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OPEN HOUSE LONG BEACH ISLAND HOME DESIGN MAGAZINE

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CONTENTS S P R I N G

Feautred

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Interior Design 106 GENERATIONS OF DECOR

112 BEYOND THE SHEETS

118 FARM TO BEACH HOUSE

126 86

DAYMARK

TINY HOME WITH A BIG HEART

Home Improvements 16 MAXIMIZING RESOURCES

24 CUSTOM COASTAL LIVING

32 HOME IMPROVEMENTS

38 RENOVATE OR REMODEL

44 NEXT LEVEL

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25 Bridge Avenue | Red Bank | New Jersey | 07701 732 | 345 | 1441

www.tckbdesigns.com

Appointments recommended OPEN HOUSE MAGAZINE

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Outdoor Living

CONTENTS

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54 BEFORE TAKING THE PLUNGE

66 WATERFRONT APPEAL

72 LET NATURE IN WITH AN OUTDOOR SHOWER

74 DIRECTIONAL DOWN LIGHTING

82 SPRING HAS SPRUNG

Art & History

Kitchen and Bath

132 INSPIRED BY EXQUISITE LANDSCAPES

138 THE SHACK

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98 THE RIGHT DESIGN


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Hello

The

MOVEMENT

On the Cover

OPEN HOUSE LONG BEACH ISLAND HOME DESIGN MAGAZINE

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PHOTO BY JOHN MARTINELLI

We are thrilled to debut the highly anticipated second edition of Open House Magazine this Spring ‘18 season. Not only are we grateful for the creative geniuses— designers, artists, builders and contractors, local business owners— for opening their homes and sharing their talent and expertise with us, but also, we express gratitude to our audience who has helped the publication develop into the exceptional home design magazine for Long Beach Island and the surrounding area that it is today. In this issue we have revealed cutting-edge design trends, industry news and expert advice regarding the interiors and exteriors of coastal homes (Think: kitchens, landscaping, outdoor showers and everything to do with new construction as well as remodeling). We bring you this season’s must-have styles and gorgeous architectural photos of design concepts that include reclaimed barn wood décor and the ultimate outdoor living space— everything needed to help inspire the creation of your own tranquil, elegant and thoughtfully well-designed coastal home. Our cover story highlights a local gem that happens to be in line with a trend that is sweeping the nation: the tiny house movement. Many of you will be surprised to learn that we do have microhomes on and around Long Beach Island. Poor Helen is not only a prime example of this newest craze in America, but there is a unique history and charming story behind this home that we are sure will pique your interest and warm your heart at the same time. Whether the homes we feature are ocean front estates or modest shacks on stilts, the one thing they all have in common is their homeowners’ collective desire for a peaceful beach retreat, a place for creating memories, and a means to simply enjoy time together on this island that we hold so dear to our hearts. We hope you enjoy this issue of Open House Magazine. -The Founders

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isit us in our NEW location in Ship Bottom Photo by Bridget Horgan Bell Photos by Dianne Ahto

609-661-6055 www.ucbuildersnj.com

256 W. 9th St. Ship Bottom

Photos by Graphicus 14

Building quality with integrity for over 25 years on LBI and in South Jersey

Photo by Graphicus 14 "Andersen" and the AW logo are registered trademarks of Andersen Corporation

We feature Andersen®windows in our homes.

NJ State Builder #045720 NJ State Reg #13VH005660000

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IF an

interior designer is rated by his satisfied, repeat clients....

LONG BEACH ISLAND HOME DESIGN MAGAZINE

OPEN HOUSE I N T E R I O R

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CO-FOUNDER | CHAIRMAN PUBLISHER GARY HENDERSON CO-FOUNDER | EDITORIAL CREATIVE DIRECTOR FARRELL DUNLEAVY VP OPERATIONS LUELLEN HENDERSON VP SALES BRAD BARGIEL PHOTOGRAPHERS

Vernon Brant Beach Oceanfront, Brant Beach Bayfront, Allentown (Oh yes, and Bonnet Island Estate, Mallard Island Yacht Club and The Ashford Estate) Sorrentino Loveladies 20,000 sq. ft. gated Bayfront Estate, Palm Beach (Former home of Donald Trump’s sister at Mar a Lago) O’Donoghue Haddonfield, Bryn Mawr, Avalon, Manhattan

JOHN MARTINELLI ERIC HANCE DIANNE AHTO SHEEN LYNN HARPER ANN COEN STEVE BELKOWITZ JAY ROSENBLATT PATRICA BURKE CAITLIN DENBLEYKER CONTRIBUTING EDITORS LISA SIMEK EMILY WARNE CONTRIBUTING WRITERS LISA SIMEK EMILY WARNE CHRIS GAYDOS DAPHNE KELLER TANEK HOOD MIKE IRVINE

Duffy Haddonfield, Avalon Taff Wall Twp., Manhattan, Jupiter Island

(We also have many satisfied clients with only one home!)

Thom Sweeney Interiors

849 West Bay Ave., Barnegat, NJ 08005

609.622.2950

www.thomsweeneyinteriors.com 10

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bay magazine

ADVERTISING SUBMISSIONS GENERAL INQUIRES info@bay-mag.com

For a digital copy of Open House Magazine visit our website at bay-magazine.com. All rights reserved. No part of this periodical may be reproduced without express permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed by writers commissioned for articles published by Open House Magazine are not necessarily those of the magazine. Copyright © 2018 LBI Publishing Inc. bay magazine Open House Magazine

bay-magazine.com

Feed your mind cookbook


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OPENNEW

FOR BUSINESS

NEW for WALTERS in 2018!

Walters Homes is pleased to announce the opening of our newest divisions: Walters Architecture & Walters Realty.

Custom Homes

Architecture

Real Estate

We offer a detailed and collaborative design-build philosophy that will blend your ideas and wishes with our professional experience into a creative and cost-effective construction process. From architecture and construction to interior design services, our commitment to this philosophy enables us to provide our customers with a finished home that addresses each client’s unique real estate needs.

Call to schedule a free consultation with one of our architects today, or visit our website to find out more about our “One-Stop” building experience. Isn’t it time to finally build your very own custom, summer escape? WALTERSHOMES.COM | 609/597-6999 Sales Office Located At: 880 Mill Creek Road, Manahawkin, NJ 08050 ALL HOMES TO BE ENERGY STAR® CERTIFIED “Look for high performance homes built to New Jersey’s Clean Energy Program standards.”

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TODAY you will make the world your playground. Remote islands. Distant shores. Foreign lands. They are all within reach aboard your new boat. Take control of the day and savor moments both rare and unrivaled. Then, prepare to do it all over again TOMORROW

MarineMax Ship Bottom 214 West 9th St., Ship Bottom, New Jersey 08008 1 (888) 579-3249

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Make Your Railing View Friendly CableRail by Feeney stainless steel cables are the perfect infill alternative for any railing. They’re extremely durable, easy to install, ultra­low maintenance, and virtually invisible, allowing the surrounding views to take center stage.

For more information visit feeneyinc.com or call 1­800­888­2418

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Home Improvement

MAXIMIZING

RESOURCES WRITTEN BY LISA SIMEK

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PHOTOS BY STEPHANIE BUTCHIN

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When Michael Pagnotta began his namesake design and building firm in 1990, he knew that he was on to something. Offering both the services of architecture and construction for homeowners looking to build was a relatively new concept melding two distinctly separate trades—yet combining them was the most effective way to carry out the main goal of all of his clients: maximizing resources while creating the best home possible. “We believe that every client, no matter who they are, have some kind of limited resources with which to complete their home,” points out Pagnotta. And he is right. The three main constraints that are top priority for his clients are time, space and money. “Everyone wants to enjoy the summer and each site is limited by its size, zoning regulations, and natural attributes. Each project has a budget of some sort, and most have tightly defined limits. Even clients who claim to have no limits still would like to leverage their resources and not waste money,” he adds. OPEN HOUSE MAGAZINE

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MAXIMIZING TIME So precisely how does this business owner propose he makes the best use of his clientele’s time? By bridging the gap between the ingenuity of architect and pragmatism of builder, Pagnotta has discovered smarter home design by thinking like a builder, and perfected first-rate construction by thinking like an architect. “The total time period for a new home project begins with site selection, architectural design, bidding, and then construction. When clients are seeking ways in which to get their projects done sooner, too much emphasis is put on the actual construction sequence, where real-world issues like weather, deliveries and inspections can bog down a schedule. We can reduce the time required prior to construction more easily through our design/build process where the architect and builder are one,” he notes. Mr. Pagnotta emphasizes that by discussing budgets early on and designing towards that budget, his firm can value engineer a home through the entire design process—eliminating the time required to bid the job (and too often, the time required to redesign the home to meet certain financial criteria). As architects with real-world construction experience, designers at firms like his that are well-versed in building are therefore able to discuss construction costs accurately and with confidence in order to examine the function, practicality and cost effectiveness of the design as they go. MAXIMIZING SPACE Maximizing a site’s potential is not as clear cut as the determination of zoning limits. It takes years of experience and familiarity working with local land use to es18

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tablish the maximum envelop in which to design a home. Michael Pagnotta’s firm, for example, conducts a thorough site analysis to determine things like solar orientation, view corridors, and vegetation. “We look at each site as a unique property—determining where the best possible views will be, and whether the views will be protected after surrounding homes are developed to their maximum size as well,” he says. They look at solar orientation and design with the harsh coastal climate in mind. “Simple things make the difference, we want the outdoor shower to be on the sunny side of the house and away from the north whenever possible.” His firm strives to design with the utility areas to the north while opening the house up to the south and east to best control solar gain. In his case, he has years of experience working with CAFRA surveyors, engineers and application expeditors, and his team can confidently project what they believe CAFRA will allow in terms of the expansion of a home’s footprint. As one would imagine, the top space concerns of homeowners on the island besides footprint are views and height. “For most homes on LBI we try to gain height by adding fill to the property to a degree and raising our floor levels when ocean views are possible,” Pagnotta says. He adds that design directives are to build homes on higher ground while maximizing ceiling heights in each floor, particularly the living level. He notes that reverse-living solutions are best for this design concept, as homeowners can enjoy soaring ceilings and a large expanse of unobstructed space— free space which can either lend itself as a sizeable palette for imaginative interior design, or be occupied by an endless sea of windows.

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MAXIMIZING MONEY Even when budgets are unlimited, it is nice to be able to cut back on expenses in any construction project. This is where the unified mind of architect and builder truly comes into play. In Pagnotta’s case, since he understands construction costs as the builder, during the architectural design phase he is also able to offer realistic cost estimates—giving clients the confidence to move forward or the ability to pull back and value-reengineer as necessary. “A client may describe to us what is most important to them and we create a design hierarchy to make sure we satisfy these [what we call] ‘hot buttons’ first. To some, the interior finishes and deluxe kitchen will be paramount and a smaller home will suffice, to others it may be the total number of bedrooms at the expense of higher finishes,” he describes of this synonymous home design and home building proficiency. So how exactly does this all ultimately save the client money? When homeowners enter into a design/build contract, Pagnotta states that architectural fees are reduced and clients are never charged for any of the architectural time spent throughout the course of construction—which is considerable, especially in a custom home. “During construction we do not seek to make up change orders or extras as we believe we’ve already provided the best solution for the client,” states Pagnotta, whose method essentially saves homeowners in fees they would have otherwise encountered while dealing with a separate architect from builder. Michael Pagnotta AIA established his architect-led design/build firm on Long Beach Island in 1990. For almost 30 years his firm has been responsible for the design and construction of over 500 homes on LBI. Pagnotta graduated from the University of Texas and is a licensed architect, licensed planner and registered builder. For more information on Mike and his firm, visit www.pagnotta.com or follow them on Houzz via Michael Pagnotta Architects pc, Instagram @michaelpagnottaarchitects and Pinterest.com/pagnottaarch.

