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bay magazine S U M M E R

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luxury in every detail With our three divisions, Architecture, Custom Homes and Realty, we offer all-inclusive services that seamlessly bring your dream home to reality. We are experts in the homebuilding business and have streamlined the process from beginning to end — saving you time and money.

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New Jersey’s Clean Energy Program™ is brought to you by the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities and does not endorse any one particular builder. Information can be found at NJCleanEnergy.com.


Let’s talk. 609.597.6999 waltershomes.com 880 Mill Creek Road, Manahawkin, NJ 08050

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Contents Open House 18

Designing a Lifestyle

27

Gardening for your Body, Soul and Well-Being

30

Life is Short—build the Beach House

36

The Ultimate Backyard Oasis

42

Creating the Perfect Outdoor Sanctuary

48

Salt Water

54

The Art of Homebuilding

60

Outdoor Furniture Trends

66

Ask The Decorator

70

Bringing Coastal Dreams to Life

76

Heart of the Home

84

95 Years and Counting

88

Keeping an Eye on 40

Photos by Sheena Lynn Photography

4 BAY MAGAZINE SUMMER 2020


CALL OR WALK IN. WE ARE HERE TO HELP AND TREAT YOUR NEEDS INCLUDING: 609-361-2677 901 LONG BEACH BLVD. SHIP BOTTOM, NJ

• Allergies • Ear infections • Urinary tract infections • Sprains and strains • Stitches • Lab, EKG and X-Ray on site • Immediate specialist referrals if needed

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Contents Get the Look 92

Simple Times

105 Summer Scores

Healthy Living 108 Nevertheless, We Persisted 114 Black Sheep Does Wellness 118 A Tribute To Our Health Care Heroes

Feature Story 122 The Silent Fight Against Hunger in the LBI Region

6 BAY MAGAZINE SUMMER 2020


Design by Appointment | Mercantile Showroom Hours Monday-Saturday 732 | 345 | 1441

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Contents Weddings 136

First Comes Love

140

Wedding Bliss One

146

Wedding Bliss Two

152

What a Gem

156

Statement Florals

162

Summer Solstice

Feed Your Mind 171 Feed your Mind : LBI Lobster & Clambake 180 The Oyster Renaissance 188 Fin-Tastic Dining 196 60 Years of Sweet History

Did you Know? 205

Explore LBI

208

Element of Nature

214

Keeping LBI in Business is Their Business

222

The Show Must go On

226

Do You Believe In Piping Plovers

234

Sharing the Stoke

Photos by Jim Verhagen 8 BAY MAGAZINE SUMMER 2020


FINE HOMES AND RENOVATIONS

EXPERIENCE THE DIFFERENCE

WWW.DFINELLIHOMES.COM ! 609.342.0495

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bay magazine

LEISURE & LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE FALL 2020

bay magazine

CO-FOUNDER | CHAIRMAN PUBLISHER GARY HENDERSON CO-FOUNDER | EDITORIAL CREATIVE DIRECTOR FARRELL DUNLEAVY VP OPERATIONS LUELLEN HENDERSON

ADVERTISING | SUBMISSIONS | GENERAL INQUIRES CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

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LISA SIMEK

info@bay-mag.com CONCEPT & STYLING WEDDINGS JEANNE COON-BOGATH BOGATH WEDDINGS AND EVENTS CONCEPT & STYLING PHOTOSHOOTS ALEXANDRA CONN BLONDE & BLUE BOUTIQUE PHOTOGRAPHERS MICHAEL JOHN MURPHY JOHN MARTINELLI SHEENA LYNN MICHAEL SPARK PATRICIA BURKE LISA RUSSMAN DELANEY DOBSON JAY ROSENBLATT KAITLIN LAVOIE ANN COEN TONY COON CONTRIBUTING WRITERS LISA SIMEK DIANA STANCZAK SARAH HODGSON CHARLES MORRIS ELAINE SISKO KATIE RIBSAM KATIE HOOD JEANNE COON-BOGATH ROBIN CHASE SUSAN VON BRACHEL ANNE GREEN MATT BURTON JIM VERHAGEN ELLE MIJAL

bay-magazine.com 10 BAY MAGAZINE SUMMER 2020

ADVERTISING SUBMISSIONS GENERAL INQUIRES info@bay-mag.com

For a digital copy of bay magazine visit our website at www.bay-magazine.com. All rights reserved. No part of this periodical may be reproduced without express permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed by writers commissioned for articles published by bay magazine are not necessarily those of the magazine.

Copyright © 2020 LBI Publishing Inc. bay magazine Open House Magazine Feed your mind cookbook™ Wedding Bliss Expo™


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FOUNDERS NOTE

What Truly Matters Our sacred Long Beach Island, paradise as it were, is going through a truly unprecedented period. We wanted to begin by paying tribute and giving our sincerest appreciation to all of the essential workers who have pulled us through a time when healthcare professionals, first responders, essential businesses, farmers, fisherman, food pantry volunteers and everyone in between felt the burden of responsibility on their shoulders like never before, and serviced our entire community with their goods, assistance and pure grit. Without you, we wouldn’t be where we are today, safely beginning to open our doors with the confidence and positivity for the better days ahead. Fatefully, 2020 happens to be a year of major celebrations: be it milestone anniversaries for many of our beloved businesses that have been around for generations, new beginnings for ingenuitive local entrepreneurs, and the rekindling of time-old traditions that find themselves creating nostalgia with the next wave of a generation being raised at the shore. In the age of social distancing, what we can strive for is a summer that won’t be defined by anxiety or fear, but instead, find deeper meaning in what truly matters in this world; the values of family, cherishing loved ones and a simpler way of life. A nice dinner out with your significant other may not quite feel the same as it did seasons prior, but nothing can stop the overwhelming sense of joy watching a little child excitedly hit a hole-in-one at a local mini-golf course, or finally finding that perfectly smooth piece of sea glass along the shore. For it’s the call of the ocean that pulls us back, year after year, to our beloved little barrier island— and as they say, the cure for anything is salt water—whether it be sweat, tears, or the sea. We wish you all a safe and healthy summer on Long Beach Island. The

Founders

12 BAY MAGAZINE SUMMER 2020

Photo by | Kady Patterson


COASTAL LIVING REAL ESTATE GROUP

LOCALLY K NOWN G LOBALLY CONNECTED COASTALIVING . PRO

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1968

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L B I R E A L E S TAT E M A R K E T L E A D E R S A N D # 1 SA L E S T E A M I N O C E A N CO U N T Y

6 0 9 . 6 6 1 . 9 3 4 5 | F R E E M A N G RO U P O F L B I .CO M 2 0 0 1 LO N G B E AC H B O U L E VA R D, S H I P B OT TO M , N J 0 8 0 0 8 MANAGING PARTNER: EDWARD A FREEMAN | PARTNER: EDWARD T FREEMAN PARTNER: EDWARD HAINES | ASSOCIATE: JOHANNAH NEHRBAUER

16 BAY MAGAZINE SUMMER 2020


SERENITY DESIGN Everything for the Home of your Dreams

FURNITURE | TILE | ART LIGHTING | RUGS | ACCESSORIES

Shoppe Open Year Round 1102 Long Beach Boulevard Ship Bottom, NJ 609.494.5162 | serenitydesignlbi.com bay-magazine.com 17


18 BAY MAGAZINE SUMMER 2020


OPEN HOUSE

DESIGNING A Written by Diana Lentini Photos by Lisa Russman

Lifestyle

Before the foundation of your new construction is poured, there are months, even years, of work that go into building a home from the ground up. But after your dream lot is secured, you’ve hired a builder and architect who work in unison and have captured your vision, and the blueprints are coming to life before your eyes, your work still isn’t done. Before the walls of your home are completely framed, consider the interior design of your new abode—the element that truly turns your new house into your new home.

