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architecture that wows

What sets us apart from the rest? At Walters, you will meet with our architect to design your home at no cost to you! Then we will provide you with pricing to build the home of your dreams with no obligations or commitments – you have nothing to lose.

ALL HOMES ARE TO BE ENERGY STAR® CERTIFIED Look for high performance homes built to EPA’s ENERGY STAR Homes Program. ENERGY STAR Homes offer enduring quality, value-adding energy efficiency features and a combination of materials and equipment that deliver better performance and an overall superior level of quality. New Jersey’s Clean Energy Program™ is brought to you by the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities and does not endorse any one particular builder. Information can be found at NJCleanEnergy.com. Walters Architecture, LLC. - Lic # N.J. AI19884 2 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2019


waltershomes.com Let’s talk. 609.597.6999 880 Mill Creek Road, Manahawkin, NJ 08050

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Contents Open House

17

Kitchen Renovation Trends

50

Small Space, High Style

24

An LBI Living Legacy

56

Beyond the Build

30

Island Living

64

Do what you love & Love what you do

38

Old World LBI

73

Heavenly Holiday Home

45

Brightening Up the Nighttime Skies

80

A Bigger Summer Garden

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CANCER KNOCKED HIM OUT OF THE DRIVER’S SEAT

WE PUT HIM BACK IN IT Diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, Arthur knew time was of the essence. At Hackensack Meridian Health highly specialized physicians bring a collective knowledge of the most effective therapies, technology and research. These experts helped steer Arthur through the successful course of his treatment. And as part of the most comprehensive health care network in New Jersey, we’re not just at the forefront of cancer, we’re pioneering the possible. LEARN ABOUT PIONEERING THE POSSIBLE Visit HackensackMeridianHealth.org/LearnMore or call to speak to a nurse at 732-776-4240.

A member of the Memorial Sloan Kettering - Hackensack Meridian Health Partnership Jersey Shore University Medical Center | JFK Medical Center | Ocean Medical Center | Raritan Bay Medical Center – Old Bridge Raritan Bay Medical Center – Perth Amboy | Riverview Medical Center | Southern Ocean Medical Center

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Contents Get the Look

84 Sugar a Spice & Everything Nice

Healthy Living 96

Beauty Buzz

102 This Ain’t Your Mama’s Spin Class 108 Not Just a Cosmetic Issue

Feature Story 110

Happy Birthday, Ol’ Barney!

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732 | 345 | 1441

www.tckbdesigns.com

Appointments recommended bay-magazine.com 7


Contents

Feed Your Mind 169 Feed your Mind: Romantic Weekend Getaway 186 I scream, you scream, The Dopes scream for Ice Cream!

Did you Know?

Weddings 122

Floral Hairpieces

128

Wedding Bliss One

134

Wedding Bliss Surprise Vow Renewal

142

First Comes Love

146

Love boat

154

Starting Your Own Family Traditions

161

Floral Design

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195

A True Story Teller

201

Explore LBI

204

Makes Difference For Local Families

207

Curator of all Things Marvelous

210

Fowl Play

214

Off Season


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bay magazine

INTERIOR DESIGN FURNITURE BED & BATH LINENS LIGHTING WINDOW TREATMENTS

CO-FOUNDER | CHAIRMAN PUBLISHER GARY HENDERSON CO-FOUNDER | EDITORIAL CREATIVE DIRECTOR FARRELL DUNLEAVY VP OPERATIONS LUELLEN HENDERSON CONTRIBUTING EDITORS LISA SIMEK CONCEPT & STYLING WEDDING PHOTO SHOOTS JEANNE COON-BOGATH BOGATH WEDDINGS AND EVENTS CONCEPT & STYLING GET THE LOOK PHOTO SHOOTS BLONDE & BLUE BOUTIQUE PHOTOGRAPHERS JOHN MARTINELLI MICHAEL SPARK MICHAEL JOHN MURPHY DIANNE AHTO ANN COEN PATRICA BURKE NICK REINHARDT ASHLEY MAC PHOTOGRAPHY SUSAN ELIZABETH PHOTOGRAPHY IDALIA PHOTOGRAPHY

ADVERTISING SUBMISSIONS GENERAL INQUIRES info@bay-mag.com

For a digital copy of bay magazine visit

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS our website at www.bay-magazine.com. LISA SIMEK SARAH HODGSON ELAINE SISKO CATHY LANDRUM PEG REYNOLDS ROBIN CHASE SUSAN VON BRACHEL MATT BURTON MELANIE CAVANAGH JEANNE COON-BOGATH

1012 Central Ave, Ship Bottom | 609.361.9297

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Copyright © 2019 LBI Publishing Inc. bay magazine Open House Magazine Feed your mind cookbook

betweenthesheetsnj.com

info@betweenthesheetsnj.net

All rights reserved. No part of this periodical may be reproduced without express permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed by writers commissioned for articles published by bay magazine are not necessarily those of the magazine.

bay-magazine.com


609-661-6055 ~Kitchens

~Baths ~Additions ~New Construction

We feature AndersenÂŽ windows in our homes.

"Andersen" and the AW logo are registered trademarks of Andersen Corporation.

www.ucbuildersnj.com

Graphicus 14, LLC

NJ Builder Lic. 045720 NJ State Lic. 13VH05660000

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Ship Bottom, NJ 08008


FOUNDERS NOTE

Shine Bright Season after season, as the island evolves and progresses towards the next generation of inhabitants, we find ourselves nostalgic with the Long Beach Island of yesteryears. It seems to be a common theme in this Fall’s issue—reaching back for bits and pieces of the rich culture and robust history that LBI has to offer. The home trends, the local artisans, the young couples starting a new life together: What is old, is certainly new again on our quaint little barrier island. Whether it be modern-day architectural nods to the Victorian style homes of early Beach Haven, or celebrating centuries-old symbolic emblems —the 160th Birthday of the Barnegat Lighthouse, local lost arts of the 20th century— in this issue we pay homage to the different types of movers and shakers who built this island up and were an integral part of its progression from once uninhabited ghost town to the bustling residential powerhouse that it is today. Full of heartwarming stories, current happenings and highlights from our local business men and women, we hope you enjoy this issue as much as we delighted in putting it together. And to Ol’ Barney, and official Happy Birthday! wish that can be heard from our north to south end, from the whole team at bay Magazine. May she shine bright for another 160 years and generations to come. Wishing you all a happy and healthy fall/winter season, The

Founders

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MODERN AMERICAN CUISINE

Located on the west side of the building, the Hotel’s main restaurant provides breakfast along with upscale dining, driven by the bounty of our local farmers and fishermen.

IMPECCABLE VIEWS MEET INCREDIBLE COCKTAILS

Watch the sunset on our top deck and relax next to the fire in one of our cozy outdoor lounges. The Rooftop features handcrafted cocktails and breathtaking, uncontested bay views.

A N OA SI S RE SO RT O N T H E J E RSE Y SH O RE ’ S M O ST M AG I C AL 1 8 M I L E BA R R IER ISLA N D

H OT EL L B I.C OM | 609 467 8000 | 350 W 8T H S T, S H IP B OTTO M , N J bay-magazine.com 15


Š2018 California Closet Company, Inc. All rights reserved. Each franchise independently owned and operated. NJ #13VH01142500

Experience a California Closets system custom designed specifically for you and the way you live. Visit us online today to arrange for a complimentary in-home design consultation.

californiaclosets.com 16 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2019

C R A N B U RY

800.229.2567

NO R TH F I ELD

M T L AU R EL


OPEN HOUSE

Our Top Five Kitchen Renovation Trends Written by Cathy Landrum

Photos by Graphicus 14 Productions, LLC

The kitchen has always been considered the “heart of the home” and has become much more than just a center for meal prep. Kitchens are the main hub of activity for holiday gatherings, entertaining family and friends and, of course, …cooking too! At Under Construction Builders, clients frequently share their desire to create an open floor plan between the kitchen, dining and living areas to make their kitchen the focal point of the home. As kitchens have evolved over time, so have the trends in kitchen design from cabinetry to countertops to flooring. Here are some of the most requested selections from our clientele.

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LARGER KITCHEN ISLANDS For many of our clients, the larger the kitchen island, the better. Islands are multi-functional and can help eliminate some of the clutter typically found on the kitchen counter. A large island allows for plenty of seating and lots of counter space for food prep, as well as ample space for a bar sink, a built-in microwave or a dishwasher. It offers additional cabinet space for loads of extra storage and might include a wine rack or open shelving for cookbooks and decorative serving dishes. And if space is tight, with a large island, you can eliminate the need for a separate dining table.

BEYOND WHITE CABINETS Make a bold statement with color for your kitchen cabinets. Although white cabinetry is still a very popular and classic look, breaking up the all-white kitchen with a complementary color will create visual interest. Selecting one color for the upper cabinets and a contrasting color for the base cabinets, or one color for the island and a contrasting color for the perimeter cabinets, can personalize and transform the space beyond all white. Shades of blue, green and grey are current popular colors used to accent a crisp, white kitchen. 18 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2019


POPULAR COUNTERTOPS Quartz and granite are the most popular choices for kitchen counters. Quartz or “engineered stone� is one of our top customer picks due to its durability and resistance to stains. Many quartz options mimic the look of granite or marble with the bonus of low maintenance. Granite, a natural stone option, is equally popular since each slab has its own unique colors and veining. Honed or leathered granite, with a matte finish, has increased in popularity recently with our homeowners. Just as mixing kitchen cabinetry colors is on trend, the same can be done with choosing one countertop material for the island and another for the perimeter cabinets.

S U B WAY T I L E I S S T I L L NUMBER ONE Subway tile continues to be our most popular backsplash selection, with white still trending as the number one color choice. Subway tile is suitable for every style of kitchen from farmhouse to traditional to contemporary because of its timeless, classic look. It is available in an array of color options as well as in assorted sizes, finishes and textures. Adding a decorative design above the cooktop to a subway tile backsplash creates a focal point. It allows you to add unique visual interest to your kitchen and transforms a simple brick pattern with a stunning accent piece.

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LOVE THE LOOK OF WOOD Hardwood or wood-look floors look great with any style of kitchen. For many people, the geographic location of their home dictates the type of flooring that they prefer. On Long Beach Island, luxury vinyl planks, or LVP, is a wood-look option that replicates the grain of natural wood. It is a durable choice because it stands up well to humid, salty air with little to no maintenance. For areas without the concern of the sand and sea, hardwood flooring is a beautiful, classic look. Natural wood requires a bit more care than LVP, but if the floor is sealed and cared for properly, it will add depth and warmth to your kitchen for years to come. The kitchen has surpassed the living and dining rooms over the years to become the focal point of almost every home. At Under Construction Builders, we look forward to helping you realize your dream kitchen from budgeting to design to construction. 20 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2019

Under Construction Builders has over 25 years of experience building and renovating on Long Beach Island and in South Jersey. We specialize in modernizing kitchens and bathrooms and adding additional living space to offer the perfect solution to update your home. For more information, visit our website at www.ucbuildersnj.com , our Houzz profile at www.houzz.com/pro/ucbuilders or call our Ship Bottom office at 609-661-6055.


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Our goal is to help you pursue yours. It’s that simple. At Merrill, we’ll help you get ready for the future with a financial strategy that’s just for you. The Somers Group Skye Gibson, CFP®, C(k)P®, CPFA Vice President Wealth Management Advisor 609.484.7101 skye.gibson@ml.com Merrill Lynch Wealth Management 3100 Hingston Avenue Egg Harbor Township, NJ 08234 fa.ml.com/somersgroup

Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated (also referred to as “MLPF&S” or “Merrill”) makes available certain investment products sponsored, managed, distributed or provided by companies that are affiliates of Bank of America Corporation (“BofA Corp.”). MLPF&S is a registered broker-dealer, Member SIPC and a wholly owned subsidiary of BofA Corp. Investment products:

Are Not FDIC Insured

Are Not Bank Guaranteed

May Lose Value

The Bull Symbol and Merrill Lynch are trademarks of Bank of America Corporation. Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards Inc. owns the certification marks CFP® and CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ in the U.S. C(k)P® is a registered trademark of The Retirement Advisor University, Inc. © 2019 Bank of America Corporation. All rights reserved. AR9PDGGT | AD-06-19-0422 | 470948PM-0519 | 06/2019 bay-magazine.com 23


OPEN HOUSE

AN LBI LIVING LEGACY Written by Lisa Simek

Long Beach Island is no longer the sleepy little barrier island of long ago. A quick trip down the Boulevard reveals the fresh and on-trend merchants that have popped up everywhere, and the same can be said for the plethora of gorgeous new homes being built from its most northern to southern ends. Perhaps you have noticed the Walters signs in front of many of these developing dwellings and thought to yourself, how does a homeowner discern one builder from the rest in a market consumed by new construction and saturated with building contractors? The first step in fact is to take a look back —at a developer’s beginnings and the multi-generational family legacy that roots Walters custom home-building to LBI where it all began.

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Ed Walters Jr. and his brother Greg started building luxury summer retreats on Long Beach Island in 1984 – a time when the housing market was booming. But by the end of the decade, the market began to slump, and while some builders retreated, the two brothers persevered. The team formed Walters and Sons Construction Company and decided to go from seasonal builders to primary home developers. They later partnered

with Joe Del Duca, a real estate attorney, who now oversees the company’s affordable housing division. By taking a methodical approach, Ed Walters Jr. was able to slowly and steadily diversify his firm’s portfolio. By 1996, the firm formed a commercial arm when it acquired 400 acres in Barnegat to develop retail, office, and multi-family projects which now includes Barnegat Village Square and Walter’s corporate offices in Barnegat. Today, Walters is a diversified real estate operation with a focus on custom home building, affordable housing, market-rate apartments, office and retail development.

a positive impact by helping rebuild the Jersey Shore. “We have a passion and commitment to building high-quality, energy efficient and affordably-priced homes,” shares Matthew Gaudet-Walters.

By 2009, Walters entered the affordable housing arena with all the components in place to build high-quality sustainable developments that are 100 percent income-restricted. Their first development was Stafford Park Apartments, a LEED® Gold-certified apartment community consisting of 112 units in Manahawkin. In fact, Stafford Park began as one of Walter’s most prominent endeavors and today encompasses a 370-acre mixeduse redevelopment in Stafford Township which includes affordable and market-rate housing, a large retail complex and a solar farm. Since then, the firm has completed a dozen income-restricted sustainable developments and another four are currently under development. THIRD-GENERATION LEADS CUSTOM HOME DIVISION Now in its third-generation leadership-- Matthew Gaudet-Walters, Ed’s son, heads business development for the custom homebuilding division. As a native of LBI, Gaudet-Walters chose to join the family business after Hurricane Sandy and made

Gaudet-Walters provides the strategy that drives the growth of the custom home-building division while implementing innovative ways to create an exceptional experience for his clients. Since Hurricane Sandy, the homebuilding division turned its sights on building safer, stronger and more resilient housing at the Jersey Shore.

“We have a long history of building homes that will stand up to what nature can deliver,” said Ed Walters Jr. “Our competitive advantage is our talented workforce whose focus is on working together to create the highest quality product.” Gaudet-Walters raised the bar even farther when he stream-

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OPEN HOUSE

lined the custom home-building process. The firm can manage everything from demolition to completion of a new custom home while maintaining open lines of communication throughout the homebuilding process.

the entire homebuilding process. Once a client meets with our sales team and architect, we can create a design which includes all of their wish list items and give them a price of what their dream home will cost in the end,” said Gaudet-Walters.

In recent years, the firm has created two new divisions—Walters Architecture LLC and Walters Realty. The realty division helps clients buy and sell property while also helping them locate land in coastal towns to build on and assisting throughout the custom homebuilding process. Clients can also utilize the free services of an in-house architect who provides preliminary architectural designs, including floor plans and elevations, using 3D color renderings. As a result, clients can get a complete cost breakdown of what a new homebuilding project will entail from start to finish.

Since Hurricane Sandy hit the Jersey coastline, Walters has built nearly 400 homes in coastal locations including Little Egg Harbor Township, Long Beach Island, Ortley Beach, Lavallette, Mantoloking, Bay Head and Manasquan to name a few. The firm has taken the lead in building resilient housing at the Jersey Shore and raising the bar in terms of streamlining services.

“Our team of professionals are housed under one roof and can work together to guide clients through

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As head of Walters Architecture, Arnold Boyle, AIA, says he designs homes that meet his client’s needs and lifestyles. His diverse architectural styles include but are not limited to Modern, Craftsman, Traditional, Farmhouse, and Coastal Contemporary, as well as the Classic Beach House.


The award-winning custom design, build and architectural firm is continuing to expand its presence in Southern Ocean County with a new sales office at 2000 Route 35 in Ortley Beach which is temporary until the permanent model home and sales center is completed on the corner of 3rd Ave. and Route 35 North This is the second sales office in Ocean County for Walters. For the future, Walters has plans to open another office and sales center in Ship Bottom by 2020. “This will be an ideal location to serve clients looking to build a new home in the Long Beach Island region,” said Gaudet-Walters. “Potential clients will be able to access all of our services.” So, the next time you see a Walters sign on someone’s front yard, just know that yet another neighbor is getting a home they will cherish for years and it’s being built by a highly- regarded developer known for their local expertise and hands-on, quality services.

