. We also ensure that the medical records of the patient are available to the doctors on time. In Patient Department: The PRO desk functions like liaison officers and helps the patients and relatives decide


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An Accident A Blessing in Disguise

Lekshmy Perumal Manager (Cash)

I am working as Manager (Cash) in the esteemed PRS Hospital. I joined the hospital in the 90’s and my journey is still continuing. Normally I start my duty in the morning and finish by evening. On that fateful day, 6th March, 2010 my day started as usual. My husband, Mr. K. Perumal, was away in Chennai to see his parents and I started from house at 8.30 a.m. by my two-wheeler. When I was entering into the hospital, one bike-rider came fast on the platform and dashed against my vehicle. I could not understand how he could come when the traffic was stopped by the Traffic Warden, to enable the vehicles to enter / leave the hospital. I fell down, with my two-wheeler and I realized to my horror, that I could not move my left leg. The bike-rider was trying to flee, but was caught by the people there. Even though I was in a great pain, I experienced the care, like a mother, which our hospital staff gives to the patients. The security staff brought a wheelchair immediately. Two or three staff came and made me sit on the wheel chair, while I held on to my left leg which was in severe pain. The Ortho-team attended immediately and I was being taken to the Operation Theatre. My second daughter, who was working in an IT firm, was informed and she rushed to the hospital. My husband, Mr. K. Perumal, who was in the train on his return journey, was informed. He could reach Trivandrum

only by noon and he also rushed to the hospital. The operation was over by that time and my family was given the assurance that everything was alright. Till 14th March 2010, I was in the hospital. I experienced the care and attention of the nursing staff, the doctors, and even the cleaning staff, whose kind enquires that will give the confidence. I was discharged on 14th March 2010 and was taken home by ambulance. Meanwhile, I was taught the exercises by the Orthodoctors and physiotherapists. I was able to join my duty on 7th April 2010, because of the motherly care given by the hospital. Since I could walk only with the help of a walker, the management was kind enough to provide me a walker in the office premises. I could almost regain my normal walk in a couple of months. Even though I had to suffer the pain and trauma of the accident, I still consider that as a blessing in disguise because I could personally experience the mother’s care attitude for which the hospital is famous for. This was one occasion when I personally witnessed the services with a smiling face of the nursing staff, the meticulous cleaning that is being done every day, the kind words of the doctors. I thank the Almighty for giving me an opportunity to work in the esteemed hospital, which comprises of the staff-supportive management and service-oriented staff.

on hospital admissions and procedures depending on the financial status of the patient. During hospital stay, the PRO helps in organizing funds and medical claims for deserving patients. The PRO desk also plays a significant role in educating patients and relatives not only about therapy but also about preventive measures. We also provide brochures

and booklets to promote public awareness of various diseases and treatment options available. We also take special interest in obtaining feedback from the patient in the form of feedback forms and suggestion letters. These help us in improving our services. Thus we help make the hospital a more humane place and try to put a smile on the faces of the patients and relatives. 83


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HmÀ½-bn ambmsX BXp-c-tk-h\ cwKs¯ Fsâ HutZym-KnI PohXw XpS-§n-bt¸mÄ k¦Â¸n-¡m³ t]mepw ]äm¯ Hcp kw`-hs¯¡pdn-¨mWv Rm³ Fgp-Xp-¶Xv. \o≠ 15 hÀjs¯ Fsâ HutZym-KnI Pohn-X-¯n Rm\pw Fsâ kl-{]-hÀ¯-Icpw Gsd BËm-Zn¨v, BtLmjn¨ Hcp bm{X-bm-bn-cp¶p. R§-fpsS `c-Wm-[n-Im-cnIÄ kwL-Sn-¸n¨ Cu hnt\m-Z-bm-{X. ]n.BÀ.Fkv. Bip-]{Xn BXpctkh-\c - w-K¯ - n {]hÀ¯\w XpS-§n-bn«v 25 hÀjw hnP-bI - c- a- mbn ]qÀ¯nbm-¡n-bX - nsâ BtLm-j§ - f - psS `mK-ambn FÃm-X-e¯n-epÅ Poh-\-¡mÀ¡pw th≠n H¶n-tesd hnt\mZ-bm-{X-IÄ kwL-Sn-¸n-¡p-I-bp-≠m-bn. Rm\pw Fsâ kwL-¯n-ep-Å-hcpw Xnc-sª-Sp-¯Xv I\ym-Ip-am-cnbn-te-bv¡pÅ bm{Xbm-bn-cp-¶p. 51 t]c-S-§p¶ R§ -fpsS kwLw cmhnse 7 aWn¡v Bip-]-{Xn A¦W-¯n \n¶v apXnÀ¶ kl-{]-hÀ¯-I\pw, tae-[nIm-cnbpw Bb s]cpamÄkmdnsâ t\Xr-Xz-¯n bm{X Xncn-¨p. Poh-\-¡mÀs¡m¸w Ah-cpsS Ip«n-Ifpw kwL ¯n-ep≠mbn-cp-¶p. Ip«n-IÄ¡v CXv ]p¯cn AÃm ¯-Xp-sIm≠v bm{X-bpsS XpS-¡¯ - n Xs¶ hml\ ¯n BtLmjw XpS-§n-¡-gn-ªncp-¶p. ]m«pIÄ s¡m¸w \r¯w sNbvXpw Ifn-X-am-i-IÄ ]dªpw AhÀ apXnÀ¶-hÀ¡v {]tNm-Z-\-am-bn. {ItaW apXnÀ¶hcpw AhÀs¡m¸w IqSm³ XpS§n. bm{X ]ptcm-K-an¡sh {]mb-t`-Z-at\y kzbw-a-d¶v FÃm-t]cpw Iem-]cn-]m-Sn-I-fn GÀs¸«p. kabw t]mb-X-dn-ªn-Ã, R§Ä BZy kt¦-Xamb am¯qÀ ]me-¯n F¯n. FÃmh-tcbpw hnkv a-bn-¸n-¡p-¶Xpw H¸w sNdnb `bw Df-hm-¡p-¶-Xp-amb Hcp-\p-`-h-am-bn-cp¶p B ]me-¯n-eq-sS-bp-Å bm{X. Gjy-bnse Xs¶ Gähpw Dbcw IqSnb sXm«n¸m-eam-Wn-Xv. 84

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Akn. tÌmÀ Hm-^okÀ

Ahn-sS-\n¶v bm{X-Xn-cn¨ R§Ä Hcp-a-Wn-¡q-dn\p-Ån ASp¯ tI{µamb Xr¸-c¸n F¯n. AXn]p-cm-X-\-amb 12 inhm-eb A¼-e-§-fn H¶m-Wv ChnsS-bp-Å-Xv. A¼-e-¯n Ibdn {]mÀ°n-¨-ti-jw, FÃmt] cpw Xmgvh-cbnse shÅ-¨m-«-¯n-\-cn-In-en-cp¶v eLp `-£Ww Ign-¨p. at\m-l-c-amb shÅ-¨m«w R-§sf BIÀjn-¨p. Cu shŨm«w R§-sf-Ãm-t]-cpsSbpw ico-c-s¯bpw H¸w a\-Ên-s\bpw XWp-¸n-¨p. kabw D¨-tbm-S-Sp¯p hcp-¶p, a\kv-knÃma\tÊmsS FÃmt]cpw shÅ-¯n \n¶v Icbv¡v Ib-dn, hml\-¯n  Ibdn AhnsS \n¶pw bm{X-bmb R§Ä \mKÀ tIm-hn ]n.BÀ.Fkv. BUntämdnb¯n F¯n. Ahn -sS Hcp kaq-l-kZy Ign-¡p¶ {]XoXn Bbn-cp¶p. D¨`-£-W-¯n\v km[m-cW kZy-I-gn-¨m D≠m-Ip¶ hnck-X-sbm¶pw R§Ä¡v A\p-`-h-s¸-«n-Ã. sNdn-sbmcp hn{i-a-¯n\p tijw R§Ä bm{X XpSÀ¶p e£yØm-\-amb I\ym-Ip-am-cn-bn-te¡v. `mcm-Xmw_ Xsâ Xr¡m-ep-IÄ C´y³ alm-k-ap{Z-¯n \\-bv¡p¶ at\m-l-c-Xocw F{X I≠mepw aXn-h-cm¯ {Xnth-Wn-kw-Kaw. Ht«sd sshhn-[y-§Ä sIm≠v k¼p-jvS-amb Xocw. Chn-Sps¯ kµÀi-\hpw tjm¸n§pw R§Ä-¡v Hcn-¡epw ad-¡m-\m-Ip-¶-X-Ã. Xncn-sI-bpÅ bm{X¡v ka-b-am-sb¶v ]d-ª-t¸mÄ IS¯o-cs¯ ]e-\n-d§-fp-Å B a®n FÃm-t]cpw Hcp \nanjw \n-i-_vZcm-bn-\n-¶p. Ft´m Hcp kt´m-jm-\p-`hw ssIhn-«pt]mbt]mse. aS-¡-bm-{X-¡m-bn hml-\-¯n Ibdnb FÃm-t]cpw Ignª aWn-¡q-dnse A\p-`-h-§Ä HmÀ¯v H¶v ab-§n. Xncn¨v Bip-]{Xn A¦-W-¯n F¯n-b-t¸mÄ cm{Xn 9 aWn-bm-bn. Hcp thdn« A\p-`-h-¯nsâ HmÀ½-Ifpw t]dn s¡m≠v FÃm-t]cpw kz´w hoSp-I-fn-te¡v aS¡-bm{X-bm-bn.


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Btcm-K-y-cw-Ks¯ C¶-se-Ifpw \msfbpw

tUm. BÀ. A-\p]a

Un.Pn.H., Un.F³._n., Fw.F³.F.Fw.Fkv.