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Oftentimes, interior design is seen as a second half play—not quite an afterthought, but not always brought into the beginning stages of planning, especially when it comes to new construction. And while that’s not an issue for most interior design firms, there is an advantage to including your designers in the initial planning conversations for your new home. For this new, ocean-front home in Brant Beach, Donna Grimes, owner of Serenity Design in Ship Bottom, was hired before work crews began breaking ground. “A lot of times, homeowners don’t get design guidance from their architects,” Donna says. “When the interior designer is a part of the conversation from the beginning, we can work together with all the contractors and trades and incorporate custom design features from the start,” she shares. There is no shortage of customization in this contemporary three-story home. A unique scenario, the design of this home needed to incorporate the luxuries of a shore house combined with daily livability, since the homeowners’ intention was to use this new house as their home base. “This is their home, but it’s also a beach 20 BAY MAGAZINE SUMMER 2020

house. We worked together to create a casual, relaxed setting with a modern and sophisticated element… that’s also dog-friendly,” Donna says laughingly. Armed with the task to create a modern beach haven suited to their clients’ everyday lifestyle, Donna, with her daughter, Victoria Grimes, an interior designer who has worked alongside Donna for the past three years, got to work. Highlights of the home include unique spaces dedicated to daily routines, hobbies and entertainment. One striking room is the custom wine cellar on the first level, lined with beachy, vintage-looking, whitewashed brick on the ceiling and floor for an enclosed, cave-like feel. Temperature-controlled with a framed glass door entry-way, the walls hold approximately 1,400 bottles in custom, floor-to-ceiling wood shelves, decorated with old wine crates. Tying the room together with a tasting table in the room, the cellar is the perfect blend of design and function. Moving toward the staircase of the home, the homeowners knew they wanted to do something special.


OPEN HOUSE

White wood topped with durable but luxe high-end vinyl in a wood tone that’s perfect for scurrying paws, the stairs are accompanied by a white wooden railing reminiscent of a barn fence, with three slats running the length of the railing. “It’s unique, and I haven’t seen anything like it down the shore,” Donna says of this treasured piece. Finished with a durable and versatile beachy, woven indoor/outdoor runner that looks just as perfectly placed inside as it would on a patio, the stairs themselves are a subtle statement. Accentuating the staircase is an eye-popping painting of a school of electric blue fish, selected by the homeowners, mounted on a custom feature wall of shiplap —an add that Donna and Victoria were able to incorporate by meeting with the contractors early on. Feature walls are a recurring theme throughout the home, adding interest through color and texture. Through their involvement from the beginning of the home-building process, Donna and Victoria were able to communicate their vision to the builder and architect from the start, like in the master bedroom on the third floor. Behind the bed, the duo suggested a wooden wall treatment, segmenting the wall into large square panels, painted white to let the texture speak for itself. Contrasted with the white oak wooden ceilings, the traditional paneling took on a new twist, topped off by modern gold and white light fixtures on either side of the headboard. More vinyl flooring is found in the master and other bedrooms of the house, crossing every day style with shore home comfort. bay-magazine.com 21


OPEN HOUSE

Another striking feature in the master, though not built in, is an antique walnut dresser, a family heirloom topped with marble and accentuated by vintage lions’ head pulls that have seen better days. Together with the homeowner, Donna and Victoria decided to restore the dresser with trusted partners. After a fresh coat of shiny white lacquer and rounds of wire brushing on the handles to restore the original sheen, the beautiful piece found its rightful place in the master, looking just as good – if not better – than the day it was built. On the third floor, the living area, topped with more white oak on the ceiling to bring an element of warmth to the 11-foot-high ceilings, is arranged as an open concept with areas that are distinctly separate. “Each space is defined in an open plane—we didn’t want it to feel like you’re in three rooms at once,” Victoria says.

22 BAY MAGAZINE SUMMER 2020

The multi-functional space is split between a living room, dining room, kitchen, and closet-turned-bar area. The architect originally had incorporated a storage space, but Donna felt it would be better suited to a bar area, which was one of the homeowners’ must-haves. “We shifted directions, removed the closet and converted it to a bar,” Donna explains. The bar, complete with worn-looking subway tile, a concrete-style quartz countertop, and custom floating shelves of reclaimed pine wood shelves, ties into the details of the other areas, like the fireplace mantle in the living room, and kitchen hood, all made of the same pine wood. The kitchen feels easy-going and livable—still on trend with the light colors of this decade, but not stark white and clinical. The cabinets are finished with cream brushstrokes, contrasted with frosted glass backsplash in an ice mist blue, complimented by a textured, gray


beige and cream pebbled concrete countertop, tying in with the impressive, 10-seat concrete dining room table on the same level. The third-floor powder room offers another glimpse at a feature wall, lined with anything-but-basic V-groove wood paneling, installed vertically and painted powder blue for a vintage beach house vibe. Complete with a small but mighty, white, distressed wood vanity paired with more artwork hand-selected by the homeowner, the powder room offers a pop of color and cheer in an unexpected place. In addition to the design consultation on the builtin aspects, Serenity Design also worked with the homeowners to curate most of the furniture and linens throughout the home. “We really get to know

our clients through a lot of front-end interviewing,” Donna explains. “We go through a series of questions about lifestyle, textures, cleanability, how the house will be used, and use this information to create proposals for the clients,” she adds. For this particular home, a soft palette of blues, greens, creams, some gray and natural wood tones was the finishing touch on a year-long project. “At Serenity Design, we design our houses to be different and special, and when someone is creating a custom home, we want to take custom to a different level,” Donna says. The Shoppe at Serenity is located at 1102 Long Beach Boulevard in Ship Bottom. For inquires, email victoria@serenitydesignlbi.com, and follow the firm on Instagram @serenitydesign.

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26 BAY MAGAZINE SUMMER 2020


OPEN HOUSE

Gardening for your Body, Soul and Well-Being Written by Elaine Sisko, Reynolds Landscaping

“The glory of gardening: hands in the dirt, head in the sun, heart with nature. To nurture a garden is to feed not just the body, but the soul.” - Alfred Austin, English Poet

Nothing creates such instant gratification, hopeful anticipation and lasting memories than time spent in the garden--planting, nurturing and observing the cycle of life. Tilling the soil, planting a seed and tending a garden is time well spent and restorative to the psyche. This is especially true during these tiring times of social distancing and forced isolation when life revolves around the confines of the home and life’s simple pleasures create a welcome diversion from the unsettling headlines of the day. Whether planting vegetables for edible summer bounty, ornamentals for fresh cut flowers or native plants to attract bees, birds and insects, gardening is both a functional and an uplifting pursuit. It is an essential tool for teaching children about the endurance of nature and respect for the environment. It is therapy for the unsettled and active mind so preoccupied with the effect of this deadly pandemic. It can produce both healthy food for the dinner table or habitat for the wildlife that calls your backyard “home”. Strolling through the garden one loses oneself in the moment observing newly emerging flowers and vegetables along with the joy of returning wildlife met in prior years. As we take in the scent of heirloom roses and lilacs, we are reminder of good times past with family and friends and the hope of better times ahead. We can take refuge in the enduring cycle of nature and its promise of hope and renewal.

A garden can be as large as the whole of your backyard or as small as a container on the deck of an apartment. All that is needed is soil, water, sunlight, plant material and time. Time to nurture young plant plugs, time to observe emerging flower buds and vegetable sprouts and time to enjoy the fruits and beauty of the bounty created. The garden lifts our spirits and reminds us of the resilience of our natural world and the restorative possibilities that await. For information on planning or purchasing plant material for your garden, we invite you to visit Reynolds Garden Center located at 201 East Bay Avenue, Manahawkin, NJ or for our latest service updates visit our website at www.reynoldslandscaping.com. For inspirational gift ideas and to peruse our collection of merchandise for your home and garden, we invite you to shop on-line at www.reynoldsgardenshop.com.

