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Design Portfolio

THEODORE BAZIL


ACADEMIC 1. Core At The Confluence 13. Dwelling: St. Croix 21. Dwelling: Nova Scotia 29. Urban Cinematography 37. Tramvia 43. Drawings + Hand Renderings

COMPETITION 49. Looking Forward 53. Oh, The Ways That You’ll Grow!

PROFESSIONAL 59. Selections From Atrium Design Group 61. 807 N. 3rd Street 63. 966 N. 2nd Street 65. 201 - 213 S. 22nd Street


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CORE AT THE CONFLUENCE YOUNGSTOWN, OHIO, USA

PROJECT TYPE: Academic (M. ARCH) STUDIO: ARCH 7010, Prof. Julie Bargmann, Fall 2017 PROGRAM: To propose a new urban paradigm for a shrinking postindustrial city, and to develop this paradigm through a series of strategic urban and architectural scale interventions. Project duration: one semester. Youngstown, Ohio was once a prosperous steel-producing town, and a symbol of 20th century America's manufacturing prowess. Decades of poor urban and infrastructural planning, combined with a severe lack of economic diversity, however, left it vulnerable to the subsequent forces of de-industrialization. Since its industrial peak in the late 1950s, the city has been rapidly shrinking in population, yet its footprint, form, and infrastructures have not adjusted and "right-sized" to match the scale and needs of its current economy, population, and demographics.


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S H R I N K I N G C I T Y / I N ACC ES S I B L E C I T Y

L AKE ERIE EUCLID

CLEVELAND

WA R R E N NILES

STRONGSVILLE KENT

A U S T I N TO W N

YO U N G S TOWN CAMPBELL

02

AKRON

STRUTHERS

CA NTON

NEW CASTLE

OH WV

MCC ANDLESS

PA MONROEVILLE

STEUBENVILLE

01. REGIONAL MAP

P I T T S BU R G H

0

30'

N

The steel plants which once powered the city’s economy and anchored its urban form are long gone, yet the sites where they stood along the Mahoning River remain barren, polluted, and sealed off from the outside. The surrounding urban fabric is littered with brownfield sites and industrial parks, and fragmented by fences, railway yards, and limited access highways, built in the 1960s to bypass the city altogether. The result is a city with an increasingly sparse, under-served, and isolated population—one whose remaining economic opportunities are hermetically contained within faceless, auto-centric, and monocultural industrial parks far from the historic city core, and neighborhoods they aim to serve.


SHARON LINE / MCGUFFE Y HEIGHTS

L ANDSDOWNE

FORMER SITE OF Y T SHEET & TUBE BRIER HILL WORKS

BRIER HILL S A LT S P R I N G S W I C K PA R K FORMER OHIO WORKS I N D U S T R I A L PA R K S A LT S P R I N G S I N D U S T R I A L PA R K

S T E E LTO N

EAST HIGH A R L I N G TO N YSU

D O W N TO W N

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EAST SIDE

H A Z E LTO N S CH EN LEY OA K H ILL

LO W E R GIBSON

LINCOLN KNOLLS

FORMER REPUBLIC STEEL WORKS

LEGEND POINT OF INTEREST

WA R R E N

CIT Y BOU N DA RY H I G H WAY ACTI V E R A I LROA D

KIRKMERE

IDORA

DEMOLISHED PROPERTIES

B U C K E Y E P L AT

F O R E C LO S E D P R O P E R T I E S

LANSINGVILLE

NON-RETURNABLE ADDRESSES % OF RESIDENTS OF COLOR

02. CITY MAP

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1 MI

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03. EXISTING SITE CONDITIONS

OHIO WORKS

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O P P O R T U N I T I E S F O R N E W, " R I G H T- S I Z E D " C O R R I D O R S

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N E W, " R I G H T- S I Z E D " C O R R I D O R S

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HOME S AV I N G S BUILDING

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POINT OF INTEREST

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OA K H ILL

RESIDENTIAL

OA K H ILL CEMETERY

INDUSTRIAL COMMERCIAL + INSTITUTIONAL

03. PROPOSED SITE STRATEGY

0

1500'