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LocaLLy K nown GLobaLLy c onnected coastaLivinG . pro

| 609 492 4444

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OPEN HOUSE

Island Living The Chef’s Sink Dreams Are Made Of Written by Lisa Simek

30 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2019

Photos by Patricia Burke Photography


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If a sink that is able to tackle every task in the kitchen seems like a scene out of The Jetsons, think again. What if your kitchen sink could be more than just a sink? The experts at Town & Country Kitchen and Bath are able to turn a boring standard sink into a super-functional, smart and stylish workstation where one can prepare, serve, entertain, and clean up all in one convenient place. Now exclusively working with The Galley® Ideal Workstation™, the designers at Town & Country Kitchen and Bath are proving to us why The Galley is the ideal option for any indoor or outdoor kitchen—because it is changing the way people everywhere think about and use their kitchens.

The Galley’s accessories can turn the sink into extra counter space for entertaining using the snack/condiment holders, ice bucket and serving boards.

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“Many of our clients are eating healthier and cooking at home with family and friends. The workstation is a great addition to the kitchen. Preparing meals has become an important part of a family’s day and The Galley makes for easier prep, serving and clean up. We like to think of the Workstation as we do appliances, you invest in appliances to cook and store food better, why not have a workstation that makes the process better!” shares Ginny Padula, owner and chief interior designer of Town & Country Kitchen and Bath. The remarkable characteristic of this unique workstation is that clients obtain a substantially larger sink than they would in a conventional kitchen, although no counter space or cabinet space is sacrificed because of it’s multiuse workspace design—it’s as if your counter top has layers that slide in and out depending on the task. “There have been so many innovations in the kitchen space over the years, but the one item under-engineered happens to be the kitchen sink,” shares the CEO of The Galley company, Scott Anderson. He goes on to say, “The Galley makes the sink that much more valuable and much more useful.” The basic premise of the product, which was invented by a kitchen designer looking to optimize his own personal kitchen functionality, is

similar to a kitchen island with a custom-sized double tier sink basin. Each of the upper and lower tiers have accessories such as cutting boards, platforms, bowls, colanders— basically all the tools necessary to do prep work, serving, entertaining and clean up—all in one location. The accessories move across from left to right and right to left as you need to use them. “This completely changes the experience of cooking, serving and entertaining,” adds Anderson. Featured on these pages are homes with their own personal ideal kitchen layouts for functionality and design. “The first home has a 36-inch under the window as the main sink and a 24-inch prep sink on the large island. This is a great kitchen for entertaining. It is open to the breakfast room and the island sink can be used for serving drinks when filed with ice or condiments if one chooses to add the accessories,” describes Padula. All of her clients like the user-friendliness of this sink, as it is a great prep area when they are working in the kitchen. They are able to perform multiple activities at the sink, especially on an island where they can still be in the conversation with guests. “To our clients, The Galley Workstation as a new kind of kitchen appliance,” she adds is Although aspiring chefs love the larger-sized workbay-magazine.com 33


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stations, they can come as small as 18-inches wide. Regardless of size, however, homeowners are still able to prepare, cook and serve all in the same place. “My favorite accessory is the drying rack since I do not like the look of a drain board on kitchen counters,� mentions Ginny when discussing the plethora of accessories available for customization with each more-than-justa-sink Galley workstation. These include condiment serving boards, wash basins, ice and storage basins, serving bowls, chef blocks and cutting boards, grates and drying racks, and standard counter decks that open and shut to reveal or uncover all of these aforementioned accessories. Whether homeowners are looking for a super-functional, smart and stylish focal point to bring attention to their kitchen, or if they just want to streamline their prep and cook time, considering The Galley workstation exclusively available at Town & Country Kitchen and Bath is the way to go. Check out https://tckbdesigns.com to learn more about the Galley Workstations that will work best for you. Happy Fall.

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Outstanding In Their Field

Call Cowles

“The Name You Know for LBI Real Estate” 609.492.1300 David Cowles, CRS GRI Broker/Associate Cell: 609.290.0779

Michael Cowles, CRS GRI Realtor Associate Cell: 609.290.3680

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OPEN HOUSE

Old World LBI, with a Modern Twist Written by Lisa Simek

38 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2019

Photos by John Martinelli


Traditional coastal architecture and design will never go out of style—but it’s safe to say that they are certainly evolving alongside the modern world. Michael Pagnotta of Michael Pagnotta Architecture & Construction in Ship Bottom is the ultimate resource for how to balance timeless design with a contemporary lifestyle. Having decades of experience building in the local environment and known for his new-age ingenuity, Pagnotta’s firm creates homes with intentional nods to the more traditional elements of Long Beach Island’s charm, while integrating the latest advancements in functional design, low-maintenance materials, energy-efficient needs and self-sustenance to meet the demands of the modern-day homeowner. To put it lightly, they are the masters at blurring the lines, inside and out, between traditional and modern when it comes to designing and building a first-class coastal home that will withstand the test of time— and the harsh local weather elements.

According to Pagnotta, even the most traditional homes can have a modern twist. By bringing in some of the tenets of light and space, homeowners are thrilled to have both the warm coziness of a lived-in, beach house with a streamlined, efficient and luxuriously fresh design. “If you look at how home styles have evolved over the years on the island, whether they were the Queen Anne-style, Neo-Gothic-style Victorian-era summer houses, or the cottages and bungalows of the early 20th century, there’s a lot of inherent good design and proportion and character and charm. The reason they’ve become styles is because it’s something people have found attractive and desirable over time. There’s an intrinsic beauty there that people like,” says Pagnotta. He goes on to say, “At the same time, people live differently than they did 100 years ago. Today’s homeowner likes openness and airiness, and lots of natural light in their homes. They want everything to flow, there’s a real migration to unobstructed spaces and definitely a demand for more open concept floor plans—with none of the maintenance.”

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In the Beach Haven home featured on these pages, Pagnotta’s client wanted the charm and feel of an older conventional shingle style Beach Haven home, with the benefits of low-maintenance and contemporary elements where possible. Below is a general breakdown of how they melded together some of the traditional and modern aspects of design to design the home:

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Traditional: - First floor living (As opposed to current reverse living trends) - Real cedar shake siding - Brick veneer (exterior and fireplace surround) - 5 panel interior doors - Custom Built-ins, window seats, and bunks—devices to maximize space and add character - Wide plank oak floors (*which are engineered and more stable) - Trim (shiplap in stairwell, tongue and groove on bedroom ceilings, shiplap above fireplace mantel) - Mahogany exterior soffits - Cast iron kitchen farm sink - Fabric awnings - Brick pavers and grass lawn

Modern: - Engineered wide plank hardwood floors - Composite garage doors to look like wood - Fiberglass stained exterior doors to look like wood - Composite decking - Vinyl exterior railings - LED lighting - Modern lighting fixtures with a traditional flair - Speakers and security system - Stainless steel energy efficient appliances - Solid vinyl exterior trim Since modern design tends to focus on the architecture of a home as part of the decor itself, using an architect’s eye to help create interesting shapes and spaces around the structure will help to tastefully blend the charm of the traditional with a chic, modern perspective. Michael Pagnotta Architecture & Construction is just the design-build team to show you that what is old, is new again when it comes to building your dream home on LBI.

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SHOWROOM

You won’t find them in ordinary kitchens. Or at ordinary stores. Sub-Zero, the preservation specialist. Wolf, the cooking specialist. Cove, the cleaning specialist. You’ll find them only at your local kitchen specialist. 1968

491A Main Street (Route 9), West Creek, NJ • 609-597-3571 • anchorappliance.com

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Brightening Up the Nighttime Skies Written by Elaine Sisko, Reynolds Landscaping

Nothing draws people together more successfully during evening hours than a fire—encouraging animated conversation among friends, quiet introspection over a glass of wine and communal stargazing with loved ones and children. A fire feature—firepit or outdoor fireplace—is the icing on the cake of any outdoor living design on LBI and a key accessory for perfected nighttime entertaining. As the popularity of fire features on LBI has risen in recent years, however, so has the regulations and restrictions surrounding their installation—a necessary safeguard against potential harm to property and life. Most Townships across the Island now ban open fires on both public beaches and in private residences. Stringent setback requirements from not only property lines and buildings but also swimming pools and water features can make the design and location of a fire feature on already small-scaled property lots both challenging and frustrating. “To save time, energy and the very realistic possibility of Township rejection” Luke Reynolds of Reynolds Landscaping advises “it makes perfect sense to hire a professional to not only design the best location for the fire feature but also to maneuver the maze of paperwork and regulations required by the different municipalities on LBI.”

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Nestled into a garden niche for intimate evening relaxation, abutting a bayside bulkhead to capture views of the setting sun or bordering an alfresco living room to combine interior and exterior living—the location of the firepit is determined by the intentions, needs and lifestyle of the homeowner and their family. “Analyzing the site flow of the property, asking the right questions of clients and really listening to their answers” Reynolds states “are essential keys to creating the perfect environment for the fire feature”. Round, square or rectangular--the shape of the firepit will need to be selected along with the materials for the structure itself. The architectural style of the residence along with the layout of and hardscaping materials of existing patios and walkways will assist in this deci46 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2019

sion. If curvilinear patios and serpentine pathways of tumbled paver stone are present on site, a round firepit of irregular fieldstone or natural stone façade would complement this naturalistic and rustic environment. If the design of the residence and hardscaping configures to a more modern and rectilinear style then a square or rectangular firepit built of natural marble or travertine composite materials would blend in more favorably and create a cool, contemporary ambiance. Finally, for a truly custom, one-of a-kind firepit design, consider concrete—a material that can be molded into any shape and exterior façade design imaginable. To create the perfect alfresco entertainment room and, if space and budget constraints will allow, consider the installation of a combination double-sided fireplace/


OPEN HOUSE

open-sided cabana structure. “We have designed and built several of these multi-functional fireplace-cabana structures in recent years, Luke Reynolds informs, “and they are an ideal way to bridge interior living into an open-air environment protected from the elements”. “Add a flat screen tv or an adjacent outdoor kitchen to the design scenario” Reynolds concludes, “and there will be little incentive for homeowners and guest alike to venture indoors”. The majority of fire features on LBI, and just about all of the units installed by Reynolds Landscaping, are powered by natural gas with a switching system that enables reliable, safe and convenient electric/ gas ignition and disconnect. As a result, their installation requires the services of both a licensed electrician and plumber along with corresponding permits approved by the Township. All units are equipped with stainless steel hardware and components for longevity and durability along with a stainless-steel cover for both safety and protection from the outside elements. The presence of small children or budget constraints need not put a permanent damper on plans for a firepit in the outdoor living area. Based upon the original design plan, gas and electric conduits for future utility lines can be incorporated under the hardscaping of a new patio installation making a future firepit installation relatively easy and hassle-free. “Proper planning and foresight along with a sound design concept”, Reynolds assures, “allow a project, including a firepit installation, to be installed in phases to accommodate not only the budget constraints of the homeowner but also the requirements of their growing family.” Despite initial hurdles, the ethereal and therapeutic qualities of a fire feature and their intangible ability to create relaxation, reflection and comfort quickly negate the initial administrative red tape surrounding their installation. Their ability to foster community and create an outdoor environment for congregating and entertaining, make the firepit and outdoor fireplace a highly valued and sought-after feature along the coastal towns of LBI. If you are considering the installation of a firepit or fireplace or to find out if a fire feature is viable on your property, contact Luke Reynolds of Reynolds Landscaping at 609-597-6099. Likewise, for more information on firepit styles and material selections, please visit the photo gallery of the Reynolds Landscaping website at www.reynoldslandscaping.com. Reynolds Landscaping and Garden Shop is located at 201 East Bay Avenue in Manahawkin, NJ.

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Small Space, High Style The Experts at Oskar Huber Share Their Top Tips for Decorating in Tight Quarters Written by Melanie Cavanagh

Whether you are a first-time homeowner, vacation property owner, or someone who is learning how to downsize, small space decorating often poses a rather large challenge. Luckily the design team at Oskar Huber, located in Ship Bottom, has experience implementing attractive interior design solutions for those living large in smaller homes on and around Long Beach Island. With four generations of expertise, they possess the ultimate intelligence in helping to make the most of the square-footage you have, and below share their advice with our readers:

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Select Appropriately Scaled Furniture Determining the right scale of furniture is the most important place to start when furnishing a smaller space. When you’re working with limited real estate, custom furniture can help you make the most of every square inch. Steer clear of oversized furniture which can overwhelm your room. Rather, opt for appropriately scaled furniture that fits your space and creates impact. An apartment sized sofa with tailored arms for example is space savvy without sacrificing comfort. As celebrity interior designer, Nate Berkus, cautions clients, the experts at Oskar Huber agree, “avoid filling a small room with several small pieces; it actually has the opposite effect of making the room feel even smaller.” Renowned designer Libby Langdon, who literally wrote the book on small space design, also agrees. Langdon is a self-reported “big fan of using one well-proportioned piece in lieu of cluttering someone’s home with a million small pieces

that aren’t as functional”. A simple, more streamlined approach will make the most of a small space.

Choose Multipurpose Furniture Choose furniture pieces with extra storage or functionality. Smartly designed furniture often features hidden storage options, such as under-bed drawers. In the living area, bring in a cocktail ottoman that’s equally suited for relaxation or serving casual fare. Small poufs provide additional pull-up seating when needed and tuck away neatly under an open console when not is use—or pair them fashionably in your seating arrangement without interrupting the room’s sight lines. Vintage inspired trunks make excellent cocktail tables or side tables while cleverly concealing extra blankets and throws. Add a stylish bar cart that can serve double duty as a side table. Select a console that can also be used as a desk or provide additional surface space when entertaining. bay-magazine.com 51


Draw the Eye Up

If your space is tight but has high ceilings, draw attention to this feature by creating a gallery wall of collected art and treasured photos. Don’t be afraid to take your arrangement high up the wall and close to the crown molding. Likewise, hang window curtains high to draw the eye upward. Stylist and New York Times Bestselling author Emily Henderson suggests a good ratio to hang the curtain rod is 2/3 the distance between the ceiling and window. Lifting the curtain rod lifts the eye; visually it makes your ceiling look higher and your space appear bigger. Another important piece of advice when hanging curtains is to extend panels on either side of the window frame if space allows so when the curtains are pushed open you can almost see the entire window. This will also bring more light into your space.

Go Big on Wall Decor

A small space can really benefit from a large scaled mirror or piece of art. Mirrors are a great way to visually expand a space. A large mirror reflects light and will bounce it around your room. Large scaled art will feel important and create an interesting focal point for the room.

Color Confidence

Most design experts agree that a monochromatic color scheme will make a space feel larger. For a light and airy approach try painting the walls and ceiling bright white—also consider whitewashed or lighter floors to remove visual boundaries. Paint doors and cabinets in a contrasting color for a chic and modern look. Reach for high-gloss blue or gray as it will add just the right amount of drama to your small space. If light colored walls aren’t your preference it’s also fine to use darker paint colors in a measured dose. Dark colors such as rich navy or charcoal, when done right, will recede and add depth to a space. Remember to layer walls with lighter colored accessories to create balance. Always be sure you have enough light to properly illuminate your space. This point brings us to Oskar Huber’s next important tip... 52 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2019


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Let There Be Light

Lighting is probably the most overlooked decorating element in a room, and this advice applies especially to small space interiors. Invest in beautiful lighting; a stunning chandelier, a sleek floor lamp, and a pair of elegant table lamps or wall sconces. Wall sconces are a great solution because they wash the wall with light and can also provide direct task lighting without taking up valuable table space. No one will notice your living area is small; they’ll be too focused on the lovely details and warm, inviting atmosphere.

Embrace a Well Edited Lifestyle

The art of organization applies to your home’s decor as well! Compact spaces require discipline, both in design and in everyday living. Regular editing and decluttering are a must. Use attractive baskets to control clutter. Try adding floor-to-ceiling bookshelves to sneak in stylish extra storage. Select home accents thoughtfully and with purpose. One of the benefits of small space living is the ability to make a strong impression with fewer, more meaningful items and showcase the accessories you love the most.

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Beyond the Build Celebrating 40 Years of Long Beach Island Custom Homebuilding …and So Much More Written by Lisa Simek

Through the excitement of building a new coastal home and all that goes along with it, it is not often that a homeowner looks too far beyond getting that final, prized “CO” (certificate of occupancy) from their homebuilder and moving forward with the

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dream of life at the beach. Until then, the focus involves getting everything and anything done to achieve that much anticipated end result— move-in day for the homeowner so they can finally enjoy their new home. For the custom homebuilder, the


on-time delivery of the perfect home is a rewarding time, as the process thus far has been meticulously planned and managed throughout—with the final product (and satisfied customer) in plain sight. But for Thomas J. Keller of Thomas J. Keller Building Contractor in Surf City and his client-centered team, the delivery of a beautiful custom home is rarely the end of the road. Relationships are established with homeowners at such an extraordinary level, that they often segue from customer to friend, sharing a mostly unspoken but quiet confidence that results in Thomas J. Keller and his team being there for clients even long after the build is completed.

Keller coastal homes have a reputation of being built to stand the test of time. They are constructed not only on a solid foundation of experience and technical expertise, but also with the goal of providing an outstanding customer experience during every phase of the home-building process. Clients are involved throughout the entire planning, selection and building stages, as communication is unwavering and homeowners are guided through the progression from the very beginning—with honest and open conversation, every question answered and every concern addressed. “How we listen to and respond to the people around us reflects on who we are as individuals and as a company.