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Life is shor t ... Build the B e ach House 22

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www.pagnotta.com (609)361-0011


Build with an Architectâ„¢

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Home Improvement

Custom Coastal Living THERE ARE MANY IMPORTANT PHASES WHEN IT COMES TO THE PLANNING, DESIGN AND BUILDING OF A CUSTOM COASTAL HOME. WRITTEN BY DAPHNE KELLER THOMAS J. KELLER BUILDING CONTRACTOR LLC PHOTOS BY JOHN MARTINELLI

Once the size, structural elements, floorplan and overall design have been carefully determined with respect to your desired lifestyle at the shore, the architectural plans, specifications and allowances are finalized and the actual building process moves forward. Your homebuilder should seamlessly handle the permits, proceed with site preparation and begin the technical aspects of the build. Finally comes the exciting time to make those decisions that will bring your home to life: The stage of homebuilding called ‘the selections process.’ The selections process phase requires the homeowner’s personal time as it visually sets the tone for the home. As one is guided through this process, you will make the many required decisions about selections that will complete the look, feel and finish of a home reflecting your personality and style. These decisions will begin to make your house unique and fully yours— with the materials, textures and colors that you’ve always envisioned. It’s time to “fill the box.” With a true custom home, there are many categories of decisions to be made like siding, roofing, windows, railings, lighting & plumbing fixtures, flooring, cabinetry, appliances, paint, trim, hardware, mantle and doors, to name a

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few. Within these categories, there are almost unlimited sizes, styles, colors and materials to choose from. To some this may sound daunting but to most it’s a lot of fun! For those not interested in all of these choices, things can be streamlined and made as simple or as detailed as you would prefer. Many people who build a new home actually collect ideas for years before the process begins. They have a folder of torn out magazine pages or saved helpful articles, pretty pictures and bookmarked websites on a laptop. Surely, you’ve even taken photos on your smartphone of things that have caught your eye, for ‘someday.’ However you do it, you’re on the right track by preparing. Taking the time (ahead of time) to simply think through and determine what you like and don’t like is extremely productive in helping your builder and you stay on track, on schedule and within budget. With the guidance and expertise of your building team—whether simple or detailed—your home selection process can be stress-free and enjoyable. An open dialogue and clear communication is always key.

Here are some hints to having you cross the finish line with a smile:


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Bonus Tip: taking photos of all of your top choices while you’re actually doing the selections will help when looking back.

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Collaborate from the onset

Involve your custom builder from the beginning of the home design process to help you achieve your best end-goal. Some homeowners assume that they know what they want once sitting down in the ‘selections meeting’ but if the home was designed with mid-range allowances in order to maintain a certain price point or final budget, the homeowner may realize that the choice they really wanted is not attainable within that allowance. Similar options may exist but this is best discussed in the beginning to avoid any potential disappointment and ensure you achieve your desired vision.

Gather Ideas

Do the research upfront. Don’t wait until your ‘selections phase’ meeting to start thinking about it. Collect and bring photos or samples of what you find attractive and appealing (i.e.: paint colors and stains, fixture finishes, siding/roof color combinations, etc.).

What’s Your Style?

Whether building a vacation, investment or primary home on Long Beach Island, clients truly enjoy making it their own. Do you favor traditional styling, modern and contemporary, craftsman or cottage? Do you lean towards certain materials like natural wood, vinyl, glass, tile, stone, metal or brick? Do you like dark or light colors, traditional or classic/clean trim styles, oil rubbed bronze, chrome or satin nickel for your plumbing fixtures? Knowing visually what you prefer will help to narrow your choices more quickly and create a nice integrated look. OPEN HOUSE MAGAZINE

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Select in Stages

Although all things inter-relate, all decisions do not have to be made at once. It is critical, however, that the homeowner understand how the promptness of their selection decisions affect the timing of the project overall. A schedule will be determined so that each stage can be focused on as-needed. For example, exterior selections are required first (windows, roofing, siding). Then come things like flooring (large area) that set the tone for the other surfaces followed by cabinetry, countertops, wall coverings (tile, paint, trim, etc.), stairs and so on. Some companies offer partial on-site showrooms; others will direct clients to select suppliers who offer more extensive showrooms with greater choice and whose quality and varied price points are on display for greater homeowner choice. Some offer a combination of both.

Consider all Elements

Think about your realistic commitment to maintenance in your new custom home. Are you the type who will be dedicated to the upkeep of a look you’ve created or are you the low maintenance type? Living on a barrier island has its challenges with salt, wind, sun, sand and overall weather. Answer this question honestly as you think about your potential selections for exterior and interior materials for your home. Watching all of the pieces finally come together is an exciting and rewarding part of building your own Long Beach Island home—a wonderful experience and exactly what you envisioned for you and your family. 28

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4 N . L O N G B E A C H B LV D . S U R F C I T Y, N J 0 8 0 0 8 6 0 9 . 4 9 4 . 2 215 WWW.THOMASJKELLER.COM

For 39 years, we’ve been custom building coastal homes for LBI families. Whether it’s your primary residence or vacation dream house at the shore, we’re passionate about providing an exceptional homebuilding experience. We’ll work with you from design to completion and beyond...committed to the quality workmanship and responsive, professional service we’re known for. Let Thomas J. Keller help you envision the possibilities.

LET’S BUILD A HOME WE FEATURE ANDERSEN®WINDOWS IN OUR HOMES.

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NJ REGISTERED BUILDER LICENSE #042471/HIC#13VH04329200


home

|

life

|

found

1700 long beach blvd. surf city | 609 494 1802 30

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AUDI O | V I DE O | CO NT RO L

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Home Improvement

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

CONTRACTING FOR SERVICES ON LBI AND THE SURROUNDING AREA: HOME IMPROVEMENTS AND THE KEYS TO SELECTING THE RIGHT CONTRACTOR FOR YOUR PROJECT WRITTEN BY TANEK HOOD

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BRIAN SWANK, BLA – REYNOLDS DESIGN TEAM -“DESIGN CONCEPT RENDERING”

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PHOTO BY ERIC HANCE

From selecting real estate, building a new home or remodeling an existing home to designing outdoor living areas, installing swimming pools and updating essential services, the search for the right service provider/contractor can be challenging and time-consuming. Whether they be architects and designers to landscapers, carpenters, plumbers and pool contractors—sifting through websites and scouring newspaper advertisements prove that finding a contractor is not difficult. Finding the right service provider for your project, on the other hand, takes time and research along with proper planning and reasonable expectations. Mark Reynolds, owner of Reynolds Landscaping Inc and Mark Reynolds Project Management Inc, serving LBI and the sur-

rounding vicinity for over 37 years, suggests the following guidelines to facilitate your search for the right professional: Recommendations from satisfied neighbors and friends are the first avenue to pursue when looking for a contractor. Besides providing the homeowner with reassurance in the reliability of the service provider, recommendations also provide the contractor with a frame of reference to the property and a level of credibility in the new client and their expectations. Regardless of the services required, Reynolds adds, it is important to ensure that the credentials of the service provider are accurate and up to date including licenses, insurance and certifications.

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PHOTOS BY JOHN MARTINELLI

The contractor should be forthcoming with these documents and be willing to provide you with examples of their work. They should also be willing to back up their services with a reasonable warrantee on the material and services to be provided. Before your first meeting with a prospective contractor, it is important to have a basic understanding of your project parameters and a clear grasp of your budget constraints. This, along with your vision for the final project, should be discussed with the service provider during your first meeting. They will increase the likelihood of your satisfaction and prevent any unreasonable expectations. Scheduling, timelines and projected completion dates should also be discussed early in the planning stage. If your project is largescale and a firm deadline is required for the project completion, Mark Reynolds 34

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advises that your planning and search for a service provider be initiated months in advance to prevent disappointment and frustration. This is especially important if the project is scheduled to take place during the high seasons—spring and summer. In these instances, Reynolds recommends committing with a contractor as early as 6 to 8 months in advance to best assure that your project will be completed on time. When obtaining a quote from the contractor for the services to be performed or the project to be installed, make sure that the estimate is comprehensive and addresses all the materials to be used and the services to be applied. This is especially important when comparing multiple bids for your project. Remember the adage “you get what you pay for� Mark Reynolds stresses, and make certain that the materials and services that you are comparing are indeed of equal quality and quantity.


Especially with respect to outdoor living projects, it is important that site preparation is accounted for in the budget and be certain that any pre-existing conditions on the site have been addressed prior to the start of the project. This is especially true with landscaping, hardscaping and swimming pool installations where underlying drainage and grading issues may be present. If left uncorrected, Reynolds warns, even if the services have been rendered correctly, the functionality of the new features can be compromised and adversely affect not only your property but the property of your adjoining neighbors. Always confirm that your contractor has prepared and submitted all required permits with your township and verify that they have been approved prior to the start of the installation. While it may slow down the progress of your project, without these required documents you run the risk of violating mandatory zoning codes and compromise your ability to sell the property in the future without costly remediation fees. In some cases, a project manager may best meet your needs--especially with large scale projects requiring multiple contractors. The project manager can provide current and accurate status updates and assure that the parameters and timeline for your project are being managed in the most efficient way possible. This is especially true when the project does not take place at the primary residence of the homeowner. A project manager will typically have an existing relationship with the sub-contractors involved in your project. They can better manage the day to day questions and monitor progress surrounding the project better than the absentee homeowner. The management fee of the project manager is typically a percentage of the total project budget and in many cases is well worth the investment. Finally, and most importantly, Reynolds concludes, an open and steady line of communication between the home owner and the contractor is vital to maintaining trust and ensuring the long-term satisfaction of the homeowner. It is the essential component to the collaborative partnership the defines the client-contractor relationship. Mark Reynolds and Mark Reynolds Project Management Inc. is licensed in the State of New Jersey as new home builder, home remodeler, real estate agent, landscape contractor, landscape irrigation contractor and certified landscape lighting professional. The companies of Mark Reynolds have been servicing LBI and the surrounding communities since 1981. For more information or to schedule an appointment contact Mark Reynolds at 609-597-6099 or mark@reynoldslbi.com.   Visit the Reynolds family of companies at www. reynoldslandscaping.com or visit us on Facebook.

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LOVING HOW YOU LIVE. You dream it. We design and build it. Make every space your own.

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See these client stories and more on our website.


Š2018 California Closet Company, Inc. All rights reserved. Each franchise independently owned and operated. NJ #13VH01142500

C R AN B U RY

N O R T H F I E LD

californiaclosets.com

M T. LAU R E L

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Home Improvement

RENOVATE OR REMODEL LOOKING TO RENOVATE OR REMODEL ON THE ISLAND AND STAY WITHIN BUDGET? THE DESIGN-BUILD PROCESS MAY BE THE BEST APPROACH FOR YOU. WRITTEN BY CATHY LANDRUM

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PHOTO BY BRIDGET HORGAN BELL

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The full-service design-build method bypasses the need for a client to go to contract with two separate companies, an architect and a builder, as it combines both aspects of the building process: architecture and construction. Instead of initially hiring an architect to design plans and send them “out to bid” to numerous builders, the design-build option keeps both services, architectural and building, in-house with one point of contact and under one contract. Under Construction in Ship Bottom, Long Beach Island, offers this method which saves the homeowner time, money and stress. During the traditional bid method, the homeowner first meets to discuss the project with an architect who then crafts architectural plans. Once the homeowner receives the plans, he or she forwards these to various builders for estimates. With this process, the homeowner typically gives the architect their wish list of design ideas 40

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and amenities. The discussion of budget may be introduced, but it may not be precise until a builder prices out all the elements of the design. An accurate budget may not be possible to establish with this traditional bid method. At Under Construction Builders the renovation is designed from the very beginning specifically with the homeowner’s target budget in mind. The process starts with a preliminary meeting with the builder to discuss the scope of the project and the homeowner’s budget. “When you first meet with your builder, it is important to get to know each other. Communication is key to a successful project,” says Jay Stack, General Manager of Under Construction Builders. During the initial discussion, the homeowner and builder establish a budget which includes the level of finishes that interest the homeowner. The “bells and whistles” along with


the size of the project are the two of driving forces of the cost of a renovation. The next step is to craft a preliminary design with the architect based on the wants and needs of the homeowner are (both functionally and aesthetically) so that the project can be designed within the established budget. The builder will confirm with the architect that the homeowner’s budget is sufficient to support their selections, from cabinets to flooring to fixtures. Equally important, the builder and architect collaborate to assure that the homeowner’s vision is also feasible from a design perspective. Once the team PHOTOS BY GRAPHICUS 14 PRODUCTIONS, LLC OPEN HOUSE MAGAZINE