N


" R I G H T-S I Z I N G " I N F R A ST R U C T U R E A targeted strategy of removing over-scaled and obstructive infrastructures, and subsequently re-claiming and promoting finer, “right-sized” ones could harness the city’s trajectory of contraction to encourage greater population densities along resilient, mixeduse, and pedestrian-oriented corridors. To test such a strategy, I propose the dismantling of a one-mile stretch of Interstate-680 through the centrally located, industrial neighborhood of Mahoning Commons, and explore a range of opportunities for “right-sized” infrastructural intervention presented by this removal, all of which aim to establish tighter links between the adjacent land uses. H I S TO R I C R A I L S TAT I O N H A R D TO A C C E S S F O R

DE-COMMISSIONED BRIDGE HIDDEN AMONG THE TREES L ACK OF CON N ECTION TO R I V E R F R O N T ACTI V E FREIG HT R A I L PRE VENTS STREET CONNECTIVIT Y

MAHONING COMMONS

PEDESTRIANS

MAHONING COMMONS

L A C K O F C O N N E C T I O N TO EASTERN BANK OF RIVER

"DOWNTOWN"

P U B L I C B LO C K E D F R O M S PA C E B E T W E E N B R I D G E S B Y R O A D S A N D R A I LWAY

FA L LO W G R O U N D LO S T F R O M H I G H WAY A N D A S S O C I AT E D G R A D I N G

MAHONING COMMONS

F O R M E R E L E VAT E D R A I L T R E S T L E L I E S FA L LO W AND CUTS THROUGH NEIGHBORHOOD

H I G H WAY B LO C K S C O N N E C T I O N B E T W E E N D O W N TO W N A N D RESIDENTIAL AREAS

OAK HILL

0 5 . E X I ST I N G

0 4 . E X I ST I N G

R E - O P E N O L D B R I D G E TO C O N N E C T TO P O I N T S N O R T H RE-PURPOSE TRESTLE AS CONNECTIVE CORRIDOR

T R E S T L E S PA N S OV ER ACTI V E R A I L BARRIER

0 6 . E X I ST I N G

MAHONING COMMONS

E S TA B L I S H P U B L I C A C C E S S TO WAT E R F R O N T V I A P U B L I C S PA C E CONNECTION E S TA B L I S H E D W I T H EAST BANK OF RIVER

PEDESTRIAN CONNECTION E S TA B L I S H E D W I T H H I S TO R I C R A I L S TAT I O N

"DOWNTOWN" PEDESTRIAN CONNECTIVIT Y A L LO W S F O R P U B L I C S PA C E BET WEEN BRIDGES

I N F I L L F O R M E R H I G H WAY A R E A TO C R E AT E C O N N E C T I V E C O R R I D O R

MAHONING COMMONS

INFILL DENSIT Y A LO N G C O R R I D O R UTILIZE EXISTING GRADING F R O M H I G H WAY O N - R A M P TO E S TA B L I S H N E W S U R FA C E S T R E E T

MAHONING COMMONS OAK HILL

0 4 . P R O P OS ED

R A I L L I N E B LO C K S PU B LIC ACCESS TO WAT E R F R O N T

L ACK OF CON N ECTI V IT Y BET WEEN NEIGHBORHOODS AND L AND USES

0 5 . P R O P OS ED

RE-GRADING CAN BRIDGE R A I LWAY A N D E S TA B L I S H PEDESTRIAN CORRIDOR A LO N G R I V E R PAT H O F F O R M E R I N T E R S TAT E 6 8 0

0 6 . P R O P OS ED


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SITE AND PHASING A de-commissioned, elevated rail trestle, which currently cuts through Mahoning Commons, could function as a prominent and vibrant confluence within the city’s new network of denser urban corridors. This proposition would first seek to establish a pedestrian and streetscape link between formerly inaccessible industrial parks along the river and their adjacent, under-served residential communities. Such a link might subsequently grow into an urban destination in its own right through the sensitive integration of commercial, industrial, residential, and public spaces along the corridor, with the fabric of the surrounding neighborhood and existing streetscape.

WEST MAHONING AVE. FROM TRESTLE

TO ARLING TON

TO DOWNTOWN

N

FORMER B&O R A I L R OA D S TAT I O N

.W ES T

SPRING COMMON BRIDGE

AV E.

