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BUILDING INSIGHT BIAW.com


//BUILDING INSIGHT  |  BIAW.COM

CONTENTS // // WE NEED YOU! 5

// LEGAL VICTORY 5

WHO WE ARE

  The Building Industry Association of Washington is the state’s largest trade association and represents nearly 8,000 member companies in the home building industry.   Known as the “Champions of Affordable Housing,” BIAW is dedicated to ensuring and enhancing the vitality of the building industry for the benefit of its members and the housing needs of citizens.

2019 SENIOR OFFICERS President Rick Hjelm, CGR MBA of Pierce County First Vice President Sherry Schwab MBA of King & Snohomish Counties Second Vice President Chris Lockhart MBA of Pierce County

STRATEGIC PLAN

// OVERTIME RULE CHANGE 7

Treasurer Tracy Doriot BIA of Clark County // SCHOLARSHIPS AWARDED 10

Secretary LouAnne Neill HBA of Tri-Cities Immediate Past President Kevin Russell, CGP North Peninsula Building Association BIAW STAFF Executive Vice President Greg Lane

// FOCUS ON SAFETY 12

PRESIDENT’S PERSPECTIVE PLEDGE TO COMMIT Don’t just try, take charge of your business outcomes

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// FUEL YOUR GROWTH 13

EVP VIEWPOINT

L&I BENDS Agreement on lawsuit against L&I paves way for a resolution

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Government Affairs Director Jan Himebaugh General Counsel Jackson Maynard Administrative Services Director Jan Rohila R.O.I.I.® Select Director Mark Shaffer Communications & Public Relations Director Jennifer Spall CONTACT THE EDITORIAL STAFF

On the Cover: BIAW’s partnership with the Yelm Community Schools Career Technical Training program is to support and increase the homebuilding industry’s skilled trades workforce.

Want to submit an article for publication? Have a story tip or suggestion? For consideration, please email communications@biaw.com

SEPTEMBER ’19 VOL. 29, ISSUE 8


PRESIDENT’S PERSPECTIVE

PLEDGE TO COMMIT

JUST TRY DO NOT, CHARGE OF YOUR BUSINESS OUTCOMES TAKE

4 Sometime during the past decade, I took a sales training class from Sandler Training based in Happy Valley, Oregon (sounds like a fun place to live). The question was asked of attendees, “If your customers graded your performance, not the performance of your product or service, but your performance, what letter grade would you receive? An A-, B+, or perhaps C?” // RICK HJELM Most of us take great pride in our end product and the processes PRESIDENT we incorporate to get there. However, without practicing proper communication skills, we might believe we are earning an A, but we are actually delivering a B. Jeffrey Gitomer, author, professional speaker, and business trainer, simply reminds us, “Presentation is what you say, communication is how you say it.”

STAR WARS STRIKES AGAIN

With that, I’m going to share some notes from the sales training class that taught me about how I communicate with my clients, co-workers, and family. A quote in the film, Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back, from the wisest and perhaps most powerful Jedi of them all, Master Yoda says, “Do. Or do not. There is no try.” You either do something or you don’t. At best, try communicates a C grade intention, not an A grade commitment. With this in mind, consider the following statements: n I’ll try to return all my calls today n I’ll try to get back to my clients as promised n I’ll try to clean my desk by the end of the week n I’ll try to get that report done by tomorrow afternoon In reality, you either schedule time for the activity or you don’t. There is no in-between. Suppose we use try in other areas of our life: n I’ll try to stop at every red light n I’ll try not to text and drive Simply put, if the outcome n I’ll try to remember to look both of the activity is important, ways at a crosswalk don’t try, instead commit. When the outcome is important, try is out of the equation. In other words, if the outcome of the activity is essential, don’t try, instead commit. If the activity isn’t important, they why even try. Have I mastered this? Absolutely not! But I have committed to sharing it, not just try.

BUILDING INSIGHT BIAW.com


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WE NEED YOU!

HAVE YOU BEEN HARMED BY HB 1579?