No^v s^À-«n-en-än I¬-kÄ«â v

Btcm-KytaJ-e-bnen¶v [mcmfw {]Xn-_-Ô-§Ä t\cn«v sIm≠n-cn-¡p¶ Ime-L-«-am-Wv. kaq-l-¯n\v `nj-K-z-c³amcn DÅ hni-zmkw \jvS-s¸«v sIm≠v Ccn-¡p-I-bm-Wv. F´mWo amä-§Ä¡v Imc-W-sa¶ Hcp Nn´ XnI¨pw A\n-hm-c-y-am-Wv. C´y kz-X-{´-bm-hp-¶-Xn\v ap¼pÅ Ime-L-«¯n kaq-l-¯n tUmIvSÀamÀ hnc-f-am-bn-cp-¶p. IqSp-Xepw ]mÝm-X-yÀ. km[m-c-W-¡m-cmb tIc-fo-bÀ icWw {]m]n-¨n-cp-¶Xv \m«psshZ-y³am-scbpw hb-äm«n-I-sf-bp-am-Wv. ASp-¯-Im-e¯v am[-y-a-§-fn Gsd NÀ¨-sN-¿-s¸« hnj-b-amWv "hb-äm-«n-Ifpw ho«n-epÅ {]k-hhpw'. ]ecpw hotdmsS hmZn-¡p-¶p-≠m-bn-cp¶p tUmIvS-dpsS Bh-i-y-anà Hcp kv{Xo¡v kpJ-{]-k-h¯n\v F¶v. ]t£ C§s\ DZvtLm-jn-¡p-¶-hÀ Hcp hkvXpX ad-¡p-¶p. A¶s¯ amXr-in-ip-a-cW \nc¡v GI-tZiw 80% IS-¡p-am-bn-cp-¶psh¶v. ]t£ kaq-l¯n\v Cu sshZ-y³amÀ ssZh-Xp-e-y-cpw, AÛpX kn²nbp-Å-h-cp-am-bn-cp-¶p. kz-X-{´-`m-c-X-¯n Hmtcm C´-y³ ]uc\pw hnZ-ym`-ym-k-¯n-\pÅ Ah-kcw e`n-¨p. X³aqew Npcp¡w Nne saUn-¡ÂtIm-tf-Pp-IÄ Øm]n-X-am-bn. XpSÀ¶v Btcm-K-y-cw-K-t¯¡v ImÂsh-¨Xv Cu hnZ-ym-t£-{X§-fn \n¶v ]pd¯v h¶ tUmIvSÀam-cm-Wv. Ah-cn H«p-an-¡-hcpw kaq-l-¯n\v th≠n kz´w PohnXw amänsh-¨-h-cm-bn-cp-¶p. Ahsc kaqlw Cui-z-c³am-cmbn Xs¶ Icp-Xn. IpjvTw, hkq-cn, £bw t]mses¯ Ime-L-«s¯ ImÀ¶v Xn¶p-sIm-≠n-cp-¶, kaqlw Adt¸msS ho£n¨ tcmKn-IÄ¡n-S-bn-te¡v Cd-§n-sN¶v {]hÀ¯n-¡m³ Ignª AhÀ¡v asä´v hnti-j-WamWv DNn-Xw. Fgp-]-Xp-IÄ IS-¶-t¸mÄ Btcm-K-y-cw-K-t¯¡v kzIm-cy Øm]-\-§Ä h¶p XpS-§n. DZm-l-c-W-¯n\v, \½psS Øm]-\-amb ]n.-BÀ.-Fkv. Bip-]-{Xn-Xs¶ FSp-¡-Ww. hnc-en-se-®m-hp¶ {]KÂ`-cmb tUmIvSÀ amsc h¨v XpS¡w Ipdn-¨-XmWv 25 hÀj-§Ä¡v ap¼v Cu Øm]\w. hfÀ¨-bpsS ]S-hp-IÄ Hs¶m¶mbn Ib-dn-b-t¸m-gpw, Cu 25 hÀj-¯n\v tijhpw A¶s¯ XpS-¡-¡m-cpsS tkh\w C¶pw e`-y-am-Wv. AXv kqNn-¸n-¡p-¶Xv Ah-cn-epw, Øm]-\-¯nepw kaql-¯n-\pÅ hni-zm-k-am-Wv. t]sc-Sp¯v ]d-bp-¶n-sÃ-¦n-

epw, AhÀ¡v ap¼n BZ-c-thmsS Hcp {]Wm-aw. ]t£ sXm®q-dp-IÄ Ign-ª-t¸m-tg-¡pw, ]e \ma -¯nepw cq]-¯nepw aÄ«n-kvs]-j-ym-enän Bip-]-{XnIÄ cwK-s¯-¯n. kzm-{ib saUn¡Â tImtf-PpIÄ Iq¬t]mse s]m«n-ap-f-¨p. X³aqew Btcm-K-yta-Je I¨-h-S-h¡-cn-¡-s¸-Sp-¶-Xnsâ XpS-¡w-Ip-dn¨p. ss\\n-IX (Medical Ethics) A{]-[m-\-ambn XpS-§n. CXn\v B¡w Iq«m³ klm-b-I-am-bXv kmt¦-Xn-Ihn-Z-y-bpsS hfÀ¨-bpw, B[p-\nI h¡-c-W-hp-am-Wv. tUmIvSÀam-cpsS F®hpw {Iam-Xo-Xa - mbn hÀ²n-¡p¶p. km{I-an-I-tcm-K-§-fpsS AXn-{]-kcw C¶v BtcmK-y-ta-Je t\cn-Sp¶ Gähpw henb shÃp-hn-fn-bm-Wv. Cu {]iv\-§Äs¡Ãmw CS-bn tUmIvSÀamÀ¡n-S-bnepÅ tNcn-t¸mcv ImcWw \½sf kaq-l-a-\-km-£n¡v ap¼n A]-lm-k-y-cm-¡m³ X¸c I£n-IÄ¡v km[-y -am-bn. ]cn-lm-c-amÀ¤-§Ä A\n-hm-c-y-am-bn sIm≠n-cn¡p¶ Cu Ime-L-«-¯n Btcm-K-y-hn-Z-Kv[À apt¶m«v h¨ amÀ¤-§Ä Fs´m-s¡-bm-sW¶v t\m¡mw. Asæn Npcp-§nb Ime-¯n-\p-Ån \nb-a-§-fm hcn ªv apdp-¡-s¸-Spw. Btcm-K-y-]-cn-c£ saUn-¡Â hnZ-ym -`-ym-k-¯n-ep-S-\ofw ss\\n-I-Xbv¡v (Medical ethics) Du¶Â sImSp-¡-Ww. sadnäv am{Xw IW-¡m-¡m-sX, Btcm-K-y-cw-K-t¯¡v {]Xn-_²-X-bp-Å-hÀ IqSp-X Cu cwK-t¯¡v IS-¶p-h-c-Ww. tcmKn-Isf kl-Po-hnI-fmbn ImWp-hm-\pw, klm-\p-`q-Xn-tbmsS {]hÀ¯n¡p-hm\pw tUmIvSÀamÀ¡v Ign-b-Ww. taml-h-e-b-§fn sN¶ps]SmsX kq£n-¡-Ww. kl-{]-hÀ¯Isc ktlm-Z-c-§-sf-t]mse Icp-Xn, Ah-cpsS {]iv\§-fn Ahsc kam-i-z-kn-¸n-¡m³ {ian-¡-Ww. tUmIvSÀam-cpsS Atkm-kn-tb-j-\p-IÄ P\-k-¼À¡ ]cn-]m-Sn-IÄ¡v ap³Xq¡w sImSp-¡-Ww. ss\\n-IXbv¡v {]m[m-\yw \ÂIp¶ XpSÀhn-Z-ym-`-ymk ]cn-]m-SnIÄ D≠m-h-Ww. Gä-hp-a-[nIw Bß-kw-LÀj-§Ä t\cn-Sp¶ cwK-amWv Btcm-K-y-ta-J-e, AXp-sIm≠v Xs¶ Chn-sS-bp-≠m-hp¶ sNdnb {]iv\-§Ä s] cp-¸n¨v ImWn-¡m³ am[-y-a-§fpw {ian-¡m-Xn-cp-¶m \Ã-Xv. imkv{Xo-bhpw am\-kn-I-hp-amb amä-§-fn-eqsS \à C¶-e-IÄ ]p\-cp-Po-hn-¸n-¡m³ \ap¡v Ignbpw F¶v A\p-{K-ln-¡-s«. 85


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tacn Fw.sP.

sU]yq-«n \-gv-knwKv kq-{]≠v

P

a e t \m-l-c-amb Hcp s n ¯ X n oh

i t y Q u a l

H e a l t h c a r e

w k Zn h

]n.BÀ.Fkv. tlmkv]n-äe - nsâ 25þmw hmÀjn-It- ¯mSv A\p-_Ô - n¨v tlmkv]n-äense Poh-\¡ - mÀ¡mbn aq¶p ]nIv\nIv kwL-Sn-¸n-¨n-cp-¶p. AXn c-≠m-as¯ ]nIv\n¡n-emWv R§Ä t]mb-Xv. B Iq«m-bvab - n R§Ä 50 t]À H¯p tNÀ¶p. 2.11.2011 cmhnse 7 aWn-¡v ]nIv\nIv Bcw-`n-¨p. ]m«pw Um³kpw Hs¡-bmbn R§Ä Htc a\tÊmsS bm{X XpS-§n. ]n.-BÀ.-Fkv tlmkv]n-äe - nse FÃm hn`m-K¯ - nÂs¸« Poh-\¡mcpw Hcp IpSpw-_¯ - nse AwK-§s - f-t¸mse ]c-kv]cw a[p-c] - e - l - m-c§ - Ä ssIam-dnbpw Xam-iI - Ä ]dªv s]m«n-¨n-cn¨pw bm{X-bn DS-\ofw BlvfmZw ]¦p-h¨ - p. BZy-ambn R§Ä F¯nt¨À¶Xv sXm«n-¸m-e¯ - m-Wv. Gjy-bnse Gähpw henb ]me s - a¶ JymXn-bp-ambn \n¡p¶ sXm«n-¸m-e¯ - n-eqsS R§Ä \S-¶p. ]me-¯n\v Ccp-hi - hpw DÅ ae-\n-cI - Ä \b\ at\m-lc - § - f - m-bn-cp-¶p. Ahn-Ss¯ ImgvNI - Ä I≠-Xn\v tijw, R§Ä F¯n-t¨À¶Xv Xr¸-c¸ - n-em-Wv. Xncp-hn-Xmw-Iq-dnse {]ikvXa - mb 12 inh-t£-{X-§f - n apJy-hpw, inhm-eb Hm«-¯n c≠m-aX - mbn F¯nt¨-cp¶ t£{X-sa¶ hnti-jW - hpw DÅ Xr¸-c¸v t£{X-¯n-te-bv¡mWv t\tc t]m b-Xv. `K-hms\ sXmgpXv shÅ-¨m-«¯ - n Ipfn¨v R§Ä bm{X XpSÀ¶p. D¨-tbmsS R§Ä Xncp-h«- m-dn F¯n, AhnsS kzmZn-jvShpw hn`-hk - a - r-²h - p-amb D¨-`£ - Ww Hcp-¡n-bn-cp-¶p. `£Ww Ign¨v {Kq¸v t^mt«mbpw FSp¯v Ipd¨v kabw hn{i-an¨v R§Ä I\ym-Ip-am-cnbn F¯n-t¨À¶p. Imäpw tImfpw \ndª {]£p-_v[a - mb Imem-hØ - b - mWv R§sf FXn-tc-äX - v. AXn-\m hniz-{]-ik - vXa - mb hnth-Im-\µ - ¸md kµÀin-¡m³ Ign-ªn-Ã. sshIp-t¶cw Ahn-sS-\n¶pw eLp-`£ - Whpw Ign¨v R§Ä aS-§n. at\m-lc - a - mb B bm{X A§s\ Ah-km-\n-¨p. Pohn-¯X - nse Ahkvac - W - o-ba - mb aplqÀ¯-§f - m-bn-cp-¶p. B bm{X-bp-S\ - ofw D≠m-bn-cp-¶X - v. ]m«pw Um³kpw Hs¡bmbn R§Ä kt´m-jn¨ \nan-j§ - Ä. tcmK-§fpw Zpcn-X§ - fpw \nXy hpw ImWp¶ Bip-]{Xn Pohn-X¯ - nse hyXy-kvXa - mb HtcSv Bbn-cp-¶p B bm{X. R§Ä FÃm-hcpw Htc a\-tÊmsS Htc Blvfm-Zt- ¯msS Hä IpSpw-_ambn amdnb at\m-lc - a - mb B bm{X Pohn-X¯ - nse Ahn-kvac - W - o-ba - mb Hcp A\p-`h - a - m-bn-cp-¶p. 86