T O R IV ER

BEND

DE- COMMISSIONED TRUSS BRIDGE NEW PUBLIC WAT E F R O N T

ACT

IVE

CSX

RAI

L

#7

W R TA B U S D E P OT #4

YO U N G S TO W N WAT E R D E P T.

EAST MAHONING AVE. FROM TRESTLE

TO

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O S R

V I C TO R I A N P L AY E R S

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VIEW TOWARD MARSHALL ST.

PEPSI PL ANT C A LV I N C E N T E R

EY PERSPECTIVE VIEW

TO OA K H I L L

POINT OF INTEREST STREET CORRIDORS TRANSIT CORRIDORS

#


ACTI V E FREIG HT R A I L PROV I DES OPPORTUNIT Y FOR FOR COMMUTER R AIL TR AFFIC PUBLIC USE OF TRESTLE PROV IDES OPPORTUN IT Y F OR U R B A N WAT E R F R O N T RE-OPEN DE-COMISSIONED B R I D G E TO T R A F F I C

R E TA I N E X I S T I N G G R A D I N G A N D W O O LY G R O W T H A R O U N D T R E S T L E C O N C R E T E R E TA I N I N G WA L L S A N D A R C H WAY TO R E M A I N P R O P O S E D R A M P S A N D S TA I R S CONNECT TRESTLE STREETSCAPE TO E X I S T I N G S U R FA C E S T R E E T S

P R O P O S E D R A M P TO C O N N E C T O L D B R I D G E TO R A I L T R E S T L E TA R G E T E D D E M O L I T I O N O F D E T E R I O R AT I N G S T R U C T U R E S

"RE-WIRING" THE CIT Y The aggregation of “right-sized” interventions could promote a larger pattern of strategic “corridor-ization” at the scale of the city. Such urban re-structuring would allow for a denser, and more vibrant urban fabric--even with a continued trajectory of population arbitrage.

PHASE 1:

Reclaim + Connect EXTEND THE PLINTH OF THE TRESTLE FOR INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERICAL PRGR AMMING P R O P O S E D PA S S E N G E R R A I L S TAT I O N PROPOSED BERM AS SONIC AND S PAT I A L B U F F E R F R O M R A I L R O A D P R O P O S E D R E - G R A D I N G TO C R E AT E N E W P U B L I C WAT E R F R O N T P R O P O S E D R A M P S A N D S TA I R S TO C O N N E C T S T R E E T L E V E L A N D E L E VAT E D C I R C U L AT I O N

N E W C I R C U L AT I O N A C T S A S F I N E G R A I N E X T E N S I O N O F C I T Y FA B R I C M A I N TA I N E X I S T I N G R E TA I N I N G WA L L S A N D T R E S T L E S T R U C T U R E N E W PAT H A LO N G R I V E R B A N K C O N N E C T S N E W WAT E R F R O N T W I T H H I S TO R I C B & O R A I L S TAT I O N

MINIMUM

P H A S E 2:

Carve + Extrude

FA C E I N D U S T R I A L P R O C E S S E S A N D LO A D I N G ZO N E S AWAY F R O M P E D E S T R I A N S T R E E T F R O N TA G E S N E W S T R E E T S C A P E E X I S T S AT M U LT I P L E L E V E L S

BUILD RESIDENTIAL AND/OR OFFICE S PA C E S U P A B O V E N E W S T R E E T S C A P E C O N C E N T R AT E D D E N S I T Y R E S U LT S I N E M E R G E N C E O F N E W, U R B A N M I C R O NEIGHBORHOODS

MEDIUM

MA XIMIZE STREET PRESENCE WITH O P E N “ F R O N T- O F - H O U S E ” P R O G R A M

PHASE 3:

Program + Infill

MAXIMUM


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1. Existing Rail Trestle 2. Bridge Ramp 3. Urban Riverbank / Public Assembly 4. Stage / Podium 5. Sound Berm 6. Riverbank Path 7. Commuter Rail Station 8. "Kiss and Ride" / Taxi Queue 9. Industrial / Loading Zone 10. Residential Lobby + Entry 11. Public Green Space 12. Small Retail / Cafe 13. Urban Plaza 14. Industrial / Workshop Spaces 15. Professional Office / Artisan Spaces 16. Restaurant + Sidewalk Cafe 17. Large Commercial Amenity 18. Residential Blocks