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OPEN HOUSE

30 BAY MAGAZINE SUMMER 2020


Life is Short BUILD THE BEACH HOUSE

Demystifying the Beachfront Homeowner, Misunderstood at the Shore Written by Lisa Simek

Photos by Real Estate Cinema

Oceanfront homeowners often get a bad rap. Throughout modern-day media and pop culture, they’ve been reduced to caricatures of greedy, self-absorbed opportunists from the North who could care less about the local community or global environment of the South. Though there have been many a high-profile story where oceanfront homeowners wouldn’t give up access to their properties in order to allow for beach replenishment, those hold outs turned out to be few and far between. Undeniably, there are always a few bad apples that spoil the bunch, but overall, in what Ship Bottom-based architect and builder, Michael Pagnotta, has experienced in his thirty-plus years of designing and building oceanfront homes on LBI and along the Jersey Shore, he can attest that most oceanfront homeowners aren’t bad— they are just vastly misunderstood. “My typical client has a lifetime of memories from the Jersey Shore,” Pagnotta shares in defense of beachfront property owners. “Many have histories that go back for generations— when a weekly stay at a modest shanty was the highlight of a happy childhood,” he adds. He observes that most oceanfront homeowners have used these memories as their “rosebud,” slowly and steadily building toward their dream to return to the beach and provide the same memories for their kids and grandchildren. And as we work through the ravages of the covid19 situation, oceanfront home owners have come to appreciate their hotel-like home in settings that are surprisingly ideal for isolation and working from home, safely surrounded by their loved ones. In this new normal, one can only expect more people choosing to have their primary home at the beach, and reverse commute to the city only when truly necessary. While family traditions, recipes, and heirlooms can be passed from generation to generation relatively unchanged, in this day and age, factors such as technology, multigenerational households, economic and societal shifts have immensely changed the archetypal family dynamic—and how they gather. The overwhelmingly dominant design theme among homeowners nowadays is to ultimately appeal to bay-magazine.com 31


OPEN HOUSE

their children and grandchildren [who may otherwise reside in scattered parts of the region], offering everyone the opportunity, the space—and an enticing reason—to come together and spend good ol’ fashioned quality time with each other at the shore. And since children’s lives are influenced by their environment, these days, a typical oceanfront owner’s prime directive is not necessarily building a bigger and better home, but more so a central vision of creating a home that is inviting and functional to a larger multigenerational family, comfortably living under one roof. “The plans are almost always centered entirely around family first,” notes Pagnotta. Because people are more mobile these days, families and friends tend to spread in many directions. Getting people together is more challenging and the logistics of everyone meeting at a central location would seem impractical if not for the large beach house. “Our design goals have become to accommodate for large gatherings, including several suites for parents and grandparents and smaller bedrooms with lots of bunks for the grandkids,” Pagnotta shares. A family stay could easily include three generations of people requiring 6+ bedrooms and a variety of spaces that allow for communal get togethers, while also providing for smaller more private spaces to get away from everyone (while still technically being with everyone).

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Along with the internal casting of character comes another assumption that the only people who can afford the skyrocketing prices of oceanfront homes are entitled silver-spooned individuals who were born into a successful life. Often times the general idea is that these homes are giant overblown boxes that serve no need save for the expression of one’s ego or success. But the summer bungalow has a new value and with it a new importance. Free time has become precious and low maintenance homes with the latest materials are the necessity. As the demand for homes by the sea has only grown over the past fifty years, the result that comes with it are soaring values and the desire to maximize the potential for each site. These economic realities coupled with the desire to accommodate growing families gathering at the beach naturally result in larger homes; homes that serve more as bed and breakfasts or mini hotels by the time they are outfitted for the slew of homeowners’ now-grown children, along with their spouses, plus a gang of grandkids in tow. Michael Pagnotta also notes of his expertise in oceanfront architecture, “our designs create large open great rooms that take advantage of views while providing visual communication between people in the kitchen dining or living areas. The central theme is to connect with family and nature, while turning away from screens and technology.” The kitchen and grill area are oftentimes designed with fluid interchangeability, as natural the heart of the home has the utmost importance, sat-


isfying the need for loved ones to gather while cooking. Ground levels are able to store all of the bicycles, surf boards, paddle boards, kayaks and beach gear required for many people. “Often times we’ll provide double outdoor showers,” he chuckles, “because anybody who has had to wait for little kids to get out of an outdoor shower knows exactly why this can be a godsend.” Many times, an oceanfront home will even feature a small pool integrated into its design. Seems a little extravagant or over the top to many, but to the multi-generational family, the pool makes lots of sense. Often times pools enable an older family member to watch grandkids while mom and dad get a much-needed break alone at the beach—without the mess and stress of prepping kids for the unpredictable sandy excursion. It also provides an outdoor gathering spot after dark or when beach conditions aren’t ideal. Lower bedroom levels feature smaller bedrooms and suites—much like a cruise ship—intentionally to encourage more time for outdoor activities and less time for Fortnight. Decks are large, allowing for a mix of shade and sunny areas and providing for outdoor dining while listening to the roar of the surf. The economics all makes sense, but what about the risk? Storms have come and gone, and people keep building. One substantial reassurance is that today’s homes are built to satisfy much stricter building codes, starting with the fact that they are all required to be on raised foundations, with many oceanfront pilings extending more than twenty feet below grade. Oceanfront homes are built well above flood levels, and any serious damage to an oceanfront would probably come from a wind event (not flooding), and that damage would be covered from one’s homeowners’ insurance.

Owning an oceanfront makes a lot sense to ordinary people for the very fact that they are great rentals; managed right, and renting your beach house may let you live in the house for free during non-peak beach season. Take an extended family that requires six bedrooms: A hotel stay could easily be $400 per night x 6 bedrooms x 7 nights so a weekly cost would be $16,800—even before food and travel costs. Plus, in the oceanfront beach house, most meals are able to be created at home which saves additional money. For oceanfront owners who have worked so hard to achieve their dreams and would like to keep these prized properties in the family (despite concerns that the next generation would have the interest or wherewithal to handle such a big investment) the high demand for rental potential is an obvious saving grace. Luckily, these properties are ideal legacy assets, or instruments that can be rented out to carry their costs during the inevitable changes in life cycles when a summer at the beach isn’t practical or impossible—whether it be to the demands of sports, college visits, caring for aging parents, etc.). Oceanfront owners have worked, saved, and moved up from other coastal homes to finally get have a chance to achieve their dream. These intelligent, savvy successful people weigh evidence with what is important in this time of their lives. Having the resources and desire for an oceanfront home offset an ever-changing threat that may or may not happen for decades or centuries to come. Over time, mitigation and adaptation are equally as likely as the sea rising to a point that affects the enjoyment of owning an oceanfront home, but a property at the shore never goes out of style. In short: Life is Short. Build the Beach House. Preferably, oceanfront.

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OPEN HOUSE

THE ULTIMATE How Proper Planning Today, Will Save You Time, Money and Aggravation Tomorrow Written by Lisa Simek

36 BAY MAGAZINE SUMMER 2020

Photos by Sheena Lynn Photography


BACKYARD OASIS bay-magazine.com 37


Preparation is imperative in order to create an ideal outdoor sanctuary. Whether you’re wanting to add functionality to your property or simply improve curb appeal, proper planning not only paves the way for a seamless process, but it also helps to avoid potential pitfalls. It saves time and money by lessening the chances of delays when landscaping begins, creates an ideal environment for introducing new and additional features, and helps you determine the project’s budget by uncovering any land conditions that could cause additional expense when the work starts. Below, David Ash, owner of the award-winning New Jersey landscape design and construction company, David Ash Jr. Landscape Contractors, outlines what to consider before the much-anticipated summer landscaping, hardscaping, custom inground pools, and yard maintenance undertakings this season.

Design.

Before homeowners even begins to source contractors, one of the first things to do is to sit down and spend a significant amount of time looking through magazine websites, outdoor living Pinterest boards and various galleries for inspiration to see which styles, textures and colors tend to grab their attention. “A good contractor will keep the architectural style of your home in mind to ensure your design ideas can be implemented tastefully and harmoniously with your home’s color tones and design aesthetic,” advises Ash “the experience shines through when the designer can effectively translate any idea into a cohesive interpretation with the current existing property structures.” 38 BAY MAGAZINE SUMMER 2020

Another interesting facet of proper planning regarding design is the anecdotal experience of experts, because more often than not, the consensus usually is that you will need more space than you think. For example, ample functionality for walkways or parking cars is usually something homeowners tend to wish they allotted more space towards after living and using the space after a season or two. Patios sometimes are initially planned for furniture but often times overlooked for the flow of traffic and other gathering spaces will be needed around the furniture or swimming pool areas for example. “For those who like to entertain, you will want to plan enough space for multiple conversation zones. And if you’re planning an outdoor kitchen, remember to plan for food prep and serving space as well,” notes Ash.

TiminG.

Since most projects are executed in phases, it is important to predict proper start and duration time in order for your project to be completed by the season (presumably Spring/Summer) that one intends on utilizing the space for. “All outdoor projects are subject to weather conditions so it’s important to consider this when gauging how long a project will take,” shares David. To his point, it is easy to assume that installing a drop-in fiber glass pool takes 1-2 days, but excavating the property, letting the earth naturally settle, considering winter weather or working through a particularly rainy season may surely delay the ability to prepare the property properly before the pool is installed.