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It is one of several things that sets us apart,” shares Thomas J. Keller, founder of the company, regarding the manner in which his firm is programmed to conduct business. Leading by example, the owner’s own modus operandi involves a commitment to the homeowner’s best interests first and foremost,

always delivering on what they say they will, and always recognizing and appreciating his team – to whom he extends a simple thank you at the end of each work day. The company has also demonstrated their commitment to clients beyond the build by consistently providing each customer with the strongest and

58 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2019

most stable, insured, written warranty available. The firm was recently awarded Residential Warranty Company’s (RWC) prestigious Award of Distinction, an industry symbol of building excellence given as a result of exemplary building practices and superior customer satisfaction. The award takes into consideration claims experience, number of homes warranted, longevity as a member and the members’ strength and stability. Receiving this stamp of approval by one of the nation’s top warranty firms is a rare honor bestowed upon an elite group of builders. “We’ve never filed a single claim to date or even had one questioned. If an issue crops up for one reason or another, clients shouldn’t have to worry whether or not it will be handled. We’ll deal with it promptly and efficiently,” shares Tom, noting the diligence it takes as a builder to ensure each home is built to perfection. He goes on to add, “We’re thrilled to be the recipient of RWC’s Award of Distinction. The award provides strong independent validation that we continue to meet our underlying mission to provide our clients with the highest levels of service, integrity, technical competence and financial stewardship.” RWC does not have an open-door policy when it comes to its Builder Membership and not every builder is able to maintain a membership with the company. Keller’s company has willingly submitted to the scrutiny inherent of the RWC screening process each and every year for the last 25 years, and has met or surpassed the stringent inspection requirements from providing company and personal financial statements to prove financial stability, to exceptional and ethical customer service, to technical competence and quality workmanship. “Thomas J. Keller Building Contractor has been a major force in the housing industry. Since becoming an RWC member in 1993, Thomas J. Keller Building Contractor has warranted over 372 homes and is part of a unique group to have the Award of Distinction bestowed upon them,” shared a representative of RWC. They go on to say that Thomas J. Keller Building Contractor has maintained an exceptional customer satisfaction track record with a commitment to exemplary building practices. For Keller and his team, his approach throughout the entire process of building a home is reinforced with the receipt of this honor. To them, the end of the build is technically, but not necessarily, the end of the client relationship. One of their greatest


satisfactions is to have people stay in touch and see families enjoying their home after many years. In fact, it has been former clients who have discussed amongst themselves, “Once you build with Keller, you will always be a part of the Keller Family of Homes.” A client from Harvey Cedars, who had recently moved into the second home he built with the company, shared this very notion while in conversation with some newly met acquaintances. He mentioned to them he had a ‘Keller home’ and was delighted to learn they did as well. He cheerfully expressed his pleasure to be part of the unofficial club and what it meant to him. Although Tom has never organized a club of sort by any means, the sense that clients feel a part of something congenial is the sort of expression that means the world to Tom. He shares, “We’ve worked hard over the years at running a business focused on our clients; relationships are at the heart of our process. I’m glad the admiration, respect and appreciation is mutual.” In fact, if one glances at a few of the hundreds of letters and notes clients have sent over the years, you will easily observe that many are thankful for their newly built home and experience working with the team, and numerous ones are actually thanking him for things done many years after the build was completed. As one customer put it, “we always felt like Thomas J. Keller Building Contractor had our best interest in mind.” Below are a few snippets of the notes sent over by clients they have built for over the years: “Wow, wow and wow!! I think it has been 8 years since you built this home for us...and you are still helping us today. I can’t begin to express our gratitude. Thanks!” -Josanne, Holgate “Our gorgeous Keller home has survived the earthquake of 2011 and Sandy 2012 - in other words, a major event for every year we’ve had it. You have treated us more like friends and better than family. A Keller Home is built to last!” -Patti & Dan, High Bar Harbor “This letter is in appreciation for the home you built for us in 2012 and the exceptional experience you and your team provided to us in the process. Your team held the highest respect for our budget, likes, dislikes and yet... they knew how to guide us when we had doubts or when there was a better choice available to us. Your office kept us informed during the process and always looked out

for our best interest. They remained readily available to address and solve any unexpected issue, before, during and after construction. We thank you and praise the people that make up your organization for their industry knowledge, integrity and for the manner in which they handle customer care.” -Hap & Barbara, Surf City “We want you to know that the attention to our flooding problem was so appreciated. Help came right at our lowest point. It felt like the cavalry had arrived. That kind of service is not easily found these days. The Bible says “A good name is to be chosen above riches.” You certainly live up to a good name and reputation. You’re the best!” -Linda & Frank, Barnegat Light Thomas J. Keller Building Contractor’s clientele throughout the years has without a doubt been enjoying the beautiful homes of their dreams. Tom and his team feel fortunate to be on the delivering end of that dream-making reality, and continue to be a company that stands by their product, offering the added value of peace of mind long after receiving that certificate of occupancy— even beyond the build. -About Thomas J. Keller Thomas J. Keller specializes in custom building coastal homes on Long Beach Island in Southern Ocean County along the New Jersey Shore and has long been recognized as one of the island’s most well-respected and leading builders. As a native of LBI, Tom founded the company in 1979, and has utilized his vast knowledge and hands-on experience in every aspect of the construction and homebuilding field necessary for building quality homes in a coastal environment and in dealing with the unique challenges inherent with building on a barrier island. For more information visit http:// www.thomasjkeller.com or call 609.494.2215. About Residential Warranty Company For over 35 years, Residential Warranty Company, one of the nation’s oldest and largest providers of written insured new home warranties, has provided homeowners with a strong foundation of security for their home. More than 3 million homes have been warranted since RWC began in 1981. RWC’s insurer, Western Pacific Mutual Insurance Company, A Risk Retention Group, has been rated “A-(Excellent)” by A.M. Best continuously since 2001. bay-magazine.com 59


Celebrating 40 Years

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&

DO WHAT YOU LOVE LOVE WHAT YOU DO Written by Lisa Simek

“I am among the luckiest people in the world. Whether it was being involved with advertising originally, or the interior design field after that, I have enjoyed what I have been doing for more than 50 years, and not everyone can say that.” -Thom Sweeney, Founder and Owner of Thom Sweeney Interiors

Thom Sweeney, ASID, at his one of his most recent projects, Hotel LBI.

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When it comes to interior design, everyone who’s anyone knows that there’s only a few folks to call on Long Beach Island—and Thom Sweeney is one of them. For decades the in demand interior designer, artist, and trendsetter has been the go-to for clients looking to take their décor to the next level. Sweeney has curated interiors for posh venues including Bonnet Island Estate, Mallard Island Yacht Club, The Ashford Estate and more recently Hotel LBI, and is known for his stunning work within many of the private homes on the island (many of which have exclusively graced the pages of Bay Magazine). But there is more to this man than an eye for detail and a keen sense of style. Thom Sweeney’s life story is not unlike a remarkable movie: Thom was poised to join his father in the family business in the cigar industry when he graduated from Villanova. However, as fate would have it, in the spring of Senior year, when companies were interviewing on campus, a friend called and asked Thom for a favor. He said that he had an interview set up with an advertising firm, but, since he had already accepted another job, if Thom would be willing to take his place at the interview? Thom agreed. The interview went well…so did the second, and Thom ended up with a Management Trainee position. Hello advertising, goodbye cigars! “As the Creative Director of the advertising agency and being involved with graphic design on a day to day basis, I was working with the same basic elements involved in interior design as well. So, the transition was an easy one for me,” shares Sweeney. Combining this knowledge and passion for color, color combinations, layout, composition and scale, when he and his wife were allowed to bid on a couple of their advertising clients’ projects within the interior design realm— and were wildly successful— it was clear the direction he was meant to head in—and his first interior design company was born. “My wife, Helen, was my partner in our original company that was set up to do the first model home for a builder client. She loved to shop, and I always joked about how it was great to be able to have her

work with me and shop with other people’s money,” chuckles Thom about starting the firm with his wife, who worked with him for a few years before retiring. Since his first company’s inception, Sweeney was accepted as a professional member of the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID). “I still remember how nervous I was going into that meeting where my work, experience and depth of knowledge was to be evaluated by two design professionals on the Admissions Committee. I consider my membership a validation and I think my clients do too,” shares Sweeney of the accomplishment. After hundreds of model homes and design projects, Sweeney has earned his share of titles and accolades throughout the years, including countless MAME awards from the Home Builders Organization. While a good portion of Thom’s business comes from Southern Ocean County, he always seems to be on the road, handling clients’ projects elsewhere. The firm is currently working with clients from Southington, Connecticut to Vero Beach, Florida. “There is a big diversity between our residential and contract clients, and frankly, that’s what keeps it exciting,” he shares. Sweeney’s present-day company, Thom Sweeney Interiors, can go from working on multi-million-dollar homes one day to working on a mid-rise for homeless veterans the next—and helping clients from 55+ communities do new window treatments in between all of that. But despite the varying projects he has worked on, what are his favorite types of projects? “Growing up doing model homes, I had to think outside my own box and work in very diverse styles, depending upon the demographics of the community. Helen and I have always collected antiques and folk art, so I would have to say that anything that can accommodate that is preferable. But that doesn’t limit it to simply traditional. Nothing makes my heart beat faster than a contemporary design with some fabulous old piece of salvage, or folk art injected into a contemporary space - with just the right lighting to highlight it. That’s when the magic happens. It’s the unexpected. Being able to pull together things

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Photos by John Martinelli

that the average person wouldn’t have the courage to do, and have them come off in a uniquely wonderful way,” he reveals enthusiastically. Recognizing that interior designers are often sought after for their color sense, he adds, “It’s not that we are known for a riotous color sense, but rather the ability to combine colors for a greater effect. I am not a “matchy-matchy” person [and I don’t know many designers who are]. I believe, for example that you can have several shades of blue in a room, not just one. It creates an energy that you simply cannot get from one unrelenting color. I learned a tremendous amount about color from a seminar I once attended at the Wagner Color Institute in San Diego, California. Texture is an underused element that I like to see in all of my designs,” he adds.

accessories to complete the look of the room. But the differentiating factor is his access to industry pieces that the average homeowner wouldn’t have access to on his or her own. “We carry a vast array of unique accessories that are not sold to individuals, nor available online. For example, when you see items in magazines that are listed as “To the trade only,” that means that they are only sold through designers or retail stores,” he explains. He goes on to share that the firm has many clients who have taken pictures of walls that have “stumped them” to complete, and emailed them to his design team. The process is as simple as that, and then his team sends back the photo to which they have added just the perfect print, sculpture or what have you, with the cost. It can’t get much easier than that. 

In addition to a well-honed eye for color and light applications, what clients seem to resonate with is Thom’s ability to steer them towards an instant finish line of their home interiors. “Clients come to us and complain that they ‘can’t seem to get their home to the finish line’,” he says. Admittedly, it’s a lot easier to pick out the major pieces for a room than it is to find just the right

For clients that wish to come into the design center for planning or browsing, Sweeney and his team have designed their 3,000-square-foot space to fit these needs perfectly. In addition to carving out offices, Thom Sweeney Interiors has a showroom in which they have furniture and accessories for sale. The highlight of the room, however, is a Century sofa that is made up of all

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different depth seats, various types of cushioning, and different styles of arms, feet and stitching. This custom piece is ideal in that a client can come in, sit down and pick the most comfortable combination of elements of a sofa that will fit them perfectly. Genius, isn’t it? Recently, Thom’s innovative thinking resonated well with Joe Mancini, a custom home builder and realtor on LBI. Thom calls it “Picture This,” and the idea is to be able to show prospective homebuyers what a home could look like furnished—without actually having to furnish it. “When you’re building enormous, six-million-dollar oceanfront spec homes, it’s a very economical tool,” Sweeney begins to describe. “It consists of a presentation board on an easel showing all the furniture, accessories and finishes of the room, a draped table with a small easel showing a perspective sketch of the room, and finally a scale drawing of the room THOM SWEENEY, showing the layout of the furniture,” he shares. This ASID little model presentation is able to convey the style of the room, instead of leaving to the imagination the prospect of how the bare room could look. “Most people do not have a sense of scale, so they generally have no idea how many pieces of furniture the room can accommodate. This answers that question,” he adds, “It also shows how we, as designers, see the space and give us an unbridled approach to it.” And as one might imagine, there isn’t a designer alive who wouldn’t jump at the chance to design a six-million-dollar oceanfront on Long Beach Island.

We’re Very Proud

So how does one know whether a designer like Thom Sweeney is the right choice for them? “Although I was originally a Psychology major at Villanova, which didn’t prepare me much for picking out furniture, I sure did learn a lot about my approach with clients,” Thom says. “It’s an important factor to have the ability to meet a client, listen to their vision, interpret it and come back with a plan that looks more like “them” than “me,” he states. If a client is confident and comfortable enough with where the designer is going with the creative vision and roll with it, that makes for the most fun and exciting—and not to mention, beautiful—projects.

...to have been involved with the Interior Design of our client’s fabulous Brant Beach home featured in this issue of Bay Magazine.

Dazzling refinement, timeless elegance, and playful warmth with an impeccable attention to luxury details remain the key words when it comes to creating universes for Thom Sweeney’s clientele, whether they be from private residences, hospitality design or commercial properties. His creations can inspire and transport anyone lucky enough to experience them, and his imprint is forever embedded within the culture of Long Beach Island.

THOM SWEENEY INTERIORS

...as well as the sensational new, iconic Hotel LBI

OUR WORK SPEAKS FOR ITSELF Call us for a no obligation assessment of your project

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Heavenly

Holiday Home Written by Lisa Simek

Photos by John Martinelli

Long Beach Island is a unique destination with a personality of its own. Extending from Barnegat Light to Holgate, this 18-mile stretch of barrier island spans only half a mile at its widest point— allowing one to physically stand in the bay and simultaneously maintain a view of the Atlantic Ocean. From the posh Loveladies, to the old-world charm of Beach Haven, it’s no wonder that a variety of vacationers from around the world flock to the beachy locales that reflect their own tastes and preferences. As one of the East Coast’s prime locations for summer homes, taking a look inside one of these dreamy spaces—owned by a couple whose entrepreneurial husband grew up summering on LBI as a boy—you’ll soon understand how this island, heralded as having an “authentic romantic charm” by the New York Times, maintains its impressive reputation. Get ready for some serious beach house envy.

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One of the most noticeable aspects of this Brant Beach, bay-front home’s façade is the modern traditionalism that starchitects like Robert A.M. Stern use to describe similar Hamptons-style residential designs. Combining formality and tradition with modernism and the new classical style, this home draws on the vernacular context and local traditions of Long Beach Island with its Victorian columns, traditional turret and hip and valley roofing. Rough, thickly cut cedar shakes and bold moldings enliven the simple forms of the house, in contrast with the taut, machine-cut shingles and planar trim of the more picturesque forms of the Shingle Style. 

throughout the house. “My direction for the couple was very uncomplicated. They wanted a blue-andwhite house, not too beachy, with accents of their Irish heritage thrown in,” says the interior designer Thom Sweeney. “The large built-in we designed for the Great Room gave us the perfect opportunity to place some of their pieces of Beleek china and other mementos of their many trips to Ireland,” he notes. “We were able to find the perfect place for the wife’s Irish great-grandmother’s treasured antique Blue and White meat platter over the Delph tiled fireplace in the den, just off the Great Room,” he adds. It was a wedding gift given to them when they were married in Dublin.

Once passing through the welcoming grand entrance of this villa, one is immediately overcome with a sense of refined simplicity only found in European holiday homes, perhaps in the style of a Caribbean commonwealth—a little bit of island with touches of regal tradition throughout. The aesthetic is very untraditional when comparing it to the average beach home on LBI. One can’t help but be drawn towards the coastal homage of the homeowners’ Irish heritage which is abound

The Great Room is a space that was designed to gracefully accommodate large groups when the homeowners entertain family and friends. Sweeney and his team divided it into several seating groups, varying the colors through pillows and upholstery to keep it fresh and not so monochromatic. Other times it is used by the kids who always have a jigsaw puzzle in various stages of completion on the very large cocktail table. Nothing is sacred in this home if it allows the children to have fun together.

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The kitchen, generally regarded as the heart of a home, and notably where guests always seem to always gravitate, is spacious, open to the Great Room and can accommodate several people at the bar in addition to seating for 10 in the adjoining breakfast room. The breakfast room’s conversation piece is surely the 100-year-old wooden ceiling beams, which happen to add substance and integrity to the space. The placement of a crystal chandelier also adds a touch of luxury to the kitchen, since it is so open to the more formal Great Room. It was important to design a visual connection between each of these rooms yet maintain their individual architectural distinction— reducing crowding and better allowing people to mingle across all of the spaces comfortably. The den is a room where the designer maintained the blue and white theme by means of a custom Thibaut wallcovering, softening up the look by adding matching fabric at the windows. “The caramel color we used was the foil

to the blue and white and it was the warming agent needed for that cozy, den vibe,” shares the designer of his selection. “In the Master Bedroom, we designed a builtin complete with sconces to highlight the bed and to create a focal point for the room,” shares Sweeney. There is an adjacent study where the ‘round-the-clock homeowner is able to stay close to his work. The bedroom also boasts a wonderful porch which overlooks the pool and cabana, the bay and beyond. The girls’ room, which has a mermaid theme, has custom built-in bunks and upholstered chairs in the center of the room which turn into single beds for overnight guests. As one can imagine, having six kids and a house at the shore, the homeowners are always hosting a ton of overnight guests. Their son also has three sets of bunk beds in a room with a corrugated tin ceiling—giving it that Surfer vibe.