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SECTION A - A

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SECTION B - B

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SECTION C - C

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SECTION D - D

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A R C H I T E C T U R A L E X P R ES S I O N The architecture of a vibrant urban confluence might be articulated as a conversation with its surrounding post-industrial context: drawing upon a vernacular palette of cast-in-place concrete with slag-based aggregate, and corrugated metal cladding with a weathered patina finish. Industrial and commercial programs would be sited so as to infill needed density along Marshall Street, Mahoning Avenue, and Tod Avenue, and would be built into the existing topographical relief along the trestle so that their roofs might function as public extensions of the newly "found" elevated streetscape.


Residences would hover above this new streetscape: shielded from the industrial and commercial activity below, yet never disconnected from it. Commercial and industrial structures would maintain a strategy of multiple frontages, with loading and industrial access zones facing away from the new pedestrian-oriented streetscape, and public entrances facing toward it. The topography of the new “found� streetscape would alternately rise to merge with the historic trestle, and then fall away to reveal it: suggesting a hierarchical order where existing industrial infrastructure, ground, and neighborhood context take precedence over architectural intervention.


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DWELLING: ST. CROIX ANNA’S HOPE ESTATES, ST. CROIX, USVI

PROJECT TYPE: Academic (B.S. ARCH) STUDIO: ARCH 411, Prof. Donald Koster, Fall 2013 PROGRAM: A private home for a husband and wife on a steep, three-quarter acre site. Reinforced concrete construction. Project duration: 7 weeks. Given a steep site with dramatic views toward the North and West, I propose a home in which the bedrooms and living spaces are elevated to the second floor, and project out over the hillside below. The first floor of the main house, which contains all of the service program, is separated from the guest suite by a shared courtyard. Building elements, such as the long swimming pool on the second floor, and the series of columns near the entrance to the first floor, help to frame key views through deliberate applications of one point perspective. The design speaks to the climate and building culture of the island through the use of prevalent local materials and construction techniques, such as reinforced concrete. A rooftop photo-voltaic array reduces the home’s reliance on the local energy grid, and an underground cistern collects rainwater for use in the home’s plumbing system.


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LOCATION MAPS

n

SITE/ROOF PLAN


E

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FIRST FLOOR PLAN E

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SECOND FLOOR PLAN E

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17 C

B

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T.O ROOF: 24’ - 6”

2ND FLOOR: 14’ -0”

1ST FLOOR: 0’ - 0”

WEST ELEVATION E

D

T.O ROOF: 24’ - 6”

2ND FLOOR: 14’ - 0”

1ST FLOOR: 0’ - 0”

NORTH ELEVATION


SECTION A - A

SECTION B - B

SECTION C - C

SECTION D - D

SECTION E - E


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DWELLING: NOVA SCOTIA UPPER PORT LATOUR, NOVA SCOTIA, CANADA

PROJECT TYPE: Academic (B.S. ARCH) STUDIO: ARCH 411, Prof. Donald Koster, Fall 2013 PROGRAM: A private, seasonal retreat with a sauna and boat storage for a couple and three children on a large, forested, waterfront site. Wood construction. Project duration: 7 weeks. The site plan is organized about the crossing of two prominent axes: the vehicular approach from the North, and the elevated pedestrian path leading Westward from the garage and boathouse towards the main house and waterfront beyond. The form, program, and circulation of the home is similarly organized about these two axes. The living, kitchen, and dining spaces are raised up to the second floor and oriented so as to take advantage of the expansive coastal view to the South and West. On the first floor, a guest suite and a sauna are separated from the family’s bedrooms by a covered breezeway. In addition to its programmatic function, this interstitial space serves as a framing device for the approaching visitor’s view towards the water, and as an invitation to that visitor to complete the journey and continue on to the end of the path.