BIAW’s legal department needs your help in its suit against the governor and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to block enforcement of recent legislation. The lawsuit alleges that the bill, HB 1579, was unconstitutionally drafted and vetoed. The bill as written applies to any project in which a hydraulic permit was required, including any residential project involving construction or repair of marine bulkheads. Our legal team has heard from several members that the bill and uncertainty about its provisions and constitutionality have cost their businesses. We are looking for more examples. Examples of harm include: n  A project near a waterway that was suspended, canceled, or modified because of the uncertainty of the law due to the bill and its potential for increased fines. n  A project that received a fine or civil citation for failure to obtain a permit due to uncertainty about the law caused in part or whole by the bill. n  A letter or notice from WDFW threatening legal action regarding a project near a waterway after July 28, 2019. n  Any potential customers who have been dissuaded from doing a new construction project or remodel on a home, parcel or structure near a waterway. n  A decision to re-focus a business away from projects that are near a waterway and may require a hydraulic permit including any lost revenue, employees who were not hired or terminated, and any other expenses or lost business opportunities due to the change.

IMPACT HARMFUL TO MEMBERS

The bill and its impact are critical to our membership. It eliminated the requirement WDFW issue a hydraulic project permit within 45 days and increased the fine from $100 to $10,000 per violation. BIAW argues that the law, as drafted, violates the single-subject requirement of the state constitution, as well as the excessive fines clause. We also assert that the language of the bill as vetoed does not provide adequate authority for WDFW

LEGAL VICTORY

BIAW, L&I REACH AGREEMENT IN LAWSUIT

BIAW has reached an agreement in its lawsuit with the Department of Labor & Industries (L&I) that prevents the agency from using Workers’ Compensation Funds to implement the governor’s Clean Energy Bill. Under the agreement, BIAW will stay the case to give L&I and the legislature time to correct the budget in the 2020 legislative session. The suit, filed against L&I and the Washington State Treasurer, seeks to bar the use of Workers’ Compensation Funds for purposes unrelated to aiding injured workers. “This agreement presents a path to resolve the case in a way that is consistent with BIAW’s goals in the lawsuit and with the state constitution. The stay will protect the fund while also avoiding litigation,” said BIAW General Counsel Jackson Maynard. “We hope the legislature will do the right thing to fix the funding source. If not, we stand ready to pursue the case in court.” The Workers’ Compensation Fund was established pursuant to Article II, Section 31 of the Washington State Constitution, which requires the legislature to pass bills to protect workers. To bolster this constitutional protection, the Washington State Supreme Court treats the Workers’ Compensation Fund as a “trust” for the benefit of workers. This session, the legislature passed SB 5116, which was part of Gov. Inslee’s package of environmental bills. Maynard explained, “This is not a dispute over the policy in the bill. However, taking $625,000 from the Workers’ Compensation Fund for the bill’s implementation is not allowed under the state constitution. We hope this case will deter policy makers from siphoning these funds away from injured workers in the future.” to fine at all. These questions leave open what version of the law is actually in effect. Please help BIAW in this fight! If the bill has harmed you, we want to hear from you. Please contact BIAW’s legal department at (360) 3527800 ext. 108 or legal@biaw.com.

SEPTEMBER ’19 VOL. 29, ISSUE 8


EVP VIEWPOINT

L&I BENDS

AGREEMENT ON LAWSUIT AGAINST L&I PAVES WAY FOR A RESOLUTION

6 Fall has always been my favorite time of year. There has always been something special to me about the start of a new school year, both when I was a student and now as a parent. And, of course, September means the return of football and spending Saturday afternoons on Montlake rooting on my Huskies. Go Dawgs! I hope you had a fantastic summer. During my continued travels around the state, our members report that they are busy—which is // GREG LANE great news. But hopefully, you also had a chance to take a break to spend some time with your family. EXECUTIVE At BIAW, we have been focused on beginning to execute the new VICE PRESIDENT Strategic Plan, as well as the anticipated closing on the organization’s purchase of a new headquarters. Here are a couple of other important updates:

PROTECTING THE WORKERS’ COMPENSATION FUND

In July, BIAW filed a lawsuit against the Department of Labor & Industries (L&I) to protect the use of the Workers’ Compensation Fund. Our suit asked the court to prevent the diversion of money from the Workers’ Compensation Fund to pay for the governor’s Clean Energy Bill, approved by the Legislature this past session. In a surprising move for this early stage in litigation, L&I sought an agreement for a joint stay on our lawsuit. A stay is a temporary hold on the litigation, and the agreement creates a pathway for the potential resolution of the suit. As part of the stay, L&I offered to ask the Legislature to seek other funding for this program in the next legislative session. In the interim, L&I also agreed not to spend Workers’ Compensation Funds for the implementation of SB 5116. If the Legislature does the right thing and corrects the funding in the supplemental budget, BIAW will voluntarily dismiss the suit. Should the Legislature fail to find alternative financing by the end of the 2020 legislative session, our lawsuit will resume. I hope you’ll join me in congratulating BIAW General Counsel Jackson Maynard and Associate Counsel Hannah Marcley for their outstanding work in this decisive win defending our members on this critical issue.

LABOR SHORTAGES

BUILDING INSIGHT BIAW.com

As part of a multiyear tracking effort, the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) released a poll last month that covered 15 specific construction-related occupations. Not surprisingly, they found labor shortages in each category, a steady downward trend NAHB Poll on Labor Shortage Builders reporting labor shortages in our industry since 2013. Since the polling 83%....................................... framing crews began in the 1990s, the incidence of shortages 82%................................. rough carpenters reached 69% in 2019, the highest on record. 78%.................................. finish carpenters We all know that these widespread labor 71%.....................bricklayers and masons shortages dramatically impact the affordabil70%................................. concrete workers ity of housing. Earlier this year, we met with 67%.................................................plumbers Washington State Superintendent of Public 47%...building-maintenance managers Instruction Chris Reykdal to discuss how we can increase trade education in our schools, and he Three-quarters of all respondents expressed a willingness to work with our indus- cited four effects of labor shortage 87%...............paying higher wages and try on this critical issue. ....................................subcontractor bids Since being appointed as BIAW Workforce 81%........ completing projects on time Development Manager, Al Audette has been 78%..........finding subcontractors with examining existing training programs in our ............................... well-trained workers state and assessing where BIAW should focus 75%.......................... higher home prices our efforts to address this issue. In the coming months, we will be working with our local associations to expand workforce training in individual communities and recruit more students into the trades.


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EXEMPT EMPLOYEES

OVERTIME RULE CHANGES L&I’S PROPOSED RULE CHANGES ON REQUIREMENT OF OVERTIME PAY MOVES FORWARD The Department of Labor and Industries (L&I) has proposed changes to the executive, administrative, and professional overtime exemptions. Among the changes is an increase in the minimum salary threshold that affects all employers who will be required to pay salaried, overtime-exempt workers.

INCREASE IN THRESHOLD

Currently, the threshold exempt from overtime pay set by the U.S. Department of Labor is $23,660 per year. L&I is proposing to set the threshold at 2.5 times the state’s minimum wage which would be $79,872 by 2026 when the new changes would be implemented. This is three times the current threshold and more than twice what the U.S. Department of Labor is currently proposing as the new federal standard.

PROCESS MISSED MARK

BIAW, along with many in the business community, urged L&I to wait until the federal update was complete and then move forward in a fair, comprehensive and meticulous manner. The proposed rule change process should have taken into account all affected parties, the business environment of each region, and the proportion of impact any changes by L&I would have had on business in those regions.

BURDEN TO BUSINESS

BIAW believes the new rule changes will harm current salaried, exempt employees if the rules change and are reclassified as hourly. Employees may have their hours reduced and have less flexibility, among other benefits that come with exempt status. Employers may discourage employees from attending events after regular business hours to avoid overtime obligations. Many salaried employees enjoy and are encouraged to use flex time to meet their professional and personal needs. Any significant rule changes will place a burden on business and remove flexibility for employees. As L&I continues to move forward with the proposed overtime rule changes, BIAW will continue to be involved and active in the process.