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The in-law’s suite, complete with two bedrooms, living area and a requisite elevator, has been transformed into space that will now accommodate the “college crowd” overnight guests. It is currently being redone from totally navy and bright green traditional floral and stripes style with swags and jabots, to a more pared-down, trendy space complete with (you guessed it) more bunk beds and groovy, ultra-contemporary dining chairs made out of seat belt material—functional style that is also practical for the new guest residents. The beauty of building a home on LBI is that you can make it what you want. The quiet towns that swell up in summer months are also filled with elegant art galleries and family-friendly activities, farmer’s markets and restaurants. But perhaps the most notable aspect of this luxe destination is its real estate: a veritable treasure trove of compounds and cottages, crafted by unique and original owners with a beautiful family story to share. 76 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2019


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OPEN HOUSE

A Bigger Summer Garden Written by Peg Reynolds

It’s true! Planting perennials in the fall is an easy way to enjoy a bigger, more beautiful garden the following year. While most gardeners are accustomed to planting in the spring, Peg Reynolds of Reynolds Landscaping and Floral Market on Bay Avenue in Manahawkin shares that, “the fall is a great time to get your perennials and shrubs in the ground and give those roots time to become established.”

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Fall weather is easier on the plants and on us. Spring planting can be a little challenging on tender young plants. The weather can be cold with an occasional freeze, and then can escalate quickly into hot summer temperatures. The weather conditions in fall are generally more consistent, and this allows the plants to grow stronger. The soil is warmer and the early season bloomers have a chance to build stronger root systems. These will become vigorous growers come spring. The garden tells you a lot in the fall about what plants need to be moved or divided. It’s a good time to divide and transplant Peonies, Hosta and Iris. Makes notes on the successes and failures in the garden such as which annuals worked and which didn’t take to the heat of summer too well. Cleaning up and putting the garden to bed is essential. Rake up any fallen leaves to help prevent disease, and disinfect garden tools, discarding garden products that are past their shelf life. Read up on particular varieties of plants for the best time to cut back and prune. Tropical plants can be brought into the garage if it stays above freezing for

the winter, but hold off the temptation to put them out too early in the spring! Take the opportunity to improve your soil in the fall by adding a layer of compost. Mulch the base of newly plated shrubs and perennials to help them overwinter. Always water newly planted perennials well. Fall showers are usually plentiful, but water plants if it doesn’t rain at least an inch per week. We don’t recommend fertilizing in the fall for newly planted shrubs or perennials. Fertilizer promotes new, tender growth that can be nipped by winter weather. Be sure to plant at least 6 weeks before the first frost. Fall is also the time to get your bulbs in for spring. Plant Daffodils, hyacinth, allium, tulips, iris and fritillaria. Cool-Season Vegetables should be planted in August to give them time to grow, although lettuce, spinach and other greens with a short maturity time can be planted later. Plant flowering trees and shrubs for a beautiful spring surprise to your garden. Check your garden center for the right varieties your area. Above all, enjoy this beautiful color changing time of year.

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HEALTHY LIVING

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Beauty Buzz Written by Lisa Simek

After a long summer season of activites and in the sun, it’s safe to assume that our skin can use a little R&R this fall. But how does one discern the winning products from the duds? Below you will find the hottest industry products coveted by the stars that will not only help repair your skin, but bring it back to tip top shape in no time: Active Lifestyle Must Have:

Active Repair Spray $24.99, Faria’s Ship Bottom You know that first aid kit stashed in the back of your medicine cabinet, the one that takes up a ton of space in your travel suitcase? Well kiss it goodbye, as the founders of BLDG Active’s flagship product, ACTIVE Skin Repair’s regenerative technology kills 99.9 percent of bacteria without harsh chemicals or antibiotics by speeding up the body’s natural recovery process with a molecule called HOCI, which is a naturally occurring molecule that is produced by our bodies’ white blood cells as a way to promote healing. The re-creation of this molecule results in a clinically proven regenerative technology that helps support the body’s natural healing process. One three-ounce bottle can be used to kill bacteria, reduce inflammation and treat scrapes, cuts, rashes, sunburn, bug bites and an array of skin irritations— even eczema. Active Skin Repair is now in the hands of hundreds of professional athletes across a range of sports including Gerry Lopez, Taylor Steele, Damien Hobgood, on tour with professional medical teams like the World Surf League, and used by navy seals and thousands of other customers. Bonus: there is a kid’s version too!

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Beauty Splurge:

24K Pure Gold Mask Get it for Less

Earth Therapeutics Radiant Rejuvenating Honey Gold Mask, $4.99 Harnessing the power of this ingredient, Earth Therapeutics has created a product to afford you such properties – their NEW Radiant Rejuvenating Honey Gold Mask Infused with a natural therapeutic gold extract and honey serum, this facial sheet mask works to stimulate cell renewal, restore the skin and lock in moisture. Together they target the signs of aging, leaving you with a healthy, soft and youthful radiance.

$349.00 , Barney’s New York It’s unquestionable that the glow of a runway-ready Victoria’s Secret model is a covetable one. As the purveyor of the gold and silver sheet masks you’ve seen all over your Instagram feed, the Israeli aesthetician Mimi Luzon has a slew of runway model devotees including Alessandra Ambrosia and Irina Shayk. While the use of gold has become increasingly popular, its benefits to the skin have been known since ancient times. Cleopatra herself was known to use gold to give her skin a healthy, radiant appearance. The 24-K Pure Gold Mask can be used as a one-time glamour treatment or as an ongoing treatment for healthier looking skin. The unique combination of a corrective anti-wrinkle mask with a gold leaf provides the skin with an immediate sense of wellbeing, treating redness and fine lines while evening the skin’s tone and promoting a healthy glow. It helps renew cells within the basal layer, improves skin elasticity and slows the natural decline of collagen production to stimulate youthful cells. bay-magazine.com 99


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THIS AIN’T YOUR MAMA’S

SPIN CLASS Written by Lisa Simek

Photos by Michael John Murphy

Can you believe that it’s been almost 40 years since Johnny G invented Spinning® in the 1980’s? The hair, the music, the legwarmers—and spin classes! —were big trends of the decade, the latter of whose popularity has been stronger than ever. On the heels of the demand for a new-age spin class, Black Sheep Studios (nestled in the old Sink R Swim location at 11101 Long Beach Blvd in Haven Beach) nails it once again, with a cult-like following, offering the most exciting, heart-pounding, sweat-drenching workout of your life with Cycology. Get ready to learn more, because this ain’t your mama’s spin class.

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DEVON TAYLOR KARVAN

KACIE FIDLER

“We can guarantee that you haven’t taken a spin class like this before,” shares Devon Karvan, founder of Black Sheep. “I can tell you I used to run a lot, but when it started bothering my knees, the solution was spinning because it’s so low impact without sacrificing any of the intensity,” continues the fitness studio owner, who acknowledges the ability to work hard on a spin bike without hurting your joints— helping you focus on results instead of the fear of potential injuries. The dancer-turned-skateboarder/surfer-turned-fitness instructor now adds successful entrepreneur to her résumé. Having opened her first studio with four spin bikes in a tiny sublet space in 2016, she would have never imagined that her fourth year in business would already include employing almost two dozen instructors and having classes sell-out daily. One of the most important factors that sets her studio’s Cycology class apart from an average spin class is that Black Sheep is equipped with stateof-the-art RealRyder® indoor cycles. At first, they may look like your run-of-the-mill indoor stationary spin bikes, but RealRyder’s greatest distinction is that it enables riders to actually tilt, lean and rock the bike—resulting in a workout that not only targets your hamstrings and glutes but your quads, entire midsection, triceps, shoulders and

ANGELA BERNABEO

JENNIFER ERRICKSON

back as well. Riding a RealRyder bike requires balance, coordination and nonstop core engagement, and pedaling out of the saddle (a.k.a. standing) on a RealRyder requires full-body integrated movement to balance and control the movement of the bike. The cycle’s pivot points allow the RealRyder to rock back and forth, lean and turn like a real bike, and the actual bike geometry adds to the real cycling feel. “We tell new people to come in early so we can fit them on their bikes,” shares Angela Bernabeo, a certified personal trainer and one of the instructors of the wildly popular Cycology classes. “This will benefit them two-fold, as first it will allow them to be positioned properly on the bike, and secondly, it will make their experience more focused on the ‘ryde’ with less stressing about the technicalities,” she adds. Bernabeo shares that instructors prefer newcomers “ryde” within their capability until they get a few “rydes” in and become a bit more comfortable with the bikes. After that point, they push class takers to challenge themselves and their perceived abilities, ultimately resulting in an addictive sense of accomplishment after they’ve experienced how far they can truly push themselves beyond their preconceived limits.

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Kacie Fidler, another CPT and instructor of the class, dishes about the atmosphere of the acclaimed classes,

“all of Black Sheep’s classes are unique, exciting and challenging in their own right, but there’s just something about our cycling classes—the music, the dark room, the black lights, the excited [screaming]instructors— it’s exhilarating. It’s as much of an experience as it is an awesome workout,” she notes while describing the studio as a dark, yet energizing oasis that many students describe as invigorating.

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Jennifer Errickson, also a CPT and one of the studios spin instructors, elaborates on the addictive allure of the spinning phenomena. “I love to spin because it burns off the crazy and creates an intense vibe and connection with the music and spinners... it pumps you up, motivates and affects you emotionally, physically and mentally, allowing you to lose yourself and release so much pent up energy, frustration, and whatever else you’re feeling— leaving all the BS behind. There’s something about riding with a large energetic group in a black lit room with crazy tunes blaring; you can’t help but let out your inner baaa’d ass… spin totally inspires and motivates you to push yourself to the limits—it’s YOU vs. YOU!” she shares. Errickson goes on to say that upon taking the class, clients should expect to feel challenged; they will be pushed beyond the boundaries of their comfort zone, their limits and beyond. Overcoming mental plateaus is an added bonus to the physical workout as clients often realize they have so much potential and can do one more climb, can actually hang on for one more minute, and are able to get completely through the intensely butt-kicking class. In the end, Errickson shares, “They feel energized, excited, exerted—but happy! It is a positive experience that leaves clients feeling incredibly motivated, inspired, and on cloud nine— and wanting to come back for more.” She notes that students often feel as if they’re

getting closer to their fitness goals, and feel freer with a balanced mind, body, and soul. “As their instructor, I want them to have fun, but know they worked out; I want them to burn off all of the bottled-up emotions, find and unleash their inner baaa’dass!” Key benefits of taking the Cycology include increased core strength and stability, challenge balance and recruit more muscles during leaning and steering to burn approximately 150 more calories compared to a conventional stationary bike. Devon Karvan confirms that an average of 850 calories are burned for every hour of spin class. Swoon. “The class and these cycles are designed as functional bikes to increase core strength and stability, to challenge balance coordination, to correct muscle imbalances and joint mobility. And the icing on the cake (also so we can eat the cake) is that you can burn up to 20% more calories than that of other bikes out there,” notes Angela. “Aside from the obvious cardiovascular, endurance and strength benefits, the benefits go way beyond just physical… pushing yourself to finish a climb or a sprint and finding out that you actually can do it... it’s almost like a natural high,” adds Kacie. So, if you would like to escape to Black Sheep’s black lit room and pedal to the beat of their handpicked music selection, give their popular spin class a try. As the class description promises, “The bike doesn’t leave the ground, but our instructors will take you for a ride.”

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WE RESTORE HEALTHY SPINE FUNCTION AND ENHANCE QUALITY OF LIFE Non-surgical treatment of Spinal Stenosis Herniated Discs of the Cervical or Lumbar Spine Degenerative Disc Disease Neck pain with or without arm pain Sciatica

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BLACK SHEEP bay-magazine.com 107


HEALTHY LIVING

Not Just a Cosmetic Issue I suffered with varicose veins almost my entire life and thought that it was a cosmetic issue that wasn’t serious,” said Mary Jo Martin of Beach Haven. “I am so glad that I found a solution that gave me relief from pain, plus, I look and feel so much better.”

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Mary Jo Martin has had “bad legs” for as long as she remembers, which she attributes to playing sports when she was younger and being on her feet all day. However, she didn’t quite think of seeking treatment yet as the issues were mostly cosmetic. Eventually Mary Jo noticed that her legs were swelling and, on top of that, she was experiencing severe pain. She had the telltale signs of vein disease for years before doing anything about it. TAKING ACTION AGAINST VARICOSE VEINS Mary Jo continued to suffer in silence for many years before making an appointment with vascular surgeon Jeffrey C. Hager, D.O., FACOS, at the Vascular Surgery Center at Hackensack Meridian Health Southern Ocean Medical Center. “Leg veins have to work against gravity to return blood to your heart for the body to experience optimal circulation, explains Dr. Hager. “If vein valves are weak or damaged, it can cause blood to flow backward and pool in the vein. This can lead the veins to stretch or twist, resulting in varicose veins, which can cause the leg to swell and cause severe skin damage. If left untreated, venous disease can advance to ulceration.” After listening to Mary Jo’s medical history, Dr. Hager suggested that they take a conservative approach and try compression stockings and some other corrective treatments before performing an invasive procedure. A detailed ultrasound was performed to identify the cause of her venous disease. Her symptoms failed to improve with conservative treatment. Due to her edema (leg swelling), pain and discoloration in her legs, Dr. Hager decided Mary Jo was a good candidate for venous radiofrequency ablation of each leg. “We use radiofrequency to heat and irritate the inside of the vein, causing it to scar and, close off,” said Dr. Hager. “This redirects blood flow to other healthy veins in order to treat painful leg symptoms and even improve the leg swelling.” With this method there is less pain and an easier recovery compared to the surgical treatment of varicose veins. LIVING PAIN FREE After Mary Jo had this procedure completed on her left leg, she noticed a difference in her pain levels almost immediately. She noted minimal discomfort after the procedure, which subsided very quickly, and she even returned to work on Monday after having the procedure the previous Thursday. Since then Mary Jo has returned to Dr. Hager’s office to have the same procedure on her other leg and have some of her larger varicose veins removed.

As Mary Jo’s leg swelling completely resolved, she no longer had leg discomfort and had significant improvement in her health. If left untreated Mary Jo would have eventually developed darkening and thickening of her skin and ultimately ulceration in her lower legs. “Dr. Hager and his team were incredible and while I was nervous at first to have the procedure done, they explained every step to me in order to keep me calm and comfortable,” Mary Jo said. She had her last follow up appointment with Dr. Hager in June and is extremely pleased with the high-quality care she received throughout the process. She is now living day to day, pain free and can fully enjoy doing her favorite activities like boating and fishing. “I encourage other women to seek treatment because many times the issue is not just cosmetic like I thought,” said Mary Jo. The Vascular Surgery Center at Southern Ocean Medical Center is located at 37 Nautilus Drive in Manahawkin. Dr. Hager and Arthur DeMarsico, D.O., FACOS, RPVI, provide each patient with a comprehensive evaluation and treatment plan for vascular conditions, including Arterial, Endovascular and Venous. To schedule an appointment or consultation, call 609-978-0778. With more than one million cardiac catheterizations occurring annually in the U.S., having cutting-edge equipment is essential to patient outcomes. Southern Ocean Medical Center recently received a gift of $1 million from Michael Armellino to be used to expand the Cardiac Catheterization/Interventional Radiology Lab. The upgrades to the cardiac catheterization lab will enable more patients to receive care using the finest diagnostic tools. VARICOSE VEINS CAN AFFECT HEALTH Here are some of the secondary issues that can arise because of having varicose veins. BLOOD CLOTS. When veins deep within the legs become enlarged, it can cause pain and swelling in the leg. This can indicate a blood clot, or thrombophlebitis, is present. People who develop a blood clot in a varicose vein can also experience clots in deeper veins, which is known as deep vein thrombosis (DVT). DVT is a more serious condition that potentially leads to the life-threatening condition known as pulmonary embolism. ULCERS. Ulcers can develop on the skin near varicose veins—especially you’re your ankles. If you notice a discolored spot on the skin, it can indicate that an ulcer is going to start. These can be very painful. SKIN INFECTIONS. The expansion of veins can also lead to skin infections, which can impair your immune system overall. BLEEDING. Varicose veins that are extremely close to the skin can burst. While the bleeding may only be minor, it can require medical attention and be a source for potential infection. Source: Mayo Clinic

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FEATURE

Happy Birthday, Ol’ Barney! Written by Lisa Simek

Photo by Michael Spark

Nestled on the northern most end of Long Beach Island, adjacent to what is now some of the last of New Jersey’s historical maritime forestry, there is a beacon of light that has deep meaning beyond any ordinary lighthouse. Celebrating its 160th year in existence, the Barnegat Lighthouse, or Ol’ Barney as it is affectionately referred to by locals, is a symbol of times gone by, built on generations of family legacies and representing much of the robust history this island has to offer. We explore some of the nostalgia that our island natives share with us about a whole other time period— an era when the Barnegat Lighthouse was one of the most crucial navigational aids of the east coast— not only safely guiding boats from Europe sailing west along the popular parallel 40° north course (which was the latitude followed by ships sailing to America), but it was particularly known as a significant “change of course point” for these boats, who would identify the light as the Barnegat Lighthouse and therefore would know to turn north towards New York Harbor. Moreover, it prevented countless deadly shipwrecks in the treacherous waters of the Barnegat Inlet and the Atlantic Ocean over the years.