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n

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E. ELEVATION

W. ELEVATION


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N. ELEVATION

SECTION A-A

S. ELEVATION

SECTION B-B


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URBAN CINEMATOGRAPHY BEVERLY HILLS, LOS ANGELES, CA, USA

PROJECT TYPE: Academic (B.S. ARCH) STUDIO: ARCH 412, Prof. Chandler Ahrens, Spring 2014 PROGRAM: A film school campus in an urban setting containing classrooms, film production spaces, faculty and administrative offices, student residences and amenities, a theater, and outdoor community spaces. Project duration: one semester. On a prominent urban corner surrounded by three major boulevards, I propose a design that weaves residential and academic program around public, community spaces. The plaza and amphitheater, intended for both university and community use, serve as a central quad for campus life, and as an extension of the surrounding urban fabric. Semi-public spaces, such as classrooms, a dining hall, kitchen, gymnasium, and student commons, form the bridge between this public sphere and the private, residential sphere beyond. Overlapping, overlooking, and converging spaces enrich and supplement formal cinematic education by encouraging students, faculty, and visitors to confront, investigate, and contemplate their understandings of viewership, mise en scène, and sensory perception. The dramatic, sweeping curves that define the campus aesthetic can be interpreted as both a contemporary nod to Los Angeles’s cultural and stylistic association with retro-futurism, as well as a commentary upon the role that cinema has played, from its Golden Age to the present day, in defining and capturing the look, feel, spirit, and values of a time and place.


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n

SITE PLAN


A MONICA BLVD

W

ILS

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Gym + Locker Rooms Student Commons Dining Hall + Kitchen

MORE PRIVATE

MORE PUBLIC COMMUNITY/PUBLIC PROGRAM

SANTA MONICA BLVD RESIDENTIAL PROGRAM

Public Theater Outdoor Amphitheater Urban Green Space Pedestrian Plaza

Dormitories Common Spaces Laundry/Trash, etc.

Classrooms Faculty/Admin Offices Editing Suites

Study Spaces Conference Rooms

ACADEMIC PROGRAM

Cafe/Bar

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Film Screening Area Scene Shop Costume Shop Dressing Rooms

W

ILS

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20

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SECTION A-A 23

1. Stage 2. Theater 3. Dressing Room 4. Costume Shop 5. Scene Shop 6. Classroom 7. Office 8. Dining Area 9. Kitchen 10. Common Space 11. Gymnasium 12. Locker Room 13. Bathroom 14. Editing Suite 15. Storage 16. Bedroom 17. Laundry 18. Communal Kitchen 19. Conference / Study 20. Courtyard 21. Outdoor Ampitheater 22. Film Screening 23. Parking 24. Cafe / Bar


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STUDENT RESIDENCES

STUDENT LOUNGE

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THEATER AND FOYER

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1. Stage 2. Theater 3. Dressing Room 4. Costume Shop 5. Scene Shop 6. Classroom 7. Office 8. Dining Area 9. Kitchen 10. Common Space 11. Gymnasium 12. Locker Room 13. Bathroom 14. Editing Suite 15. Storage 16. Bedroom 17. Laundry 18. Communal Kitchen 19. Conference / Study 20. Courtyard 21. Outdoor Ampitheater 22. Film Screening 23. Parking 24. Cafe / Bar


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TRAMVIA

STAZIONE PORTA AL PRATO, FLORENCE, ITALY PROJECT TYPE: Academic STUDIO: ARCH 312, Prof. Zeuler Lima, Spring 2013 COLLABORATORS: Kristen Nowotarski, Samantha Stapleton PROGRAM: An urban scale redevelopment of an existing tram stop and surrounding public space. Project duration: 7 weeks. Porta al Prato Station, located between Florence’s city center, Cascine park, and a newly opened opera house, sits at the boundary between the dense urban fabric of central Florence and the more automobile-centric sprawl beyond. The site is a disorienting confluence of transportation: the tram line and a limited access highway pierce through the surrounding surface streets, resulting in pockets of unusable space and impeding pedestrian connectivity with the city center. As a solution, we propose to sink the highway below grade, reconfigure and simplify the route of the tram line, and extend the logic of the city street grid to convert the previously disparate, unusable, and leftover spaces into a series of pedestrian ways and public plazas surrounded by cafes, stores, pavilions, green spaces, and water elements. These interventions not only promote the pedestrian connection between the city, the park, and the opera house, but also establish and activate an urban locus of its own. *The proposed design and accompanying images were a collaborative group effort, however all of the hand drawn elements were specifically produced by me. 7.