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PHOTOS BY GRAPHICUS 14 PRODUCTIONS, LLC

can assure the customer that the plans are buildable from a practical standpoint, a design-build firm can complete the entire project from the initial design sketches to the construction drawings that are suitable for a permit. This integrated team of architect and builder can deliver a project quicker, more cost effectively and with fewer changes. If an issue arises either prior to or during construction, the architect and builder will tackle it together, make the change on-site and come to a successful resolution. Having one point of contact for the homeowner keeps things simple and helps to maintain a smoothly-run project. This is especially helpful in managing a long-distance remodel. The design-build method allows clients to contract all elements of a project from start to finish with a single firm. Contrary to the traditional bid method which requires two firms and two contracts, this method is a better solution to assure a quality job is completed within a timely and economical manner. At Under Construction Builders, our design-build

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approach allows us to offer parallel services that merge the expertise of our architects and construction specialists, while maintaining superb, quality craftsmanship throughout the project. Under Construction Builders has serviced Southern New Jersey and the Jersey Shore for over 25 years. We recently moved our offices from Brant Beach to 9th Street in Ship Bottom, directly across from the Southern Ocean County Chamber of Commerce. Our general manager, Jay Stack, has more than 30 years of experience in new home construction and remodeling. His love of the island grew from childhood summer memories at his Brant Beach family home and his Long Beach Township Lifeguard years. His knowledge of and his passion for LBI is seen in his commitment to helping people build their dream homes. We look forward to continuing to serve the LBI area from our new location. For more information about Under Construction Builders, please visit our website at www.ucbuildersnj.com and follow us on Facebook and Houzz to see numerous pictures of our most recent projects.


THE MOST BEAUTIFUL TV YOU’VE NEVER SEEN ART MODE

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No more blank rectangle on your wall when your TV is off. Choose from 100 works of art from the Samsung Collection, or from your own memories. Customizable frames blend with your décor. www.islandaudiovideolbi.com 26th & Street Long Beach Blvd | Ship Bottom NJ, 08008 | 609.494.2540 Open Year Round | Monday- Friday | Saturday by appointment IslandAudioVideoLBI@gmail.com

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Home Improvement

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Next Level The staircase is one of the main focal points in your home. Its fundamental purpose is to provide access to the different levels of your house, but it also adds beauty, personal style and architectural interest to a home’s design. WRITTEN BY MIKE IRVINE

PHOTOS BY STEVE BELKOWITZ OPEN HOUSE MAGAZINE

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Most of us don’t choose a staircase very often. Stairs and railings come in many varieties, shapes and sizes, and the process can feel intimidating at times. A good place to start is by looking at the style of your home. A modern, sleek staircase will look best in contemporary homes, and traditional colonial homes generally feature a straight staircase that lines up with the front door.

The parameters of your project are just as important as your home’s style. Budget, space, building codes and safety requirements will help narrow down your stair options. And of course, your personal style and preferences should always be considered. At the end of the day, the decision is yours, so take the time to make sure every detail is right for you and your family. Even if you don’t have small children now, you may want to think about a time when there will be tiny feet on your stairs. Likewise, you may want to consider ease of use for elderly family members. Every staircase is custom to a degree, as every home will have different measurements. Custom built stairs are a great option, because they add to the architectural uniqueness of your home while fitting nearly any space limitation. Woodhaven’s experi46

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enced professionals have the capabilities to create custom stair and rail systems that meet your exact specifications. They’ll work with you to create a custom staircase as unique as your home. If you’re in need of a spiral staircase solution to maximize space, Woodhaven can help you navigate every twist and turn. Spiral staircases can be engineered to fit into very small spaces, or present a dramatically sweeping entrance. Their experienced professionals have the capacity to engineer spiral staircases in classic steel, solid wood, forged iron, aluminum, and galvanized steel. The stairs may get most of the glory, but a staircase isn’t complete until the rail system has been defined and selected. Woodhaven offers many rail components that will add a touch of elegance to


STEP 1: CONTACT

STEP 2: SITE VISIT

STEP 3: SPECIFICATIONS: DESIGN, STYLE, MATERIALS

STEP 4: PROJECT APPROVAL

STEP 5: MANUFACTURING

7 Steps to the “Perfect Staircase” With help from the experts at Woodhaven, your new staircase is only a few steps away.Call or visit Woodhaven’s Stair & Rail Department in Lakewood, NJ, or their other building materials stores in Manahawkin and Point Pleasant Beach.

STEP 6: DELIVERY

STEP 7: STAIR & RAILING INSTALLATION

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your unique stair design; including balusters, newels, handrails, fittings, and stair treads. Ask and they will gladly show you the many designs and styles available. If your head is spinning faster than a spiral staircase, it’s okay. The experts at Woodhaven know how to make a staircase project a simple and enjoyable experience. Over the years, Woodhaven’s skilled team has perfected every step of the stair buying process. The first step is to call or visit Woodhaven to set up a site visit to your property. Show them your ideas, sketches, architectural drawings, anything that conveys what you’re looking for. The

site visit helps Woodhaven get a better understanding of your home, and gives them a chance to walk you through appropriate styles and materials. They’ll also help you understand what you can and can’t do in your home. Woodhaven looks at your home design and wish list with a fresh pair of eyes, which can be a valuable asset. They want to help you choose the best staircase for your home – plain and simple. Woodhaven manufactures stairs in its state-ofthe-art facility in Lakewood, NJ. The building of the stairs begins once there is an approved

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scope of work. Estimated time and cost to build the stairs is influenced by things like: number of risers, complexity of style, and degree of custom work. In approximately two to three weeks the stairs and railing are delivered to the property and ready for installation. Homeowners have the option to use Woodhaven for the install, or their own contractor. WITH HELP FROM THE EXPERTS AT WOODHAVEN, YOUR NEW STAIRCASE IS ONLY A FEW STEPS AWAY. CALL OR VISIT WOODHAVEN’S STAIR & RAIL DEPARTMENT IN LAKEWOOD, NJ, OR THEIR OTHER BUILDING MATERIALS STORES IN MANAHAWKIN AND POINT PLEASANT BEACH. WOODHAVENLUMBER.COM 732-901-5518


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Outdoor

Backyard NO MAINTENANCE

GARDENMARK ARTIFICIAL GRASS FOR YOUR DREAM SUMMER

Summer— most often synonymous with spending long, dreamy days outdoors with friends and family. The most telltale signs of summer include a quick round of catch with the kids on a beautiful lawn, an afternoon bocce session with the neighbors or practicing putting on your own green. GardenMark Artificial Grass is ready to turn all of these dreams into a reality. If lawn mowing or regular trips to the home center are your favorite pastimes, then GardenMark isn’t for you.  All of our products are extremely low maintenance— so none of that is required.  GardenMark markets three high quality styles of artificial grass that replicate the appearance and function of lush, natural grass. Our four-color Montana, three-color Kentucky and Augusta Putting Green all share the same world-class, high quality fibers that stand up naturally and are soft and durable. All of these varieties are available for both large-scale and small-scale projects. 

GARDENMARK ARTIFICIAL GRASS – MAKING YOUR STAYCATION A TRUE VACATION

in places that grass cannot grow such as around pools, under trees, pet or children play areas, and even as a substitute for rock and gravel for any location where low maintenance is preferred. Once installed, GreenMark’s Artificial Grass is always ready for fun immediately, making any day of the year a vacation day.   

GardenMark Artificial Grass is a smart option for everyone who wants to increase the usable space of any size property while saving on maintenance costs. Homeowners enjoy the appearance and function of lush, natural grass with a no-maintenance backyard. Not only is it perfect for all kinds of family fun whether you are into soccer, baseball, reading a book by the pool—or all of the above, but if you don’t have a yard then artificial grass is even ideal for balconies, rooftops and courtyards. GardenMark offers three beautiful, water-permeable styles, which can easily be installed

The best part of any “staycation” is having time to relax! With GardenMark Artificial Grass, there is no lawn work. Your beautiful lawn or play area is good to go from day one.  The upkeep couldn’t be simpler.  There is no seeding, no mowing and no harmful fertilizers, weed killers or pesticides leaching into the ground.  As water conservation is also so vital in many areas of the country, no watering means saving on expensive sprinkler systems and water bills.  Some cities will even offer rebates or credits for residents who install artificial grass as a water-saving landscaping alternative.

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GREENMARK ARTIFICIAL GRASS- GOOD, CLEAN FUN FOR EVERYONE! Municipalities are pleasing their residents and taxpayers using GardenMark products. Artificial grass has been used around the country to create gorgeous facilities for residents of all ages to enjoy. They create a fun, fresh, clean and mudfree environment for families and pets. Artificial grass may be perfect for large-scale use such as for athletic fields, but it’s simple installation and affordability also make it a great choice for converting smaller spaces into usable recreation areas.  The possibilities are endless and the ongoing savings make it a real winner.  There is one visitor municipalities and industry agree they do not want: Canadian Geese. They cause a great deal of property damage and tend to dangerously gravitate towards airports. Recent evidence has shown that the geese prefer natural grass areas over artificial grass, so switching out some or all areas with artificial grass can be an effective tool in reducing their impact and related expenses. GardenMark is also an excellent choice for larger, commercial properties. The beautification of industrial parks, airports, large office complexes, and other landscaped areas is a growing segment of the commercial market. Why? Because it makes great business sense. Installing artificial grass on areas traditionally covered with landscaping creates a beautiful, vibrant environment while positively impacting the bottom line. About GardenMark                                                                                            GardenMark is a one-stop supplier headquartered in Hoboken, New Jersey. All artificial grass products are always in stock, including everything needed for a quality installation and timely delivery to the tri-state area and the entire eastern seaboard. GardenMark’s ongoing dedication to new developments and advanced technology allows a superior product with the confidence of a fifteen-year limited warranty on their artificial grass products. Browse our website to select the products that meet your needs.GardenMark LLC 1-877-711-8873 www.Garden-Mark.com

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@anncoenphotography @ giglioawning @bigwavedavebl @jonathanmgiglio @timmygiglio

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Outdoor

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BEFORE TAKING thePLUNGE THINGS TO CONSIDER BEFORE INSTALLING A SWIMMING POOL WRITTEN BY LISA SIMEK

Whether you are a stone’s throw from the beach or have a boat docked in the bay, nothing brings on mental repose quite like floating—or swimming—in a relaxing pool of still, tranquil water that is nestled in the privacy of your very own backyard. But putting in a new pool doesn’t have to be an exasperating undertaking. For those considering the installation of a swimming pool or spa on their property, there are a few things to consider before you jump into the deep end. David Ash, Jr., owner of Surf City’s David Ash Jr., Landscape Contractors has more than 30 years of experience transforming ordinary properties into dream-like outdoor living and entertaining spaces, including their highly regarded pool contracting services for Long Beach Island and the surround area. Here he shares his recommendations for selecting the best type of swimming pool, spa or water feature that’ll really make a splash in your yard.