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Department of Environmental Protection

Helen and Alma Thompson

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Back in 1834, when talk of the necessity of a leading light was spurring, a 40-foot subpar lighthouse structure was built about 300 feet away from the waters of the Barnegat inlet as an attempt to navigate seafarers around the area’s most dangerous currents, hidden rocks and shoals. After a record number of tragic shipwrecks even after this $6,000 lighthouse was built, it wasn’t long before the building’s non-flashing, (low-grade) fifth-class light was considered gravely inadequate. The government commissioned Lieutenant George G. Meade, a United States Army Corps engineer (and later, a Union General hero during the Civil War Battle of Gettysburg), to design and build a new-and-improved lighthouse beginning in 1857 through 1858. The official Barnegat Lighthouse that still stands to this day was first lit on January 1, 1859. It cost $60,000 and

required about 675,000 bricks to build. The new, élite first-order lens, designed by Augustine Fresnel and built in France by Henri LePaute, was 6 feet wide and 12 feet tall. It weighed five tons and was made up of 1,024 glass prisms which would help ensure the new light visible to sailors as far as a whopping 19 miles out to sea (more than double the distance of the last lighthouse). And since every lighthouse of the day had its own distinguishable light signal that helped sailors decipher which lighthouse and inlet or port they were approaching at night, and the Barnegat Lighthouse’s unique flash pattern was deemed one flash every 10 seconds. During the day lighthouses were identified by their daymarks, which were distinct patterns or colors that gave each one it’s unique qualities. Old Barney’s daymark was to be a red top half with a white bottom.


For anyone that has ever taken in the stunning aerial views from atop of Ol’ Barney, the first-hand experience of climbing 217 steps in a lighthouse that sits 172 feet above sea level yields the realization that this is no easy feat. One may imagine how difficult it must have been for a lightkeeper and his family to make the trek multiple times a day, while hauling gallons of lamp oil. “That was a part of the everyday shift work and the kids would all pitch in—my mother and her four siblings would take turns walking oil up to the top where the lamp was,” shares Dennis Flynn, Long Beach Island native whose Grandfather, Frank L. Thompson, was one of the last lighthouse keeper assistants Barnegat Light had seen by the end of his term in 1920. (Dennis owns the Haven Beach Motel with his brother Bill, which, interestingly enough, was built in 1959 by their father, who is accredited with having named and

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developed most of present-day Haven Beach.) Since there were always three keepers employed at a time, night watches were usually divided into three equal shifts—and, from sun down to sun up, it was each keeper’s job to ensure that light remained lit all night long while simultaneously keeping a close watch over the horizon. Overnight responsibilities included hauling oil buckets up the staircase to ensure it never ran out of fuel and winding the clockwork mechanism responsible for turning the lens every hour (and if that fine piece of machinery malfunctioned, which it often did, you can bet they had to hand crank that five-ton lens manually). Other factors in keeping it well-lit included trimming the lantern wicks and cleaning the lenses and lamp itself every single day, first dusting it with a feather brush, then wiping it with a soft linen cloth, and lastly polishing it with a buff-skin. Perhaps one of the lesser known, yet equally important civic duties of a lighthouse keeper, was more that of an unofficial lifeguard, as it wasn’t uncommon for them to make water rescues regularly. In fact, one nightshift in 1918 it was the Flynns’ grandmother, Mrs. Edna Thompson, who had spotted an explosion and then a ship sinking out in the horizon and a small lifeboat struggling to make it ashore—so she waded waist-deep into the ocean and their lifeboat in singlehandedly. The keeper’s wife later learned that the ship, Chaparra, was actually a freighter making its way north from Cuba with a cargo full of raw sugar and accidentally detonated an underwater German mine left over from World War I— which consequentially ended up sinking the ship about 7 miles from the coast. Often referred to as the graveyard of the Atlantic, it was a commonality for the families who inhabited the three-family keepers’ home to encounter bodies that had washed up onshore from shipwrecks out at sea. A regular chore for the wives and children even included collecting the dead ducks around the perimeter of the lighthouse, as the Flynns’ grandmother used to do, since it was common for water fowl and shore birds to fly violently into portions of the lighthouse structure. More often than not, especially after a big storm, it meant they were having duck for dinner.

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At the same time that the Flynns’ grandfather was stationed at the Barnegat Lighthouse, the head keeper for whom he worked was a man named Clarence H. Cranmer, arguably one of the most popular and longest-serving keepers in all of the lighthouse’s history (43 years in service). As his great-grandniece Kathy King shares, Cranmer was first owner of the Clarence House (which was a famous bar & restaurant, and later, hotel) in Barnegat before relocating to Long Beach Island and becoming a lighthouse keeper in Barnegat Light. (It would be Kathy’s great grandfather, Elmer King, Clarence’s brother-in-law, who would be responsible for building the wildly successful Beach Haven boardwalk in 1916.) Following Clarence was Andrew E. Applegate, the lighthouse’s last official head keeper and founder of Applegate’s General Store (formerly Butterworth’s), which later became the Inlet Deli in Barnegat Light. The lighthouse was turned over to the State of New Jersey (and later deactivated) in April 1926 when a lightship was placed 8 miles offshore from the inlet and eliminated the need for the onshore light. The Fresnel lens was removed in 1927 and taken to district headquarters on Staten Island. By the time Applegate’s term was coming to an end, an electric lamp was being used in the now minor aid to navigation. He tragically drowned in 1928 during his term as the last keeper while fishing near the lighthouse with his son, Robert. Robert was later appointed as lamplighter to look after the light following his father’s death. The battle to save the lighthouse from erosion had begun generations earlier when a number of short jetties were constructed perpendicular to the shoreline in 1869 and 1870. Newspaper records at the time even reported local residents dumping everything from “abandoned cars, to rusty bed springs, to kitchen stoves and other junk” along the coast in a desperate attempt to save the Barnegat Lighthouse from destruction. Over the years beach replenishment and jetties have helped to slow down the erosion and the area around the lighthouse was declared a state park and dedicated in 1957. Thanks to the Friends of Barnegat Lighthouse, the nonprofit group dedicated to preserving and promoting the park, funds were raised to purchase a new Coast Guard-approved lens and 150 years after its original lighting day, on January 1, 2009, the Barnegat Lighthouse was officially relit and is being used as a back-up, complimentary navigational aid to the mariners at sea.

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Photo by Michael Spark 118 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2019


The 32-acre park was created in 1957. The main attraction is the lighthouse, which you can climb to the topmost lookout point. From this lofty perch there are wonderful views of LBI, the Atlantic Ocean, Barnegat Bay, Barnegat Inlet and Island Beach State Park. In addition to visiting the lighthouse, people come to the park to walk, birdwatch, learn about maritime history and fish. There is a small remnant maritime forest in the park that is dominated by Black Cherry, Sassafras, Eastern Red Cedar, and American Holly. A short loop trail heads out from the interpretive center, and has walkways to guide you over some parts of the route. There are interpretive signs along the way that tell you about the birds and plants you may see during your walk. There is a long 1,000 ft. plus concrete walkway that extends from the lighthouse to a portion of the southern border of Barnegat Inlet. Here you can see boats coming and going from the bay and observe birds and sea life along the edge of the inlet jetty. The lighthouse dominates the landscape throughout this area and you will have a nice view of it as you stroll along the walkway. Be sure to visit the Interpretive Center before leaving the park in order to learn more details surrounding the Barnegat Lighthouse. Cheers to 160 more years, Old Barney!

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design dynamos. word wizards. tech ninjas. community supporters. We are a results driven digital agency in New Jersey focused on creative marketing, web design and development.

877-361-8016 creativeclickmedia.com

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CHILDREN SHOULD BE HAPPY...

NOT HUNGRY *19.3% OF OCEAN COUNTY’S CHILDREN ARE FOOD INSECURE *According to the latest numbers available from Feeding America

Please help us with our vision

“A COMMUNITY WHERE ALL OF OUR NEIGHBORS ARE FREE FROM HUNGER” To Support our efforts, and learn more about our activities. Your donations and participation are greatly appreciated!

The Hunger Foundation has hosted Fundraising Events and received Donations to provide much needed financial support to our local community food banks.

We Proudly Support

Barnegat Food Pantry, Fr. Ken’s Kitchen at St. Mary’s Parish, Greater Tuckerton Food Pantry, Lacey Food Bank Program, Ocean Community Chruch, St. Francis Community Center, St. Episcopal Church

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Floral Hairpieces Written by Katie Hood

Photos by Melanie Cassie Photography

Floral combs add just the perfect touch of feminine detail. Primarily used for post veil photos at a wedding, these whimsical accent pieces are now being used for bridal showers, dinner parties, proms, birthdays, and photo shoots.

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The combination of soft blooms, textural elements such as pods or succulents, and free flowing greenery make for a delicate accent to any hair style.

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WEDDINGS

Soft blooms tucked gently into the hair provide a subtle nod to the ever so popular bohemian trend. There is just something about wearing flowers in your hair‌ it makes everyone feel a little bit extra lovely.

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IT’S ALL IN THE

Floral Market Fresh Bouquets + Arrangements Event Decor for Intimate Gatherings to Weddings Chic Apparel | Handbags | Jewelry

201 / 227 East Bay Ave., Manahawkin, NJ 08050 | 609.597.6099 | ReynoldsGardenShop.com PHOTO BY: JESSA SCHIFILLITI

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W h e r e E l e g a n c e To u c h e s the Jersey Shore

C O N T I N U E S O U R E X C E L L E N C E I N O F F S I T E C AT E R I N G W E W I L L H E L P Y O U C R E AT E T H E P E R F E C T M E N U F O R Y O U R S P E C I A L O C C A S I O N , W H E T H E R I T I S Y O U R W E D D I N G D AY, A L A R G E G A L A O R A S M A L L I N T I M AT E A F FA I R . F R O M A B A C K YA R D B B Q , G R A D U AT I O N , S H O W E R , R E H E A R S A L D I N N E R , C O R P O R AT E E V E N T O R S I M P LY A C E L E B R AT I O N O F O N E O F L I F E ’ S S P E C I A L M O M E N T S TO U C H O F E L E G A N C E C AT E R I N G W I L L C AT E R TO A L L O F Y O U R N E E D S . TO U C H O F E L E G A N C E I S A P R E F E R R E D C AT E R E R AT M A N Y O F T H E J E R S E Y S H O R E ’ S P R I VAT E H O M E S , FA S H I O N A B L E YA C H T C L U B S , V I C TO R I A N B & B S A N D G U E S T H O U S E S .

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1 H E R I TA G E C I R C L E , WA R E TO W N , N J TO U C H O F E L E G A N C E N J . C O M 609.693.8811


Photo Credit: Delaney Dobson Photography Invitation Design: Crisp By Britt Florals: Reynolds Garden Shop

www.BogathEvents.com (973) 477-1392 Jeanne@BogathEvents.com bay-magazine.com 127


WEDDINGS

wedding bliss one

Photographer | Susan Elizabeth Photography NJ + Worldwide

Photographer | Susan Elizabeth Photography NJ + Worldwide Event Venue: Bonnet Island Estate Cinema: Color Room Films Entertainment: Elite Entertainment Floral Designer: MDS Floral Hair Stylist: Family Friend Makeup Artist: Make Me Up Eva Wedding Gown Designer: Hayley Paige Reception Gown Designer: Hayley Paige Shoes: Vince Camuto Bridesmaid Dresses: Jenny Yoo Menswear: ChazMaTazz Rings: Corinne Jewelers Invitation Designer: Britt Larson Bakery: The Bakeworks

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HOW WE MET? Tyler and I met at Monmouth University. We met through mutual friends and became friends first in Two thousand and eleven and starting dating in Two thousand thirteen.

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HOW HE PROPOSED? Tyler proposed at a basketball game while I was coaching. I was called out to the middle of the court during half time and Tyler was dressed as the mascot. Fans in the bleachers raised up signs that said “Brielle, will you marry me?� Tyler revealed himself in the costume and proposed.

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ANN COEN PHOTOGRAPHY

Our private coastal island Estate with picturesque waterfront views and majestic interior design.

Surrounded by the Barnegat Bay, our elegant Yacht Club will transport you to another world.

2400 EAST BAY AVENUE, MANAHAWKIN, NJ

1450 EAST BAY AVENUE, MANAHAWKIN,NJ

THE STUDIO PHOTOGRAPHERS

Exceptional amenities and accommodations designed to complement your wedding celebration.

Our beautiful and exquisite venue is complete with unparalleled service.

151 NJ 72, MANAHAWKIN, NJ

637 PROVINCE LINE RD, ALLENTOWN, NJ

THE

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wedding bliss Surprise Vow Renewal Written by Jeanne Coon-Bogath

Planner | Bogath Weddings & Events Photographer | Heather Palecek Photography Venue | Private Residence Caterer | Foodies, Inc. Liquor | Neptune Liquors Florals | Reynolds Garden Shop DJ | Universal Entertainment Ceremony Music | Ceremonious Strings Arbor Rental | Rustic Drift Food Truck | Johnny Porkroll and Coffee Too...

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I got a phone call from Bill and his sister, Karen. I knew I was going to have fun when Bill told me, “I want to throw my wife, Patty, a surprise thirysixth wedding anniversary and vow renewal. And I want you to plan it.” OK!!! Done! It’s not that often that I get direction that is so succinct. Bill’s sister, Karen, worked closely with me for six months to help Bill pull off, what I’m going to say was the romantic gesturer of the summer! Bill and his wife, Patty, live in Florida, but have been summering at the Jersey shore for their entire lives. Bill wanted to surprise his wife with a party and LBI vow renewal on the beach. Um… yeah! Ladies, cue all the heart-eyes. Talk about romantic!!! Gentlemen, your job has just become a little bit harder, because Bill set the bar!

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The day began with a beautiful set-up under the tent! As guests arrived, they were able to enjoy snacks and piano music from Ceremonious Stings. Foodies, Inc. was the event’s caterer and Peggy and her crew made sure that the food was perfect. An extended cocktail hour made certain that guests enjoyed themselves while waiting for Patty & Bill to arrive. Surprise number one! Patty, thought that guests were simply going down to the beach to share and enjoy the family tradition of “Sobre la Playa.” But really, it was surprise number two for Patty. A gorgeous ocean-front LBI vow renewal! Complete with string duo form Ceremonious Strings! And the most stunning ocean front arbor set-up from Rustic Drift. Afterwards, dinner under the tent and a night filled with amazing toasts from Bill and Patty’s best man and maid of honor, as well as their children. Music, dancing, and more food! 138 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2019


WELCOME TO

Hotel LBI

N E W J E R S E Y ’ S F I N E S T C O A S TA L H OT E L A WORLD CLASS EXPERIENCE

The Perfect Blend of Comfort and Luxury Hotel LBI offers the charm of a summer home paired with world class amenities. Relax in your well-appointed room, enjoy a cocktail and watch the sunset on the rooftop, or escape for a day of fun in the sun on our majestic island.

A N OA SI S RE SO RT O N T H E J E RSE Y SH O RE ’ S M O ST M AG I C AL 1 8 M I L E BA R R IER ISLA N D

H OT EL L B I.C OM | 609 467 8000 | 350 W 8T H S T, S H IP B OTTO M , N J bay-magazine.com 139


RELAX AND REJUVENATE Experience true luxury salon and spa amenities and services within Hotel LBI. We offer massage, facials, nails, hair, waxing and more. Our spa desk is ready to book your reservation, call today or stop by and say hello.

Salon Services HAIR, NAILS AND MORE

Manicure & Pedicure

Hair & Makeup

Hands and feet will be rejuvenated with the healing properties of the sea. Soak your feet in a soothing sea salt bath. Relax as one of our nail specialists massage your hands and feet, and gently implement the ancient practice of Thai reflexology. No detail will be missed as your nails will be shaped and cuticles trimmed. Finish with a polish application of your choice or natural buffing.

Cut, color, style or treatment, the staff at our Spa & Salon have experience working will all types of hair. We can give you a bold new look, or help accentuate your already fabulous style. Whether it’s a girls night out on the town, or your big day, our makeup artists will help create a look that makes you feel like the celebrity version of yourself.

Massage & Facial Let your cares melt away as you find yourself in a blissful state of relaxation. At Lighthouse Beauty & Wellness we offer several different massage services and durations.

We offer Try our state of the art Hydrafacial and infrared light therapy. Only the highest quality products are used in our skincare services.

AN OASI S RE SO RT O N T H E J E RSE Y SH O RE ’ S M O ST M AG I C A L 1 8 M I L E B A RR IER ISLA N D

H OT EL L B I.C OM | 609 467 8000 | 350 W 8T H S T, S H IP B OTTO M , N J 140 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2019


YOU ARE INVITED TO

S AV E

Your

DAT E

NOW BOOKING FOR 2020 & 2021 AT LONG BEACH ISLAND’S PREMIER OCEANFRONT RESORT Private Beach Ceremonies , Formal & Elegant Receptions, Cocktail Style Weddings & Events, Bridal Showers, Baby Showers & more.