SEPTEMBER ’19 VOL. 29, ISSUE 8


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FINDING SOLUTIONS

SKILLED TRADES TRAINING BIAW COLLABORATES WITH CTE PROGRAM TO BOLSTER INDUSTRY’S WORKFORCE IN WASHINGTON

WHAT IS CTE?

Career and Technical Education (CTE) is a term for educational programs that specialize in the skilled trades, applied sciences programs were developed to help ease the skilled trades labor shortage by integrating technical career skill proficiencies, applied sciences, modern technologies, and career preparation. In short, CTE program’s goal is to help students plan for life beyond high school. In the state of Washington, every school district offers some type of CTE service, such as the leadership organization, Future Farmers of America. An excellent model of CTE is Yelm High School’s flourishing nationally-recognized CTE program. Yelm Community Schools CTE Director Teri Pablo has dedicated the last nine years to ensuring students in the Yelm School District have access to career choice options and paths through its CTE program.

BUILDING INSIGHT BIAW.com

“We want to make sure we offer and create successful, core-equivalent classes to help students meet graduation requirements and build the skills they need to move into a career path of their choice, ” said Pablo. “Whether that is moving them right into a full-time job, apprenticeship, a two-year or four-year degree path, we want all our students to be prepared and ready.”

YELM HIGH SCHOOL

Yelm High School has seven different program areas with a total of 40 different pathways a student could take, such as construction, home shop, landscaping, automotive, STEM, welding, sustainable habitats, among many others. “There are 1,400 students enrolled at Yelm High School and CTE serves approximately 900 to 1,000 of them a year,” explained Pablo. “We want our students to be cogni-

BIAW Workforce Development Manager Al Audette with Yelm Community Schools CTE Director Teri Pablo. BIAW is a partnering with the Yelm High School CTE program to help promote career options in the skilled trades and apprenticeship programs.

zant of their class choices so they can make a career choice that best fits their wants and needs.” CTE is more than an elective class; it gives students more ownership


9 than most high school schedules. “I think the most rewarding part of my job is seeing students make that connection to what they want to do in the future and knowing that they are empowered to make those choices for themselves,” said Pablo. “You never want to make them feel like someone else decided for them, but rather they are doing it on their own.”

Trades in Motion

Building our industry workforce one trade intern at a time

WHO DOES CTE TARGET?

CTE programs are available to every high school student.

Yelm High School CTE program students get hands-on training instruction in cement work. The CTE program’s non-traditional, hands-on “classrooms” training is another option for students planning careers in the skilled trades workforce.

“We are creating programs, designing opportunities and instruction that prepares students for their future and not the future that we had,” added Pablo. “The myth is if you can’t make it in other classes, you can make it in CTE. That’s just not true. You can be just as successful graduating from a CTE program as a 4-year university. CTE is for all students of all learning levels and abilities.”

HANDS-ON LEARNING

A component of Yelm’s CTE program is the opportunity for students to experience learning outside of the typical classroom setting. This is called extended learning. “We offer CTE students the option of participating in “field trips” often times to construction sites. We can talk about safety and wearing goggles, but when a student walks onto a jobsite and experiences it first hand, it clicks for many of them.” The process of teaching students about

KBA HAND-ON LEARNING EXPERIENCE

Hosted by the Kitsap Building Association (KBA), Trades in Motion is all about sharing the construction industry with high school students from across Kitsap County. Over 20 young men and women from the Kitsap county area were bused each day to The Ridge at Buck Lake; a development that is currently under construction. While at the jobsite, students were separated into groups of four and rotated through five construction trades: carpentry, electrical work, plumbing, painting and coating, and HVAC installation. Each student had an opportunity to not only learn what goes into building a home, but actually participate—hands-on—in the process. Trades in Motion is KBA’s endeavor to educate high school students about the home building industry, and perhaps pique their vocational interest in the trades. career opportunities has and will continue to evolve. What worked just ten years ago may not apply in another three. CTE programs are another option for students exploring a career the trades profession.