The same goes for product availability. It’s important to note the delivery time of materials for the scope of the project, as many popular items can be backordered during busy seasons, as well as add-ons. If you add features in halfway through the construction phase, it is only to be expected that such changes would delay the schedule and add to the overall cost of the project.

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Placement.

If you have an overall vision for your property and know you can’t do everything at once, you should still plan everything before breaking ground on the first project. Doing so can save you a lot of money and headaches down the road. For example, if you’re installing a pool and plan to add a cabana and an outdoor kitchen later, put in column footings and any needed electrical and gas lines under the pool deck now. It will cost a little extra on the front end but will save significant money and time later so you won’t have to dig up the ground after your landscape has already been manicured. “A contractor who understands the overall vision you present will guide you in these types of decisions and help you plan the best way to proactively place things such as gas and water lines now, if there is a chance you will want to utilize these down the road with additional construction,” says David.

Budget.

After creating a reasonable plan for the features you would like in your yard, organizing your priorities and your budget will dictate exactly how to execute or alter your dream project to meet those budget restraints. If the scope of a project is too much to handle financially in one season, many times planning the project in phases helps to alleviate some of that overwhelming stress in order to fall in line more with a seasonal budget. “Certain details such as utilizing a linear design as opposed to curves or winding features can make or break a budget,” David Ash notes. “Sometimes a homeowner needs a little guidance and relies on our expertise to suggest alternative perspectives or unique substitutions for features they didn’t even know were an option for their space,” he adds. This is where sourcing the expert opinion of someone who has been contracting outdoor landscapes for decades comes in handy, as their ability to look ahead into the scope of a project and what it entails will give homeowners a better, more realistic idea of what it will really take to get the job done, right.

For more information or to receive a free estimate for your next backyard oasis project, please visit LBILandscaper.com or email info@davidashlandscaping.com. bay-magazine.com 39


Thomas J. Keller BUILDING CONTRACTOR LLC

4 N . L O N G B E A C H B LV D . S U R F C I T Y, N J 0 8 0 0 8 609.494.2215 | THOMASJKELLER.COM 40 BAY MAGAZINE SUMMER 2020


LET’S BUILD A HOME

W E ’ R E I N T H E D R E A M M A K I N G B U S I N E S S . F R O M C O A S TA L C O T TA G E T O M A G N I F I C E N T W AT E R F R O N T, F O R O V E R 4 0 Y E A R S W E ’ V E E N J O Y E D C U S T O M BUILDING A WIDE RANGE OF DIVERSE AND BEAUTIFUL HOMES FOR LONG BEACH I S L A N D FA M I L I E S . R E C O G N I Z E D W I T H T H E P R E S T I G I O U S ‘A W A R D O F D I S T I N C T I O N ’ B Y O U R P R E M I E R W A R R A N T Y C O M PA N Y R W C F O R O N G O I N G B U I L D I N G E X C E L L E N C E & S U P E R I O R C U S T O M E R S AT I S FA C T I O N , O U R C L I E N T C E N T E R E D T E A M W I L L W O R K W I T H YO U F R O M D E S I G N TO C O M P L E T I O N A N D B E YO N D. E N J OY T H E P E AC E O F M I N D YO U ’ R E LOOKING FOR. LET THOMAS J. KELLER HELP YOU ENVISION THE POSSIBILITIES.

NJ REGISTERED BUILDER LICENSE #042471/HIC#13VH04329200

CHOOSE ANDERSEN AND NOTHING LESS “ANDERSEN” AND THE AW LOGO ARE REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OF ANDERSEN CORPORATION

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OPEN HOUSE

Creating the Perfect

Outdoor Sanctuary Written by Lisa Simek

Photos by Patricia Burke Photography

It seems as though the only way to seek refuge these days is to head outdoors. And during these uncertain times, families are opting to spend less time out and about and more time out in the yard. With the outdoor living space now being used as an extension of the indoor floorplan, it’s important to heed advice from the pros regarding maximizing its potential to the fullest—and ensuring it remains cohesive with the aesthetic of your home. Below, the design team from Town & Country Kitchen and Bath boutique design studio and mercantile showroom offers their tips and tricks for transforming your space into a backyard haven:

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Lighting Decor

keep things simple and natural, wood bark vases

Some fresh flowers or greens go a long way. This time of year, it is easy to harvest the plants around your house and yard to brighten a table.  A T&C favorite; snip a few hydrangea blooms from the garden and pop them in an interesting vase or vessel. To add texture and warmth, integrate natural material via linens, pillows, and outdoor rugs

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Lighting is so important when entertaining. Luckily, depending on the time of day, you may not need additional light sources, but lanterns with real or battery-operated candles are a great addition to add ambience and keep the party going into the evening. Similarly to their approach when designing spaces, TCKB encourages mixing materials and metals on a table to create further interest.


OPEN HOUSE

Food We like the idea of creating individual meal portions for each guest. It creates an individual/personalized experience for each guest and can even be tailored to each diner’s preferences. Bonus: it keeps the guessing game at bay for social distancing etiquette, so you spend more time being safely present and less time worrying.

Outdoor Kitchen

The expert design team at TCKB are knowledgeable and can help you crush your goal of a functional and gorgeous outdoor living space. Whether it is fully equipped with a grill, sink, refrigerator, storage compartment, wine fridge, cooktop, island or stereo system, the design planning portion of your outdoor kitchen project is one of the most important.

Bugs

A beautiful collection of citronella candles and incense that are stylishly packaged look great on display and serve a purpose, keeping those unwelcome pests away. bay-magazine.com 45


ENHANCING YOUR EXPERIENCE AT THE SHORE

AUDIO • VIDEO • HOME CONTROL

GOLD DEALER Photo: Ryan Paul Marchese

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OPEN HOUSE

48 BAY MAGAZINE SUMMER 2020


Salt Water Written by Charles Morris, LLA Bay Avenue Plant Company

Photos by Jay Rosenblatt

A N O T H E R T Y P E O F S A L T WAT E R There is something to be said about rolling down your windows or walking outside and smelling that salt air, hearing the waves crash, and swimming in the ocean. The beach has been our favorite destination for generations and will continue to be.  It is the saltwater, sand, family, and friends that draw us here.

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OPEN HOUSE

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A trend in the landscape industry, and in the Long Beach Island area, is the desire for another type of saltwater.  A saltwater pool paired with the comfort of your own home, provides relaxation and security that may be more important than ever at this time.  Adding a saltwater pool to your own home is not as simple as digging a hole. However, you can say goodbye to the harsh chlorine chemicals and lingering smells.  A saltwater pool comes with a lot of choices to ensure you are making the right decision for yourself and your family.  The first choice with a pool on Long Beach Island would be the type of pool you would like – fiberglass or gunite.  Now let us take a closer look at these decisions and break down the advantages of each. FIBERGLASS POOLS Fiberglass pool manufacturers produce a variety of pool shells in a number of colors to fit different needs and uses for a pool. A fiberglass pool will have an initial lower cost and the pool installation can be complete in a matter of a few days. For these reasons, it can be a very appealing option. During installation, fiberglass pools are placed on a bed of stone and chained down to pilings. The pool shells can also be paired with accessory items such as spas and sun ledges. One thing to keep in mind when attaching a spa, whether it be fiberglass or gunite, is that once the pool is winterized this will include the spa. If it is a goal to use the spa in the cold winter months, it may be best to explore an independent spa/hot tub in addition to your saltwater pool. GUNITE POOLS Gunite pools can be constructed in any shape imaginable. The design, size, and functional accessories you can include with a gunite pool allows for endless customization. Raised spas, water spillway walls, custom bar stools and/or benches can all be added into the design. Different natural pebble stone interior finishes can be added to enhance the water’s color and texture. A gunite pool can be considered a ‘forever pool’ and one enjoyed for generations. Homeowners who are building on waterfronts should especially consider gunite pools due to their structural integrity. Gunite pools are built with pilings, rebar, and cement, creating a longer lasting product with a lifetime warranty. C O M F O RT A N D L U X U RY Saltwater pools will never replace that feeling of the beach, but the convenience, luxury, style, and comfort that they can provide is the reason this trend is so prevalent. The monetary value it adds to a home is just a bonus, whether it be personal or rental, but it is just one more reason to add to the list of ways to enjoy LBI. After all, our Long Beach Island community is one that we take pride in and will continue to for years to come. bay-magazine.com 51