10 S Atlantic Ave - Beach Haven, NJ - theseashellresort.com bay-magazine.com 141


WEDDINGS

First comes Love

Planner & Designer Bogath Weddings & Events

Photos by Idalia Photography

Written by Jeanne Coon-Bogath

You are going to love this shoot, it’s got a stunning sunset, the sweetest couple, and the perfect summer palette! Ashley and Drew chose some really beautiful details for their LBI ice cream themed engagement photo session; a cute outfit, ice cream, flowers, and stunning wooden calligraphy sign. But my favorite detail (no doubt) was their one-year-old rescued pup, Hatchi. He was styled to perfection wearing the cutest bow-tie! For their LBI ice cream theme engagement photo session, we pulled together an amazing team of local LBI vendors. If you’ve been following my blog for a while, you might remember that last spring, at the LBI Wedding Road Show, I got together with the amazing wedding vendors below to give away three styled engagement photo sessions with Idalia Photography. They all came out amazingly, and it was so much fun getting to meet and know these three amazing couples, all of whom are getting married this year on LBI! 142 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2019


Photography | Idalia Photography Planner | Bogath Weddings & Events Hair & Makeup | Lavish Salon Florals | Lily in the Valley Florist Calligraphy | The Shaded Maple Rentals | Rustic Drift The Couple | Ashley & Drew The Pup | Hachi

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Love is Sweet

We’re donuts about this wall! Weddings, Bridal Showers, Baby Showers, Anniversaries and more! You get the donuts, we’ll bring the wall! Contact us at 203-240-4269

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2 2 5 J A C K S O N S T R E E T C A P E M AY, N J freelovebridal.com bay-magazine.com 145


WEDDINGS

Love

Boat Photos by Ashley Mac Photography

Planner & Designer Bogath Weddings & Events

PLANNER & DESIGNER| @bogathevents PHOTOGRAPHER | @ashleymacphotographs HAIR | @lavishlbi MAKEUP | @beachhousespa BRIDE’S DRESS SHOP | @freelovebridal BRIDE’S SHOES | @louiseetcie GROOM’S ATTIRE | @theblacktux LUXURY YACHT | @lbiluxurycharters INVITATIONS | @crispbybritt VENUE | @mallardislandyachtclub @weddingsofdistinctionnj FLORIST | @eastlinfloraldesign CAKE | @sweetmelissagoodness JEWELRY | @atlanticcityjewelry RENTALS | @rusticdrift TABLE TOP RENTALS | @thevintagetablecompany MODELS | Carly & Tom Hanscom 146 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2019


This beautiful wedding inspiration, photographed by Ashley Mac Photographs for bay magazine was punctuated perfectly with the most gorgeous sunset boat ride. The shoot was inspired by both the venue, Mallard Island Yacht Club on Barnegat Bay and the LBI luxury yacht, Relentless. The team pulled together a beautiful fall palette with tones of burgundy, mauve and burnt oranges. The details are an homage to the bay and the beach without going overboard (pun intended). The evening was punctuated by the perfect sunset with the bride and groom riding off into the sunset aboard a classic New England Cuttyhunk Bass Boat, Relentless. The boat holds up to six passengers (perfect for a bride and groom to sail off with their photographer for the most amazing portraits and a little private time on their wedding day. Relentless boasts handmade teak rails, cabinets and accents, making her the most attractive boat in on the bay!

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WEDDINGS

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HAVE YOUR

WEDDING

AT THE

PHOTOS BY ANN COEN PHOTOGRAPHY

LONG BEACH ISLAND FOUNDATION OF THE ARTS & SCIENCES 152 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2019

120 LONG BEACH BLVD., LOVELADIES, NJ 08008 // WWW.LBIFOUNDATION.ORG


Specializing in Advanced

Skin Care | Body Work | Waxing | Event Makeup | Blow Dry and Event Styling Bar

Now offering Skinceuticals, Living Proof Hair Care and Farm House Fresh Body Products Open all Year Beachhousespalbi.com | 609.342.1519 | 614 Long Beach Blvd | Surf City Photo | Ann Coen Photography

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STARTING YOUR OWN FAMILY TRADITIONS Written by Sarah Hodgson

Photos by Shannon Murphy

There’s nothing quite like passing something shiny down to a relative. Something dipped in gold, encrusted with gems and inlaid with years and years of wear and life. Rings, pendants and shimmering time pieces that have known various countries, and cultures, trends and generations - persisting through each in the name of family tradition. However, many families don’t possess bejeweled heirlooms to endow. They don’t have engraved pocket watches, necklaces from the 1920s or five-generation-old engagement rings just lying around waiting for younger hands. But that can be changed with a visit to Atlantic City Jewelry.

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Chris Biele is the owner of the family-run, Bayville and Tuckerton-based business, Atlantic City Jewelry. Like a family might pass down a beloved brooch, Biele’s family has passed down a love of jewelry for three generations, claiming close to 65 seasoned years in the industry. “I really like to think of us as craftspeople. We’re not that typical shop. We know our stuff,” said Biele. One of Biele’s many specialties? Estate jewelry. According to the local expert, estate jewelry is valuable, preowned adornments of a certain time period, caliber and designer. Adjectives that come to mind? Eclectic, intriguing and vintage.


Biele prides himself on the expansive estate jewelry collection showcased in his Tuckerton locale. “Nobody has what I have. The experience, the depth of inventory. You go to a jewelry store, you walk in and you want a mikimoto pearl with a half carat diamond on top. I have it.” That piece your aunt wore in the 50s? Biele has it. A silver spoon from the 20s? Biele has it. Pocket watches, platinum and diamond timepieces, golden tennis bracelets, eternity bands with three carat rose cut diamonds? A beatle pin? A vintage cameo? Biele has it. Picture Princess Ariel’s secret, glittering grotto brimming with treasures recovered from sunken ships. Such is Atlantic City Jewelry. “We have a large collection of Rolex and Timex vintage pieces. We also have a full watch repair shop where we work on our own watches and your family treasures.” Clients can peruse the store and find a rare piece to incorporate into their family traditions. They can have it repaired, resized and even engraved to include the name of a loved one. “Everything about jewelry is so cool,” mused Biele. “Say somebody gets a diamond necklace from their mother but it’s too 80s. They don’t like it? They can bring it here and we can make studs or a ring out of it.” Folks can hand their heirlooms to Biele and have them redesigned to reflect modern tastes. All repairs are done on premise - from soldering a chain, to resizing a ring, to hand and computerized engravings. The Atlantic City Jewelry staff treats your jewels as if they were their own. Lacking in the family heirloom department? Simply build your own collection. At Atlantic City Jewelry, Biele and his family are dedicated to helping clients start their own dazzling traditions with exceptional estate jewelry pieces. For more information about Atlantic City Jewelry and their valuable estate jewelry collection, visit http://atlanticcityjewelry.com/.

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Extraordinary Events U N I Q U E LY Y O U , P E R F E C T LY L B I Visions become realizations in extraordinary places. Hotel LBI offers immense opportunity to create a day filled with beautiful moments in one of the greatest locations along the Jersey shore.

Premier Wedding & Event Venue B E A C H F RO N T O R H OT E L V E N U E S Hotel LBI provides a premier wedding venue to couples searching for a charming destination, in the heart of a quaint beach town. Single event weddings and overnight accommodations are available within our luxury venue.

Corporate Events E V E N T S PA C E F O R U P TO 2 0 0 G U E S T S Hotel LBI offers over 3,700 square feet of meeting and event space, including the Conservatory – with vaulted ceilings, gas fireplace and panoramic windows overlooking the charming seaside town of Ship Bottom.

A N OA SI S RE SO RT O N T H E J E RSE Y SH O RE ’ S M O ST M AG I C AL 1 8 M I L E B AR R IER ISLA N D

H OT EL L B I.C OM | 609 467 8000 | 350 W 8T H S T, S H IP B OTTO M , N J 156 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2019


Photo | Delaney Dobson Photography

437 Route 9 Bayville, NJ 732.269.6699 | 110 E. Main Street Tuckerton NJ 609.294.6699 chris@atlanticcityjewerly.com bay-magazine.com 157


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bay magazine

LEISURE & LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE SUMMER 2020 ADVERTISING | SUBMISSIONS | GENERAL INQUIRES

bay-magazine.com

info@bay-mag.com

PHOTO BY MICHAEL SPARK

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WEDDINGS

Floral Design

Trends and Ideas for Weddings on Long Beach Island

Written by Michele Tallent of Floral Designs by Bay Avenue Plant Company Photos by Vinyl Media and Ann Coen Photography

What can be more exciting that planning your special day in what has become your most special place, Long Beach Island? Having your wedding in LBI gives you so many opportunities to bring what is beautiful about the island into your flowers and dĂŠcor. What we, at Floral Designs by Bay Avenue get excited about, are all of the subtle elements of LBI that allow for a unique approach to a beach wedding. While we love the use of sea shells and sea glass; there are many features of the island that many brides are beginning to incorporate and use as inspiration. Here are some themes to consider when planning your beach or island wedding.

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Winter Rustic

HEAVY ON GREENERY, TEXTURES AND COLORS

Many weddings are now being held during the fall and winter months. The use of candles enhances the dĂŠcor and warms the room; while also creating a romantic feel. Grapevine and wood elements can be incorporated for a natural beachy feel. Using subtle colors such as off-white and peach will soften the wood and be a nice contrast to the heaviness of it, while also complimenting the candle light. Adding a personal touch such as an enjoyed hobby can also bring a new interest to your wedding.

ANYTHING GOES WITH THE SHAPE AND SIZE OF A BOUQUET.

The theme in the table pictured represented the grooms’ love for the outdoors and nature.

Cascading Bouquets The newest trends in bouquets are steering away from the traditional tight look and have become softer, looser and more irregular with a cascading effect. Adding ferns, vines and longer green material with large flower blooms assist in creating the look of the bouquet becoming an extension of the bride and her gown.

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Formal & Bold Holding your wedding in a venue that is already full of color and character can sometimes be a challenge. Being mindful to compliment the space and not compete with it is key. For example, when we designed the pictured “formal” arrangement for The Gables, a venue full of charm and romance, we wanted to use elegant flowers such as David Austin Garden Roses, Parrot Edge Tullips, and Lisianthus.

THE LESS IS MORE THEORY

FLORAL ARRANGEMENTS SHOULD ALWAYS BE DESIGNED WITH THE ROOM IN MIND

Whimsical elements are added through the use of the Lilac and Hanging Amaranthus.

Beach Simplicity When you have a wedding in what may seem like an overwhelming space such as the beach, consider incorporating the natural elements of your environment. For example, using dune grass wrapped in burlap along the seating aisles will bring the grandness of your surroundings to a deeper and more personal level. When you are choosing your flowers to use in your arrangements, utilizing native materials such as hydrangea, thistle, dusty miller, and beach grass will help capture a relaxed and romantic feel.

Adding curly willow to a simple arrangement will bring the guests’ eyes to the entire room while still allowing the flowers to be the focus while seated for dinner..

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WEDDING E X P Oâ„¢

Bliss

2020

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Craft Beer Barrel Aged Cocktails

New American Food

Local Farms

R A W F R E S H

B A R

L O C A L

W E D D I N G

S E A F O O D

R E C E P T I O N S

P R I V A T E R E H E A R S A L

E V E N T S D I N N E R S

C E R E M O N I E S

A T

T H E

L I G H T H O U S E Brunch Saturday and Sunday Happy Hour Daily Oysters Rehearsal Dinners Showers Private Parties Open Daily Year Round

O P E N

Y E A R

R O U N D

D A I L Y

L U N C H | D I N N E R | B R U N C H H A P P Y

H O U R

4TH ST, BARNEGAT LIGHT 1302 Long Beach Blvd, Ship Bottom New Jersey 08008 (609) 494-8848 arlingtonlbi.com

NEW JERSEY 08006 609.494.2100 DAYMARKLBI.COM bay-magazine.com 165


CAUSAL BITES POOLSIDE Stop by for a delicious lunch and refreshing drinks by the pool!

WAKE UP OR UNWIND IN OUR LIVING ROOM Offering coffee drinks in the morning and small bites paired with unique cocktails at night.

A N OA SI S RE SO RT O N T H E J E RSE Y SH O RE ’ S M O ST M AG I C AL 1 8 M I L E B AR R IER ISLA N D

H OT EL L B I.C OM | 609 467 8000 | 350 W 8T H S T, S H IP B OTTO M , N J 166 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2019


NOW G N BOOKI ARTIES TE P P R I VA O R T H E F AY S HOLID 1 0 1 S O U T H W E S T AV E . | B E A C H H AV E N , 609.492.2300

|

N J

t u c k e r s t a v e r n - l b i . c o m

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NOW

B

eat, stay, play, year round

O

OK

ING

AY HOLIDES, I T PA R N D WEEKE TS & A R E T R E W AY S A T GE

4 4 0 1

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6 0 9 . 4 9 4 . 1 3 0 0

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B L V D .

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B R A N T

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d a d d y o r e s t a u r a n t . c o m

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FEED YOUR MIND

FEED YOUR MIND

Recipes and photos by Susan von Brachel and Robin Chase www.robinandsue.com

It’s officially autumn—a very special time of year on Long Beach Island.The air is crisp, the sunshine plentiful, and the longer shadows cast a rejuvenating spell for those who come down for a romantic weekend getaway. We’ve created a fall dinner menu that is simple and fun to make together. So start the evening with a perfect fall drink—an Old Fashioned with Maple Simple Syrup and get cooking!

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Old Fashioned with Maple Simple Syrup Serves 2 Ingredients and directions for Maple Simple Syrup: ½ c pure maple syrup ½ c water Bring to a simmer and cool Ingredients for Old Fashioned: 4 oz Bourbon ½ oz Maple Simple Syrup 4 dashes Angostura bitters Orange peels for garnish Directions: Add all ingredients into a mixing glass with ice and stir. Pour into an Old Fashioned glasses over ice. Garnish with orange peels.

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Roasted Parsnips with Sage & Red Pepper Flakes Serves 2-4 Ingredients: 2 lb. parsnips, cut into 3” pieces 2 tbsp. olive oil 10 fresh sage leaves ¼ tsp. Kosher salt ¼ tsp. black pepper Pinch of red pepper flakes

Directions: Preheat oven to 400°. Place parsnips on a large baking sheet. Drizzle with olive oil and add salt, pepper, sage leaves and red pepper flakes. Toss to evenly coat. Roast for 15 minutes and move parsnips around in the pan. Roast an additional 15 minutes until golden brown. Serve warm or at room temperature.

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Brussels Sprouts with Honey & Balsamic Vinegar Serves 2-4 Ingredients: 1 ½ lbs fresh brussels sprouts, rinsed and sliced in half 3 tbsp olive oil, separated ½ tsp kosher salt ½ tsp black pepper 1T. balsamic vinegar 1T. honey Directions: Preheat oven to 400°F. Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil, shiny side down. In a large bowl, mix brussels sprouts with 2 tablespoons of olive oil, kosher salt and black pepper. Mix well. Place the brussels sprouts on the baking sheet and roast until tender, about 20-25 minutes. Remove brussels sprouts from oven and put back in bowl. Add remaining olive oil, balsamic vinegar and honey and toss to coat evenly. bay-magazine.com

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Shiitake Mushroom and Goat Cheese Mini Tarts Serves 2-4 Ingredients: 1 sheet puff pastry, unrolled and cut into 9 squares 1 1/2 lb. Shiitake mushrooms, chopped 1 garlic clove, minced 3T. unsalted butter ½ C. goat cheese crumbles 3 T. flat leaf parsley, roughly chopped Salt & pepper to taste Directions: Preheat oven to 400°. Lightly grease a baking sheet or line with parchment paper. Unroll puff pastry out on a lightly floured surface and cut into 9 squares. With a fork, gently prick the squares. Place the puff pastry squares on prepared baking sheet. Bake the puff pastry squares for around 7 minutes. Remove tray from the oven and press down the squares using the backside of a spatula. Place puff pastry back into the oven and bake until golden brown, 6-8 minutes. Remove from oven and cool. Melt butter in a pan over medium high heat. Add the garlic and mushrooms and stir until mushrooms begin to soften, 5 to 7 minutes. Remove from burner and set aside. Evenly place mushroom mixture on top of each baked puff pastry square. Add goat cheese crumbles over mushrooms and sprinkle with roughly chopped parsley. Lightly sprinkle each with salt and pepper.

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Grilled Lamb Loin Chops with Rosemary Serves 2-4 Ingredients: 6 Lamb Loin Chops, about 1 ½ thick ¼ cup olive oil 3 cloves garlic, minced 1 T. fresh rosemary, roughly chopped & whole rosemary for garnish 1 tsp. kosher salt ½ tsp. black pepper ¼ cup olive oil Directions: Combine olive oil, garlic rosemary, salt & pepper into small bowl and mix well. Put the lamb chops into a deep baking dish and pour marinade over. Cover and marinate in the fridge for at least one hour. Light grill and heat to medium-high heat. Add lamb chops and grill 2-3 minutes per side. Turn grill to medium heat and grill another 5-6 minutes per side. Remove from grill and let lamb rest for 5 minutes before serving. Garnish with whole rosemary. 176 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2019


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Individual Apple Crisps Serves 4 Ingredients: Apple Filling: 6 apples, preferably Macintosh, cored & roughly chopped 1 T. fresh lemon juice ½ C. sugar 2 T. flour Topping: 1 ¼ C. flour ½ C. rolled oats ¼tsp. salt ½ C. light brown sugar ½ tsp. ground cinnamon 1 ½ sticks of unsalted butter, chilled and cut into small pieces ½ cup almonds, roughly chopped and toasted Directions: Preheat the oven to 350°F. Lightly grease 4 ceramic ramekins with butter. For the apple filling: In a large mixing bowl, toss the chopped apples, lemon juice, sugar, and flour. Pour the apple mixture evenly into the 4 ramekins and set aside. For the topping: In a large mixing bowl, mix the flour, oats, brown sugar, cinnamon, and salt. Add ingredients into a food processor and add the butter. Pulse until large clumps form. Fold toasted almonds into mixture. Evenly spread the topping over each apple filling. Bake the apple crisps until the fruit is bubbling and the topping is golden brown and crisp, about 30-35 minutes. Serve with whipped cream or vanilla ice

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LONG BEACH ISLAND’S COOKBOOK The perfect day on Long Beach Island consists of a memorable day at the beach followed by sharing a great meal with family and friends as the sun sets over the bay. In Feed Your Mind: Long Beach Island’s Cookbook, seafood-lovers will dive into more than 45 original, delicious and savory dishes that offer all the right ingredients for fabulous dining with an ocean (or bay) view.