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H e a l t h c a r e

Prof. Dr. V.E. Krishna Mohan MD

Consultant Pathologist

For thousands of years, the human body was a mystery to the world of Science. Indeed, cultures across the globe employed various forms of observations, experience, ritual, intuition and other methods to combat illness. Such effect met with varying degree of success, Yet, profound exploration of Human Physiology remained elusive. Many other questions in the understanding of blood went unanswered. During and shortly after the 2nd world war, the concept of transfusion achieved acceptance. The transfusion time line highlights the great work of many Individuals. The discoveries, inventions, observations and practices since ancient times have led to remarkable progress and resulted in effective treatments. The 20th century has witnessed the most progress in the enumerable transfusion practice activities and safety. Past Practices and Beliefs Egypt: Egyptians bathed in blood for their health. It is believed that the ancient king of Egypt apparently bathed in blood, believing such baths to “resuscitate the sick and rejuvenate the old and ‘incapacitated”, as well as believing to be a cure for elephantiasis. The Egyptians also used ‘bleeding’ to treat patients. A tomb illustration in Memphis-

Egypt, belonging to 2500 BC depicts a patient bleeding from the foot and neck. Taurbolium mentioned the practice of bathing in blood as it cascaded from a sacrificial bull, was practiced by the Romans. “Documents in the 1st Century AD described how spectators, rushed into the arena to drink the blood of dying gladiators. These people did this because they felt that such blood was especially beneficial, since the athletes were strong and brave, qualities that they believed were present within and therefore transmissible by the blood of the person concerned. History 1. In 1492, Pope Innocent VIII received blood directly from 3 boys to save his life. All of them died. 2. China: In 1000 BC, the Chinese believed that the soul was contained in the blood. 3. Classical Greek Medicine: In classical Greek Medicine, the blood was associated with air, spring time and with a merry and gluttonous (sanouine) personally. It was also believed to be produced exclusively by the liver. In Hippocratic medicine, blood was considered to be one of the four humors together with phlegm, yellow bile and black bile and their imbalance causes disease. 4. Viking tribes and ancient Norwegians reportedly drank the blood of seals and whales as a remedy for epilepsy and scurvy. Roman Empire: 1. In classical times Romans and Greeks besides bathing in blood, have reportedly drank it. 87


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Organ Sharing -

Myths and Facts

88

Dr. R. Deepa MD Sr. Assistant Professor of Microbiology Madras Medical College & Rajiv Gandhi Govt. General Hospital,Chennai

Organ Sharing- Myths and Facts Every year, a few thousands of lives are saved by transplant surgery in this country. Sadly, thousands more are lost waiting for organs that would have transformed their lives. Besides, living organ sales, in contravention of the law of the land, also get reported. This is because cadaveric transplantation - using organs of dead persons - is at a low level in India. In India, the biggest problem facing the transplant community is the shortage of cadaveric donor organs, due to lack of utilization of the available cadaver organs from brain dead persons. Here are a few myths and facts on organ sharing that every one of us needs to know.1

Myth: There are age limits on donation Fact: There is no age limit on who can donate. Whether individuals can donate organs and tissue depends on their physical condition, not their age. Newborns as well as senior citizens have been organ donors. Myth: Donation will disfigure my body. Fact: Donated organs are removed surgically in a routine operation similar to appendix removal. Donation doesn’t disfigure the body.

2. In 1628 English Physician William Harvey (15781657) described the functions of the heart and the circulation of blood. 3. In 1661, The Royal Society was founded in London and received its Royal charter in 1662. 4. In 1665, the first blood transfusions of record took place. Richard Lower demonstrated the first animal to animal transfusions and then animal to human transfusion by Jean-Baptiste Denis in 1667. 5. In 1818, James Blundell, a British obstetrician performed the 1st successful transfusion of human blood to a patient for the treatment of post partum Hemorrhage. 6. In 1865 Dr. J Roussel used direct arm to arm transfusion for a patient with puerperal hemorrhage. During the period 1873 to 1884, physicians in the United States are documented to have transfused milk of animals to humans. Soon saline infusion replaced milk as a ‘blood substitute’. 7. In 1901, Karl Landsteiner documented the first three

human blood groups A, B and O. In 1902 A fourth main blood type AB was found by A. Decastrello and A. Sturli In 1903, Karl Landsteiner received the Nobel Prize in Medicine. 8. In 1915 Richard Lewlsohn was documented to have used Sodium Citrate as an anticoagulant which was to have transformed the blood banking system. R.Weil Demonstrated the feasibility of refrigerated storage of such anti coagulated blood at the same time. 9. In 1916, citrate-glucose solution was introduced for storage of blood for several days. 10. In 1932 the 1st functional blood bank was established in Leningrad Russia Hospital. The 1st hospital Blood Bank was established in USA in 1937. 11. In 1940’s Plasma was broken down into its components that were used to treat bleeding patients. 12. In 1947, Carl Walter introduced plastic bags for blood collection. Carl Walter founded the Fenwal Laborotory with T. Legave Fenn in 1947. Courtesy: Fenwal

Myth: My family will be charged for donating my organs. Fact: Donation costs nothing to the donor’s family. Funeral costs remain the responsibility of the family. Myth: My decision to be a donor will affect my medical care


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Fact: Organ and tissue recovery takes place only after all efforts to save your life have been exhausted and death has been legally declared. The medical team treating you is completely separate from the transplant team. Myth: Religion does not support donation. Fact: Most major religions approve of organ and tissue donation and consider it an act of charity. Myth: I have a history of medical illness. Hence I cannot donate organs. Fact: At the time of brain death, the appropriate medical professionals will review the donor’s medical and social histories to determine whether or not he/she can be a donor. Myth: I don’t need to tell my family that I want to be a donor because I have it written in my will. Fact: By the time your will is read, it will be too late to recover your organs. Telling your family now that you want to be an organ and tissue donor is the best way to ensure that your wishes are carried out. Myth: If emergency room doctors know I am an organ donor, they won’t work as hard to save me. Fact: If you are sick or injured and admitted to the hospital, the number one priority is to save your life. Organ donation can only be considered after brain death has been declared by a physician. Many states have adopted legislation allowing individuals to legally designate their wish to be a donor should brain death occur, although in many states Organ Procurement Organizations also require consent from the donor’s family. Myth: Wealthy people and celebrities are moved to the top of the list faster than ‘regular’ people The organ allocation and distribution system is blind to wealth or social status. The length of time it takes to

receive a transplant is governed by many factors, including blood type, length of time on the waiting list, severity of illness and other medical criteria. Factors such as race, gender, age, income or celebrity status are never considered when determining who receives an organ Myth :I have heard that they take everything even if I want to donate only my eyes Fact: You can specify which organ you want to donate in your donor card and by informing your family. Myth: Having “organ donor” noted on my driver’s licence or carrying a donor card is all I have to do to become a donor. Fact: In most states, hospitals can legally proceed with organ, eye or tissue donation, without consent from next of kin, if you have a driver’s license with an “organ donor” designation and have signed up with an organ donor registry. However, it’s important to talk to your family about your decision to donate LIFE so they are aware of your wishes and will feel comfortable honoring them. Myth: Only hearts, liver, and kidneys can be transplanted. Fact: Needed organs include the heart, kidneys, pancreas, lungs, liver and intestines. Tissue that can be donated include the eyes, skin, bone, heart valves and tendons. Author: Dr. R. Deepa is involved in the infectious diseases screening and cross matching of donor and potential organ recipients prior to deceased organ transplantation at MMC & RGGGH.2 Sources: 1. Official Website of National Network for Organ Sharing. 2. Deepa .R, Complement dependant Cytotoxicity in Deceased Donor Renal Transplant-A Single Institutional Experience. Indian J Med Microbiol 2011;29:414-7. 89