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G I F T Barnegat Light 1 6 W. 1 9 t h S t r e e t

H O M E

C O A S T A L

Ocean City

943 Asbury Avenue

Stone Harbor

9501 3rd Avenue

L I V I N G Beach Haven 500 N. Bay Avenue

www.spottedwhale.com bay-magazine.com 53


OPEN HOUSE

The Art of Homebuilding Local Builder Discusses Client-Centric Philosophy, The Artistic Intent Behind Each One of His Builds, and the Multigenerational Legacy of a Family-Owned Business Written by Lisa Simek

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Photos by NK Woodworking


Richard Aitken and his team are celebrating their 36th year in business on Long Beach Island this season, and they have quite the reason to celebrate. Not only have homeowners entrusted the building of their coastal homes to the firm, but decades later, the new wave of next generation homeowners continues to call on Aitken’s services as well. Thirty-six years since its inception, the Rick Aitken building and contracting team now consists of more than 70 full-time employees, guaranteeing the ultimate customer service commitment no matter what department a client’s situation may be geared towards. The company is operated by a stellar executive committee consisting of founder and owner Rick Aitken, business manager of more than 20 years Christine DiThomas, and Debbie Mattson, who oversees all operations at the firm, including the service department. Likewise, the veteran management team is comprised of Heather Aitken, Rick’s daughter and Director of Sales & Design, Bob Rizzo who oversees the entire Andersen® Authorized Windows and Door service department, and Tom Craig who is the Estimating Department Manager. The entire staff, from the field crew to the design team to the office coordinators, works tirelessly to ensure that the Aitken high-standard values come across in every facet of their services. While Rick’s artistic eye, love for design, and knowledge of what is architecturally accurate may have drew him into the construction industry more than three decades ago, it was his ancestry that brought him to LBI. Rick’s heritage is Norwegian—his grandparents were among the earliest settlers of Barnegat City (now Barnegat Light)

who eventually founded the area within the vicinity of present-day Viking Village— and throughout his formative years, the Norwegian culture has shaped how he lived, worked and eventually established a company engrained with hard work and honesty. As a settler from Norway, Aitken’s grandfather, Ingvald Dalland, among others, was known for his inherent skilled wood craftsmanship even though he was not officially a builder by trade. In fact, most of the men in the village earned a living by working as fishermen, and then, in their downtime, they came together as neighbors and church members to quite literally build the community by erecting some of the earlier homes, the firehouse and the Lutheran Church (which still stands today) in the area (We will discuss in more detail the history of Viking Village within the Fall issue of bay magazine.) After seeing some of the award-winning carpentry put forth by Aitken and his team, one would be remiss not to appreciate that Rick certainly inherited Grandfather Ingvald’s woodworking talents. The Aitken homebuilding firm offers clients unmatched quality, with a unique opportunity to create art in the home—as in, art that is a part of the home. Whereas the common impression of art is something that is hung a wall, the Aitkens’ create art that is actually built into the home, sourcing craftsman-artists and wood sculptors from across the country to fashion magical pieces of art for homeowners. What distinguishes this homebuilder is his level of taste and curiosity for the art of woodworking along with a sense of adventure and the vision to realize a client’s wants and needs through impeccable execution.

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OPEN HOUSE

“I wasn’t built to be the type of engineer that sits behind a desk,” Aitken notes of his creative side. He prides himself in visualizing the artistic side of homebuilding. Heavily inspired by the work of the late “Godfather of the Studio Craft Movement,” Wharton Esherick, Rick Aitken’s modus operandi is a distinctive one. When a client makes a special request, “If I can draw it, then I can build it,” Rick tells of his enthusiasm for pushing creative boundaries in the construction industry. Take the example of a homeowner who wanted a custom walnut and maple staircase installed with no posts. Within a few weeks of mapping out the request, Rick had commissioned a seasoned wood artist to hand carve and ship the staircase in sections, which he then installed on-site. The designer happened to be a Seattle native who is the famous sculptor behind the breathtaking exclusive bathtubs made from sustainable and exotic hardwoods. Craftsperson Nathie Katzoff uses his background in ship woodworking and restoration to create these striking wooden bathtubs, which have won the most prestige design awards and have made headlines in countless home design and architectural magazines. What’s interesting about this artist is the bathtubs aren’t even the most popular item he sells—the wooden staircases are the favorite, and his collaboration with Aitken’s team for this handcrafted staircase is precisely what swept 4 out of 5 “Best Staircase” awards from the Stairway Manufacturers’ Association recently (the organization of the leading stair builders in North America). As a large local employer, another fascinating aspect behind the scenes of Aitken’s company is the succession planning—as his daughter, Heather, is grooming herself to assume eventual leadership of the business her father built. Rick discloses that he isn’t going anywhere anytime soon though, as he rather enjoys working—particularly alongside his daughter—and relishes in continuing this gratifying course for the foreseeable future. “My father started this company when I was just learning to walk, so for as long as I can remember my world smelled of sawdust. As a teenager, I started out cleaning jobsites and final cleaning when the 56 BAY MAGAZINE SUMMER 2020


“My client who wanted the rail without posts also noted that the custom wooden tub didn’t have any jets, and asked, ‘Why can’t I have that tub with jets?’ So, I figured out how to do it, and, together with Nathie [he figured out how to make it water tight] we created this spectacular work-of-art tub that is comprised of more than 80 jets, where water comes out of the ceiling to fill it.” -Rick Aitken

projects were complete. Falling in love with our finish work and the beautiful kitchens and baths, I later moved on to assisting with customer selections and design,” Heather recalls of her earliest of experiences within the family business. The construction industry may be one of the most male-dominated industries in the world (with 9.1% of construction workers in the U.S. being female; even more unbalanced is the percentage of females in the construction trades, which is only 3.4%), but Heather hopes to break these gender barriers by building and taking on the tough jobs as her father does. Advocating for women in construction and proving herself as a leader at work time and again, Rick makes it very clear that he is elated with the countless achievements Heather has undertaken since joining the firm in 2004. But the company is not all about building one house and then moving on to the next—Aitken and team pride themselves with building both a home and a relationship with its occupants that will last throughout the generations. Dedicating a 12-person division of the firm entirely to service and property management, Aitken still has the key to the first home he has ever built—“Key #1” as it is referred to—as well as an additional 850 keys for homes on the island with

which homeowners have entrusted his team for maintenance and care throughout the years. The running list of property management duties include things such as ductwork cleaning and winterizing homes, to kitchen and bath remodels, to installing elevator towers and other custom features, even keeping tabs on manufacture warranties for maintenance and safety purposes. “Many of our clients end up becoming lifelong friends,” Rick cheerfully notes, adding that “trust and honor” is everything in this type of relationship. Surrounding himself with the best of the best in the industry, the approach of the Aitken team is focusing on homeowners’ contentment first and foremost. And that happiness sure is contagious, as the Norwegian culture has consistently ranked in the top spot in the United Nations’ World Happiness Report. The mission at A. Richard Aitken Builders is to offer clients peace of mind – whether building their castle in the sand, upgrading it with a major renovation, or providing routine services – by knowing that they have chosen a builder who will stand by them in the years to come. After all, building custom homes and lasting relationships within the community of Long Beach Island is what they do best; it runs in the family. bay-magazine.com 57