SEPTEMBER ’19 VOL. 29, ISSUE 8


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PASSION FOR THE INDUSTRY

SCHOLARSHIPS AWARDED NEW THIS YEAR, BIAW ADDS GRANTS TO BOOST SUPPORT OF SKILLED TRADES TRAINING

Since its inception, BIAW has awarded over $500,000 in scholarships to students who have demonstrated a passion and commitment to developing a career in the home building or industry-related professions. In addition to the individual scholarships, new this year, BIAW awarded four grants to organizations offering programs in construction-related fields of study, residential construction career training, continuing education, and apprenticeship and skills assessment services. BIAW is proud to provide scholarships to students pursuing a career in the home building industry. Training tomorrow’s home builders is our goal. —BIAW Education Committee Chair Diane Glenn A huge thank you to BIAW’s scholarship review committee who spent countless hours reviewing and evaluating the scholarship and grant applications. We couldn’t have done it without your guidance and support. Thank you. If you are interested in more information about the BIAW scholarship and grant programs, please contact Education Program Manager Hillary Vanatta at (360) 352-7800, ext. 106 or hillaryv@biaw.com.

BUILDING INSIGHT BIAW.com

2019 SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS Connor Ellis Sierra Rothlisberger Hamed Ghaheri Kayla Snodgrass Luis Briones Zeb Chamberlain Colt Corrigan Julian Garcia Sergio Gonzalez Shawn Leyenhorst Cayden Tanasse Kevin Mendoza Colby Tucker Troy Hilseneger Brandon Boudrieau Matthew Clark Carson Cortez Jose Luna, Jr.

Washington State University Washington State University Seattle Central College Washington State University Perry Technical College Central Washington University Whitworth University Bates Technical College Perry Technical College Washington PolyTech Gonzaga University Wenatchee Valley College Washington State University Washington State University Washington State University Skagit Valley College Western Washington University Perry Technical College

2019 GRANT RECIPIENTS

Community Boat Project Port Hadlock Peninsula College Port Angeles Perry Technical Institute Yakima Builder Grant Program Bremerton

Construction Management Interior Design Wood Technology/Carpentry Construction Management Welding Construction Management Construction Management Welding Electrical Engineering Civil Engineering Accounting Architecture Engineering Construction Management Construction Management Civil Engineering Urban Planning HVAC

Internship program Summer program Financial aid program Internship program and new forklift

$2,500 $2,500 $2,000 $1,500 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 $750 $750 $650 $500 $500 $500 $500

$2,000 $2,000 $2,000 $1,500


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#BUILDINGBETTERFUTURES

FUTURE WORKFORCE

BIAW is proud to award 18 scholarship awards to students pursuing a career in construction-related fields, apprenticeships, and/or trades training. BIAW sat down recently with two of our scholarship awardees to get an inside look at their continuing education goals.

Awardee: Colby Tucker Age: 18 School: Washington State University, Vancouver Field of study: Engineering Year in school: First year student, Junior by credits Graduation target date: 2021 Scholarship awarded: $1,000

Awardee: Julian Garcia Age: 19 School: Bates Technical College Field of study: Welding Year in school: First year student Graduation target date: 2020 Scholarship awarded: $1,000

Q: What are some of your favorite hobbies? A: Snowboarding, camping, hiking, riding dirt bikes, four-wheeling, working out at the gym

Q: What are some of your favorite hobbies? A: Welding, blacksmithing, woodworking

Q: Did your high school have any trade programs? A: My high school offered a shop class, but that was it. I was enrolled in Running Start full time, so I graduated high school with an associate degree. Q: What got you interested in engineering? A: My grandpa was an electrician and my dad is an electrical salesman, so I have been around the trades a lot. My friend’s grandpa is an engineer and I job shadowed him and loved it.

Q: What is your favorite part about welding? A: The satisfaction when I fuse two pieces of metal together. BIAW scholarship award recipient Colby Tucker currently studies engineering at WSU.

Q: What is your favorite part about engineering? A: The ability to help others.

BUILDING INSIGHT BIAW.com

Q: What got you interested in welding? A: During my time at Yelm High School, I took a home shop program that offered welding. That’s when I fell in love with it.

BIAW Executive Vice President Greg Lane congratulates Julian Garcia with a $1000 scholarship. Garcia will be studying welding in the fall.