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Bgv¨h« kvac-W-IÄ s{]m-^. tUm. hn.C. Ir-jv-W-tam-l³ Fw.Un. D¨bv¡v DuWp-I-gnªv A½q½ Xsâ ]mb hncn¨p ]pS-h-sIm≠v Hcp Xe-bW D≠m¡n Dd-§m³ InS-¶p. I®\v Ft¸mgpw kpc-£n-XXzw tXm¶p-¶Xv A½q½bpsS ASp¯v Npcp-≠p-IqSn InS-¡p-t¼m-gm-Wv. ""cmap-®n-tb-«³ C\n Bcm-bn«v P\n¡pw'' I®³ A½p-½-tbmSv tNmZn-¨p. ""\à lrZbhpw ]cn-ip-²-amb kv\lhp-ap-Å-hÀ¡v C\n Hcp P·-an-Ã. AhÀ Cuiz-c-km-£m-XvImcw t\ Spw'' A½p½ ]d-ªp. cmap-®n-tb-«s\tbmÀ¯v I®\v kam-[m-\-ambn. Ah³ A½q½-tbmSv tNÀ¶v InS-¶p. A½-bpsS A`mhw I®³ Adn-bm-¯Xv A½q-½-bpsS kvt\ lw H¶p-sIm-≠p-am-{X-am-Wv. cmhnse Fgp-t¶-äm {]`mX{]mÀ°-\. Ipd¨p ]Tn-¡mw. A½q-½ Hcp XpSw FsÅ® Xe-bn-sem-gn-¨p-X-cpw. AXpw XShn, ssI¿n hmk-\-c-ln-X-tkm¸pw. Hcp tXmÀ¯p-ambn t\sc A¼e-¡p-f-¯n-tebv¡v, \o´epw Ipfnbpw Ignªp inht£-{X-hpw, kmaqXn-cn-cm-Pmhv t\cn«v \S-¯p¶ tZhnt£-{Xhpw hW-§n, \nth-Zy-tNm-dp-ambn ho«n-tebv¡v aS-§pw. ]ns¶ {]`mX`£Ww Ignªp kvIqfn-tebv¡v. sshIp-t¶cw A½q½ ]dbpw: ""I®m, koX¸ip-hn-t\bpw InSm-hn-t\bpw `K-hXo-]p-c-¯n \n¶v ho«n-tebv¡v sXfn-¨p-sIm-≠p-hcq''. I®\v Gähpw CjvS-apÅ Imcy-am-WXv ImcWw Ah\v koX-¸-iphpw InSmhpw Poh-\m-Wv. ho«n sN¶v Be-bn ]ip-hns\ sI«n-bn«v Fs´-¦nepw Ign¨v F¶p hcp¯n Hscmä Hm«-am-Wv. ]ns¶ Ifn-IfpsS _lfw. ]´p-I-fn, k¬tU-I-fn, AIt¯m ]pd t¯m hÃ-t¸mgpw tN¨nbpsS IqsS ]Ãmw¦pgn Ifnbv¡pw. {In¡-äv, _mUvanâ³ XpS-§nb Ifn-I-sf-Ipdn¨v I®³ tI«n-cp-¶n-Ã. Ifn-I-gnªv ho«n-se-¯nbm A½q½ I®s\ H¶pt\m¡pw. ""I®m DSp-¸nepw ico-c-¯nepw apgp-h³ a®mWv \o F´m CS-h-gn-bn sRcp§n \o´ntbm'' ssI¿pw Im epw taÂIgp-Iepw Ign-ªm ]ns¶ hnkvXc - n-¨pÅ \ma -P-]-am-Wv. FÃm-hcpw AXn ]¦p-tN-cpw. AXp-sIm≠v I®\v hnjvWp-k-l-{k-\maw ImWm]mTw. ]ns¶ BZn90

Xy-lr-Z-bhpw, AXp Ign-ªm ]T-\w-. Imew F{X-th-K-amWv IS¶p t]mIp-¶-Xv. a\Êv ]g-b-Im-es¯ B \Ã-\m-fp-I-fn-tebv¡v sasà ^vsf anwtKm ]£nsbt¸mse ]d-¶p-t]m-bn. \nÀ½-e-amb kvt\lw a\ÊnepS-se-Sp-¡p-¶Xv Iuam-c-¯ntem buÆ\-¯ntem Aà _mey-¯n-em-Wv. _mey-Ime HmÀ½-Ifn F¶pw kq£n¨psh¨ kvt\l-¯nsâ IY a\Ên-tebv¡v IS¶phcpw. tah® aT-¯nse At´-hm-kn-IÄ¡v A¶pw Hcp km[m-cW Znhkw t]mse-bm-bn-cp-¶p. F¶m B aT-¯nse I®³ BtLm-j¯n-aÀ¸n-em-Wv. A¶v tN¨n-bpsS IqsS Ahsâ kvIqfn-te-bv¡pÅ BZybm-{X-bmWv ]cn-{`-ahpw kt´m-jhpw sIm≠v a\ Êv hn§ns¸m«p-I-bm-Wv. It¨-cn-¡p¶v Kh¬saâ v kvIqfn-se BZy-ImÂhbv¸v. C¶-s¯-t¸mse sI.Pn sb¶pw A¶p-≠m-bn-cp-¶n-Ã. I¿n XpWn-Ê©nbpw AXn-\p-Ån tÉäpw. s]³knepw ]ns¶ tÌäv ambv¡m-\pÅ shÅ-¯≠pw Hcp Intem-ao-äÀ Zqc-bpÅ kvIqfn-tebv¡v tN¨n-tbmsSm¸w Ab-e-¯pÅ Iq«p-ImÀ FÃmw IqSn Hcp ]S. kvIqfns\ Xgp-In-H-gp-Ip¶ tXmSnsâ adp-Ic Xma-kn¡p¶ sh¦-e-aq-imcn ]dbpw ""B«n³ Ip«n-IfpsS ]S Fgp-¶Åp-¶p≠v'' \¼qXncn amjnsâ ¢mkn I®³ Ccn-¡p-I-bm-Wv. amjnsâ hchpw Im¯v. A¸p-¸-t\bpw A½p-sbbpw ImWm³ amjv ]e-t¸mgpw ho«n hcp-am-bn-cp-¶p. A½p-½-bpsS kw`mcw amjn\v hfsc CjvSam-bn-cp-¶p. I®sâ IpSpw-_-¯nse hc-{]-km-Z-amb tZhn-t£-{X¯n\v ASp-¯m-bn-cp¶p amjv Xma-kn-¨n-cp-¶-Xv. H¶mw ¢mkp-ap-X I®s\ ]Tn-¸n¨Xv amjm-Wv. IY-Ifpw, ]gs©mÃpIfpw, IW-¡nse amPn¡pw ck-I-c-ambn At±lw ]Tn-¸n-¨p. Hcp Znhkw tN¨n I®-t\mSv ]dªp ""Ip«m Rm³ ASp-¯-hÀjw kvIqÄ amdp-I-bmWv. C\n F\n¡v BgvN-h-«-¯nse kvIqfn-emWv t]mtI-≠Xv''. ""B kvIqfn F´m C{X henb {]tXy-IX?'' I®³ tNmZn-¨p.


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""henb ¢mkmWv Ifn-bv¡m³ ssaXm-\-ap-≠v.- hm-b-\im-e-bp≠v ]ns¶ Hmtcm hÀjhpw ]Tn-¸n¡m³ shtÆsd A²ym-]-IÀ'' tN¨n hnh-cn-¨p. BgvN-h-«-t¯bv¡v c≠p hgn-I-fp-≠v. H¶v hfª hgn, aq¶p Intem-ao-äÀ \S-¡-Ww. AsÃ-¦n ivaim\w hgn. H¶-c In-tem-ao-ä-td-bp-Åq. Ipcp¶p a\-Êp-I-fnse `oXn-Im-cWw, I®\pw Iq«p-Imcpw hf-ª-h-gn-bnemWv bm{X. It¨cn¡p-¶nse ]Tn-s¸Ãmw Ignªv I®\pw BgvNh-«-t¯bv¡v tNt¡dn. [mcmfw Iq«p-Imcpw Iq«p-Im-cn-Ifpw i¦-c-\pw, IrjvW\pw CÃs¯ `mKo-cYn X¼p-cm-«nbpw, hoSp-IÄ tXmdpw tamcpw sh®bpw hnÂ]\ \S-¯p¶ cmL-th«sâ aI³ apcp-I³, tKmX¼v s]mSn-¸n-¡p¶ anÃnse cmPn-b-½m-fnsâ aI³ chn A§s\ H¯n-cn-t¸À. Ccp]-tXmfw hcp¶ Ipªm-Sn³ ]S. I®\v BgvNh«w kvIqfn t]mIm³ henb Cjvam-bn-cp-¶p. ImcWw tÉäpw, tÉäp-s]³knepw th≠. ]Icw IS-emkv ]pkvX-I-§fpw t]\bpw. C¶-s¯-t¸mse t_mÄt]-\-bpw, sPÂt]-\-bp-sam¶p-an-Ã. kzm\pw »m¡v t_ÀUpambn-cp¶ ]W-¡mcpsS a¡Ä¡v. Ah-cp-sS-bn-S-bn I®³ D]-tbm-Kn-¨ncp¶ Atim-I-t]-\bv¡v henb Øm\sam¶p-an-Ã. Hcn-¡Â I®³ A½q-½-tbmSv Bh-i-y-s¸«p ""F\n¡v Hcp kzm³ t]\ hm§n-X-cWw''. I®sâ A½q½ Ahs\ Hcn-bv¡epw \ncm-i-s¸-Sp¯p-I-bn-Ã. A½q½ ]dbpw ""A½m-h³ _Ãm-cn-bn \n ¶pw sIm≠phcpw'' AXp-tI-«Â aXn, I®\v Xr]vXnbm-hm-³ Ah³ {]Xo-£-tbmsS Im¯n-cn-¡pw. PohnX-¯n {]Xo-£-bn-sÃ-¦n FÃmw ZpxJ-am-hp-I-bntÃ? s^u≠³ t]\-bn F¶pw ajn \nd-bv¡-Ww. I®\pw Iq«p-Imcpw kvIqfnsâ ASp-¯pÅ cmhp-®ntb-«sâ IS-bn \n¶mWv ajn \nd-¨n-cp-¶-Xv. A¶pw {_n ajn D≠m-bn-cp¶p F¶m I®\pw Iq«p-Imcpw ajn KpfnI Aen-¨p-≠m-¡nb ajn-bmWv D]-tbmKn-¨n-cp-¶-Xv. {_n ajnbv¡v hne IqSp-X-em-Wv. I®\v cmhp-®n-tb-«s\ ad-¡m-\m-hn-Ã. A¶v cmhp-®n-tb-«\v Adp-]-tXmfw hb-Êp-≠m-bn-cp-¶p. ""cmhp-®n-tb-«³'' F¶v hnfn-bv¡p-t¼mÄ, ISbv¡v Xmsg _oUnsXdp¡p¶ samb-vXo³ lmPn (C-t±lw sa¡-bn-sem¶pw t]mbn-«n-Ã. sa¡ C³U-y-bn-emWv F¶mWv hni-zm-kw. Hcp Znhkw t]mIp-sa¶pw {]Xo-£n¨p Ign-bp¶p) ] dbpw. ""FSm sIm¨p-§sf \n§fv Rt½sS cmhp-®n sb sNdp-¸-am-¡p-I-bmtWm?'' CXp-tI-«m cmhp-®n-tb-«\v s]cp¯v kt´mj-am-Ipw. c≠p ss]ktbm aq¶v ss]k-tbm BWv t]\-bn ajn \nd-bv¡m³. I®\pw Iq«p-Imcpw