Get your Copy Today! REYNOLDS GARDEN SHOP • SPOTTED WHALE LITTLE BUNGALOW • HOW TO LIVE LAVISH • ARTIFACTS • GIFTED WILDFLOWERS • BLUE CLAW SEAFOOD TOWN& COUNTY KITCHEN • GOOD LIFE H O T E L L B I • M A I N L A N D • B AY AV E P L A N T C O M PA N Y

Buy Online

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bistro14

bay village

LBI’s Best oyster bar, and a classic mix of shore food. Open Weekends Serving Lunch and Dinner 830 North Bay Ave Beach Haven, NJ | 609.492.6100 Find us on

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The best Italian food on the Jersey Shore

1905 Long Beach Blvd | Surf City, NJ | 609.361.2500 Open through Christmas! www.themariositalianmarket.com

1103 Long Beach Blvd Surf City, NJ 08008 609 • 361 • 0050

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BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNER

We start with

FRESH

When you’re on the Island, let our family take care of yours

71 2 Long Beach Blvd Surf City, NJ

When you’re 609.494.1667 on the Island, we accept let our family take When you’re on the island let our family take care of yours! care of yours

COMING 2020

712 Long Beach Blvd Surf City • 609.494.1667 71 2 Long Beach Blvd

For Hours Surfand City,Full NJ Menu Please609.494.1667 visit Wallyslbi.com we accept

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FEED YOUR MIND

@twodopesfromjersey

I scream, you scream, The Dopes scream for Ice Cream! Written by Brian Smith

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Long Beach Island has a long history of great ice cream spots and in our humble opinion, late summer is the best time to indulge. When you’re looking to cool down, you’re going to need to know where to go. Luckily for you, we put in the hard work and tasted a lot of ice cream, from Old Barney down to Fantasy Island, to bring you our top spots.!


Barry’s Do Me A Flavor

Just a few blocks south of Fantasy Island is the family-owned Barry’s Do Me A Flavor. Barry’s is a tourist and local favorite for casual dinning, serving everything from fish tacos to cheesesteaks, and of course, ice cream. They offer 24 different flavors of Arctic Ice Cream and have plenty of great topping options. We went with the classic Banana Split and washed it down with a refreshing orange creamsicle float made with vanilla soft serve. It was a pure sugar overload in the best possible way. With plenty of inside seating, Barry’s is a great spot to escape the sun and cool down with a frozen treat.

Skipper Dipper

It is nearly impossible to drive around Long Beach Island and not notice the Skipper Dipper. The sign sticks out like a sweet oasis on a hot sunny day, and when you stop in, it’s all about their soft serve ice cream. This staple has been around since 1978 and has been featured in many news outlets, including NBC and HGTV. This is our favorite soft serve spot on the island and we cannot get enough of their delicious cones. With no frills or gimmicks needed, we went with a classic vanilla soft serve in a waffle cone and rainbow sprinkles. They offer a variety of toppings and dips to accompany their selection of ice cream, which can be enjoyed in the shaded outside seating, making Skipper Dipper a sweet-tooth-craving must.

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Poppy’s

Poppy’s has been serving ice cream by Old Barney for over 40 years and is almost just as iconic as the lighthouse. The large yellow building has ample seating inside and shaded seating on the porch. Their wide selection of hard and soft ice cream options and great variety of toppings makes this an island favorite. One thing that separates Poppy’s from the rest of the pack is their ice cream parfaits. We had a vanilla parfait with M&M’s and gummy bears that was so refreshing we decided yogurt parfaits should be banned! We also tried the fantastic grasshopper sundae made with mint chocolate chip ice cream, Oreos, chocolate mints and hot fudge. Next time your visiting Old Barney, stop in and treat yourself.

The Big Dipper

The Big Dipper is in an unassuming shop that can easily be missed, but when we tell you their ice cream is moan-out-loud delicious, you’re going to want to make your way over to Surf City and taste it for yourself. There aren’t a lot of seats inside the shop, but the ice cream is so delectable that it will practicably be gone before you even get to the door. They have a great selection of flavors and cones to choose from, so there truly is something for even the pickiest of ice cream lovers. We went with the salted pretzel caramel flavor on a buttery pretzel cone, which was simply ice cream perfection!

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Scratch-Made Boutique Bakery | Custom Confections Elegant Dessert Displays | Gourmet Coffee, Teas & more 1102 North Bay Avenue Beach Haven, NJ sweetmelissagoodness.com

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Plan your next Visit with us!

Open daily 9am-6pm

The Lodging • Fine Dining • Sushi & Sand Bars

FINE DINING Open Everyday at 5pm Sushi Lunch 12-2pm Daily THE SAND BAR Open Daily at 11:30am Live Music 3-7pm (weather permitting) OCEANFRONT HOTEL

30 Engleside Ave Beach Haven,NJ 800-762-2214 www.Engleside.com

-Over 100 varieties Of cheese frOm 13 cOuntries-cheese spreads, hummus, and bruschetta-Over 20 varieties Of crackers-special jams, jellies, marmalades, chutneys, and hOneys-unique barbeque sauces and rubs-Olive Oils and balsamic vinegars-freshly rOasted cOffee beans grOund tO Order-chips, salsas, nuts, snacks and cOOkies-salad dressing and marinades-dried and frOzen pasta and pasta saucewe’re cheese, but were so much more! 1800 lOng beach blvd, surf city, nj 08008 www.thecheeseshOppe.net

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COUNTRY CORNER FARM MARKET BEST PIE’S ON LBI

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275 W 9TH STREET SHIP BOTTOM, NEW JERSEY 609 494 0667


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DID YOU KNOW

A True Story Teller Written by Matt Burton

The “Season”, as it’s known in these parts, is the nine to ten weeks of the summer when island guests and warm weather residents come to join the rest of us on Long Beach Island. As the island population swells, lines get a little longer, traffic lights are turned on and everyone seems to be a little competitive. Race to the store and back so as not to lose valuable time with out-of-town family or back to swimming in the perfect ocean temperatures. I get it. No one likes wasting their vacation time running errands when in paradise. This is the time to slow down. I can not think of a better way to reset then going out, a cold drink in my hand and listening to live music. One of the perks of this time of year is the amount of live music you can listen to on any given night. Ryan Zimmerman, 43, is one of my favorite artists. I first heard him play at the release party for his debut album “Working Musician”. Ryan has a bluesy, southern rock sound. The rhythmic windmill style in which he plays his guitar lends itself to the funky and jazz-like improvisational sound he commands. He is a master craftsman who utilizes his tools inside and out and makes musical magic. His deep track covers feel familiar. Other classic favorites are personalized with a fresh feel. Mixed in his sets Ryan will play one of his original songs. He is a true story teller conveying a positive feeling or an empathetic narrative we can relate to. He engages with the crowd, many there to see him, and gets you into the groove. I recently caught Ryan playing at the Black Whale Bar & Fish House in Beach Haven. Matt Burton: Did you study music?

Photo by Ann Coen

Ryan Zimmerman: Not in the traditional sense, no, but I have spent endless hours listening, practicing, and going to live performances of all kinds. I’ve learned everything by ear and vision. When I started out I was not very good. I had friends who just picked up instruments and just magically played them and were extremely gifted. I had to put in time and practice to improve my playing. When I was a teenager playing I remember it taking forever just to be able to sing and play at the same time. I’ve studied the soul and the meaning of music on my own life adventures, but I never took a “class” of any kind. I always listened bay-magazine.com 195


Photo by Nick Reinhardt

intently to and observed the musicians I’ve had interest in and tried to see what moved them and researched why I was moved. That was school for me and I took notes! Guitar Player Magazine was my text book. I would get the latest copy and play from the tablature in the back of the mag. I would watch videos of my favorite guitar players and watch where they were putting their fingers. It was a long tedious process but I had the passion and drive. I was so gullible back then. I would actually think I invented a chord when I would accidentally stumble upon a shape on the neck that sounded good. Youthful Bliss! MB: How did you first get into music?

RZ: It’s more like something that I “have” to do. It’s been calling me forever but it seemed out of reach. It was always a part time gig plus I had family obligations when I was younger. The more I put into it seems to generate more success and satisfaction. MB: Who are your guitar hero’s? RZ: First guitar hero was Ritchie Havens. Totally unique and he created his own style. He used open tunings and barred chords with his thumb! Very, rhythmic, windmill like style. Close second, Jimmy Page or David Gilmore. As I got older it was Johnny Ramone, Kurt Cobain, Trey Anastasio, Jerry Garcia… I could go on forever.

RZ: Like most people, stumbling upon my parents record collection as a kid in the 80’s. I think I was three or four and I found the record player and learned how to use it. Luckily my folks had good taste! Beatles, Led Zeppelin, Bob Dylan, Pink Floyd, The Doors… One of my first memories was opening the cover to “Led Zeppelin II” and just being blown away. It was like a big greek temple or something inside. Then I put it on and went down the rabbit hole.

MB: What is your goal in terms of reaching your audience?

MB: How did you decide you should play music for a living?

MB: What is your biggest challenge as a musician?

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RZ: I want the audience to feel like how I feel when I go see a performance. If it is just to forget about life for an hour, have a good time, and be inspired then my goal has been reached. With that being said, a good grove and a meaningful message can definitely make that happen!

RZ: To just keep going. I’m an independent musician,


and proud of it, but that means I book my own gigs, pay out of pocket for recording, plan my own tours, find my own places to stay, etc. It’s challenging but also very rewarding to watch a project form from your own head manifest into reality, especially when it is successful and positive. MB: What’s your touring schedule like? RZ: Hectic. I was on the road for much of the beginning of 2019. The last few summers I’ve been staying home because I have a lot of work and its nice to sleep in your own bed every night! Next year though I’m thinking I might tour in the summer if I can make it work. I’m planning a fall tour now which is going to take me from Maine down to Georgia. In November I will be going out west to do Seattle then down to San Diego. In December I’m hoping to play in Hawaii for the first time and this winter I plan to do both coasts of Florida, into the gulf states then finally up into Austin. MB: Where is your favorite place to play other than LBI? RZ: I really like North Carolina, Asheville, Wilmington, The Outer Banks. I’ve been going to Florida to play for years. I like the Keys, New Smyrna Beach, I have a lot friends on the gulf coast too. Easy escape in the winter. I really enjoyed playing in Austin, Nashville and North-

ern Georgia as well. Very beautiful down there. Out west I really like Northern California and the central coast. San Louis Obispo comes to mind. I played in a real cool town in Oregon called Ashland. I always love going up to Vermont in ski season to play as well. MB: You currently have two albums available (“Working Musician” and “Ephemeral as a Kiss”) and your third album, “No Overhead No Liability” is going to drop soon - where can people find your music? RZ: Right now my full length solo album (Working Musician) and new album (Ephemeral as a Kiss) along with some singles are available on all major streaming platforms. You can download them all from my website for a small cost (thanks for the support). You can also find random songs I put up on my sound cloud page. Also, if you come to one of my performances you can buy a CD! As the evening progresses the crowd is getting into vibe. Ryan has played some crowd favorites and requests for his originals. Everyone is in the moment. Letting go to the music. The finish line. To download Ryan’s music, release dates and tour dates visit his website: www.ryanzimmermanmusic.com Photo by Nick Reinhardt

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MUSICALS • CHILDREN’S THEATRE CONCERTS • COMEDY www.surflight.org ∙ 609-492-9477 201 Engleside Avenue, Beach Haven

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m.t.burton gallery & 19th St. Clay Studio 1819 N. Long Beach Blvd., Surf City mtburtongallery@gmail.com 609-494-0006

Fine Art, Antiques, Jewelry, Pottery and Classes

Barnegat Lighthouse Mug, stoneware Part of the “Open Water� series, by Matt Burton

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BayMagAd819_Layout 1 8/5/19 3:00 PM Page 1

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DID YOU KNOW

Explore LBI

Reel It In 65th Annual LBI Surf Fishing Classic

Come Hungry Chowderfest Cook Off October 6

Written by Lori Pepenella, CDME

Long Beach Island Region DMO Southern Ocean County Chamber of Commerce Follow LBI Region for more informations on the LBI Region Southern Ocean County Chamber of Commerce bring 105 years of service representing the business and tourism community. Fall back to the LBI Region with our top 5 picks for things to do this fall that will help redefine beach culture. Feel free to contact them at 609-494-7211, online at visitLBIregion.com or on social as @southernoceanchamber @LBIregion and @theofficialLBIchowderfest.

See It Live Surflight Fall Line up

Epic opening day is Saturday October 5 with Surf Fishing Seminar and running through December 9 this tournament is loaded with bonus days and prizes. Started in 1954, the Long Beach Island Surf Fishing Classic is one the nation’s oldest and most recognized surfcasting tournaments, providing an eight-week contest for beach anglers who fish for striped bass and bluefish along the shores of LBI. Visit a participating bait and tackle shop or go to www.lbisfc.com/

Pre Game by the Bay Merchant Mart Oct 5

Come see why we are the Chowder Capital of NJ! Chowderfest Cook off Classic has been LBI’s main event for over three decades featuring restaurants competing for your vote with unlimited sampling. Be an official Taster and vote for your fave in red, white and creative categories. Enjoy live music, entertainment, beer, cider and wine as you become a chowder expert under the big tents! General admission tickets have 11am entry VIP 10am – Tickets on sale at www.chowderfest.com or by contacting the Southern Ocean Chamber office.  Chowderfest Weekend is a rain or shine event!

Shop Till You Drop Small Business Saturday November 30

Beginning September running through holidays Hang out at the Boyton Beach Club, Sip with the Savannah Society or solve a Sherlock Holmes mystery as Surflight theatre rounds out their 70th Anniversary in Beach Haven. Catch the mainstage brilliance or take in a live special event happening throughout the season! Contact the box office for all the details - 201 Engleside Avenue Beach Haven surflight.org 609 492 9477

It’s become a tradition for friends and family to come together on Long Beach Island to welcome the fall with Chowderfest Weekend. Centered at the Taylor Avenue ball field in Beach Haven, this massive event begins with the Merchant Mart! This free event is filled with local vendors offering up end of season bargains from 10am to 5pm along with live music, specialty food and drink and special activities for kids.

Bypass the mall crowds and spend Thanksgiving Weekend with us! Local shops and restaurants create a one of a kind experience any shopper will love. Pick up gift certificates, unique LBI inspired items and decorations while getting into the holiday spirit with events, activities and demos. For complete list go to visitLBIregion.com for Shop Small Updates

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Shawn MICHAELS & Sue MOLL

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DID YOU KNOW

Makes Difference For Local Families Written by Sarah Hodgson

In the early 1990s, a Doctor named Jack McConnell retired to Hilton Head and prepared to settle into a much-deserved life of leisure. However, during his brief stint of rest and relaxation, McConnell noticed that a significant number of employees in the seasonal resort community were without access to proper healthcare. McConnell cut his retirement short, wiggled his way back into the workforce and established a free medical clinic for the uninsured: Volunteers in Medicine (VIM). Now almost 30 years later, VIM has sprouted roots in communities all across the country, including our very own Southern Ocean County. Coastal Volunteers in Medicine (Coastal VIM) is a free, non-emergency primary medical clinic that serves the uninsured residents of the Southern Ocean County region. Founded in 2013, Coastal VIM is one of 87 independently run clinics across the country under the Vol204 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2019


unteers in Medicine umbrella. In order to qualify for care at Coastal VIM, recipients must be without health insurance, must live within the Southern Ocean County area and must have an annual income equal to or below 250% of the Federal Poverty Level. The story of the Southern Ocean County clinic’s creation follows a similar narrative to that of the national VIM office. In our seasonal tourist community, not unlike that of Hilton Head’s, a local nurse practitioner noticed there was a disturbingly large amount of uninsured workers. At the end of each summer, a majority of local laborers find themselves scrambling for work and lacking the finances to fund basic healthcare visits. Instead, they pay exorbitant Emergency room bills for issues that could be settled in a primary care office with proper insurance. Some even choose to forgo healthcare and hospitals altogether, allowing their illnesses to persist and escalate beyond manageable conditions. “Most of our patients are working. LBI is back to life, so they’ll postpone a visit with us because they have to work,” said Celia Mendelsohn, Executive Director at Coastal VIM. One of the biggest challenges, she said, is communicating to patients how important regular primary care visits are. “It’s really hard. They have to make a lot of tough choices this time of year, whether they work or come in and take care of themselves,” said Pattie Lewis, Coastal VIM Nurse Manager. Lewis said the decision for most patients often falls to: Do I feed my family and pay my rent? Or do I visit the Doctor? They typically choose the former. Fortunately, Coastal Volunteers in Medicine provides an easy solution for those waiving their own personal care in the name of saving money: free medical visits. Some of the services offered by Coast VIM’s volunteer clinicians include primary and on-going care, psychiatric services, diabetes management, diagnostic testing, prescription assistance, vision screening, and much more. The clinic has about 60 active volunteers including physicians, nurse practitioners, nurses, mental health practitioners, a dietitian who works regularly with diabetic patients, translators who assist Spanish speaking patients and administrative support. Coastal VIM even hosts a “Women’s Health Night” mammograms, which is funded by the NJ Cancer Education and Early Detection program.