“One of the most important questions I ask my clients upfront is ‘How are you going to live in your backyard?’,” begins David Ash, Jr. “’How big is your family, what are your lifestyle habits,’ and then we as the professionals take everything into consideration and parallel it with the sun angles, wind directions, natural elements, the size and condition of the living space, style of house, ambiance of any existing landscaping, and make our recommendations,” he adds. Shapes are important to the flow of a home and

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landscaping usually reflects the style dictated by the existing structures. Following this direction will help determine the scope of the project—whether it be a small lap pool or a custom shaped swimming pool equipped with hidden grottos and waterfall-throughfire-bowl features. At the end of the day, Ash admits, despite property size most homeowners take full advantage of space by using basic rectangle shapes. “With rectangular pools, the lines are clean, we try to push them right to the set back lines and get them as tight as we can. Every angle is a right angle so we are able really maximize living space, especially on these narrow lots of LBI,” shares Ash. He goes on, “that’s not to say that there isn’t a time and space for free-form; many times, we insert a spa in the ‘belly’ of the kidney, so that it doesn’t take up as much room. And it works beautifully.” The question of shape thenceforth leads to the next significant variable—material. The most popular options on Long Beach Island being gunite (concrete) and fiberglass. Vinyl pools may be a common economical third option when it comes to installing in-ground pools— but Ash assures that these are without-a-question not a feasible option on the island specifically due to the severity of the ground water. One must also note that vinyl is incredibly susceptible to holes and punctures

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from sharp objects or pool toys, which in turn also makes it all-around vulnerable to the elements above and below ground on Long Beach Island. The maintenance and repair costs are one of the highest due to the necessity of replacing liners caused by ripping, tearing, staining, fading and even wrinkling. “At the end of the day, you are digging a hole on an island, and the risk of it collapsing is inevitable. There is nothing to hold back the dirt. A vinyl pool on LBI is just not an option because of the high-water table,” ensures the contractor. Since concrete pools are built by means of shaping concrete onto steel walls, David ash, Jr. shares that an alluring aspect of this costliest type of pool is that it can be formed to any size or shape for a truly custom pool. If one is building a higher-end pool with a beach entry, grotto, waterfall, or any other eye-catching features, the flexibility of gunite might be needed to make your vision a reality. The time it takes to install a gunite pool, however, can take anywhere from weeks to months, depending on the extent of the project. Although concrete may be considered the strongest, most durable type of material, it does subject itself to the wear and tear of coastal elements and the constant saturation in groundwater, coupled with the porous nature of gunite, makes it a nuisance to keep algae-free without the use of harsh chemicals.


The texture of concrete is also quite harsh on skin, and only roughens up with age, so children jumping in and out of the pools or playing pool volleyball, for example, will definitely experience uncomfortable abrasion on their feet and/or arms (bloody toes are unfortunately a common byproduct). “There is new technology however to reduce the severity of coarseness in gunite pools. PebbleTec, one of our preferred suppliers, has created an extremely fine pebble finish to spray over the gunite (instead of the traditional plaster) which is not as rough. They even offer larger-sized pebble sprays that are round and soft to limit abrasion. No matter what, though, after 7-12 years with a plaster finish you must acid wash and resurface pool because of natural wear and color fading of the pool. Perhaps the PebbleTec finish would buy you an extra 5-7 years on top of that time frame, but no matter what, when the time comes, it would need to be a complete renovation regardless.” Gaining popularity more than ever, the option of Fiberglass pools seems to be the best choice when looking to install an inground pool on LBI. Fiberglass pools are very quick and easy to install, and they seem to have the most options in terms of shape and size of

a ready-made pool. “Since the shell is prebuilt by the manufacturer, installation is not too much more than a matter of dropping the shell in a hole and connecting the plumbing. And a reputable manufacturer like the one we work with, Leisure Pools, will give customers a lifetime warranty.” The texture of fiberglass makes it smooth to the touch, unlike gunite’s rough surface, and the impermeable material make it the ultimate choice for the prevention of algae accumulation. There is virtually no threat of wear on the finishes, so the gel coatings will not roughen over time, and the colors last the longest. The main reason why Ash decided to exclusively deal with Leisure Pools is because this company specifically utilizes a proprietary vinyl ester resin, protecting the inside and outside of the pool—which he deems to be just as, if not more, important in the long run. “As soon as we dig on this island, we hit water. Any pool installed will be sitting in salt water 24/7 for the duration of its existence,” David Ash, Jr. reminds us. The leading competitors of fiberglass pool manufacturing only use the vinyl ester resin in one layer of the swimming pool (there are normally four layers of a pool) as it is double the cost of a polyester resin, which is a cheaper resin OPEN HOUSE MAGAZINE

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used to provide bulk to the swimming pool. Unfortunately, even with this one layer of vinyl ester resin, osmosis still occurs and a pool submerged in water with a weaker barrier will eventually saturate with moisture that can become trapped under the surface, creating blisters that may ultimately burst—and require repairs. But Leisure Pools manufactures their composite fiberglass swimming pools using the corrosive-resistant vinyl ester resin for each of the four layers of the swimming pool construction, resulting in unrivaled quality. This is why Leisure is the only manufacturer to offer a Lifetime Structural Warranty and Lifetime Structural Osmosis Warranty, making it the best available warranty on the market today, and the only company that Ash recommends for quality and reliability. In addition to its extremely durable composition and desirable texture, fiberglass pools offer the most architecturally modern and innovative range of pool shapes available at competitive prices to suit any family and budget. The benefits of fiberglass leave the homeowner with a virtually maintenance-free swimming pool, as this type of swimming pool’s surface is chemically inert so there is nothing in the pool surface that can alter the water chemistry. Homeowners can expect very low chemical usage and a considerable cost savings over time on

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operating the swimming pool, and a nofuss upkeep even if they decide to utilize it as a salt water pool. David’s company happens to be the only landscape design firm one on the island that offers the full-service package in-house without subcontracting, so customization is always an option even with fiberglass prefabricated pools. “We can do all sorts of things with fiberglass, whether it be building knee-high walls of sheer descent waterfalls, free standing spas with molded seated lounge areas and custom drilled jets, or adding perimeter tile (glass tile with a nice finish) at the water line for that gunite “look” without the maintenance. We mount fire and water bowls into fiberglass, combo flame or planters with water features, even build entire walls across the backs of pools with trickling water scuppers— it all can be done with fiberglass and an experienced professional team.” His landscape contracting firm is certified to install fiberglass in-ground swimming pools, plunge pools, lap pools and water features, with capabilities of doing so within a matter of days, and with that personalized touch. The design team works together to create hardscaping, lighting, pavers, firepits and outdoor kitchens—making it a true one stop shop for the ultimate backyard experience.


David Ash Jr. Landscape Contractors is a high-end landscape and design firm based in Surf City. Servicing Long Beach Island for more than 25 years, David Ash Jr. offers a visionary, functional, and natural approach to full service luxury outdoor living design, custom installation and building. To learn more visit www.lbilandscaper.com or follow them on Instagram @davidashjrlandscape

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LBI’S EXCLUSIVE LEISURE POOLS DEALER O P E N H O U#13VH06147600 SE MAGAZINE 61 (609) 494-7007 | info@davidashlandscaping.com | www.davidashlandscaping.com | License


COMFORT | ST YLE | QUALIT Y

Opdyke Furniture has become a landmark casual furniture store at the Jersey Shore. Our merchandise is an upscale, eclectic mix of casual indoor and outdoor furniture, home accessories and, of course, a spectacular Holiday Shoppe during the Christmas season. Known for quality and service, our changing inventory always has something new and exciting to offer. Whether you are furnishing a home or just visiting the shore, we have something for everyone!

POINT PLEASANT BEACH | WALL 732.892.2020 | 732.449.5940

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OPDYKEFURNITURENJ.COM


Beauty Beac� AND THE

Design | Build | Live

We Use Andersen® Windows for peace of mind - Yours and Ours. “Andersen” and the AW logo are registered trademarks of Andersen Corporation.

Family Owned & Operated

609.978.8855 | JDMAndrews.com 1919 Long Beach Blvd. Ship Bottom LBI NJ Registered Builder License #022587 | HIC #13VH07200400 OPEN HOUSE MAGAZINE

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Hot tub maintenance | Pre-delivery site inspection Delivery and Installation services 319 West 8th St. PO Box 127 Ship Bottom, NJ 08008 609.361.0221 | WWW.lbihotspringspas.com

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Outdoor

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WATERFRONT APPEAL DESIGNING AND BUILDING YOUR LANDSCAPE ON THE WATER Q & A WITH TOM SCANGARELLO JR. OF BAY AVENUE PLANT COMPANY

After an afternoon boat ride along the Barnegat Bay, you may find that you see Long Beach Island from a different point of view. One of the most unique aspects of LBI is it’s expansive amount of water. With all of it’s beauty and the effect it has on our senses, we as homeowners and visitors want to know how we can utilize these natural elements to their fullest potential. As landscape designers and builders, Bay Avenue Plant Company is always enthralled with the challenge of designing around the water and using the water as an inspiration for their

PHOTOS BY JAY ROSENBLATT PHOTOGRAPHY

projects. In this North Beach project, Bay Avenue was fortunate to begin with such a beautiful home nestled into a perfect point on the bay. “Each waterfront project has its own feeling and character depending on where the property lies, where the sun sets, and what elements surround you. All of these factors play into how we design a landscape.” says Tom Scangarello, owner of Bay Ave. Plant Co. We asked Tom and the designers at Bay Avenue Plant Company what process they take in designing around the water. Here are some of the key ideas and features present in this particular project. OPEN HOUSE MAGAZINE

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Q: When designing around the water, how do you maximize your view but also make the space functional? A: With any design project, we begin by identifying the key components a homeowner wants to include in their project. This particular project included a swimming pool, hot tub, fire pit, outdoor kitchen and eating area. For a waterfront home, there is an added importance of placement. We wanted to make sure that each component or space in the yard took full advantage of the available view. Each space also had to remain functional. For example, the outdoor kitchen was designed and built with a slight moon shaped arch in it so that every bar stool has a full view of the pool, the bay, and the sunset. Each of the other features were taken through a similar thought process when deciding where and how they should be placed on the property. Q: What was the inspiration behind the overall design of the pool and some of it’s features? A: When designing the pool, we knew it had to be a custom design. We wanted the shape of the pool to take advantage of the bayfront views, especially the entry points and the hot tub area. We wanted the pool’s water color to have a natural hue to it that looked great with the bay water, but also paired well with the coping and patio work. It was important for this homeowner to have an autocover for safety. Making sure the pool’s (3) covers worked properly drove some of the overall shape of the pool. Lastly, the pool had to functionally flow well with the other elements of the design we would be building throughout the yard. Q: How do you incorporate plants when designing on the water? A: One of the biggest challenges we face when designing on the water is including a fitting balance of 68

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hardscape and softscape. It can be so easy to engulf a property with too much hardscape, such as a stone kitchen or a paving stone patio. Here we were able to balance many of these elements with softer materials and strategic layering. By adding potted plants throughout the patio space, you get small pops of color that grab your attention. We lined portions of the patio and driveway with sod for additional and flexible green space. One of the biggest impacts was the row of Adagio grass that softened the line of the bulkhead and additional taller grasses that surround the fire pit area. In the breeze these grasses create movement, which adds to the calming effect of the surrounding water. Including taller trees along the peripheral edges and the foundation of the home helped to frame and separate the vertical lines of the home from the flat work of the patio. Lastly, we worked with the homeowner and


their interior designer to make sure that the patio furniture was identified early on in the project and designed into the project to make sure each piece had a perfect fit. Here, many teak products were used to help soften the overall feel.

er, it’s a good idea to take advantage of some of the local companies who have a good amount of experience working with more of the native species of plants found in our area. These plants are still here for a reason.

Q: When installing plant material on a waterfront, what are some of the things that you think about and plants that you like to use?

Q: How do you choose the type of stone for a waterfront project?

A: Choosing plant material that can survive our harsh off-season weather conditions is a challenge when it comes to coastal living. Some of the materials used in this project were Adagio Grass, Rosa Rugosa, Bayberry, Privet, Eastern Red Cedar Trees and Australian Pines. It’s not so much planting on the waterfront that makes it difficult; it’s the wind that comes off of the water. There are many homes on Long Beach Island that do not sit directly on the water, but can experience the same challenges with plant material survival. When planting on waterfronts or in areas that are highly impacted by weath-

A: For this project we used Limestone because of the color tones and the versatility of the product. I personally like using Limestone because it is easy to cut and fabricate for the use of multiple applications. Limestone is clean and crisp; we have used it on contemporary projects as well as traditional projects. On this project it was a good fit for the customization requirements of the pool coping, auto cover boxes and the fire pit cap. The look of the stone’s coloring also matched the vertical veneer stone that was used on the façade of the home. This helped to tie everything together and create a fluid continuation from the home to the landscape.