AhnsS\n-¶mWv ajn \nd-bv¡p¶Xv. [rXn Iq«n-bm cmhp-®n-tb-«³ kz-X-kn-²-amb Nncn-tbmsS ]d-bpw. ""a¡tf CXv aq{Xw Hgn-bv¡p-¶Xv t]mse A{X Ffp-¸-apÅ Imc-y-aÃ. ajn-bmWv ajn''. ajn \nd¨ t]\-tbm-sS¸w I®\pw Iq«p-ImÀ¡pw Hmtcm ISpIv anTmbn cmhp®ntb«³ Xcpw. kzm-Z-dnbpw apt¼ anTmbn Aenªp t]mIpw. F¦nepw cmhp-®ntb-«sâ kvt\lw \mhn-epw a\-Ênepw X§n \nÂIpw. kzm-X-{´-Zn-\-¯n-\pw, dn¸-»n¡v Zn\-¯n\pw I®\pw Iq-«p-ImÀ¡pw Np-h¸v anTm-bn-bpw, \mc§ anTm-bnbpw ]ns¶ Hcp sImSnbpw cmhp®ntb«³ \ÂIn-bn-cp-¶p. cmhp-®n-tb-«-s\-t¸mse Hcp I¨-h-S-¡m-c-\m-bm Xct¡-Snà F¶v I®³ Icp-Xn. F¶pw a[pcw \pW-bv¡matÃm. sImÃ-¸-co-£-bmbn. ]co£ Ignªp. Ah -km-\-Zn-hkw kmaq-l-y-]m-T-am-bn-cp¶p. cmhp-®n-tb-«sâ IS-bn Ibdn ASp-¯-sImÃmw ImWm-sa¶v bm{X ]d-ªp. ""A©mw-¢m-Ên tNcm³ hcp-t¼mÄ Rm\o-¡S H¶p hep-Xm-¡pw. sFkv{Iow D≠mIpw. \¶mbn ]Tn¡p¶ Ip«n-IÄ¡v kÀ_¯v Xcpw. ¢mÊn H¶m-a-\mbm IkvIkv tNÀ¯ sFkv {^q«v'' cmhp-®n-tb-«³ ]d-ªp. I®\pw Iq«p-ImÀ¡pw CXn¸cw F´p-thWw? Nne-t¸mÄ tN¨n-tbm-sS¸w AsÃ-¦n AÑ-t\m-sSm¸w _kn bm{X-sN-¿p-t¼mÄ BgvN-h«w _kv tÌm¸v F¯n-bm cmhp-®n-tb-«sâ IS-bn-tebv¡v H¶p t\m ¡pw. IS ]g-b-Xp-t]mse Xs¶ ]pXp-¡n-¸Wn H¶pw \S-¶n-«n-Ã. th\-e-h-[n-sbÃmw Ignªp am¦mhv tImhn-e-Is¯ sNdn-tb-«³ cmP-kmÀ ]dªp \msf-bmWv ^ew {] J-ym-]n-¡p-¶Xv IqsS amÀ¡pw CSp-¶p-≠v. cmhp-®n-tb-«sâ hmKvZm-\-amWv a\-Ên A¼-e¯n h¨v `mKo-cYn X¼p-cm«n ]dªp I®³ Xs¶bm-bn-cn¡pw ¢mÊn H¶m-a³ CXv tI«-t¸mÄ a\Êv kt´mjw sIm≠v \nd-ªp. cmhnse Hcp§n I®³ Iq«p-Im-cp-sam-¯v, tZhnsb sXmgpXv kv¡qfn-te¡v bm{X-bm-bn. ssIbn ]pkvXI-an-Ã, D¨-t¨m-dn-Ã, IpS-bn-Ã, hfsc hnim-e-amb Hcp \S-¯w. kvIqfn Ip«n-I-fpsS Xnc-¡m-Wv. F¶m cmhp-®n-tb-«sâ IS Xpd-¶n-«n-Ã. Xpd-¡p-am-bn-cn¡pw F¶v {]Xo-£n-¨p-, ^ew t\m¡m³ t]mbn. apIp-µ³ hnfn¨p ]d-ªp. ""I®m, \n BWv H¶m-a³'', I®\v kt´m-j-am-bn. hmKvZm-\-§Ä H¯n-cn-bp-≠v. _Ãmcn ama-bpsS kzm³ t]\, cmhp-®n-tb-«sâ IkvIkv tNÀ ¯ sFkv {^q«v A½q-½-bpsS hI-bmbn ]pXnb tNmäp -]m-{Xw. ]Xn-s\m¶p aWn-hsc kvIqfn Id§n\S-¶p. 91


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\m«n³]p-ds¯ ]pcm-X\ - a - mb Hcp XdhmSv, tIih³kzm-an- Xd-hm-«nse Imc-Wh - À, aq¯-aI - ³ ImÀ¯ntI-b³ c≠mas¯ aIÄ ktcmPw, aq¶m-as¯ aIÄ kc-kp, \mem-as¯ aI³ A¸p. FÃm-t]À¡pw hnZym-`ymkw Ipdhv \m«n³]p-da - tÃ, tImtfPv hnZym-`ymk-¯n-\pÅ \ne-hm-cs - am-¶p-an-Ã. ktcm-P¯ - n\v Hcp IeymWmtem-N\ h¶p. ]¿³ KÄ^n-emWv Htc-t¡À Øehpw ]¯p-]d- \ - n-ehpw ]Xn-\©v ]hsâ Dcp-¸Sn bpw. sNdp-¡\v s]®ns\ CjvSs - ¸-«p. IeymWw Dd¸m bn aq¶p amks¯ ka-ba - p-≠v. Ieym-W¯ - nsâ \S-¯n¸n-s\ kw_-Ôn¨p ho«p-Imcpw _Ôp-¡fpw HmSn-\S- ¡p-¶p. c≠p Znh-kw-sIm≠v ktcm-P¯ - n\v \à kpJan-Ã. Hcp Pe-tZm-j¯ - nsâ Bcw`w Xp½pew aq¡p Noä epw, ASp¯v Hcp sNdnb Bip-]{- Xn-, AhnsS sIm≠p ImWn-¨p. tUmIvSÀ ]cn-tim-[n-¨p. càw ]cn-tim-[n ¡m³ Fgp-Xn-sImSp¯p. ]cn-tim-[\ - I - g- nªv ASp¯ Znhkw tUmIvSsd ho≠pw I≠p. Ign-¡m-\pÅ KpfnIfpw IpSn-¡m-\pÅ acp¶pw Fgp-Xn-sIm-Sp-¯p. Znh-k§Ä ]eXp Ignªp tcmK-¯n\v Ipd-hn-Ã. Ieym-Ws - ]®nsâ Akp-Js¯ Iq«p-Im-cn-IÄ Ifn-bm¡n XpS§n

At¸m-gm-Wv hoSp-IÄtXmdpw Ibdn Cd-§n cà-]c - ntim-[\ \S-¯p¶ Hcp sl¯v hnkn-äÀ h¶v FÃmt]-cp-sSbpw càw FSp¯psIm≠p-t]mbn Hcm-gvN Ignª-t¸mÄ AbmÄ ho≠pwh¶p. tIi-hk - zm-anbpw ktcm-Phpw se{]kn skâ-dn F¯-Ws - a-¶v ]d-ªp. ImcWw hyà-am-bn-Ã. F´n-\msW¶v tNmZn-¨t- ¸mÄ \n§-fpsS cà-]c - n-tim-[\ - b - n \n§-fp-sS tcmKs¯¸ än-bpÅ hni-Zh - n-hc - § - Ä Adn-bn-¡m³ \msf X - s¶ F¯Ww F¶v ]d-ªn«v AbmÄ t]m-bn. ASp¯ Znhkw {]`m-X¯n tPyjvT³ ImÀ¯ntI-b\ - p-am-bn«v ktcmPw sl¯v skâ-dn t]mbn tUmIvSsd I≠p. tUmIvSÀ ktcm-Ps¯ ]cn-tim-[n-¨p. ktlm-Zc - t- \mSv Imcy-§Ä tNmZn¨p a\-Ên-em-¡n. IeymW-¯n\v C\n c≠p-amkw am{Xta ka-ba - pÅq. AXn\n-Sb - v¡mWv AkpJw F´mWv tUmIvSÀ AkpJw ImÀ¯n-tI-b³ hfsc DÂIWvTtbmSp tNmZn-¨p. tUmIv SÀ hfsc kuay-am-bn«v ImÀ¯n-tI-bt- \mSp ]pd-¯pt]mbncn-¡m³ ]d-ªp. kwibw a\-Ên XfwsI«n a\Ên-Ãm-a\ - t- km-sS- ImÀ¯n-tI-b³ ]pd¯p-t]m-bn, tUmIv SdpsS apdnbpsS ap¶n Xq¡n-bn-cn-¡p¶ t_mÀUv t\m

cmhp-®n-tb-«sâ IS C\nbpw Xpd-¶n-«n-Ã. Iq«pImÀ aS §m³ Xocp-am-\n-¨p. sambvXo³Ip«nlmPn ]oSn-I-Xn-®-bn-en-cp¶p _oUn hen-bv¡p-¶p. I®³ tNmZn-¨p. ""Ft´ cmhp-®ntb-«³ IS Xpd-¡m-¯Xv'' lmPn Xe \nhÀ¯n I®sâ apJ¯p t\m¡n ""tams\, C¶se \n§-fpsS cmhp-®n-tb-«³ acn-¨p-t]m bn. tUm. Fw.F. \mb-cpsS NnIn-Õb - m-bn-cp-¶p. s\©n  I^-s¡«pw \ocpw IqSn izmkw In«m-sXbm acn-¨X - v.'' I®sâ a\Êv hÃmsX hnXp-¼n. ]co£m ^e -¯nsâ Bth-i-saÃmw amªp-t]m-bn. I®sâ apXpIn X«n `mKo-cYn X¼p-cm«n ]dªp ""cmhp-®n-tb-«³ Ipsd Znhkw IqSn Ignªp acn-¨m aXn-bm-bn-cp-¶p.'' ""C¶se sshIp-t¶cw hf-b-\mSv ivaim-\-¯nemWv Zln-¸n-¨Xv'' lmPn ]dªp tN¨n-tbmSv sI©n-¸d-ª-Xp-sIm≠v A¶v ho«n-te-bv¡pÅ bm{X hf-b-\mSv

ivaim\w hgn-bm-¡n. I®sâ a\-Ên `oXn-bn-Ãm-bncp-¶p. ivaim-\-sa-¯n-b-t¸mÄ I®s\m¶p t\m¡n. NnXbn Fcn-ªa-cp¶ ih-i-co-c-§Ä AXn-te-Xntem H¶v cmhp-®n-tb-«sâXmWv. I®sâ a\Êv ZpxJw sIm ≠v \ndªp cmhp-®n-tb-«sâ kvt\l-¯nsâ apJw a\-Ên sXfn-ªp. a\-Ên H¯ncn kwi-b-§Ä. D¯cw \ÂIm³ Hcm-sf-bpÅq, A½q-½. kwi-b-§Äs¡Ãmw A½q½ adp-]Sn ]dªp cmhp®n-tb-«\v ]p\ÀP-·-anà ImcWw cmhp-®n-tb-«³ kvt\lap-Å-h\pw, \Ã-h-\p-am-bn-cp-¶p. I®\v kam-[m-\-ambn. GXm-bmepw cmhp-®n-tb-«³ Cui-z-c-k-¶n-[n-bn-em-W-tÃm. kvt\l-¯nsâ hym]vXn I®-\-dn-ªXv cmhp®n tb«-\n-eq-sS-bm-Wv.