Q: What is the one accomplishment you are most proud? A: Earning the rank of Eagle Scout. It was REALLY hard. I have been in the Boy Scouts since I was little and I completed this goal when I was 17.

Q: What is the one thing you want to tell people about trade schools? A: Trade schools are a lot of hard work, but they will definitely pay off—and pay off quicker than most college programs. You learn a lot of useful skills.

SEPTEMBER ’19 VOL. 29, ISSUE 8


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#SAFETYPAYS

FOCUS ON SAFETY

INDUSTRY’S SHORTAGE OF SKILLED WORKERS SHINES LIGHT ON IMPORTANCE OF PROPER SAFETY TRAINING

Due to the skilled labor shortage in the residential construction industry, builders are finding themselves having to do more with less help. Nationwide polls suggest worker’s safety due to the lack of skilled labor is a top concern in 2019. This problem has worsened since the legalization of marijuana and the opioid crisis throughout our state.

REDUCE YOUR RISK

In Washington, this type of climate can also create a higher risk of a Washington State Department of Labor & Industries (L &I), Division of Occupational Safety and Health (DOSH) safety violation penalty, which have increased dramatically and continue to rise. Now is a good

many benefits beyond assisting drug addiction and alcohol abuse in the workplace. By-products of a healthy safety culture minimize your risk for bad hires, fraudulent injury claims, safety violations and penalties, and high employee turnover.

LEADERSHIP KEY

One of the best ways for employers to combat the rising drug addiction problem in the construction industry is to create a safety culture based on teamwork and accountability. Improving your supervisory leadership and demonstratSafety is the sum of many ing your company’s comparts working together to mitment to safety as well as getting your employees create success. involved in a safety program is crucial. Educating workers time for your company to improve on how unsafe behavior not only afits safety culture on a company-wide fects the company, but the livelihood basis as well as the job site. of co-workers helps employees feel more invested and creates accountability. SAFER EMPLOYEES = SUCCESS Educated employees are safer employees, which in turn yields MENTORS MATTER better awareness and conscientiousInexperienced employees can also ness. Safety is the sum of many parts be a cause of increased and expenworking together to create success. sive workers’ comp claims. Combine This type of success also comes with that with the industry’s labor short-

BUILDING INSIGHT BIAW.com

age, and you get many reasons on why providing good hiring practices and a training and mentoring program designed for young or inexperienced workers can help you lower your risk of workplace injuries.

SAFETY WORKSHOPS AHEAD

BIAW, in conjunction with our local associations, will offer a three-hour workshop to help combat these safety concerns along with how to implement best hiring practices. Classes are being scheduled for 2020. For more information on all BIAW class offerings, visit BIAW.com/education or contact BIAW Education Program Manager Hillary Vanatta at (360) 352-7800 ext. 106 or hillaryv@ biaw.com.


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BUILD YOUR BRAND

FUEL YOUR GROWTH BIAW CLASS OFFERS MARKETING STRATEGIES AND TACTICS TO ATTRACT NEW CUSTOMERS Do you wish you knew more about marketing and advertising strategies? For example, did you know: n  It takes at least seven times for the public to read or see information about your company before they remember you or your business n  Nearly 70% of consumers say they use social media for issues dealing with customer service n  Using a copyrighted image could earn you a $20,000 fine

TOPIC REQUEST EVOLVES INTO NEW CLASS

What if you had the inside track about these subjects? Well, now you can! BIAW will cover these topics and many more with our new class, Marketing Strategies for Today’s Contractor, debuting in 2020. This class is designed to help take the mystery out of marketing and advertising in today’s digital world. Other topics we’ll delve into: n Creating and developing an integrated marketing and advertising plan = Does your marketing message resonate with your intended audience? n Creating meaningful content that consumers will actually read = Is your marketing on message? n Overview on the use of images, websites, web optimization, and social media = Does your marketing incorporate a variety of types and techniques? n Methods for tracking and reevaluating your anticipated outcomes = How can I measure my marketing strategies?