Bay Avenue Plant Company is the premier provider of outdoor design services on Long Beach Island. Visit bayaveplantco.com to discover more about their landscape design, construction and maintenance services. Or stop in at the Garden Boutique, open 7 days a week May through September, to explore their annuals, outdoor cooking appliances, furniture and pottery, along with garden inspired home décor. Located at 1808 Long Beach Blvd., Surf City (609) 361.8800

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Outdoor

LET NATURE IN WITH AN OUTDOOR SHOWER WRITTEN BY EMILY WARNE

Those with coastal homes are no stranger to the perils of living close to the surf—but few of these challenges are as pesky than when the surf comes home with you. Tracked-in-sand and sunscreen-laced soles sliding across your floors are notoriously difficult to clean— and just plan annoying.

es, towel bars, hooks, toilet and pump, pedestal sink, faucet, shower valve trim set, and more.

An obvious solution, of course, is an outdoor bathroom – and it’s one that many LBI-dwellers have invested in during recent years. One of the most popular local contractors specializing in these enclosures is the Outdoor Shower Distributing Center, which manufactures the “ToddPodd” line of showers, lockers, and cabanas.

All parts are individually boxed to make for easy distribution and fast installation—and they’re built to last. The frame is made of aluminum and powder coated to guarantee no chips, fading, or rust. The floor decking is slip-resistant and walls are completely private (ensuring no embarrassing “peek-aboo” areas!). They’re built to withstand all weather climates, from summer sunshine to off-season winter storms. Outdoor Shower Distribution Center is so confident in this product, they offer a limited lifetime warranty on the unit.

These enclosures have a plethora of choices and sizes to fit your home on the beach or backyard pool. Accessories include corner seats, free standing bench-

If this sounds like a solution to your sunscreen-and-sand problems, visit Outdoor Showers of Manahawkin on East Bay Ave. to see them for yourself!

Located at 1316 East Bay Avenue in Manahawkin, New Jersey, Outdoor Shower of Manahawkin helps residents expand their outdoor living areas with ToddPod outdoor showers, changing rooms, cabanas and bathrooms and Trex Furniture. New to their line of products for Spring/Summer 2018 will be OFYR Grills, Thermacell® products and Splash & Dash outdoor décor collection. The one-stop-shop offers delivery on most items within a week, call (888) 545-9763, extension 1 for more information.

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THERE ARE PLENTY OF OPTIONS TO CHOOSE FROM IN HOW TO MAKE YOUR OUTDOOR BATHROOM YOUR OWN, BUT TODDPODD SPECIALIZES IN THREE MODELS:

SINGLE UNITS

These units are ideal for families looking for to quickly rinse off after a swim at the beach or in the pool, and for a place to hang their dripping bathing suits.

DOUBLE UNITS

Double units provide all of the same features as single units, with the additional benefit of a changing room that can be separated (with or without a partition wall). This provides groups and families looking for space to change privately.

CABANA UNITS

For those looking for something even more complex, cabana models are ideal by combining a shower, changing room, and bathroom with complete privacy. This unit is perfect for those who entertain frequently, and want a seamless outdoor living space.

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Outdoor

DIRECTIONAL DOWN LIGHTING WRITTEN BY TANEK HOOD

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A

fter a long day at the beach, a late dinner is even later than expected on the bay in Beach Haven. Two generations of children set the table under the disappearing sun. As guests arrive to enjoy cocktails, darkness sets in and the outdoor lighting comes on and provides necessary lighting to recognize faces. Clusters of candles create glimmering points on the table, but the passed food and smiles are lit by the soffit down lighting from two stories above. This is a typical evening on LBI where downlighting improves entertaining and extends time outside. In Southern Ocean County, our lighting team strives to create a lighting plan that lights from above the ground. Down lights are

designed and installed to mimic the natural appeal of sunlight. This style of lighting feels familiar from our days on the bay and beach. As a design firm, we find inspiration in many aspects of our lives. The sun is one of those driving sources as the original light in our lives each day. It creates shadows at times, shows us the way and provides warmth. Down light fixtures are aimed onto landscapes from trees, evenly spaced in shower ceilings and positioned in pergolas over patios. Here is how we create that space with downlighting. Safety, Security and Clean-up Lighting Our type of down lighting at the shore comes from a variety of sources, both 120V and 12V. The wall mounted or

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soffit mounted down light is completed during initial construction wiring. This common, structure mounted flood light is installed during the building of the home for site safety and security. We upgrade this flood light source to a subtle version with multiple aiming angles to highlight a dining area or set of stairs. This change and upgrade converts a distracting light source into a functional light source. These directional flood lights rarely need to be as bright. Most sites require multiple fixtures in correctly placed locations for a small amount of light with a glare shield or cowl. A focus going to utility first, beauty second and respect for neighbors third. TREE DOWN LIGHTING Many sites in Southern New Jersey provide medium to large trees to down light from the trunks and branches. This is a beautiful way to light certain species of trees. As a lighting specialist, respect and care for the tree is the emphasis with tree lighting. Some specific sites on the island allow for tree down lighting in a smaller scale, and it is privilege to give this effect to the island homes. Shadows created by the branches highlight the plant material below with contrast. Tree down lights can provide a focal point for a seating area or dining table. ACCENT LIGHTING A directional down lighting plan requires less fixtures to light a space. Yet, lighting a space with one fixture

or a few fixtures is flat and overly lit. Accent lighting will provide additional lighting for special occasions, improved reading nooks, and better accenting of architectural details. Single light flood lights are great for annoying neighbors. Subtle accent lighting blends down lighting with landscape lighting to create a beautiful, comprehensive design. A pergola mounted downlight can highlight the pergola’s structure, a seating area or a grade change. Shower directional lighting can highlight a rock wall or artwork. A focus on smaller fixtures and balanced design to achieve the lighting goal. The fixture style, shape, and color must fit the design and architectural composition. Accent down lights create focal points in an outdoor oasis at night. Soft light adjusts in brightness to your entertaining style. RECESSED CAN DOWN LIGHTING Used alone or in conjunction with other light sources, recessed can lighting is an important part of your lighting plan. A ceiling covered outdoor shower space or a covered dining al fresco area will use recessed can down light fixtures. Dimmable fixtures will tailor the lighting to the space and LED lamps will reduce outages. These inconspicuous fixtures are low profile. Each project will have different finish to blend in with the ceiling finish. The key with recessed cans is to balance their layout so that they are even over a dining table, bar top or shower changing room.

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Directional down lights provide some flexibility if you can slow your building or landscape project down to put the light fixtures in the optimal locations. The complexity of working in down lights means that most contractors prefer to skip incorporating some of the directional wall mounted down light fixtures. The wall mounted and structure mounted fixtures require skilled craftsman, coordination with different teams, and foresight. They often push a budget upward, yet they give a desired result of forethought and vision. Recessed can fixtures and accent fixtures are more common ways to down light. Mounting fixtures where the down light should go is never easy. The reward is more time with family outside after the sun is set. If not planning to add them now in your current build project, think to fit them into the future additions of your outdoor space.

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LEISURE & LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE SUMMER | FALL 2018

bay magazine

bay-magazine.com info@bay-mag.com

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CHILDREN SHOULD BE HAPPY...

NOT HUNGRY *19.3% OF OCEAN COUNTYS CHILDREN ARE FOOD INSECURE *According to the latest numbers available from Feeding America

Please help us with our vision

“A COMMUNITY WHERE ALL OF OUR NEIGHBORS ARE FREE FROM HUNGER” To Support our efforts, and learn more about our activities. Your donations and participation are greatly appreciated!

The Hunger Foundation had hosted Fundraising Events and received Donations to provide much needed financial support to our local community food banks.

We Proudly Support

Barnegat Food Pantry, Fr. Ken’s Kitchen at St. Mary’s Parish, Greater Tuckerton Food Pantry, Lacey Food Bank Program, Ocean Community Chruch, St. Francis Community Center, St. Episcopal Church

Please visit our website - www.HFOSO.org OPEN HOUSE MAGAZINE

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Outdoor

Spring has SPRUNG WRITTEN BY PEG REYNOLDS

The season of rejuvenation! The first sunny warm days of spring bring us all outside and into the garden. Planting annuals in beds or pots marks the beginning of the best time of year if you are a gardener. As excited as we are, spring can be tricky so be careful to pick the right plants. Choose plants that like the cool weather. Typically, garden centers sell the appropriate annuals for the season and the ones to come. Planting too soon can often cause plant to suffer or not make it at all. Remember to help your plants get settled, give them a fresh coating of mulch, some fertilize and most importantly keep them watered. 82

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If you were lucky enough to plant your bulbs in the fall, you will have bursts of color emerging already. If you didn’t, purchase some daffodils or other bulbs in bloom now and you will have a head start for next spring. No one can resist the smiling face of a pansy. Did you know pansies are the most sold flower in the world? And for good reason, there are so many colors to choose from. They love the cold nights and often overwinter. Violas, stock and primrose are some of the flowers that are tried and true performers. Nothing is as sweet as the fragrance of stock. Add some snapdragon for height in the garden. They are great to cut and bring in for spring bouquets. The plant that is considered a


Spring Blooming Annuals Pansies, Primrose, Snapdragon, Ranunculus

little miracle performer is without a doubt the Ranunculus. It has layers and Layers of color with delicate looking foliage but withstands the cold nights. They come in lots of colors and are great in pots, window boxes and the garden. Everyone wants lots of color but doesn’t always have time to plant. Spring perennials are the surest sign that warmer weather is coming. Plant them among your summer perennials to create a lovely continuous show of color. Everyone loves the bright purple mountain pinks that spread like crazy. Columbine, poppies, bleeding hearts and dianthus are all great perennials. My favorites are peonies, iris and Hosta. Don’t forget to plant some vines. Clematis is an early bloomer that comes in many varieties. Take a stroll through your garden center and see what perennials Are starting to come up. Lettuce and kale are great cool weather vegetable that add color and

Spring Blooming Perennials Mountain Inks, Columbine, Poppies, Bleeding Hearts, Peonies, Iris, Hosta, Clematis

texture and are easy to grow. I always add vegetables in with my flowers. Many of the herbs Are perennial too. Try growing chives with their lavender blossoms, oregano, thyme and English Lavender. As these cool weather plants start to dwindle in the heat make sure to cut them back, and remove the foliage as it finishes. It is important to keep the garden clean and ready for the next set of blooms. The choices are endless. Enjoy every Flower and take lots of photos to help you remember what you planted next spring. This is just the beginning of your beautiful garden.

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Introducing LONG BEACH ISLAND’S NEW COOKBOOK The perfect day on Long Beach Island consists of a memorable day at the beach followed by sharing a great meal with family and friends as the sun sets over the bay. In Feed Your Mind: Long Beach Island’s Cookbook, seafood-lovers will dive into more than 45 original, delicious and savory dishes that offer all the right ingredients for fabulous dining with an ocean (or bay) view.

Get your Copy Today! REYNOLDS GARDEN SHOP • SPOTTED WHALE LITTLE BUNGALOW • HOW TO LIVE LAVISH • ARTIFACTS • GIFTED

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Feature

tiny home with a

BIG HEART WRITTEN BY LISA SIMEK

PHOTOS BY JOHN MARTINELLI

The micro home movement is one of the most fascinating architectural and social phenomena of our time. Appealing to those in the market for a second home or homeowners who are looking to downsize, a house less than 500 square feet guarantees lower living costs and decreased maintenance while offering a simpler, decluttered perspective on life. But millennials are not the only ones adopting minimalism principles by moving into tiny homes, cutting their wardrobes and donating their possessions. Little did Thom Sweeney know that when he and his wife, Helen, took a chance buying the smallest home on Long Beach Island in 1980, this advertising executive-turned-interior designer would actually be a visionary of his day.