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OPEN HOUSE

OUTDOOR FURNITURE TRENDS Written by Lisa Simek

If 2020 has accomplished anything so far, it has surely proven just how important investing in a backyard oasis truly is—especially during these unprecedented times. Contrary to common belief, everyone’s home has room to grow, without spending money on costly architects and construction—all you have to do is embrace the outdoor living concept as an extension of your indoor square footage. And since it doesn’t seem like we will be going out and enjoying cocktails on a packed restaurant patio anytime soon, as the weather warms, the idea of revamping your own outdoor living space seems like the best route to take in order to ensure carefree time enjoying the great outdoors. Below, the style experts from Oskar Huber Furniture & Design in Ship Bottom fill us in with the latest trends of the season and likewise give us a few pointers to ensure that our quality—and quantity— time al fresco this summer is full of comfort, function and, most importantly, cohesive with and reflective of the indoor personality of our homes. One of the most exciting trends that Oskar Huber sees a high demand for is the upcy60 BAY MAGAZINE SUMMER 2020

cled and sustainable outdoor furniture trend. Who doesn’t like to climb high? Well, once rock-climbing rope is no longer passable for actual rock climbing, instead of throwing it away, a US-based manufacturer available at Oskar Huber uses this strong and durable material to create beautiful outdoor chairs, loungers, loves seats and ottomans. Other furniture designers use eco-friendly materials such as recycled plastic or natural teak wood, which is also a hot trend for 2020. Teak has a reputation as the best choice for an everlasting outdoor wood that ages beautifully. An outstanding feature of teak outdoor furniture is the ability to withstand all types of weather. It is one of the few woods in the world containing a natural oil which repels water, keeping it from warping, cracking or becoming brittle, and Oskar Huber sources from one of the best regional, American-made suppliers in the industry. In terms of color trends for the season, the experts at Oskar Huber forecast:


NEW ORLEANS INFLUENCE

Cajun—spiced just right! Recalling the exotic flavors of southern-inspired dishes, this palette nods to paprika, saffron, cayenne pepper and cinnamon. The Cajun colorway is a daring addition to 2020 design trends. While the hues are smoking hot, patterns are approachable in colorful weaves and playful stripes evoking the laid-back atmospheres of Louisiana summers.

CHAMBRAY’S HISTORY OF COLOR

Inspired by antique French workwear, this outdoor chambray has a lightweight textile feel with nuances of sun-bleached denim. Popularized by the 1900’s factory workers, the term “blue collar” gives the Chambray trend an entirely new meaning—and with these dusty blues and cool greys, they are incredibly cozy and warm.

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OPEN HOUSE

THE FLAMINGO

Equally powerful and pretty, the Flamingo trend is sure to be one of 2020s most popular colorways. You may remember that the Pantone color “Living Coral” was 2019’s color of the year, and this year’s designers are treading further into this tropical territory with shades of pink and coral. Somewhere between rose and that peachy orange trend is this striking hue, which exemplifies just the right balance between tart and sweet.

THE CLASSIC: INTO THE BLUE

This year’s Pantone Color of the year is none other than Classic Blue. Instilling calmness, confidence, and connection with the ocean waves, this enduring nautical blue hue highlights our desire for a dependable and stable foundation on which to build as we cross the threshold into a new era. The classic coastal color never goes out of style and is on trend more than ever for 2020.

Making the most out of your outdoor living space during cultural climate is the best way to ensure that your family is safely enjoying socially distanced time outdoors. This season, keep the furniture and accessories from Oskar Huber outdoor furnishings department at the top of your list when you decide to transform an already incredible project into a one-of-a-kind work of art.

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UNMATCHED COASTAL SELECTIONS.

Our Ship Bottom NJ (Long Beach Island) store is your destination for everything coastal. Bring the sounds of the ocean, the warmth of the sun and your beach memories inside with our coastal, nautical and beach styled furniture and accents.

Ship Bottom NJ / 609-494-8127 101 W 8th St, Ship Bottom, NJ 08008 Mon Tue Wed Thu 9-6. Fri 9-7. Sat 9-6. Sun 10-4. Also in Southampton, PA • oskarhuber.com

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Coastal Cushion Custom Upholstery, Cushions, Slipcovers Designer Fabrics, Blinds Wallpaper

STOP BY ANY FRIDAY* ON YOUR WAY TO LBI Bring Pictures...Show us what your home’s problem areas are, and we will come up with the solution for you. It’s as easy as that! Browse...We have a staggering amount of fabric and wallpaper books, as well as area rugs and carpeting from which to choose. And we carry upholsted furniture and casegoods from a variety of manufacturers. And Don’t Forget...we do decorative and privacy window treatments as well. For one room or the whole house, we are literally a one stop shopping kind of shop!

“Our accessories range in price from practically free to almost unaffordable!”

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1509 Long Beach Blvd. Surf City

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849 West Bay Ave., Barnegat, NJ 08005 609.622.2950

* ALL OTHER DAYS BY APPT ONLY bay-magazine.com 65


OPEN HOUSE

Ask

T H E D E CO R ATO R Q & A WITH TOM SWEENEY

Thom Sweeney is founder and owner of Thom Sweeney Interiors, an award-winning full-service interior design studio specializing in contract design and residential business. With a well-trained and careful eye for quality, craftsmanship, and statement-making furnishings & textiles, Thom is recognized for his bold and elegant, yet timeless and classic styled designs.

Q. I’m considering having shiplap put up in my family room. Am I making a big mistake? Is it too trendy; will I be sorry? Help! -Valerie, Moorestown A. Shiplap is trendy, but lots of good things are, and there is nothing wrong with that if the trend lasts. My prediction is that it will last for some time to come, because of its subtlety. The trend now is for a more casual, unfussy lifestyle which differs greatly from the more formal one of days gone by. Keep in mind though, if you have swags and jabots adorning your windows, the shiplap won’t work. However, if you have a Coastal, Farmhouse, Country French, or even contemporary style going on, it will be perfect. It will add the much-needed architectural elements and textures that are so often missing in a room. It serves as a wonderful backdrop for any artwork, or for that complex grouping of family photos you’ve been promising yourself to have resized and framed! And don’t forget: you don’t have to shiplap the entire room. If you’re nervous about making a total commitment, then why not just try one feature wall to begin with. Here are some great examples from one of our clients in Avalon who chose to shiplap the fireplace wall in their Great Room, and the bed wall in their Master Bedroom. Q. What can I do myself that doesn’t cost a lot of money, but will add a designer touch to my home? -Betsy, Surf City

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A. Well Betsy, it depends on how much nerve you have! The first thing that comes to mind is to paint a wall in horizontal stripes. We used that technique at the Hotel LBI in the corridor from the Lobby to the restaurant, and people have really responded to it. In that case we used striped wallcovering and had it hung horizontally, but you can get the same nautical effect with paint and Frog Tape to keep the lines crisp (and for a fraction of the cost.) Another thing you can do is to paint a piece of furniture. Why not? It’s certainly no news that “brown furniture” is out. I credit Restoration Hardware for that. They jumped in with both feet a few years back and introduced the world to Reclaimed wood, which in my mind started the trend that made brown furniture look passé by comparison. So why not rescue a piece that you already have by painting it a rich color? And for Pete’s Sake, keep in mind that BEIGE is NOT a rich color. Maybe choose a color that is found in the artwork, fabric or pillows that are in your room. I bit the bullet and painted a brown breakfront in my Dining Room a French Blue/Gray, and I must confess to you that even I was very nervous about doing it. But it turned out to be a really great pick-me-up for the room. It also serves to remind me that big rewards come with big risks. So now that I know it works, and have seen for myself the effect that it’s had on my dining room, I feel confident in saying to you: Go buy that paint, Betsy! Q. I have lived in a 55+ Community for 12 years. What can I do to make it look more current without spending much money?  -Debbie, Barnegat


A. Debbie, You’ve got to put your home on a diet! How?  By getting rid of the “heavy” and focusing on “lite.”  For example, you probably still have swags, jabots or heavy side panels, perhaps even in a dark, jewel-toned colors, right? OK. Listen to me. RIP ‘EM DOWN!  NOW. (I’ll wait.)  See?  Wasn’t that a catharsis?  Doesn’t the place look better already? And so far, you haven’t even spent a cent!  Light and airy is the goal. And by the way, if you want to maintain a traditional vibe without being so literal with mostly large, classic brown furniture, you can. The trick is to inject pieces with clean lines that will let the room breathe, like maybe an iron and glass side or cocktail table. One

of the other elements that dates a room are lamps, especially those with bell shaped shades. If you still love a lamp, pop on a new barrel shade (the same height and diameter as your current one)—et voilà! —you’ve got a whole new look. How about toss pillows? If your current pillows are faded, or have lost their shape, be sure to find new ones (down-filled only) that will inject a current color combination to your room. And now check out those prints that have caught the afternoon sun for those 12 years. If they have a blue gray cast to them, get the trash can. Add some freshly colored ones, and you’re on your way to relevant home decor. Get going, Debbie (and buy a can of white paint while you’re at it). bay-magazine.com 67


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DE Si GN OPEN HOUSE LONG BEACH ISLAND HOME DESIGN MAGAZINE

I N T E R I O R

A N D

E X T E R I O R

S P R I N G

D E S I G N

2 0 2 0

LONG BEACH ISLAND HOME DESIGN MAGAZINE

OPEN HOUSE I N T E R I O R

&

E X T E R I O R

D E S I G N

Open House Magazine is the top resource for consumers who want to tap into design and architecture communities in the Long Beach Island and surrounding area.