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OP

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EXISTING CONDITIONS

EXISTING BUILDINGS

GREENSCAPE / PARK

LEFTOVER SPACE

PROPOSED STRUCTURES

WATER FEATURE

TRAM LINE

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SECTION A

SECTION B

SECTION C


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BOBOLI GARDENS, FLORENCE, ITALY. Ink Wash, 2013, Prof. Regan Wheat

DRAWINGS + HAND RENDERINGS A collection of drawings and hand renderings from Bob Hansman’s 112 Studio (Spring 2011), Zeuler Lima’s 312 studio (Spring 2013), Catalina Freixas’s Representations I studio (Fall 2012), and Regan Wheat’s Representations II studio (Spring 2013).


CLOCKTOWER Acrylic, 2011, Prof. Bob Hansman


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PIAZZA SANTA MARIA DEL FIORE Analytical Study of a Public Space Pencil, 2013, Prof. Zeuler Lima


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LANDSCAPE AND URBAN STUDIES Pencil, 2012, Prof. Catalina Freixas


URBAN PALIMPSEST Pencil, 2012, Prof. Catalina Freixas

SELF-PORTRAIT Pencil, 2012, Prof. Catalina Freixas


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LOOKING FORWARD

RE-IMAGINING THE FUTURE ATHENAEUM OF PHILADELPHIA PROJECT TYPE: Open Design Competition, Individual Entry YEAR: 2014 If the current trend towards instantaneous and remotely accessible digital information is any indication of the future, by the year 2050, contemporary brick-and-mortar libraries will be seen as historical anachronisms. While its physical collection will remain unrivaled, the new Athenaeum recognizes that architecture is an art of the physical and experiential world. To remain the leading architectural resource in Philadelphia, the institution must not only serve as a custodian of records, but also as an integral feature of the surrounding urban fabric. The proposed massing respects the legacy of the institution and its historic context by maintaining the height and footprint of the original brownstone structure, whilst simultaneously re-orienting the building’s formerly hermetic street level presence towards something more open and outwardly engaging. A porous pedestrian link between historic city neighborhoods is established by treating the first floor gallery, cafe, and lounge spaces, and the second floor event space, as a programmed extension of the surrounding street grid. Gently sheltered from the bustle and commotion of this new urban corridor above, the lower floors provide an ideal environment for the more inwardly focused, traditional scholarly functions of the building.


51

12

14

6

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LOWER LEVEL

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LOWER MEZZANINE

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1ST FLOOR

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2ND FLOOR

1. Digital Media Resources 2. Screening Room 3. Private Reading + Conference Room 4. Open Reading Area 5. Climate Controlled Special Collections/Archives 6. Print Collections 7. Mezzanine 8. Staff Lounge 9. Common Lounge + Cafe 10. Circulation Desk + Information 11. Gallery 12. Pedestrian Entry + Atrium 13. Public Gathering + Event Space 14. Administrative Office


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SECTION A

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SECTION C

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THE FREE LIBRARY OF PHILADELPHIA: BLANCHE A. NIXON/COBB’S CREEK

PROJECT TYPE: Open Design Competition, Team Entry YEAR: 2016 TEAM MEMBERS: Ted Bazil, Evan Litvin, Snezana Litvinovic, Nurit Nachum, Colby Rosenwald, Kyrie Yaccarino, Shimi Zakin Children are uniquely gifted at re-imagining their surroundings as venues for play, regardless of their intended uses. Similarly, the best play spaces naturally offer themselves to “children” of all ages to appropriate, define and reinterpret. While current playgrounds typically feature mass-produced, nearly identical equipment, we break this mold by looking back to a more informal understanding of what a playspace can be. The proposed space safely encourages children to be the masters of their own environment by appropriating, defining, and reinterpreting it. In turn, this strengthens their perception, imagination and confidence in themselves. The playspace is a flexible setting where library programming and open play interweave at multiple scales, inviting community members to participate in the “theater” and continue developing the space. *The design of the proposal, and the production of the selected drawings and images was a collaborative effort in which I played a leading role. The section drawings, however, were solely produced by me.