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¡n tUmIvSÀ tXmakv IpjvTt- cm-Kh - n-ZK - v[³. ImÀ¯ntI-bsâ Xe-bn Hcp CSnXo hnW-Xp-t]mse tXm¶n. F´v ktcm-P¯ - n\v IpjvTt- cm-Ktam þ Hcn-¡e - p-aà - . shdpw Pe-tZmjw Rms\-´n\v Chn-sS-sIm≠p h¶p Rm³ Ahsf hnfn¨v sIm≠p t]mImw F¶v a\-Ên IcpXn FWo-ät- ¸mÄ tUmIvSÀ tXmaÊv ImÀ¯n-tIbs\ hnfn-¨p. ImÀ¯n-tI-b³ apdn-bn sN¶p. ktcmPs¯ tUmIvSÀ ]cn-tim-[n-¡p-Ib - mWv ktcm-P¯ - nsâ ssIhn-ce - p-IÄ \nhÀ¯n-]n-Sn-¡m³ ]d-ªp. ssI¿n t\m¡msX Xncnªp \n¡m³ ]d-ªp. tUmIvSÀ Hcp t]¸À IjWw FSp-¯n«v ktcm-P¯ - nsâ Hmtcm hnc-ep-If - n-embn kv]Àin-¨p. H¶v c≠v aq¶v ktcmPw H¶pw Adn-bp-¶n-Ã. ASp-¯h - n-c t\m¡n t]¸À sXm«Xmbn ktcmPw ]d-ªp. kmc-an-Ã. ktcm-Pt- ¯mSp ]pd¯p-t]mbncn¡m³ ]d-ªn«v ImÀ¯n-tI-bt\mSv hnh-c§Ä tNmZn-¨p. Hcp Pe-tZm-j¯ - nsâ Bcw`w F´mWv tUmIvSÀ C§s\? tUmIvSÀ þ kmc-anà tcmK-¯nsâ BZy-Zn-ib - mWv NnInÂkn¨v t`Z-am¡mw ImÀ¯nþ tUmIvSÀ ktlm-Zc - n-bpsS IeymWw tUmIvSÀ þ AXn\v XS-Êa - n-Ã. tcmKw t`mZ-ambm ]n s¶´m {]iv\w ImÀ¯nþ tUmIvSÀkmÀ CXv IpjvTt- cmKw Xs¶bmtWm tUmIvSÀ þ XoÀ¨-bm-bn«pw ktcm-P¯ - nsâ càw FSp¯-t¸mÄ Ahn-sS-\n¶v \n§-fpsS AÑsâ càw IqSn FSp-¯n-cp-¶p. At±-l¯ - nsâ càw ]cn-tim-[n-¨t- ¸mÄ ktcm-Pt¯-¡mÄ F{Xtbm hÀjw ap³]mWv At±-l¯n\v Cu tcmKw XpS-§n-bn«v ]s£ ]pd-¯d- n-ªn-Ã. Ct¸mÄ ]cn-tim-[\bn am{X-amWv sXfn-bp-¶X - v. Ahn sS \n¶mWv ktcm-Phpw tcmKn-bm-Im³ Imc-Ww. ImÀ¯n t- I-b³ BsI-¸msS _p²namµyw kw`-hn-¨X - p-t]mse. tUmIvSÀ ]dªp kam-[m-\n-¸n-¨p. ktcm-Ps¯ se{]kn skâ-dn AUvanäv sNbvXn«v Znhk-§Ä ]eXp Ign-ªp. ktcm-P¯ - nsâ Ieym-W¯ - n\v C\n GXm\w BgvNI - Ä am{Xw. tUm. tXma-knsâ \n Àt±-i{- ]-Imcw ktcm-Ps¯ IeymWw Ign-¡m³ t]mIp ¶ sN¡s\ Iq«n-s¡m-≠p-h¶ - p. tUmIvSÀ tXmakv Imcy§Ä FÃmw hni-Zo-Ic - n-¨p.- tcm-K¯ - nsâ Bcw-`a - mWv NnIn-Õn-¨m t`Z-amIpw IeymWw apS-¡≠ - . hc³ þ tUmIvSÀ IpjvTt- cmKw NnIn-Õn¨v amäm³ Ignbptam? tUmIvSÀ þ XoÀ¨-bmbpw amäm³ Ignbpw Bcm ]d-bp¶Xv amäm³ Ign-bnÃm F¶v hc³ þ tUmIvSÀ Xm¦Ä henb Bfmbn-cn¡mw Rm³ Adn-hn-Ãm¯ hnh-ct- Zmjn tUmIvSÀ kmÀ, Fsâ

PohXs¯ ]´m-Sm³ F\n¡v ]än-Ã. Cu ]co-£Ww Ft¶mSp th≠ \ap¡p ChnsS Ah-km-\n-¸n¡mw F¶p ]d-ªn«v t]mIm³ `mhn-¡p-¶p. ImÀ¯n-tI-b³ Abmsf ]nSn¨p \ndp-¯p-¶p. ImÀ¯n-tI-b³ (h-ct- \m-Sv) F´m kpIp-amcm CXv tUmIvSÀ ]d-ªXv \o tI«ntÃ! tcmKw amdpw. kpIp-am-c³ þ tcmKw amdpw amdn-bmepw IpjvTt- cmKn IpjvTt- cmKn Xs¶. kaqlw Hcn-¡epw AwKo-Ic - n-¡n-Ã. F\n¡v Cu _Ô-¯n\v XmÂ]-cy-an-Ã. Rm³ t]mIp-¶p. (A-bmÄ Cd-§n-t¸mbn tUmIvSdpw ImÀ¯n-tI-b\pw t\m¡n-\n¡p-¶p. amk-§Ä ]e-Xp-Ig- nªv ktcm-P¯ - nsâ IeymWw apS-§n. ktcmPw Bip-]{- Xn-bnse Hcp tcmKnsb¡mfpw aäp-Åh - c - psS Hcp B{in-X. FÃm-t]À¡pw ktcm-Ps¯ henb CjvSa - mWv Ahn-sSs¯ Hcp \gvkns\ t]msebpÅ s]cp-amäw ktcm-Ps¯ I≠m Hcp tcmKn-bmsW¶p Bcpw ]d-bn-Ã. hfsc kt´m-jh - X - n-bmbn FÃm tcmKn-It- fmSpw Ah-cpsS tcmK-hn-hc - § - Ä At\z-jn-¡pI AhÀ¡p th≠ klm-b§ - Ä sN¿pI CsXm-s¡-bmWv ktcm-P¯ - nsâ Zn\w-{]-Xn-bpÅ tPmen. Hcp Zn-hkw ktcmPw ho«pIm-cy-§fpw IeymWw apS-§n-bX - p-saÃmw Btem-Nn¨v tcmKn-IÄ¡v hn{i-an-¡m³ th≠n-bpÅ 93


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Øe¯v I-cª p-sIm≠n¡p-t¼mÄ AhnsS tcmKn-bm b - n hfsc¡mew InS-¶n«v Unkv¨mÀÖmbn t]mb HcmÄ IS¶p h¶p. ]g-bt- cm-Kn-bmWv Ct¸mÄ KXn-bn-Ãm-Xmb t¸mÄ `n£m-SI - ³. `n£-bm-Nn¨v Ign-bp¶ `n£-¡m-c³. CXp-t]mse Nnet¸msgms¡ ChnsS IS¶p hcpw. ]Xn-hpt]mse h¶-XmWv C¶pw `n£-bm-Nn-¡m³ at\m-lc - ambn ]mSpw AIse \n¶pÅ ]m«p-tI-«t- ¸mÄ ktcmP-¯n\v kt´m-ja - m-bn. hÃ-t¸m-gpsams¡ h¶n-cp¶v Xt¶mSv \à hÀ¯-am\w ]dªv Xs¶ kam-[m-\n-¸n¡p¶ A½m-h³. A½m-h³ ]m¼p-IÄ¡v amf-ap≠v ]d-hI - Ä¡v BIm-ia - p≠v a\p-jy-]p-{X\v Xe-Nm-bv¡m³ a®n-en-Sa - n-Ã. F{X AÀ°-h¯ - mb ]m«mWv. A½m-h³ ASps¯¯n. ]m«v \n¶p. ktcm-P¯ - n\v kt´m-ja - mbn A½m-h³ ktcm-P¯ - ns\ t\m¡n-bn«v, Iptª, Ipªn-´n\m Ic-bp¶Xv. ktcmPw þ CÃ-½mhm ]m«p-tI«v Rm³ Ic-ªp-t]m-bn. A½m þ Hcp ]cn-lmk Nncn-tbmsS Iptª \½Ä ]m]nIfmWv, temI-¯mcpw IpjvTt- cm-Knsb kvt\ln-¡n-Ã. Aѳ shdp¡pw A½ shdp¡pw tN«³ shdp¡pw ktlm-Zc - § - Ä FÃm-t]cpw shdp-¡pw. ktcmPw þ Cà Fsâ tN«³ shdp-¡n-Ã, Fs¶ Poh-\m Wv. Fsâ A\p-P¯n Fs¶ shdp-¡n-Ã. Fsâ A¸p shdp-¡n-Ã. A½m þ shdp¡pw Iptª shdp¡pw Ipªnsâ I¿pw Imep-saÃmw Noªv Agp-In hnc-ep-Is - fÃmw s]mgnªp hogpw At¸mÄ (Zq-sc-t\m-¡n) B ImWp¶ ]pI-¡p-gep-s≠tÃm? \ap¡p \S-¡m³ Ign-bmsX hcp-t¼mÄ Cu tUmIn-«ÀamÀ B Nqf-bn-em¡n \½sf sImÃpw. ]pI-t]mepw Bcpw izkn-¡m-Xn-cn-¡m-\mWv C{X-bpw Db-c¯ - n B Ipg sI«n-bn-cn-¡p-¶X - v. Ipªv ChnsS \n¶v t]mIWw A½m-hsâ B{K-la - m-Wv. t]mIq Iptª t]mIq... ktcmPw þ Cà Rm³ t]mInà acn-¡p-s¶-¦n Rm\nhn-sS-¡n-S¶p acn-¡pw AXmWv F\n-¡m-izm-kw. (s]-s«¶v tUmIvSÀ tXmakv IS¶p hcp-¶p) A½mhs\ t\m¡n CbmÄ ChnsS, \osb-§ns\ CXn-\I - ¯p-h¶ - p. A½m þ aXnepNmSn tUmIvSÀ þ It≠m ktcmPw aXnepNmSn h¶n-cn-¡p-¶p. Ch-s\-t¸m-ep-Åh - À ]mh-s¸« tcmKn-Isf ]dªv Xncn¸n¨v A´-hn-izmkw ASnt¨Â]n-¡p-¶p. CXn\v {]Xnhn[n Rm³ I≠n«p≠v. ktcmPw þ F´mWv tUmIvSÀ? tUmIv þ C¯cw tcmKn-Isf s]mXp-\n-c¯ - n I≠m hmd≠p IqSmsX AdÌv sNbvXv Bdpamkw hsc XShpin-£n-¡m-\pÅ \nbaw sIm≠phcm³ Rm³ ip]mÀi sNbvXn-cn-¡b - m-Wv. Ch³ ImcWw aäp-Å94