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Thom Sweeney’s life story is not unlike a remarkable movie: his dad was a proprietor within the cigar industry during the 1950s and he, himself, attended Villanova as a psych major. When as a last-minute favor the recent grad took the place of a buddy who didn’t want to go on a job interview at an advertising agency, not only did charismatic Thom blow the interviewers out of the water (a ’la a scene straight out of the wildly popular series Mad Men), but years later he would actually become partner of the largest advertising firm in South Jersey (top ten agency within the entire Philadelphia market). Fast forward to his passion for design and gift for style, after he and his wife bid on a couple of their clients’ projects within the interior design realm— and were incredibly successful— it was clear the direction he was meant to head in. Throughout the 1970s the Sweeneys, a family of five, spent their summers on a 34 foot by 9 foot boat docked in Morrison’s Marina of Beach Haven in Long Beach Island. The boat was wittily named Poor Helen, as “Poor Helen!” is the exact phrase people would exclaim to Thom after the announcement that he and his wife, Helen, along with their three sons, Reed, Brad and Gavin, would all be living on the boat in such tight quarters for the duration of summer. “It was a wonderful time, and I cherish the memories we created on that boat,” recalls Thom Sweeney of the time they spent on their summer boat home. Then a friend from LBI sent the family a real estate ad from The Beachcomber entitled “Fisherman’s Delight” and Thom knew that this was one home he couldn’t let get away. “I remember the ad as if it were yesterday, ‘Can you imagine waterfront property on LBI for under $30,000?’ it read. My friend Joan had gone to check out the listing and reported back to me, declaring ‘Thom, it has your name written all over it!’ And so, I knew, I had to go check it out,” reminiscences Sweeney.

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artist form, Thom saw a blank canvas and couldn’t resist getting to work, sketching away his vision for this tiny little house on pilings that rested completely over a gorgeous 360° view of Barnegat Bay.

What the designer saw upon entering the home for the first time would have been enough to make any other prospective buyers turn around and walk back out the door. “The previous owners really let the place go,” he remembers, “the real estate agent said that at that point she must have shown this house more than 200 times already.” There were dilapidated walls and rags on the windows. The floors were covered in bright orange linoleum flooring, and when you looked up, a dropped ceiling was quite literally dropping overhead. Measuring at 24 feet long by 12 feet wide, the tiny shack on 15th Street in Beach Haven was technically 18 square feet smaller than his family’s house boat. But in true

Ironically, at the time that Sweeney and his family purchased the smallest house on Long Beach Island, the successful interior designer was commissioned to work on the largest home on the island—a mansion in Love Ladies whose 14 bathrooms had nothing on the shack’s then non-existent lavatory facilities (they later added in full plumbing with a 5’ x 6’ bath including a 3 square foot shower and basic kitchen accommodations). “But it really is amazing... how much you don’t need to be very, very happy,” smiles Thom; an underlying theme throughout any conversation with the charming and down-to-earth artist. But with serious limitations to space and functionality, Sweeney’s professional skills were unquestionably put to the test. The first thing Thom did was tear down the ceilings with hopes of adding much-needed height to the inside of the home. By utilizing the space all the way up to OPEN HOUSE MAGAZINE

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the roof, he was able to create an entire loft space for his three sons to enjoy as their own bedroom area. Then Sweeney replaced all of the windows and added a sliding glass door to the home, significantly increasing the amount of natural light entering the room. He added closet space where there was none to be had, and basically reconfigured the entire studio area for maximum usability and practicality. He created a wondrous eat-in kitchen and added a sleeper sofa, to be used as a living room corner during the day and a place where he and his wife could sleep soundly in the evenings. “I always said I would eventually put in a vertical Murphy wall bed,” Thom chuckles, “but I never really got around to it!” And that atrocious orange linoleum flooring? Replaced all around by beautiful vintage wood-mimicking tile flooring. Last but not least, that affectionate name plaque that hung from their old boat, Poor Helen, was lovingly draped right over the front door of their new LBI sanctuary. The décor inside of the shack is beachy, without any overly nautical or surfer typecasts. The look is beachmeets-boho; sun-washed chic wood and entwined, earthy accents paired with a nearly white palette and

pops of blues and seafoam green. Every piece of décor in the home was handpicked by Thom, whether discovered at a vintage market or while browsing antique sales in his spare time. There are woven lamp shades evocative of Bali paired with lobster buoys on one wall, and a turtle decoy reminiscent of the Galapagos Islands on the other end near an old-fashioned sign that reads, “Due to the small space, items left over 60 days will be sold.” “It’s like an uptown fishing shack,” Sweeney concludes. Officially a historical landmark of Long Beach Island, the Sweeneys’ home was actually a fishing shack at one point in the early 1900s. There was another building, a fishery, adjacent to what is now their present-day home, so the belief is that the shack was used more as a storage shed by the fishery for all of their netting and gear, as well as a bunkhouse for the fishermen themselves. Interestingly enough, Thom reveals that an elderly man approached his son, Reed, during their early days as the new homeowners of the property to share his own anecdotes of yonder years: the man’s father recalled lobster fishing in the area in the 1920s and then selling the crustaceans to Rikers Island, since lobster was significantly cheaper than beef to feed the prisoners. Any lobsters the

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ic as opposed to designing by trends,” notes Sweeney. As with any good interior design, his objective is always to create the optimal atmosphere for clients, in this case, his family. “Being so close with the people you love and designing a space for all of us was an absolute treat,” adds the artist. His décor expertise is sourced by clientele from all walks of life including residential, commercial, model homes to contract design, and he’s designed everything from elite Manhattan brownstones and Palm Beach mansions to low-income housing for seniors. Locally, the designer has worked with countless private homeowners and is accredited with creating the stunning interiors of LBI wedding venues including Bonnet Island Estate, Mallard Island Yacht Club, The Stateroom, The Mercer Ballroom and The Ashford Estate. As the saying goes, “Good things come in small packages,” and the Poor Helen is testament to how that phrase holds true. As is the case with all possessions—the more stuff you own, the more your stuff owns you. There is something incredibly liberating when it comes to spending less, risking less, accumulating less, cleaning and maintaining less, and best of all— spending more time doing the things you enjoy most with those you hold dearest in your heart. The Sweeneys have proven that a home on Long Beach Island does not have to be big to be great, and that all you need is four walls, a roof over your head, and plenty of love to go around... although, an impeccable view of the sunset from your waterfront deck doesn’t hurt. man caught that were not sold to the prisons, he then used to sell off of the deck of the shack for “10 cents a pop” to residents and passerby’s. Oddly enough the fishery itself washed away during a storm in the 1930s, but the shack next door survived all storms thereafter (including Hurricane Sandy) and remains solid present-day. The timeless traits that Mr. Sweeney furnishes his tiny home with resonate throughout all of his décor projects, big and small. “I design for the demograph94

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Thom Sweeney is founder and owner of New Home Interiors, an award-winning full-service interior design studio specializing in contract design and residential business. With a well-trained and careful eye for quality, craftsmanship, and statement-making furnishings & textiles, Thom is recognized for his bold and elegant, yet timeless and classic styled designs. Visit him at his new office and showroom at The Gunning River Mall, 849 West Bay Avenue in Barnegat, NJ (609-622-2950) or follow him on Instagram via @thomsweeneyinteriors.


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Kitchens

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THE RIGHT

Design

WRITTEN BY LISA SIMEK

PHOTOS BY PATRICA BURKE

If Pinterest and HGTV have tempted you with a DIY kitchen renovation, before catching yourself uttering “that’s a piece of cake, I can do that”—think again. Unless you have a design degree, industry contractor insight, and years of experience combing through proper aesthetics, function and style with financially reasonable and well-timed execution… meticulously planning, designing and constructing a fabulous kitchen is not as simple as it may seem. However, enlisting in the guidance of a professional kitchen designer will ensure you design the kitchen of your dreams, without the stress and guesswork that accompanies any construction project—especially one that is the most important location of your home.

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“SINCE IT IS SUCH AN IMPORTANT PORTION OF THE HOME, OUR CLIENTS WANT A PROFESSIONAL TO MAKE SURE IT WILL BE THEIR DREAM SPACE.” - GINNY PADULA, OWNER AND DESIGNER AT TOWN & COUNTRY KITCHEN AND BATH

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“Design for me, is a lifestyle. I see new ideas in everything from nature to travel to the everyday surroundings,” reveals Ginny Padula, owner and designer at Town & Country Kitchen and Bath. In business for more than 30 years, the art major with a concentration in textile design has been involved in renovating and decorating from the very beginning. “As designers we can make sure you budget wisely, avoid mistakes, make the space beautiful and functional. We also have access to new and specialized resources. Since our firm is full-service, in our case, we handle projects from concept to completion. We work on selections for cabinetry, counter top material, tile, lighting, hardware and plumbing fixtures; we create the design and provide floor plans, specifications, elevations, and renderings. We have subcontractors that do the work to our highest of standards,” she goes on. Shifting the responsibility from the homeowner to the professional designer has many benefits. Kitchens are often referred to the heart of the home, and in that respect, it’s not always easy for homeowners to trust their “heart” in a stranger’s hands. “We all live such hectic lives and I do believe the

kitchen is where we reconnect with family and friends daily. We spend so much of our time in the kitchen, cooking, doing homework, planning our schedules. The kitchen gives us a place where everyone can be together and be a part of what is going on,” notes Padula. “Since it is such an important portion of the home, our clients want a professional to make sure it will be their dream space,” she adds. Understanding the sentimental and emotional aspect that goes into kitchen renovation and construction, Ginny acknowledges clients’ needs for assurances regarding the outcome. The designer shares, “Once we meet with clients, they become comfortable in our expertise and they know that we will not let them make a mistake. It is a huge undertaking. We will be working together over a long period of time, so we want to make sure all fears or apprehensions are addressed immediately.” So, what exactly does the process of designing a kitchen with a professional entail? Ginny Padula, who also happens to be a member of the National Kitchen + Bath Association and an industry partner in the American Society of Interior Designers, goes on to share the main phases: OPEN HOUSE MAGAZINE

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CONSULTATION

The first thing Ginny and her team do is meet with clients at her showroom for a free one-hour consultation to review architectural plans or measurements, photos of existing space, and discuss ideas for the project. “This is when we discuss the flow of space, workspace, appliance preferences, and specific family needs. This is a good time to view magazine photos or digital images of ideas clients have gathered to help us identify the style of cabinetry and design details they prefer,” Padula shares. During this meeting the designer gives clients a “Design Checklist” to fill out, which aids in their understanding of style and personality, and ultimately in accurately planning the project to depict the clients’ taste.

DESIGN PHASE

This is when the design team takes exact measurements and photographs of the existing space (or works with architectural plans) to formally design the clients’ new kitchen. Homeowners have the opportunity to review the cabinetry layout and design selections to better visualize the new space as well as understand the logic behind the design suggestions and then make any necessary edits. This is also when clients receive pricing and a preliminary material estimate for the project. 102

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CONTRACT DRAWINGS AND ORDER PHASE

Preparation of contract drawings is the next important step in the design process, as these official detailed layouts and elevations include cabinetry measurements, lighting, plumbing fixture and appliance notes to be used to order cabinetry and all additional finishing materials. Materials are now ordered and the space is prepared.