57TH ST

COBB’S

59TH ST

61ST ST

63RD ST

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CREEK PK WY

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IM BALT COBB’S CREEK

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PKW

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LOCATION MAP Y

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LIBRARY

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VE RE A IMO

SITE PLAN

C A

1. Overlook 2. Theater 3. Terraced steps 4. Climbing wall 5. Slide 6. Jungle Gym 7. Seating 8. Cobb’s Creek Trail Stop 9. Interactive Wall 10. Play Sprinklers 11. Community Plaza 12. Rain Garden 13. Community Garden 14. Accessible library entry 15. The “Truffula” tree


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SECTION A-A

R E-I NTER P R E TAT I O N A N D I MAG I N AT I O N Flexibility is central to this play space, both in terms of site organization and the way a child interacts with its elements. The large court in the center of the site, along with the amphitheater seating, can become a community gathering space, an outdoor classroom, a place for theatrical performances and film projections, or an open recreational space with a water feature in the summer. Interactive features such as tunnels, mesh walkways, cozy niches, a slide, and a climbing wall not only allow for prescribed uses, but also prompt adventurers to reinterpret, reinvent and re-imagine their environment. Responsive elements such as the melody wall and the giant abacus encourage children to observe, engage, experiment, and manipulate. The playspace’s attention to information extraction and creative re-construction helps children to gain decision making skills and the impulse to lead rather than follow.

“Think and wonder. Wonder and think.” - Dr. Suess


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PATTER N R EC O G N I T I O N

INTER ACTIV ITY The playspace promotes interactivity on three levels: between children and their environments; between children and their peers; and between children and their accompanying adults. In addition to their traditional role as guardians, the playspace invites adults to facilitate the exploration of patterns, to become peers in discovery, and to be the audience (or even the performers) for theatrical and educational events. Adults can even become the primary users of the play court, such as when library and neighborhood programs spill out into the space for workshops and community events.

Musical, visual and tactile patterned elements are scattered throughout the site to encourage children to learn through action and direct manipulation. Children learn about cause and effect, spatial relations, essential natural sequences, and improvisation. The Rubix wall, or the “Abacus”, is a series of colored wood blocks strung on steel bars, The blocks slide and rotate to create groupings and patterns. An array of melodic tubes, and an oversized xylophone can be explored individually or in groups.

“It’s better to learn to know how to learn, than to know.”

“The more that you read, the more things that you will know. The more that you learn, the more places you’ll go.”

- Dr. Suess

- Dr. Suess

LIBRARY 1

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SECTION B-B

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SECTION C-C

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1. Overlook 2. Theater 3. Terraced steps 4. Climbing wall 5. Slide 6. Jungle Gym 7. Seating 8. Cobb’s Creek Trail Stop 9. Interactive Wall 10. Play Sprinklers 11. Community Plaza 12. Rain Garden 13. Community Garden 14. Accessible library entry 15. The “Truffula” tree


C O MMU NITY ENGAGEMENT The community garden and children’s herb garden take advantage of the site’s southern sun exposure, and serve as a quiet retreat and an outdoor classroom away from the bustle and commotion of the play area. The mural around the base of the building is given new life by being uncovered and restored. It now becomes a centerpiece for lessons in local history and community development.

“A person’s a person, No matter how small.” - Dr. Suess

PHYSICA L DEV ELOPMENT Healthy, active children are better able to learn, focus, process information, and critically engage with their surroundings. This playspace safely provides a variety of environments and experiences so that children can hone their coordination and motor skills, explore their physical limits, and develop a better sense of risks and rewards. Free of any physical danger, the children design their own experience, and grow a stronger sense of self as well as a confidence about their environment.

“You’re off to great places, today is your day! Your mountain is waiting... So get on your way!” - Dr. Suess

EN VIRONMENTA L STEWA R DSH I P The site beckons observers to consider the ecological features throughout the site. The large rain garden and adjacent community plaza double as a nature walk and environmental learning area. The placement of the water features in the play court demarcate the underground storm water flow, visually representing natural phenomena normally unseen. Similarly, the drip line of the ‘Truffula’ tree is preserved in the grading plan and materialized by the shape of the climbing wall.