DON’T BE LEFT BEHIND

BIAW will keep you updated as the class scheduled is fine-tuned and ready to publish. For more information on BIAW’S entire class schedule, visit BIAW.com/education or contact BIAW Education Manager Hillary Vanatta at (360) 352-7800, ext. 106 or hillaryv@biaw.com.

World Suicide Prevention Day Sept. 10 #WSPD

Suicidal employees are only invisible if no one is looking. Keep an eye out for these warning signs: • Increased tardiness and absenteeism • Decreased productivity • Decreased self-confidence • Isolation from peers • Agitation and increased conflict among co-workers • Increased feelings of being overwhelmed • Decreased problem solving ability • Legal and illicit substance abuse • Near hits, incidents and injuries

WORLD SUICIDE PREVENTION DAY SEPT. 10 #WSPD If you are feeling overwhelmed, depressed, or even suicidal, you are not alone. In fact, construction workers are statistically at a higher risk for mental health issues than virtually every other profession. For urgent assistance, please reach out to the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline right away.

ALLIES IN THE FIGHT FOR SUICIDE PREVENTION & MENTAL HEALTH PROMOTION

www.constructionworkingminds.org

www.cfma.org/suicideprevention #suicidepreventioncfma

www.mantherapy.org

Original design inspired and created by the CFMA’s VALLEY OF THE SUN CHAPTER in association with the JP GRIFFIN GROUP: Trusted Employee Benefit Advisors (www.griffinbenefits.com)

SEPTEMBER ’19 VOL. 29, ISSUE 8


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KITSAP COUNTY

WATER FIELD TRIP

HIRST LEGISLATION PROMPTS STAKEHOLDERS’ VISIT TO WATERSHED RESTORATION PROJECTS

The eight watershed restoration enhancement committees, created as a result of the Hirst legislation during the last legislative session, were directed by the legislature to devise a list of projects to offset future water use from household wells.

SHOVEL-READY PROJECTS

In Kitsap county, a group of stakeMembers of the Hirst legislation stakeholder holders including group visit Kitsap county-area water conservaBIAW Regulations tion projects last month. and Government Affairs Manager Josie Cummings recently visited the Kitsap Conservation District facility, Clear Creek Restoration project, and the Kitsap Public Utility District’s (PUD) Port Gamble Resource Recovery Facility. This field trip was an opportunity to see first hand projects being developed to aid streamflow, restore fish habitat, and conserve water instead of imposing additional regulatory burdens onto home builders, business and landowners.

KITSAP CONSERVATION DISTRICT FACILITY

At the Kitsap Conservation District facility, they have on-site examples of how landowners can implement optional low impact development projects at home. The facility features a rain garden (rain gardens collect and filter runoff water from impervious surfaces such as roofs, driveways, parking areas and other hard surfaces) and a water catchment system that stores nearly 50,000 gallons of water onsite. The water catchment system stores recycled water for their 3/4-acre community garden and indoor toilet use.

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CLEAR CREEK WETLAND

At the Clear Creek Wetland and Floodplain Restoration site, county efforts have removed two culverts, 1,500 feet of existing road, created 500 feet of new stream channel and restored 30 acres of stream floodplain along Clear Creek. Members of the community can enjoy this restoration project by strolling through miles of walking paths The Clear Creek Wetland and Floodplain and bike trails. Restoration site project aims to restore floodplains and riparian habitat to reduce the risk of flooding downstream properties.

PORT GAMBLE RESOURCE RECOVERY FACILITY

The last stop of the field trip was to the Kitsap County Public Utilities District’s Port Gamble Resource Recovery Facility. The wastewater-treatment facility is a new, state-of-the-art Membrane Bio-Reactor plant, which treats wastewater to a high enough degree that it can be reused for other purposes. However, that treated water is currently being returned to the groundwater and streamflow system, but other reuse purposes will likely be considered in the future. No longer is treated wastewater discharged into Hood Canal, thus The state-of-the-art Membrane Bio-Rereopening 90 acres of actor allows treated wastewater to be returned to the groundwater and streamflow shellfish beds. system. Comments from the field trip group will help the committee as they are required to submit a list of water projects to the Department of Ecology with deadline of 2021.