I N F O @ B AY- M A G . C O M | B AY- M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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bringing coastal dreams to life. walters has been building quality homes along the jersey shore since 1984.

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One of the best places to live in New Jersey is close to the beach – especially if that beach is Long Beach Island. Rated one of the Garden State’s top beaches by New Jersey Monthly, U.S. News & World Report and NJ.com, LBI really does have it all. A quiet retreat with amazing ocean and bay views. Breathtaking sunsets. Waves gently crashing along the seashore. Exciting


attractions. A convenient location. A unique social dynamic all its own. With all that and

open floor plans, so much goes into creating

“We are passionate about helping others bring their coastal dreams to life.”

the ideal coastal retreat and no one knows

– Ed Walters, Jr.

that better than Ed Walters, Jr., President

President and Founder

so much more, what could make living on LBI even better? The perfect beach house to call home, of course. From easy beach access to modern details and

and Founder of Walters.

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Walters grew up on Long Beach Island where he developed a love for building homes by helping his parents build their own home in Surf City in the 1970s, as well as other properties in Beach Haven and Holgate. “This is where it all began and this is what inspires us to bring our home building experience to communities all over Long Beach Island and beyond,” said Walters. “We are passionate about helping others bring their coastal dreams to life.” When it comes to putting those dreams on paper, Walters says the first thing to take into consideration is the people living inside the home and the coastal landscape that surrounds it. A retiree moving to LBI will likely have a much different goal for their new home than a growing family with young children. “Whether you prefer a two- or three-story home, a traditional shore colonial that is both versatile and symmetrical, or a contemporary marvel with clean lines and a connection to the outdoors, your home should be a reflection of both your lifestyle and personal preferences,” said Walters.

“And since LBI is our home, we care deeply about creating a vibrant community that can be enjoyed for generations.” – Matthew Gaudet-Walters, Director of Business Development

Once you have selected your home type, it’s time to think about the design and functionality. Matthew Gaudet-Walters,

outside with beautiful outdoor decks and

Director of Business Development for Walters

patios, sparkling pools and outdoor kitchens

Homes, says there are certain elements to

for entertaining.”

consider when creating your dream home by the sea. “We love to incorporate, wide-

Now that your plan is established, it’s time

open living spaces, floor-to-ceiling windows,

to start bringing it to life. “We believe that a

spacious kitchen islands with plenty of seating

strong foundation will make for a successful

and luxurious master suites,” he said. “The

new home project,” said Gaudet-Walters. “As

living experience should then flow seamlessly

experts in the home building industry, we

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about walters Walters has been building quality homes at the Jersey Shore since 1984. The company offers three divisions, Architecture, Custom Homes and Realty, to offer all-inclusive services that seamlessly bring a home buyer’s dream vision to reality. Walters Realty offers full-service brokerage experts that help home buyers find the right homesite depending on their desired location. Walters Architecture allows home buyers to work with in-house architects and designers to establish a working knowledge of the property in order to design the perfect home using the latest technology and quality building materials. Home buyers receive a complimentary first meeting with preliminary draft and one revision. Walters Custom Homes executes the homebuilding process from concept, construction and delivery to move-in and future warranty services. The entire process is

have a streamlined process from beginning to end by offering one-stop shopping with

expertly managed by experienced project managers and staff. Every custom home built by Walters meets or exceeds the energy efficiency requirements for

in-house real estate, architecture and custom

ENERGY STAR® certification. Walters Headquarters

home services. This gives us the opportunity

is located at 500 Barnegat Boulevard North, Building

to truly connect with our home buyers in order

400, Barnegat, NJ 08005.

to build the home they’ve always wanted.” Perhaps that’s the reason why so many families choose Walters to build their dream home. To date, Walters has built over 1,600 homes at the Jersey Shore – that’s over 1,600 relationships with individuals and families that have been developed, nourished and sustained. “Although so much has changed through the years, our core principles have not,” said Gaudet-Walters. “We operate with honesty, integrity, passion and love. And since LBI is our home, we care deeply about creating a vibrant community that can be enjoyed for generations.”

To learn more, call 609.597.6999 bay-magazine.com 73 or visit waltershomes.com.


Personalized Mortgage Solutions Mixed with Jersey Shore Expertise and Hospitality

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Rick Butera Home Loan Consultant 0t$ /.-4

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rick@rickbutera.com Ž Member FDIC. Equal Opportunity Lender. All Rights Reserved. VCS-7732 Š 2018Valley ValleyNational NationalBank Bank. Š 2017 . Member FDIC. Equal Opportunity Lender. All Rights Reserved. VCS-7724

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S E AG AT E G RO U P S e a g at e i n t ro d u c e s t h e H a r b o r C o l l e c t i o n w at e r f ro n t re s i d e n c e s i n L ove l a d i e s.

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6 0 9 . 9 9 4 . 4 7 0 0 | s e a g at e g ro u p l b i @ g m a i l . c o m | s e a g at e l b i . c o m 75 NJ bay-magazine.com Builders Licencse 050985


CUSTOM HOME BY NEWSOM CARPENTRY KITCHEN DESIGN & INSTALLATION BY WOODHAVEN KITCHEN & DESIGN CENTER DESIGNER: YASMIN DEREN PHOTOGRAPHY: JOHN MARTINELLI

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Heart of

the Home Written by Diana Lentini

A kitchen is the heart of any shore home, setting the tone for the type of lifestyle housed within its walls. Whether you’re a seasoned home cook whose love language is shared meals, an entertainer with a passion for mixology, or in need of a laid-back space for weekend brunch with guests, the design of your kitchen should be a priority, not an afterthought. Builders on the island know this, and that’s why for new construction in Ocean and Monmouth counties, Woodhaven Lumber & Millwork is a top partner for full-service kitchen design and installation, including cabinetry, countertops and flooring. Woodhaven has been in business for over four decades, working with both builders and homeowners directly, serving as trusted consultants. They believe that everything starts with a dream, and take it upon themselves to make it a reality, listening to their client’s needs, wish lists and budget. There is a certain beauty to designing a kitchen from tabula rasa, as in the case of brand new homes— blank slates ready to be formed in the eye of the client. But equally as intriguing is a kitchen remodel, working within the confines of an existing structure to creatively analyze every inch of available space and reimagine the room’s potential in a whole new way. For both types of projects, Woodhaven’s designers are here to help along every step of the process, ready to bring your vision to life in a way that’s both functional and stylish. These two elements—aesthetics and functionality— are top of mind for Woodhaven’s design team. With over 50 combined years of experience, design experts Yasmin Deren, Evamaria Sibilia, and Melody Ann Wells, members of the Kitchen Design team at Woodhaven, share their insights on kitchen trends and how to make the most out of any space.

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Layout

One trend that’s here to stay is the creation of cohesive spaces connected to other rooms, allowing for a flow between the kitchen, dining area and living room, Deren explains. The most popular way to achieve this layout is with the addition of a freestanding island. “One level islands are the most popular— they allow the person sitting behind it to be working alongside the person in the kitchen. Plus, it creates less visual clutter than a two-level island,” she adds.

KITCHEN DESIGN & INSTALLATION BY WOODHAVEN KITCHEN & DESIGN CENTER DESIGNER: YASMIN DEREN PHOTOGRAPHY: JOHN MARTINELLI

But what about for smaller kitchens, where a large, center island is simply not feasible? “A peninsula is a great option if there’s just not enough room. You only need a 12-inch space to add a little knee wall,” says Sibilia, referring to a countertop overhang that’s perfect for creating a place for eating, or even a bar area. No matter the size of the kitchen, the designers at Woodhaven agree: a shore home is a retreat, and your kitchen should include as many little luxuries as possible.