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hÀ¡pw tcmKw hcpw. hnhcw CÃm¯hcmWv C¡q«À. ktcmPw tUmIvSd- psS kwkmcw CjvSs - ¸-SmsX i_vZw DbÀ¯n tUmIvSÀkmÀ R§Ä hnh-ca - nÃm¯hcm-bXv F§-s\-bmWv kÀ, F§s\ tcmK-¯n\v hnhcw DÅ-hcpw CÃm-¯h - cpw F¶pt≠m? A§-s\bm-sW-¦n Rm\pw A¡q-«¯ - nÂs]«-hftÃ? ktcm-P¯nsâ hm¡p-IÄ tUmIvSs - dh - à - msX XfÀ¯n, Rm³ ktcm-P¯ - ns\ Dt±-in-¨Ã ]d-ªX - v. Ch-cpsS kw`mjWw tI«v `b¶v \n¶ `n£-¡m-c³ tUmIvSsd hnfn¨p. tUmIvSÀ kÀ, Rm³ CXn-\I - ¯p IS-¡m³ XpS-§nbn«v hÀj-§Ä Gsd-bm-bn. F\n¡v CXn-\I - ¯v Aev] sa-¦nepw Bizmkw e`n-¡p-¶Xv Cu Ipªn \n ¶m-Wv. kÀ R§Ä tcmKn-If - m-bn-t¸mbn R§Ä a\pjy-ctà tUmIvSÀ `n£-¡m-csâ hm¡p-Ifpw ktcmP-¯nsâ tNmZy-hp-saÃmw IqSn-bm-bt- ¸mÄ hÃmsX A£a\mbn. ktcmPw Rm³ \n§sf Ipä-s¸-Sp-¯nbà kwkm-cn-¨X - v. tcmK-ia - \ - ¯ - n-\v, Ime-tam, hn[ntbm Fs¶m-¶n-Ã. FÃm-t]cpw ]dbpw hn[n-bmsW¶v! AÃ, Hcp tUmIvSÀ tcmK-s¯¸änbpw tcmKn-sb-¸ä- nbpw Adnªn-cn-¡W - w. Cu tcmKs¯ kw_-Ôn-¨nSt¯mfw tcmKn-sb-¡mÄ tcmK-s¯bpw tcmKn-tbbpw Adn-ªncn-t¡-≠Xv tUmIvSd- m-Wv. ktcmPw þ tUmIvSÀ tcmKw Hcp Ipä-amtWm? ktcm-P¯ - nsâ hm¡p-If - n Ft´m Ipä-t_m-[¯ - nsâ kwibw tUmIvSÀ¡p tXm¶n. F´m ktcmPw Hcp ]Xn-hn-Ãm¯ tNmZyw. ktcmPw þ ]Xn-hn-Ãm¯XmWtÃm? ]eXpw \S-¡p-¶Xv tUmIvSÀ þ F´m ktcmPw F\n-s¡m¶pw a\-kn-em-Ip ¶ - n-Ã. ktcmPw þ tUmIvSÀ, tcmKw Hcp Ipä-amtWm? BsW¦n R§sf DSs\ AdÌv sNbvXv Pbn-en CSWw tUmIvSÀ kÀ R§fpw a\p-jy-cmWv tcmKn-If - mb a\pjyÀ. shdp-¡s¸« a\p-jyÀ tUmIvSÀ kÀ R§-tfmSv AÂ]w Zb ImWn-¡Ww. ktcmPw s]m«n-¡c - b - p-¶p. tUmIvSÀ AXp-I≠v Hcp Ipä-hm-fn-sb-t¸m-epÅ tXm ¶Â. `n£-¡m-c³ þ Gams\! tUmIvSÀ `n£-¡m-cs\ t\m¡n Gam-\Ãm tUmIvSÀ þ hnfn¡q tUmIvSÀ ] d-ªp. `n£-¡m-c³ þ tUmIvSÀ-Gam. Aà tUmIvSÀ kÀ Zqsc t\m¡n B ImWp¶ ]pI-]m-dp¶ Nqfbn R§sf t¸mep-Åh - À¡v tcmKw IqSp-t¼mÄ \n§Ä Ip¯nh¨v sIm¶n«v AXn-\I - ¯v sIm≠p CSptam? Ic-ªpsIm≠v. tUmIvSÀ kÀ R§sf ssI hnStÃ? R§-fpsS ssZh-amWv A§v ktcm-Ps - ¯- t\m¡n Cu Ipªn sâ KXn F´mWv kÀ þ R§Ä ]m]n-If - mWv kÀ, tUmIvSÀ hfsc Nn´m-\n-aá - \ - m-bn«v `n£-¡m-cs\ ASp-


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t¯bv¡v hnfn-¡p-¶p. `n£-¡m-c³ `b¶v amdp-¶p. C§v ASp¯p hcq. A§v F´m tNmZn-¨Xv? B ]pI¡p-ge - n \n§sf sIm≠n«v sImÃpsat¶m? tUmIvSÀ Nncn-¡p-¶p. CsXms¡ A½m-ht\mSv Bcm ]d-ªpX-¶X - v. CXn-s\-bmWv Rm³ FXnÀ-¡p¶Xv. A´ h - n-izmkw ]dªp ]c-¯p-¶h - s - c Rm³ hnSnà ià-ambn«v FXnÀ¡pw. Bip-]{- Xn Fsâ IpSp-w_-amWv tcmKn-IÄ Fsâ IpSp-w_-¡mÀ, Rm³ kvt\ln¡p-¶Xv A§-s\-bmWv ktcmPw H¶p a\-Ên-em-¡W - w. hfsc {i²n-¨p-tIÄ ¡Ww. Fsâ IpSpw-_`- {- ZX hfsc tami-amWv F\n¡v Fsâ `mcy-tbbpw Ipªp-§s - fbpw kvt\ln-¡p-¶X - n s - \-¡mÄ D]cn Bip-]{Xntbbpw, tcm-Kn-Is - fbpw kvt\ ln-¡p-¶X - n-emWv IqSp-X XmÂ]-cyw. AXp-Im-cWw F\n¡v IpSpw-_`- {- ZX e`n-¡p-¶n-Ã. Fsâ `mcy tKfn \Ã-hf - mWv. \à `mcy-bmWv, Fsâ a¡Ä. Ahsc F\n¡v kvt\ln-¡m³ ka-ba - n-Ã. Ah-tcmSv H¶p t\sc \n¶v kwkm-cn-¡m³ H¶p-Nn-cn-¡m³ H¶n-¨n-cp¶v `£ Ww Ign-¡m³ H¶n\pw Ign-bp-¶n-Ã. ImcWw Rms\ mcp tUmIvSÀ Bbn-t¸m-bn. ho«n h¶v Ipªp-§fpw `mcy-bp-sam¯v t\cs¯ Xocp-am-\n-¨{- ]-Im-cw. Hcp kn\nabv¡v t]mIm-³ Cd-§p-t¼m-gm-bn-cn¡pw Bip-]{- Xnbnse t^m¬ tImÄ Hcp tcmKn AXym-k¶ \ne-bn DS³ hc-Ww. Rm³ F´p-sN-¿W - w. ktcmPw ]dbq F\n¡p thW-sa-¦n Hgn-ªp-am-dmw. t]mIm-Xn-cn¡mw. `mcybpw Ipªp-§f - p-sam¯v kn\n-abv¡v t]m Imw. Hcp tUmIvSd- mb F\n-¡X - n\v Ign-bn-Ã. Ign-bm³ ]mSnà Hcp kn\na ]ns¶bpw ImWmw. Hcp Poh³ ssI hn-«p-t]m-bm Xncn-s¨-Sp-¡m³ ]än-Ã. sshZy-im-kv{X¯nsâ kXyw AXm-Wv. If-¦a - n-Ãm¯ NnInÕ, tcmKntbmSpÅ kvt\lw, kvt\l-amb hm¡p-IÄ, kvt\l¯nsâ ]qs¨-≠p-sIm≠pÅ ]cn-em-f\ - w, AhnsS ]\n\oÀ ico-c¯ - n hogp-¶X - p-t]mse tcmKn-s¡mcp tXm ¶m AXmWv Hcp tUmIvSdpw tcmKn-bp-am-bpÅ _Ôw CXn IpSpw-_Ô - § - Ä XIÀ¶m Rm³ Ipä-hm-fnbm-tWm? ktcmPw tNmZn-¨n-tÃ? tcmKw Hcp Ipä-amtWm F¶v Hcn-¡e - p-aà - . tcmKw Hcp Ipä-aà a\p-jy-a\ - Ê - n-se IpjvTa - mWv amtd-≠X - v. Hcp tUmIvSd- n \n¶v thZ\ AI-em³ acp¶pIsf¡mÄ a\-Ênsâ emf\w Hcp ] cn-[n- hsc AXym-hi - y-am-Wv. AXv ktcmPw Fs¶ ]Tn¸n-¨p. ktcmPw ktcm-P¯ - nsâ tcmKw t`Z-am-bn, ktcmP-¯n\v Ft¸mÄ thW-sa-¦nepw t]mImw. ktcmPw þ tUmIvSÀ kmÀ, A§v Hcp D]-Imcw sN¿Ww kmÀ, AXv ]men-¡ptam. tUmIvSÀ þ F´m ktcmPw ]dbq ktcmPw þ tUmIvSÀ kmÀ F\n¡v Hcp shÅ kmcnbpw shÅ-tIm«pw \ÂI-Ww. Rm³ AXp [cn-¨p-sIm≠v