“One morning I came to this glorious place, And first I saw the trees! The Truffula Trees!” - Dr. Suess


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ATRIUM DESIGN GROUP PHILADELPHIA, PA, USA

YEARS: August 2014 - July 2017 As a designer and team member of Atrium Design Group, I was responsible for the design, documentation, coordination, and delivery of a range of residential and commercial mixed-use projects in the Philadelphia area. All of the work displayed here was drawn, rendered, or photographed by me, and come from projects where I played a prominent design and/or project management role from schematic design up through construction administration.

HIGHLIGHTED PROJECTS: 807 N. 3rd St, Philadelphia, PA (2016-2017) Lead project designer and manager of 40,000 sqft commercial mixeduse building from early schematic design up through 60% completion of construction documentation.

966 N. 2nd St, Philadelphia, PA (2015-2016) Project designer and manager of 25,000 sqft commercial mixed-use building from early design development up through 50% construction completion.

201-213 S. 22nd St, Philadelphia, PA (2014-2016) Project designer and manager for five rowhomes and an adjacent 11,000 sqft commercial mixed-use building from late schematic design up through completion of construction administration. H I STOR I C STOR E F R ON T REN OVAT I O N (2 7 N . 2 N D ST. )


B U I LD I N G SECT I O N (K H AYT I N R ESI D EN CE)

S CH E M ATI C RE ND E R I N G (1 7 5 2 - 7 0 H OWAR D ST )

MASO N RY D ETA I L S (2 01- 2 13 S. 2 2 N D ST )


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807 N. 3RD STREET

NORTHERN LIBERTIES, PHILADELPHIA, PA, USA PROJECT TYPE: Professional YEAR: 2016-2017 ROLE: Lead designer and project manager from early schematic design up through 60% completion of construction documentation. PROGRAM: A 40,000 sqft mixed-use building containing 32 residential units on five floors above a 3400 sqft street level artist studio, and subterranean parking garage. Type III-B (upper floors) over I-A (ground floor and basement) Construction. Architect: Atrium Design Group, LLC Nurit Nachum (Principal) and Shimi Zakin (Principal), Karl Adey, Andre Assis, Ted Bazil, Evan Litvin, Snezana Litvinovic, Colby Rosenwald. Structural: Structure labs, LLC MEP: Wachter Engineering, LLC Geotechnical: BP Geotech, LLC Civil: Ruggiero Plante Land Design


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966 N. 2ND STREET

NORTHERN LIBERTIES, PHILADELPHIA, PA, USA PROJECT TYPE: Professional YEAR: 2015-2016 ROLE: Designer and project manager from late schematic design up through 50% completion of building construction. PROGRAM: A 25,000 sqft mixed-use building containing 13 residential units on four floors above a street level veterinary clinic and subterranean parking. Type VB (upper floors) over I-A (ground floor and basement) Construction.

Architect: Atrium Design Group, LLC Nurit Nachum (Principal) and Shimi Zakin (Principal), Karl Adey, Andre Assis, Ted Bazil, Evan Litvin, Snezana Litvinovic, Colby Rosenwald. Structural: Larsen & Landis MEP: Bipin Associates, LLC Geotechnical: BP Geotech, LLC Civil: Ruggiero Plante Land Design


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201-213 S. 22ND STREET RITTENHOUSE SQUARE, PHILADELPHIA, PA, USA

PROJECT TYPE: Professional YEAR: 2014-2016 ROLE: Designer and project manager from early design development up through completion of construction documentation and completion of building construction. PROGRAM: Five single-family rowhomes and an adjacent 11,000 sqft mixed-use building containing 9 residential units on five floors above a street level retail space. Types VB and III-B over I-A construction, respectively.

Architect: Atrium Design Group, LLC Nurit Nachum (Principal) and Shimi Zakin (Principal), Ted Bazil, Jason Jiang, Evan Litvin, Snezana Litvinovic, Colby Rosenwald. Structural: Larsen & Landis Geotechnical: BP Geotech, LLC Civil: Ruggiero Plante Land Design


T H E O DO R E B A Z I L c | 240-252-0735 e | bazil.ted@gmail.com w | www.theodorebazil.com

Ted Bazil Architectural Portfolio (Full Version)  
Ted Bazil Architectural Portfolio (Full Version)  
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