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SUMMERTIME EVENTS

LOCAL HAPPENINGS IT’S A WIN-WIN

(l to r): Central Washington Home Builders Association (CWHBA) board member Ernesto Gonzalez, representative of Perry Technical Institute (PTI) Darin Peters, CWHBA scholarship recipient Amanda Nesary, CWHBA President Clint Adamson, and CWHBA Education Coordinator Ashley Ferreira. Amanda was awarded is enrolled in the electrical technology program at Perry Technical Institute. PTI was also a 2019 BIAW grant recipient.

BIA of Clark County (BIACC) education scholarship committee member Lisa Thompson with seven of the nine BIACC’s Building Futures Foundation academic scholarship recipients. New this year, and made possible by a partnership with the Construction Industry Training Council, BIACC BFF awarded six electrical apprentices with $500 Tool Grants.

MBA of Pierce County members Ryan Jewell, Chris Lockhart, and Ken Jewell, enjoy an evening of fun and baseball with the Tacoma Rainiers at Cheney Stadium. Attendees of the membership appreciation event enjoyed a private party deck, barbeque buffet and beverages.

Shelli Lucus-Kennedy and her husband Paul Davidson (center) with friends Kirk and Heidi Ihde at the Virginia Mason Athletic Center, location of the Seahawks training camp.

Many thanks to MBA of King and Snohomish County member Shelli Lucus-Kennedy for her support of the Washington Affordable Housing Council (WAHC.) During the BIAW Spike Party, Lucus-Kennedy was the winning bidder of a Seahawks-themed set of cornhole boards and a 4-pack of Seahawks training camp tickets. Lucus-Kennedy jumped at the chance to surprise her husband, a die-hard Seahwaks fan, with the birthday gift—a win-win for WAHC and Lucus-Kennedy. “I have long supported WAHC. Whether it’s fighting over-regulation, defending our industry or raising money for builder friendly-candidates, I am all in every time. This was for a great cause,” said Shelli Lucus-Kennedy. “We had a great time. We enjoyed the sunny day, our friends, the day off work, and of course, the Seahawks. Thank you BIAW, we had a blast!”

SEPTEMBER ’19 VOL. 29, ISSUE 8


BIAW’S NEW HEADQUARTERS

BUILDING UPDATE

Building Industry Association of Washington 111 21st Avenue SW | Olympia, WA 98501 (360) 352-7800 | BIAW.com | 

NEXT UP: TENANT IMPROVEMENTS, LISTING PROPERTY

As many in the association are aware, after a lengthy evaluation process, BIAW’S board of directors, during the summer board meeting in June, voted to approve the purchase of a building in Tumwater as BIAW’s new headquarters. Since that decision by the BIAW board, the purchase of the Parkside Building (300 Deschutes Way Tumwater, WA 98501) has been progressing on schedule. Here is the latest update: n  A Phase 1 Environmental Report on the property was completed and reported no concerns n  An independent appraisal valued the property at $5.25 million, the agreed-upon purchase price n  The sellers agreed to reduce the final purchase price to $5,205,250, to cover the cost of repairing a few minor items that were identified in the property inspection report n  The 90-day feasibility period was completed, and BIAW removed all contingencies on the purchase n  An LLC was created by BIAW to purchase and manage the operations of the facility n  The closing will take place on or before Sep. 10

TENANT IMPROVEMENTS

BIAW President Rick Hjelm has appointed an oversight committee from the BIAW executive committee to supervise the tenant improvements that are necessary for BIAW to move into the new building. (BIAW’s board of directors approved funds to complete the tenant improvements and the move of BIAW staff to the new office space.) BIAW is working with an architect to finalize the design of the space, which includes the entire third (top) floor and the west half of the first floor. Once the design is completed, BIAW will interview potential general contractors and select one to manage the tenant improvement project.

FUTURE OF THE MCCLEARY MANSION

BIAW’s Member Services Corporation (MSC) voted to sell the McCleary Mansion and anticipates listing the mansion in the next few weeks. The listing price will be $1.19 million. As directed by the BIAW Board, all proceeds from the sale of the mansion will be put into BIAW’s long-term reserves.

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Building Insight September 2019  

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