F\n¡v ChnsS Ign-bW - w. ChnsS tcmKn-Isf F\n¡v ]cn-Nc - n-¡W - w. \nbaw Hcp {]iv\a - m-¡c - p-Xv. tUmIvSÀ þ ktcmPw. ktcmPw hfsc hnim-ea - m-bn«v Nn´n-¡p-¶h - f - m-Wv. Cu tcmKw amdn-bmepw ]ecpw ho«n t]mIm³ Ign-bmsX A\m-Yc - mbn Ign-bp-¶p. `n£-¡m-cs\ Nq≠n Cu A½m-hsâ Imcyw H¶p BtemNn¨pt\m¡q. ktcmPw ChnsS hn«v t]mIm³ Xbm-dmIp-¶nÃ. ktcmPw þ tUmIvSÀ kmÀ, Cu Nn´-IÄ amän FSp¡m³ \mw apt¶m«p \o§-Ww, Fs¶t¸mep-Åh - À AXn\v ap¶n-«n-d§ - W - w. tcmKw, Hcp Ipä-aÃm F¶v kaqls¯ ]Tn-¸n-¡W - w, AXn-\p-th≠nbmWv Rm³ ChnsS \n¶v t]mIp-¶nà F¶p ]d-ªX - v. CXptI« tUmIvSÀ ktcm-P¯ - ns\ D]-tZ-in-¨p. ktcmPw IpjvTt- cm-Ks - ¯-¡mÄ amc-Ia - mbn ]I-cp¶ tcmK-§Ä thsd-bntÃ? kaqlw F´p-sIm≠p Ahsc amän \ndp-¯p-¶n-Ã. ]s£ IpjvTt- cm-Ks - ¯-am{Xw kaq lw amdn ImWp-¶p. AXmWv ktcmPw tNmZn¨Xv tcmKw Hcp Ipä-amtWm? Hcn-¡e - p-aà NnIn-Õn¨p t`Z-am-¡mhp-¶X - mWv ktcmPw ktcm-Ps - ¯-t¸msebpÅ-hÀ kaql-¯n \nc-h[n t]À D≠mI-Ww, a\pjy a\-Ên amä-§Ä hc-Ww, tUmIvSdpw tcmKnbpw Bß-an-{X-§fmWv, Ic-bp¶ Ipªn\v ]d-bm³ Adn-bn-Ã. Ic-bmsX Adnbq AXnsâ Ic-¨n F´m-sW¶v a\-Ên-em-¡m-\p Å Adnhv Hcp tUmIvSÀ¡v D≠m-IW - w. AXp-t]m-sebmWv tcmKw F´m-sW¶v I≠p-]n-Sn¨p acp¶p \nÝbn-¡p-I. tcmKn-bpsS a\-Êns\ XfÀ¯-cp-Xv. a\-Ênse kt´mjw acp-¶n-s\-¡mÄ hep-Xm-Wv. CXv tI« ktcm Pw tUmIvStdmSv, tUmIvSÀ kÀ, A§v, R§-fpsS ImW-s¸« ssZh-am-Wv. [À½-¡m-c³ þ tUmIvSt- dm-Sv, Gamt\ ]Xn-\© - p-sIm-Ãambn Rm³ kvt- \-la - p-sÅm-cp hm-¡v tI-«n«v Cu Ime ¯ - n-\n-Sb - n Cu Ipªv am{Xta Ft¶mSv Nncn-¨n«p-Åq. Cu Ipªns\ It≠m-≠n-cn-¡m-\m-tW-amt\ Rm³ aXn NmSn ChnsS hcp-¶X - v. tUmIvSÀ [À½-¡mcs\ ]nSn¨p Xtem-Sp-¶p. [À½-¡m-c³ Gams\ F¶p hnfn¨p tX§p-¶p. ktcmPw þ kÀ Fsâ hm¡p-IÄ {Iqc-am-bn-s¸m-sb¦n £an-¡Ww tUmIvSÀ þ AsXm¶pw kmc-an-Ã. ktcmPw tNmZn-¨ntÃ? tcmKw Hcp Ipä-amtWm F¶v Hcn-¡e - p-aà - . NnIn-Õn¨v t`Z-am-¡mw, F¶m a\p-jysâ a\-Ênse IpjvTw amd-Ww, F¦nse a\p-jy³ \¶m-Iq. \ap¡p AXn\p th≠n {ian-¡mw. (tXm¸n `m-kn-bp-sS A-iz-ta-[w F-¶ \m-SI - ¯ - n-se H-cp cw-Ks - ¯ te-J\ a - m-bn-«m-Wv Rm³ F-gp-Xn-bn-cn-¡p¶Xv. tXm¸n `m-kn-tbm-Sv I-S¸ - mSv. þ _m-e³ Xn-cpae) 95


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kqk-½ tXmakv em-_vþC³þNmÀÖv

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PRS Hospital Staff Photo Album

97


Standing(4th row): Dr. K. Krishna Kumar, Dr. Abhijit Kumar, Dr. T. Arun

Standing(3rd row): Dr. K. Rajesh, Dr. Anu Antony Varghese, Dr. Praveen S. Lal, Dr. S.Sajeev, Dr. Bino Rajamani, Dr. A. Deepu, Dr. K.R. Santhosh, Dr. S. Binu Krishnan, Dr. Arun Pareeth, Dr. J. Padmakumar, Dr. G. Manoj, Dr. Jimmy Thomas, Dr. Sahir N. Abdullah

Standing(2nd row): Dr. David Sujin, Dr. M.A. Kishor, Dr. S. Subramoniam, Dr. N. Prasannakumar, Dr. V. Prathapan, Dr. P.R. Syamkumar, Dr. A.T. Pramod, Dr. D. Mathew, Dr. G. Ravikumar, Dr. V.G. Suresh, Dr. K. Balakrishnan, Maj. R.K. Rajagopal, Dr. P.S. Pavithran, Dr. S.R. Krishnamoorthy, Dr. N. Gopakumar, Dr. S. Rakesh, Dr. P. Vivek, Dr. S. Venkiteswara Babu, Dr. A.G. Pradeep Kidangoor

Standing (1st row): Dr. T. J. Rema Devi, Dr. P.R. Mary, Dr. Aswathy Mahesh, Dr. Jaya Suresh Babu, Dr. Jismi B. Krishnan, Dr. Naiji S. James, Dr. Binitha Segin, Dr. C.P. Rohini, Dr. G. Usha, Dr. S. Parvathy, Dr. Geetha M Nair, Dr. Anju Deepak Unnithan, Dr. P.V. Aysha, Dr. P. Kanagalekshmi, Dr. K.S. Sarojaya, Dr. L. Anitha, Dr. R. Anupama, Mrs. Preetha P. Nair, Dr. Churchin Ben, Dr. Mallika Cherian

Sitting (left to right): Capt. Dr. George Selvaraj, Dr. V. Snehapalan, Dr. D.S. Mohan, Dr. P. Murukesan, Dr. Tiny Nair, Dr. M.S. Thiruvarian, Dr. V.E. Krishna Mohan, Dr. Meenu Hariharan, Dr. R. Anandam, Dr. Komalam Kumar, Dr. K. Anand, Dr. Josemon Thomas


Administration, Accounts, Human Resources and Quality Departments


Front Office, Public Relations, Medical Records, Birth & Death, Discharge Summary Departments and Ward Secretaries


Laboratory (Biochemistry, Haematology, Andrology and Cytology) and Blood Bank Departments


Pharmacy, Medical Store, X-ray, Scan, Cathlab (Technicians), Clinical Research and Housekeeping Departments.


Bio-medical, Cardiac Theatre, Pharmacy, EMG, Echo and General Store Departments


Dietry, Physiotherapy, PFT, Theatre Technicians, Theatre Staff and Secretaries


Nursing Heads, Staff Nurses and Junior Staff Nurses with the Nursing Superintendents


Physician Assistants, ANM, Nursing Assistants and Hospital Aides with the Nursing Superintendent


Security, Electrical, Laundry Departments and Attenders, Lift Operators, Traffic Wardens, Cleaners and Drivers.


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The Management of PRS Hospital gratefully acknowledges the following sponsors for the Silver Jubilee Celebrations and Service Projects Platinum Sponsors

Gold Sponsors

J.D. Diagnostics Pvt. Ltd

Amy Pharma

Advanced Micronic Devices Ltd. Archana Associates Arjohunt Leigh Healthcare India Pvt. Ltd. Arumugham Enterprises Bions Medical Systems C.P. Biomed (P) Ltd Capital Surgicals City Drugs Gtc Pharma Hisol

Kochin Inlab Equipments India Pvt. Ltd.

Malavika Enterprises Medic Biologicals & Pharmaceuticals Pvt. Ltd. Radix Health Care Raj Enterprises S.B. Enterprises Saravana Associates Shifa Pharma

Shilpa Agencies Sree Balaji Pharma Surgiplast Trust Health Care Technologies Vanchinad Medicals & Surgicals Venus Medical Systems Pvt.Ltd. V-Guard Industries Ltd. Wellcare Surgicals

Devi Pharma Heartwares Omkar Enterprises Roche Diagnostics India Pvt. Ltd Silver Sponsors Adara Pharma Classic Agencies Innovative Medical Systems International Agencies J.S.P. Associates Krishna Associates Lab Aid Agencies

Lifeline Gas System & Services Pvt Ltd. Medi Choice Mitra Surgicals S.S. Medilines Santha Pharmaceuticals Distributors Scientific Agencies Sree Gokulam Healthcare Pvt.Ltd. Tricore Medical Systems

PRS hospital is recognised by the following State, Central Government Organisations, leading firms & Corporate bodies for the treatment of their staff w VSSC and LPSC w National Airport Authority of India w Air India w Indian Airlines w ONGC

w NABARD w Reserve Bank Of India w Attukal Bhagawathy Temple Trust w Rajiv Gandhi Center for Biotechnology w Sree Chithira Tirunal Institute of Medical Sciences and Technology (BME Wing)

PRS Hospital has entered into MOUs with the following Insurance Companies & Its TPAs for cashless and medical reimbursement benefits w w w w w

National Insurance (TTK) Oriental Insurance (TTK) New India Assurance (TTK) United India Insurance (TTK) ICICI Prudential

w TTK w Paramount w Star Health & Allied Insurance Co. Ltd w Bajaj Alliance General Insurance Co. Ltd w Sri Gokulam Health Services

TAX BENEFIT PRS Hospital is approved by the Chief Commissioner of Income Tax under rule 3A(2) of the Income Tax Rules 1962 for exempting any bill by an employer for the treatment of diseases specified in the act while calculating the taxable income of a person.


PRS_Silver Jubilee Souvenir_2012  

PRS Hospital Trivandrum Silver Jubilee Souvenir_2012

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