DELIVERIES AND INSTALLATION

To ensure that goals for any given project are achieved, Ginny recommends that professional, credible installers handle the specialized installation of new cabinetry and hardware. Designers often work with contractors whom they trust and collaborate with on a regular basis, and any responsibilities such as “sign off” on the final room measurements, verification of plumb and level conditions, handling the cabinet delivery, and cabinetry/ hardware installation are seamless due to this fluid working relationship. After completion of any project, her team returns on-site for final adjustments and touch-ups, to ensure everything is perfect in the newly transformed space. As such was the case for the LBI home photographed and featured in this month’s issue of Open House. “For


this project, we did the kitchen and three bathrooms. The homeowner had a clear vision of what she wanted. I listened and was able to come up with designs that worked for her. I advised her on what would work and look best in each space. We went back and forth a little on door styles and finishes based on her other selections for the spaces (such as tile, paint, etc.) and we even created some custom color samples for her. In the end, she loved everything when it was all in her home together,” recalls Padula of her relationship with the homeowner of the stunning residence. Homes like these have been the Monmouth County-based company’s passion for the past three decades. And to the owner, it never ceases to be an incredibly rewarding process, “When clients see the renovated or new space, they cannot believe that they get to live in that space. Many clients call us and tell us they love just waking up and having coffee in their new kitchen, and that it is more than they could have ever imagined.” OPEN HOUSE MAGAZINE

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Town and County Kitchen and Bath is a kitchen & bath design studio located in Red Bank, New Jersey. Specializing in hand-made, custom-fit and semi-custom cabinetry, they beautifully transform every aspect of a home’s most utilized rooms. For more information, visit their showroom located at 25 Bridge Ave, Ste 100, in Red Bank, call 732-387-6745, or visit their website tckbdesigns.com 104

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Ginny and her professional design team are the visionaries that help homeowners discover the ideas, desires and styles to transform ordinary quarters into the most perfect of spaces. “Being designers, we do not just look at the cabinetry. We look at all the selections in the project and how they will all work together. Our primary focus is make sure the space is beautiful, functional and cohesive,” the founder of the firm adds. The wildly talented bunch is incredibly passionate about design and craftsmanship, respectful of budget, and diligent to timelines. Reason enough to leave the designing to the professionals—and enjoy that nice warm cup of coffee from your newly designed kitchen by Town & Country Kitchen and Bath.


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Interior Design

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generations of décor WRITTEN BY EMILY WARNE PHOTOS BY CAITLIN DENBLEYKER

It’s no secret that Long Beach Island has developed rapidly in recent years—almost every time you cross the Causeway, you can expect to see larger and more complex beach homes mid-construction, a couple new restaurants or eateries, and rebuilt storefronts.

That change is easy to witness on the outside, but Oskar Huber, a favorite furniture retailer amongst locals, has the unique experience of also getting to peek inside. Serving LBI for over 50 years, they’ve witnessed the island solidify its reputation as a premier destination for vacationing families, those looking for a second-home for entertaining, and everything in between. Oskar Huber has furnished them all, and has first-hand knowledge of how design trends and coastal style have evolved in tandem with the island’s development—and what’s stayed the same throughout generations.

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“Today beach décor is all about having a fun outlet for self-expression,” says Bobby Huber, Jr., a fourth-generation member of the family business. “Before, we couldn’t be as creative as we are today with the colors, fabrics, and all the improved technology that is being offered in the fabric industry.” While he notes that the colors commonly used in upholstery and fabric remain reminiscent of sand, sea, and sky, bright accents are also becoming more popular than they were in previous years. Bobby explains, “Today, people want to have more fun! This isn’t their main house—it’s an escape from reality. They just want to put on their flip-flops, crack open a beer, and enjoy the salty air.” Thankfully, the salty air and other elements are no match for the durability of new fabrics commonly found in beach-home furniture today. “You want to relax and enjoy the sunset but know that your furniture is able to take the blows of crazy kids, grandkids, and pets,” says Bobby. Fabrics such as Sunbrella, Crypton, and other “lifeproof” textiles that are resistant to rain and UV-damage have seen a rise in popularity, as have pieces that can be easily customized to fit a customer’s exact vision. That flexibility is at the core of Oskar Huber’s customer-focused mentality. “Our merchandising is always evolving and we are focused on fulfilling their every design need,” explains Bob Huber, Bobby’s father and co-president along with Ron and Don Huber. “Our accessory merchandiser has her finger on the pulse of the marketplace, is always surprising us with new shipments of her latest finds, and is always on top of what is trending.” Speaking of trending, “Gray is the new beige (for wood finishes),” explains Bobby. “We have this beautiful new driftwood gray

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finish that really pays homage to the sea and has taken the LBI-market by storm.” That’s a far cry from now dated-looking wicker and rattan, and the “crate furniture” that Oskar Huber sold thousands of pieces of years ago. Another trend that has risen in popularity amongst Oskar Huber are unique, or even oneof-a-kind statement pieces. “We have seen an increase in higher-priced accents and home décor than ever before,” says Bobby. “These items are pieces of art. They have a story to them and are conversation pieces that become the gems of people’s homes.” And while trends may come and go, the reason behind putting thoughtful care into designing your perfect beach home remains the same throughout the years. “Those who own homes on LBI—whether it’s their primary or secondary home or their rental property—don’t want to sacrifice comfort and life’s small pleasures,” says Bobby. “They want to be able to escape life’s chaos and relax while sitting under the sun—we just provide you with the seat.”

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Beyond

the sheets WRITTEN BY EMILY WARNE

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Don’t let the name fool you—Between the Sheets, one of Long Beach Island’s most beloved interior design companies, doesn’t just deal in luxury linens for the home. Kristin Nissen and Maryann Schmid have provided an inclusive shop for home-decorating and design needs for over 25 years. Between the Sheets specializes in coastal-chic designs that cater to the lifestyle of the second homeowner. Ensuring that each client feels surrounded in “comfort and elegance” throughout the home is a key component of their decorating strategy—whether it be navigating the tricky transition from indoor to outdoor living, transforming master suites into “master retreats,” or even just sourcing the perfect finishing touches to grace a window treatment or bathroom. When embarking on any home interior design project, Schmid notes that it’s never too early to start the process, but it’s important to include a professional in the journey as soon as possible to create a plan and avoid disappointment. “We discuss a client’s expectations and budget before doing anything else,” says Schmid. A realistic budget and time frame are important elements to have on the table, so that Between the Sheet’s expects can help you successfully realize your vision for your home. “We can get you where you want to be by starting the process with quality conversations about your dreams for the space,” Nissen notes. Between the Sheets prides itself as being full-service, but notes that they can be as hands-on or as hands-off as their

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customer prefers. “Some clients are busy and simply want to arrive on LBI with their home interior project complete and some clients to be prefer to be move involved and just need a little hand-holding. We enjoy working with both of these scenarios.” Between the Sheets has utilized this flexible attitude to furnish not only homes on LBI and throughout the Tri-State area, and as far away as California and plenty of places in between. “Our customers come to us because they want to find something that is a little bit different, and because they don’t want to make a costly decorating mistake,” the designers explain. “It takes experience to harmoniously marry the many design elements needed to create a beautiful home that is not only pleasing to the senses, but also practical and user-friendly for the homeowners and their guests.” And while their name may not do justice to the breadth of services Between the Sheets offers its customers, it does boil down to that very idea of functionality plus luxury. “At the end of the day, it IS all about the sheets,” Nissen explains. “Who doesn’t want to slip into luxurious bedding in a well-designed suite, and relax?”

To start your home decorating or design project with Between the Sheets, visit them at 1012 Central Ave in Ship Bottom or call 609-361-9297.

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RUSTIKBEACH from the silo to the shore

Custome made Reclaimed Furniture and Accents

Commercial and Residential 609 709 1982

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FARM to

BEACH HOUSE WRITTEN BY LISA SIMEK

PHOTOS BY ANN COEN

From hipster coffee shops of Williamsburg to millennial studio apartments of Silicon Valley, the trendy incorporation of vintage reclaimed barn wood has been arguably the most coveted accent to any home design project for the past few years. Revered for both its charm and versatility, the allure of these solid, weathered, one-of-a-kind beams is not only desirable from a structural perspective (think about it: the wood has had decades of elemental exposure to do all the warping, splitting and fading that it’s ever going to do), but as a conversation piece it offers a sense of pride in ownership when discussing the history and intrigue behind where a certain lot of wood came from and what its first purpose in life was before being salvaged and reconstructed into something new and eye-catching for your home. There was a time when a barn or silo had its purpose, but in a modern era when farming practices aren’t the same as they once were, most of these old structures are no longer necessary and considered more of a novelty item. This is when the craftsmen from Rustik Beach, an LBI-based company that specializes in custom-built repurposed furniture and home décor, salvage the wood from these old buildings and give them a chance at new life. “It was really rather serendipitous, the way we got together,” begins David Voris, local contractor and co-founder of Rustik Beach. He and his wife would attend the Elk Mountain Fall Festival in Pennsylvania every year, and in 2015, a new exhibitor caught his eye. It was Roger Whitaker, a lifelong builder by trade that was transitioning into reclaimed wood artistry, who had a few eye-catching creations on display: a coffee table, an outdoor bar, a sitting chair as well as a handful of decorative lath art pieces created by his daughter, and third-generation talented wood-

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working artist (Whitaker’s 86-year-old father being the current first-generation wood artisan), Kelsey. When Dave approached Roger and the two men immediately bonded over having mutual clientele on Long Beach Island, the rest, as they say, was history. The duo collaborated together for their first major project when owners of Ship Bottom’s The Local Market & Kitchen commissioned them to design and construct the inside of their latest retail undertaking. Since then, the team has been the innovative craftsmen behind such establishments as How You Brewin, Sink R Swim, Blue Water Café, California Grill & Pizza and Breakers Kitchen & Tap. The two artists create everything under the sun, both commercially and residentially, from accent walls to large dining room tables, simple wine racks to custom-made kitchen cabinets, bedroom headboards, fireplace mantles, pallet walls, built-ins, étages, outdoor bars, sliding barn doors, flooring and everything in between.

A major source of inspiration for Roger Whitaker’s artistic passion is a sense of admiration for the wood itself. “There is a distinct beauty in this material. The character of each piece, the tight growth rings from locally harvested wood, the natural weathering, the beautiful grain and knots—it’s something that can’t be manufactured or artificially replicated in a factory,” Whitaker notes. He chronicles all of the occasions that he found himself connecting with a barn that he was disassembling, taking it down piece by piece, and noticing details like pitch fork marks on the wood or how the stored grain stained the patina on the inside

of the boards. He shares that ideally the best finds can be well over 100 years old, and he can estimate the build dates by noticing details such as the way beams were sawn and nails were hand-forged. His favorite are hand hewn beams, which means there was absolutely no power tool used in their making. The wood generally came from trees that were cut right where the barn was to be built, and then shaped using little more than a broad axe and simple hand tools, perfectly and precisely, piece by piece, until the structure was complete. Whitaker notes the time and patience this process took, making clear why each piece is so valuOPEN HOUSE MAGAZINE

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able, unique and timeless—a testament to the hard work it took to survive in the Pennsylvania frontier of yonder years. David Voris reveals that a large part of the charm of this business is the small-scale focus on the craft itself. “We are not interested in growing too quickly and needing to hire a crew of workers to build dozens of custom pieces at once,” he goes on, “it’s really about the detail-oriented and specialized artistry that goes into creating each of these projects. That is why as woodworkers, we only do one job at a time… quality over quantity.” Priding themselves in products of outstanding merit that are competitively priced, highly requested items such as accent pieces, wine racks, sliding barn doors, custom cabinetry or flooring can range in price anywhere from the hundreds to the thousands—depending on the variety of wood and scope of work.

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The benefits of reclaimed wood also have a positive impact on the environment – less trees are cut, it reduces the carbon footprint to process new timber, and of course the act of recycling is eco-friendly in itself. It is often difficult to visualize how something so old can create something new. Trends in Scandinavian design and the hygge lifestyle are influencing a prowood tendency by homeowners, but so is the simple desire to connect with nature when inside of one’s home. By inviting the outdoors in through such customized lost-art ingenuity, the rustic aura of upcycled timber connects even the most modern and industrial of living spaces to the natural world with its everlasting warmth and cozy character. For more information about Rustik Beach, visit them on Instagram @rustik_beach and Facebook, or call 609-709-1982.


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Interior Design

Daymark:

Definition: noun: the markings on a lighthouse  or other aid to navigation that enable it to be recognized when it is daytime

WRITTEN BY EMILY WARNE

PHOTOS BY ANN COEN

For years, and under the shadow of the lighthouse, LBI denizens could find the iconic Rick’s American Cafe – though usually they’d find it after dark. Reminiscent of its namesake – the main setting of Casablanca—it was not, though

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you may have encountered a brawl or two worthy of a blockbuster on any given evening. Known for its blackened sea bass, cold beer, live music, and even livelier crowds, Rick’s was famous (and sometimes infamous) amongst locals.