At the Forked River office, Mendelsohn said patients are treated to a rare, personalized healthcare experience. A visit to Coastal VIM is not your typical in-andout check-up at the Doctor’s. Patients are greeted and treated like revered guests and the practitioners feel like family. “It’s a very unique experience here because we follow the culture of caring model,” said Mendelsohn. The “Culture of Caring” model asserts that the way in which patients are treated during a clinic visit is just as important as the medical attention they receive. Volunteers seek to make healthcare as convenient as possible for their patients. For patients, this could mean having a Coastal VIM practitioner. For patients this could mean having CVIM assist them in applying for funding for their medications or having easy access, to resources like “Good Rx,” a phone app that shows the most affordable prescription fill-ups nearby. “We try to make our patients feel welcome because a lot of them have such challenges. it’s just about making their lives a little easier,” said Mendelsohn. Coastal VIM operations rely solely on donations from annual fundraisers, local donors and businesses. This summer, they held a “Cocktails en Blanc” party at The Gables in Beach Haven and on September 6th, The Sea Shell Resort and Beach Club will generously host “The Best Medicine is Vitamin Sea” benefit. Their annual Gala with dining and dancing will be held on October 4 at the Greenbriar in Waretown. These parties serve a dual purpose, as they not only raise funds for supplies and medical equipment, but they also raise awareness about Coastal VIM as a resource for community business owners and their staff members. With roughly 260 regular patients and over 600 yearly visits, Coastal VIM volunteers have their hands full. “It runs very well considering it can get very busy. We run on a shoestring but we really try to give them the best healthcare that they can get,” said Mendelsohn. Mendelsohn began volunteering for Coastal VIM post-retirement and can speak to the impact the organization has had on the community and it’s dedicated volunteers. “This is so fulfilling. The people here are wonderful. They’re very, very caring.” For more information about Coast Volunteers in Medicine and their upcoming events, visit https://coastalvim.org/. bay-magazine.com 205


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DID YOU KNOW

Curator of all Things Marvelous Gallery and Boutique Owner Celebrates 20 Years in Business Written by Sarah Hodgson

It’s rare that a concrete parking bumper does anything but mark a space with dull efficiency - its overbearing, industrial aesthetic commanding, “Park here or risk facing the wrath of your disgruntled peers!” But the embellished parking bumper I idled up to at Barnegat Lightbased gallery Wildflowers Too sang a sweet welcome. The concrete slab was plastered with a rich mosaic of shiny ceramic shards and translucent marbles. A red tile here, a royal blue fragment there. The parking lot art was an inviting peek into the owner’s clear knack for subverting and beautifying the mundane. Cricket Luker, the owner of Wildflowers Too and it’s neighboring boutique Wildflowers by the Lighthouse, is as delightful as her parking lot accessories. Bold, stylish and soft-spoken, the artist is the living, breathing manifestation of her eclectic stores. Maggie Smith Roedema, Luker’s right-hand woman, loyal compadre and Wildflowers Too manager can attest to that. “You could probably write a book about Cricket. She’s that interesting and cool and quirky,” said Roedema,

Photos by Michael Spark

who seems to exude an equally unique brand of cool and quirky. Luker’s gallery brims with other-worldly pieces: ethereal photos printed on metallic plates; a 3D sculpture that casts an intricate shadow against the wall; a raku potter’s handywork; paintings on handmade paper; glasswork manipulated to look smooth and frosty like it’s been tossed about in the ocean; multi-toned wooden masterpieces from a retired engineer. “It is such a great space for a gallery. It’s so grand,” said Luker, dressed in lime green and drifting about the airy room while her ringtone emitted the persistent chirp of a cricket (perhaps in ironic homage to her insectile namesake). Grand is an understatement. The gallery boasts high, vaulted ceilings painted blue and flecked with fleecy clouds to imitate an open sky. Spacious nooks and adjoining rooms hold treasure upon treasure. Artwork occupies nearly every stitch of wall. bay-magazine.com 207


Roedema credits Luker’s uncanny ability to curate the space to her artistic background. The gallery owner grew up in a suburb of Philly and moved to Long Beach Island after her first marriage. She worked as an elementary school art teacher for five years before deciding to leave the profession. While she loved teaching children, she was averse to lesson plans, structure, schedules. “Teaching wasn’t satisfying enough for me. I realized when I was wanting those snow days as much as the kids, that’s when I made the decision. I left and I started my own studio,” said Luker. Luker worked as a printmaker, a tile maker and a travelling artist, selling her pieces to over 400 galleries and shops, catalogues and zoos. Then came her unofficial pièce de résistance: Wildflowers by the Lighthouse. Her “art-to-wear” boutique that, this year, celebrates 20 years in business. When Luker purchased the first half of her Barnegat Light boutique two decades ago, she wasn’t sure what to fill it with. She started with art and steadily dabbled in fashion. She’d tag along with a designer friend to buyer’s trips and trade shows, learning the ins and outs of the industry while developing a purchasing routine. A year into Wildflowers by the Lighthouse, Luker acquired the other half of the building and continued to fill the shop with garment upon garment upon garment, until finally there wasn’t room for much else. She’d inadvertently pushed out all of the artwork. “When I started working for her 14,15 years ago, it was a little cottage full of beachy garden stuff. Over the years it has turned into a boutique of what she calls art-to-wear clothes,” said Roedema, remembering her first visit to Wildflowers by the Lighthouse. “It’s not the 208 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2019


kind of stuff you expect to find on LBI.” Roedema herself was sporting an article of clothing from the boutique: onyx and caramel colored pants that billow like palm leaves in the wind. But what makes these clothes “art-to-wear?” “Have you ever seen Project Runway?” said Luker, referring to the hit television series where uber-talented, rookie fashion designers have a limited amount of time to envision, produce and present their collections to a panel of judges. “The people that I am working with could be contestants on Project Runway. I am always searching for innovative looks, innovative accessories.” A quick stroll through her store and it’s not hard to understand what Luker means. Wildflowers by the Lighthouse is as eclectic a store as her neighboring gallery. Tastefully arranged, meaningfully decorated. Paintings paired with garments. Handmade tunics. Glittering bags made from hardware. It’s as if a whimsical art museum exploded inside, smattering the shelves and hangers with remarkable vestments. She toured the boutique with me, caressing silken blouses, gently tugging suede jackets from their racks and into the light. Around every corner was an exciting find: crinkle fabric dresses dangling from their hangers in wrinkled, shimmering masses; jackets made from vintage, recycled Saris; a handbag made from an old radiator cover. “This looks like a painter’s cloth,” she said, motioning towards a top splattered with colors. This year, Luker’s art-to-wear will hit the runway in her annual, glamorous fashion show “Artful Noir” on September 21st. Last year’s event benefited Friends of Southern Ocean County Animal Shelter and this year’s will benefit the Long Beach Island Foundation of the Arts and Sciences. Models travel the runway in quirky collections while a backdrop projects corresponding artwork. Right up Luker’s alley. “The designers that we are bringing in are over the top.

These are things that I probably wouldn’t be able to sell in the store but are just so innovative,” said Luker. Though Luker claims to have no background in the fashion industry, the store has the touch of someone with clear instinct and unbridled flair. Maybe we can attribute her chic tendencies to her artistic origins and obvious creativity? Sweet, humble and unmissable with her shock of white, close-cropped hair, Luker exhibits a passionate delight for the designers she displays around her boutique. One from Turkey, another from Iceland, others from Israel, Amsterdam, London, Poland and Chicago. The artist finds joy in filling her little Barnegat Light shop with pieces from all over the world. Despite her obvious talents in fashion retail, Luker couldn’t stay away from her artistic roots forever. Nine years ago, Luker decided to open the aforementioned Wildflowers Too, a cleverly-named sequel to Wildflowers by the Lighthouse. A block over from the boutique, the gallery features bedazzled parking bumpers and art in lieu of “art-towear.” When asked what she considers herself now: a stylist, a gallery curator, a fashion expert, an artist? She responded, “I don’t know what I consider myself. I don’t think about what I am and what I do. A lot of this is about the quest of finding something fresh and new and creative.” “I learned a life lesson early in my life that if you don’t like what you’re doing, you change what you’re doing. As long as you’re having a good time doing what you’re doing it doesn’t seem like work,” she said. Perhaps Cricket Luker could be best described as an adventurer. A traverser of countries and cultures and colors, gathering up hidden gemstones and carting them back to Barnegat Light. A seeker and discoverer of all things lovely, bright and unabashedly novel. For more information about Wildflowers by the Lighthouse, Wildflowers Too and the upcoming “Artful Noir” event, visit https://www.wildflowersbythelighthouse.com/. bay-magazine.com 209


DID YOU KNOW

F O W L P L AY How a Local Duck Decoy Artist Has Carved His Way Through LBI History Written by Lisa Simek

Photos by Shannon Murphy

The art of carving and creating lifelike waterfowl decoys has a long, storied history within the Long Beach Island region. Duck hunting, or “gunning� as it is popularly referred to, started out as market hunting and hunting parties in the 1800s on LBI, as duck was considered a delicacy, even more so

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Herb Miller, circa 1953

than today. Hunters initially were killing birds to put food on the table and since many of the finest restaurants in the area featured it on the menu, duck hunting was big business in those days. By the 1900s hunters would sell waterfowl for $1 or $2 a bird, shooting 100 or more in a day, and make a full-time living off the demand for them. Other well to-doers including presidents and celebrities (Babe Ruth was known for gunning the Barnegat Bay area!) would often come down to the coastal duck hunt clubs from New York City and Philadelphia, hire hunting guides (also a popular business) and make their way to the marshes for recreational days partaking in this posh pastime. Without wooden duck decoys for the birds to flock to, however, this would have never been possible — the need for decoys increased, and carving them became a moneymaker in its own right. Here is where the artistic niche of crafting life-like duck decoys comes into play. Born in Roebling, NJ, Herb Miller spent his early boyhood on the Delaware River. The son of a gun smith who made hunting rifles, he was introduced to hunting and fishing at a very young age and developed a passion [and talent] for the sports early on. He didn’t just shoot or catch his prey; he studied their moves and habits, watching the way they turned their necks to preen their wing feathers. This is how, at the age of 14, he made his first decoys—a rig of black ducks and mallards—all from memory. He took to the art like a duck to water. He bought a boat and spent every free moment he had gunning the Delaware in and around Roebling Island and Money Island, all the while creating his own decoys as props for the sport. The decoys drew birds to the water, making it easier for him to lure the catch. (Make no mistake, it is unsportsmanlike to shoot a bird not in flight.) It wasn’t just a single decoy that hunters would throw into the water. Every hunt would require hundreds of them— evenly weighted and carefully hollowed so they floated. And the more realistic the decoy, the more convinced ducks would be to settle safely near a wading flock. After a stint in the Navy as a young man, newlywed Miller and his wife, Carol, finally settled in Ship Bottom, NJ in 1961. Shortly after, he joined the Ship Bottom police department where he remained for 32 years. During the 1960s is when he began duck hunting the Barnegat Bay when he wasn’t working, eventually becoming a local expert. He bought a 26-foot garvey named “Ruth” and leased 100 acres in

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DID YOU KNOW

Cedar Run, what is presently known as The Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge and began offering gunning party expeditions as a guide. From the early 1960s until the 1980s, during the very precise migrating season of November-January, every morning at daybreak, he took these professionals from New York City and Philadelphia [who couldn’t take themselves, he chuckles] gunning in the marshy wetlands of the Barnegat Bay, charging $125 per boatload. He built three sneak boxes that he buried in the mud, leaving about 1 foot above ground, and taught the tourists the tricks of the trade. If the wind blew the wrong way, and the water came in, he’d have to bail the tourists out of the sneak boxes with a bucket. But it was all a part of the experience. It was his marvelous handcrafted decoys that were stealing the show most of the time. By 1968 Herb Miller began entering in decoy carving competitions and sure enough, hit it out of the park winning countless ribbons and a myriad of “Best in Show” awards throughout the years. He actively competed until 1980, when he was named Chief of Police of Ship Bottom and served until his retirement in 1993. Not only had he been recognized as the illustrious artist that he was (with his decoys, canvas prints and even highly coveted hand painted Christmas ornaments), but Herb was also a local legend in law enforcement as he and his men had successfully intercepted and seized 16 kilos (32 pounds) of cocaine on its way to New York City from Miami on the now-infamous trade route of the 1970s. In the heist worthy of a New York Times article in 1974, the drugs had a street value of $5 million, the State Police and F.B.I. confirming that the seizure was by far the largest narcotics seizure in the state of New Jersey by any law enforcement agency up until that point in time. Over the years, federal gaming regulations went into effect as our migratory birds became less plentiful. As a true native of the lands, Miller recognizes that the criticism that duck hunting effectively diminishes duck population is untrue, when in fact, most marsh and wetland areas are shrinking at tremendous rates—and that is what’s giving rise to an already diminishing habitat for these migratory birds. “They should have had these Save the Bay campaigns 50 years ago… it’s too late now,” he remorsefully acknowledges of our local habitats.

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Nonetheless after his retirement, in true fisherman form, Herb Miller prides himself on having gone fishing on his shrimp boat every single day since 1993, until a few years ago when his health made making his way around on a boat nearly impossible. But having 3 sons, 7 grandchildren and 2 great-grandchildren in the family still keeps him busy. One of his sons in particular, Steve Miller, inheriting the artistic gene from his dad and creates whimsical paintings and watercolor artwork by means of this inherent talent. Another son, Herbie, along with his daughter Nikki, inherited the fisherman gene— Nikki even holding a World Record from the International Game Fish Association for catching the heaviest Weakfish on record as a teenager in Beach Haven in 2006. Like Grandfather, like granddaughter. To any other person a simple slab of wood may seem like any old generic log from a tree, but to Herb Miller, whose wood of choice is the highly coveted Jersey Cedar (now endangered and hard to come by), harvested in the dead of winter while its sap rests accumulated in the roots, he sees a mallard or a northern pintail or a blue winged teal. Nowadays, his work is more apt to land on fireplace mantels than in the marshy bay. At 87 years young, and more refined in his craft than ever, painting each decoy with a $150 paintbrush is a rewarding, if often frustrating, job. As a perfectionist with his artwork, depicting the subtle markings and nuances of the hundreds of different ducks he works on takes patience as well as skill. All of this magic happens in a workshop sprinkled with sawdust and paint palettes in the first floor and garage of his home. One can sense that there is a satisfaction in being this type of artist, in taking the history of the area and showing people the ways of the past — and then enhancing it. Since the number of birds has decreased along with the number of hunters, today’s decoys are prized art objects, many on display in museums and sold at auctions with hefty price tags. Most of Herb’s decoys range in price from $700-$1000, whereas his World Decoy Championship winning decoys are appraised at a value closer to $10,000. To put that into perspective, the current world record price for antique duck decoys at auction is a red-breasted merganser hen that sold for $856,000 at Christie’s New York in of January 2007. The first million-dollar price for any decoy was achieved when two decoys (Canada goose and a preening pintail drake) were sold for $1.13 million each in a private sale in September of 2007. At his home in Ship Bottom, Miller has his ducks in a row. And mallards. And pintails. And wood ducks, canvasbacks and goldeyes. All of them are his own creations, and he treasures them. Not for financial reasons—although some of the pieces are worth thousands—but because he values the craft. It’s one of America’s oldest traditional arts that’s purely American. Decorative decoys have claimed the upscale market, in a generation when folk art sells. For if one is lucky enough to get their hands on one of these works of art, they can’t help but become connected to the history it carries along with it.

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OFF SEASON LBT OYSTER SHELLABRATION 2018.

Photos by Charles Gravener 214 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2019


OFF SEASON 47th Annual Long Beach Island Commemorative 18 Mile Run

Photos by Charles Gravener bay-magazine.com 215


OFF SEASON HUNGER FOUNDATION OF SOUTHERN OCEAN 24th Annual Hunger Relief Dinner

Photos by Charles Gravener 216 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2019


OFF SEASON JETTY ROCK FOUNDATION’S THIRD ANNUAL ESKIMO OUTREACH EVENT HOSTED BY MUD CITY. 2019 EVENT PLANNED FOR FEBRUARY 23RD.

Photos by Charles Gravener bay-magazine.com 217


OFF SEASON 30TH ANNUAL LBI CHOWDERFEST. 31ST ANNUAL CHOWDERFEST WILL BE HELD OCTOBER 6TH, 2019

Photos by Charles Gravener 218 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2019


OFF SEASON THE SEA SHELL’S ANNUAL STRIPED BASS DERBY 2018

Photos by Jaimee Hughes

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OFF SEASON 4TH ANNUAL LBI FLY KITE FESTIVAL, 2018 5TH ANNUAL EVENT OCTOBER 11-13, 2019

Photos by Charles Gravener bay-magazine.com 221


Est. 1987

732•449•9080 www.padulabuilders.com Timeless craftsmanship now available to the LBI Community License #13VH00078000 222 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2019

Builder Registration #025823


HONEST PRICING, DEDICATED SERVICE, EVERYDAY.

Family owned and operated since 1971. bay-magazine.com 223

just 2 miles from LBI | 445 Route 72 East • Manahawkin | 609.597.4700 | barlowbuickgmc.com


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