Today, what stands in its place is the opposite of the dark, nicotine-stained walls you’d expect from a traditional waterfront watering hole. The Daymark, owned and operated by The Arlington’s Paul and Brian Sabarese, is a light, breezy ode to the bay it sits on, both in its cuisine and décor.

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The transformation from beloved dive bar to a hip brunch spot and event space is impressive enough, and only compounded by the fact that it happened in only a few short months. The Sabareses closed on the property in mid-March of 2016, and opened their doors mere three months later in June of that year – just in time for the summer season. “I was here pretty much every day, but it had to get it done,” says Brian, one-half of the founding brother-duo and chef. “It was a very aggressive construction schedule. All new siding; we stripped the walls down here to the stud – all new insulation, all new plumbing, all new electric, all new sheetrock, all new windows, all new finishes.” So, really – all new everything, which is evident most

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in the attention-to-detail that was paid when decorating the downstairs restaurant, and the upstairs banquet hall. But the process of figuring out how to brighten- and liven-up the space was a little less traditional than you’d expect from longtime restauranteurs (both brothers have spent over 20 years in the business): “The whole place pretty much started with the wallpaper,” Sabarase says, “And then we came up with the floor design.” Those patrons who have previously visited The Arlington, the Sabarese’s popular hangout in Ship Bottom, will recognize their attention to wall accents. Where The Arlington features warm-toned blowfish sourced from a textile firm in California, The Daymark’s wallpaper comes from the Brooklyn outfit


Eskayel and has splashes of a modern blue-andpurple abstract reminiscent of soundwaves. “The Arlington’s a huge craft beer bar, we’re top 10 in the state—we have 25 beers on tap. When we came here, we just didn’t want to be competing with ourselves. And so here, decor-wise, we kind of went the opposite,” explains Sabarese. That design philosophy carried them all the way through the renovation process. Where The Arlington’s floors are wood, The Daymark’s from LBI Tile are a white-and-blue pattern of bistro design. Bring in the bar-top of blue-and-green painted, reclaimed boat wood from JM Lifestyles in Randolph, NJ, and you’ve created the perfect design foil to their sister restaurant—and a great place for them to host events to complement those hold at their Ship Bottom property.

Where The Arlington has established itself as a hotspot for rehearsal dinners, The Daymark has the water-view, the sentimental value of the lighthouse, and proximity to local churches on its side for weddings. That’s been proven by their heavily booked schedule of events for 2018 and into 2018 – and not only for receptions, but also baby and bridal showers, anniversaries, and other celebrations. This is exceptionally attractive for the couple or party-planner who isn’t looking to heavily bring in their own décor—the space speaks for itself, as best described by Sabarase: “Little funky, little eclectic.” Combined with a whole-lot of light, and a whole-lot of attention to detail, The Daymark is quickly living up to its patronage as being an easily-recognized marker – not only in LBI dining, but in event space.

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LBI Arts Council 2018 Events & Happenings

LBI Artists Open Studio Tour Classical Music Jam Session Series Bayview Park Monday Night Summer Music Series Lighthouse International Film Festival Art Galler y Small Business Saturday Follow us online for updates

B LBIArtsCouncil C LBI_Arts E LBIArtsCouncil lbiartists.com, lbiartscouncil.org lbiartcouncil@gmail.com

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LONG BEACH ISLAND FOUNDATION OF THE ARTS AND SCIENCES 2018 ANNUAL SEASHORE OPEN HOUSE TOUR Wednesday August 1st 10:30 – 4:30

Tickets and information at 609 494.1241 lbifoundation.org

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Art & History

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INSPIRED BY

Exquisite Landscapes A morning in the Sabine household begins with an all too familiar scene: a mother of three, unruffled, coffee in hand, packing lunches and getting her older children ready for school. In true mom-fashion, she may even have a toddler on her hip and a golden retriever by her side. But that’s where any similarities of this artist’s life and any other average mom’s ends. WRITTEN BY LISA SIMEK

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While mesmerized by a canvas inside of her home’s very own art studio, Elizabeth Sabine, the woman with a cheerful smile and determined eyes, silently communicates her thoughts, her emotions—the way she perceives the world— with nothing but a bit of paint and coarse bristles. Largely influenced by the impressionist [but also modern, pop art, and abstract] movement, New Jersey native Elizabeth Sabine brings to life the true ambience of any given moment in time. Her focus is landscapes, primarily bodies of water with boats and coastal scenes but she also paints florals and custom commissioned artwork. No matter the subject, each of her pieces have one important trait in common: a resonating sense of tranquility; it’s easy to see why her artwork resonates so well with Long Beach Islanders. And although her paintings may be simple and serene, the conception is impassioned, deeply personal and indicative of the striking seascapes and florals that surround her charming home. She finds inspiration within the unpretentious colors found in nature, emphasizing them through pure technique. “I tend to use a very minimal pallet and let the mixing and blending happen with sometimes just three or less hues,” the artist shares. It’s remarkable to learn that some of her most popular paintings invoked only a hue or two from her palette. Formerly trained in interior design at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York City, Sabine ran her own floral design business for more than ten years and worked as a visual merchandiser for the luxury retailer Nordstrom. But the artist shared that her career path didn’t quite satisfy her appetite for expression as does fine art, noting, “Nothing excites me more than when I have a blank canvas and white pallet. It’s a fresh start, sometimes I’m

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really not sure where it will lead, but once I start mixing the paints is when a lot of the inspiration begins.” It’s no surprise that in another life Sabine embodied that fast-paced, Manhattan existence for her artwork now seems to be the perfect antidote for anyone looking to disconnect from the hustle and bustle and simply relish in a moment or two inspired by nature. Although her work may be compared to the likes of celebrated impressionists Claude Monet, Camille Pissarro, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, and Eugène Boudin, it clearly stands alone in its subtlety and ability to elicit a sense of wonder and peace. The organic shapes, smooth textures and delicate lines offer a sense of hope and perpetuity, while the difference in tones with such slight hue have just the right amount of saturation and contrasts—leaving the audience with a sense of exhilaration, a delight akin to the contentment one has after an absolute perfect day on the beach or out on a boat. “I would like to think my work speaks to the souls of those who view it,” shares Elizabeth. “I try to create a new story, a new feeling, a new emotion for them which each and every painting,” the artist adds.

inspired, one thing is for sure: the product of her exquisite interpretations is one of Long Beach Island’s most sought-after artistic creations.

Maintaining the raw nature of her work, Elizabeth’s husband, Adam, fabricates all of the frames for her paintings by hand. Her three children, daughter Alanis, aged 9, sons Adam, 7, and William, 1, also love spending time with their artist mother in her studio. “They’ll sit on the on the floor painting along with me. It’s fun and definitely very messy,” she shares. Whether the coastal breeze wisps salty air through an open window or perhaps the aroma of her favorite red currant candle takes her away to the place she feels most at peace and

Sabine has had the privilege of exhibiting and selling her work to collectors through shows at Agora Gallery in the Chelsea Art District of New York City, Main Street Gallery in Manasquan, Noon Designs in Bay Head, Finishing Touches in Spring Lake, and Salt Design Co in Asbury Park. Her artwork is currently available at Artifacts & Company of Beach Haven, Long Beach Island, and an updated peek of her portfolio can be viewed on her website www.elizabethsabineart.com and Instagram page, @elizabethsabineart. OPEN HOUSE MAGAZINE

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Art & History

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THE SHACK WRITTEN BY CHRISTINE GAYDOS

PHOTO BY ANN COEN

Long Beach Island is known for its multimillion-dollar and architecturally significant homes, however, sitting in a marsh along Barnegat Bay, one small, rustic, weather-beaten cabin captured the hearts and imagination of multiple generations of Long Beach Island residents and vacationers -The Shack. Located off to the right on Eastbound Route 72 as you crossed Bonnet Island, the Shack called out, “Welcome to LBI,” for over 80 years.

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A - PHOTO BY TRINA GARRETT

B - PHOTO BY PEG O’HARA

C - PHOTO BY TANKE HOOD

C C

C A

B

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FROM GUNNING CLUB TO SYMBOL OF SURVIVAL The Shack was an ordinary hunting cabin built sometime in the 1920s. Known as the Happy Day Club, it accommodated duck hunters and provided hunting supplies such as decoys, sodding, and sneak boxes (a unique boat developed in Barnegat Bay to navigate shallow water). Gun Clubs were common in the early 20th century and the Shack was actually one of three similar structures in the area, all of them on the north side of the Route 72 Causeway. In 1957 a new causeway was under construction and the Happy Day Club was moved to the opposite side of the roadway where it became an unofficial “Welcome to LBI” landmark. The Shack stood alone in the marsh alongside the Barnegat Bay and became a muse for countless artists who captured the Shack’s mystery and historic allure in paintings, photographs, and sculptures. Over time the Shack became one of the most talked about and artistically captured sites associated with LBI. As the decades passed the Shack became less of a sporting club and, in the 1960s and 1970s, more of a place for parties. It was eventually abandoned and the Shack slowly started to fall apart. What was once a two-story cabin with quarter moon openings carved into its shutters eventually became what some referred to as “a pile of sticks.” After strong storms and harsh winters, the conversation of residents and vacationers turned to wondering if the Shack would still be there. The little hunting cabin became a symbol of survival.

the Shack” movement. He took it upon himself to brace its deteriorating walls and adorn it with a large American Flag. His goal was to get people interested in restoring the Shack in any way possible. At the same time, the land surrounding the Shack had been purchased for the installation of billboards. The new owner was willing to work on a restoration project, however aside from the lengthy process of working through the Department of Environmental Protection and the Army Corps of Engineers, there was a question of legal ownership of the property. Working together with Stafford Township and the Ocean County Cultural and Heritage Commission a clear title dating back to the 1600s was obtained in 2011. That same year a fundraising effort to raise money and supplies for a restoration project was launched with the creation of savetheshack.com, and a video documentary was produced by Sean Gallagher, whose grandfather was an artist who painted the shack in the 1980s. Through great efforts, major hurdles had been resolved, but time was still running out. THE END The Shack had survived the historic storms of the 1930s and 1940s, and later the great Nor’easter of 1962. Just as the reality of restoring the Shack was within sight, Superstorm Sandy struck. Weakened by years of exposure to the harsh elements of the coastal New Jersey, the Shack fell victim; a short report from the Harvey Cedars Police on October 30, 2012, reported, “the shack was gone as of 7 A.M.” Its demise was not witnessed and all that remained were four supportive pilings.

WHAT TO DO WITH THE SHACK?

THE FUTURE

Recognizing its frailty, the public began to consider options for the future of their beloved Shack. Ideas included a Viking funeral in which the Shack would be burned down in an honored tradition, building an acrylic enclosure to “freeze” it in time, and even building a replica on LBI to be turned into a Shack art museum.

Today most people still remember the Shack and talk fondly about how long it stood and when it was lost, but what about the newcomers who have never actually seen the Shack – what will become their welcome sign? Maybe a replica shack will be built to remind travelers of the history of the Bay, or maybe the countless paintings and photos will be enough to tell the story of the Shack. One thing is for sure, the Shack was a survivor and an inspiration to many during its 80 years of existence, and its legacy will carry on in the future as well.

Spurred by his personal history and love of the Shack (and its ties to the history of early baymen), local LBI resident James Yuhas started a “Save

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As a fourth generation family business, we at Oskar Huber Furniture & Design pride ourselves on creative design and quality custom furniture. Our talented designers guide and inspire you throughout the entire design process. The result? Your dream home. Visit us on Long Beach Island for unmatched coastal selections. Visit us in Southampton PA where traditional meets trendy.

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Profile for bay magazine

Open house magazine 2018 issuu  

A Interior & Exterior Design Magazine for Long Beach Island and the Surrounding area

Open house magazine 2018 issuu  

A Interior & Exterior Design Magazine for Long Beach Island and the Surrounding area

Profile for bay-mag