Seating

“I love when a client says, ‘My kitchen isn’t large, but I love to entertain,’” Deren shares. “We can still coordinate a small, minute part of the kitchen to tailor to their specialty, with elements like a glass cabinet for stemware that distinctly differs from the cabinets used for storing cooking tools.” Areas designated for wine cabinets, coffee stations with built in K-cup drawers and hidden appliances are all growing in popularity as people create their own personal oases in their vacation homes.

Countertops

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There’s more to seating than deciding between bar-height stools behind the island, or traditional chairs for a standalone kitchen table. Consider custom builtins for added seating and storage. “We can look at cabinetry in a different way to get creative. Bench seating can be custom-made to coordinate with the rest of the cabinetry for homey eating nooks, or to accompany large tables,” Deren says. There are two main factors when it comes to choosing your countertops: material and color. Man-made quartz and natural granite are both popular choices right now that will last you years into the future. “People are leaning toward these materials because of their durability,” Wells explains. While quartz does have a slightly lower heat rating than granite does, it offers more options in color, especially when it comes to a clean white look with gold, gray or tan marbling. Meanwhile, a granite countertop will offer a higher heat tolerance, but the selection of color will be limited to what’s found in nature. (For most people, though, heat tolerance shouldn’t be a deciding factor—use of a trivet under hot pots, pans and plates is a recommended best practice for all countertops, no matter the material.) Both are easy to clean, but depending on the color, you may need to worry about stains for granite. And as for marble? You will have plenty of options with colors, but its softer, porous material will make it more susceptible to scratches and stains, Deren explains.


Cabinets and Hardware

The biggest difference between a kitchen in a shore home and one in a primary residence is that you won’t find many deep-colored wood tones on the coast—that’s reserved more for a primary residence, Sibilia says. “Shore homes are an opportunity to have fun and create something bright. I don’t recommend wood tones in a shore home kitchen, unless it’s driftwood,” she adds.

KITCHEN DESIGN & INSTALLATION BY WOODHAVEN KITCHEN & DESIGN CENTER DESIGNER: YASMIN DEREN PHOTOGRAPHY: JOHN MARTINELLI

Grays and whites continue to be popular, creating a sleek, airy and inviting look that’s timeless and sure to age well. Plus, lighter kitchens make the room feel larger. However, a white kitchen is not destined to be cookie-cutter. “Decorative hardware makes a kitchen. For a while everything was brushed nickel. Now we’re seeing metal finishes like gold and copper coming up, along with chrome,” Wells notes.

CUSTOM HOME BY PRIVATE HOME OWNER KITCHEN DESIGN & INSTALLATION BY WOODHAVEN KITCHEN & DESIGN CENTER DESIGNER: EVAMARIE SIBILIA PHOTOGRAPHY: JOHN MARTINELLI

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Flooring

For Wells, many of the flooring requests she receives are for engineered wood in beachy shades of gray, brown and tan. “The advantage of engineered wood is that it can be customized with wider boards and may often be more durable for shore living, especially with water and sand tracking through the home,” she explains. Still, others opt for hardwood that’s stained and sanded for a classic look.

CUSTOM HOME BY MANCINI CUSTOM HOMES KITCHEN DESIGN & INSTALLATION BY WOODHAVEN KITCHEN & DESIGN CENTER DESIGNER: MELODY ANN WELLS PHOTOGRAPHY: ROBIN + SUE

It’s the pairing of floors with cabinetry where the advantage of using a one-stop shop like Woodhaven becomes extremely evident: a visit to one of their local showrooms can cut your decision-making time in half by helping you visualize your countertop, cabinet and flooring choices in one place. CUSTOM HOME BY NEWSOM CARPENTRY KITCHEN DESIGN & INSTALLATION BY WOODHAVEN KITCHEN & DESIGN CENTER DESIGNER: YASMIN DEREN PHOTOGRAPHY: JOHN MARTINELLI

Color and Texture

It’s clear that neutral tones are a winner for shore kitchens, but for those looking to go bolder, consider a palette of beachy blues or airy greens. “You can still do things that are fun, but timeless,” Deren encourages. “If you’re not ready to commit to a navy blue, consider a softer blue.” Whether it’s on the walls, countertop or cabinet colors, the right color can elevate a room to a new level of polished. And for those set on a single-color kitchen, playing with textures is an easy way to add visual interest. Mixing up wood species in the same color offers variety without having to commit to a bold statement piece.

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It’s easy to feel overwhelmed when considering the amount of decision-making that goes into creating your dream kitchen—all the more reason to work with one expert, who can take care of the entire process and walk you through every step of the way, communicating with your builder, architect and other contractors, if necessary. “We ensure our clients are getting the best customer service, and that everything goes smoothly. At the end of the day, the Woodhaven name is on the kitchen, and we take pride in that fact,” Sibilia says. Considering that many residents on the island have a primary residence elsewhere in the tristate area, this onestop shop approach to service is key to a smooth design experience. “We’re flexible,” Wells says. “We work nights and weekends. While we invite you to our showroom to help you visualize your options, we don’t keep ‘showroom hours,’” she adds. Woodhaven also encourages virtual meetings, especially for clients who live further away and are unable to meet in person multiple times a month. But the ultimate sign of a job well done? Repeat customers and their testimonials. “We get a lot of return customers—they know to come to us for anything. A bathroom, a bar, a closet, and even for work in their primary residences,” Sibilia shares proudly. As one happy customer said in an online testimonial, “I tell all of my friends that I swear by Woodhaven.” Your kitchen is an investment; invest your trust in a team that’s proven. For kitchen inspiration, visit woodhavenlumber.com to CUSTOM HOME BY MANCINI CUSTOM HOMES KITCHEN DESIGN & INSTALLATION BY WOODHAVEN KITCHEN & DESIGN CENTER DESIGNER: MELODY ANN WELLS PHOTOGRAPHY: ROBIN + SUE

view a gallery of completed projects and learn more about the design team. You can also visit one of Woodhaven’s four showrooms, located in Lakewood, Manahawkin, Point Pleasant and Shrewsbury. bay-magazine.com 81


INTRODUCING TOTAL WELLNESS

WE SELL AND SERVICE 2 FULL LINES OF F R E S H W AT E R & S A LT S Y S T E M S P A S 319 WEST 8TH ST. PO BOX 127 SHIP BOTTOM, NJ 08008 609.361.0221 | WWW.LBIHOTSPRINGSPAS.COM 82 BAY MAGAZINE SUMMER 2020


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kate susannah home residential and commercial interior design Creating beautiful homes on the Jersey shore and the NY/NJ metropolitan area Call or email for a complimentary design consultation. info@katesusannahhome.com

201.683.4425

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95 OPEN HOUSE

Years and Counting

Have you ever wondered what LBI was like decades ago, just as many of the island’s towns were laying their roots as seasonal resort communities? Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Zack Shore, Realtors—or Zack Shore, as the real estate agency is known on the island— can tell you. Celebrating their 95th year in business in LBI and surrounding towns, this third-generation, family-owned firm is just as much a part of local history as they are historians. Today, under the leadership of Kevin Thomas, President and Owner, along with his daughter, Seton McKeon, Vice President, Broker Manager, and working closely with family member Aileen Kidd, Broker of Record, Zack Shore sells more real estate on Long Beach Island than any other broker, in both units and volume. Their secret to nearly a century of success? Loyal, experienced agents empowered by the trust and support of the leadership team, and dedication to their community.

Thomas puts it plainly: “The reason we’re in business for 95 years is because of our agents, and the work that they do. Our company has a reputation of keeping people. We have some agents who have been with us for decades—30, 40 years. We try to treat people like family.” 84 BAY MAGAZINE SUMMER 2020

Written by Diana Lentini

95 Years of Family Business A familial feel is an undeniable part of Zack Shore’s rich history. The story begins in 1925, when businessman Richard A. Zachariae founded Zachariae Realty. A family friend of the Thomas family, Zachariae was known to Thomas and his siblings as “Papa Zach,” even spending holidays and vacations with the family. “He was an ‘old salt’ from Long Beach Island. He was just one of the guys who ran the show,” Thomas says. In fact, Zachariae ran many shows: He served as President of Long Beach Island’s School Board, President of the Ocean County Board of Realtors, and as President of the LBI Board of Trade, of which he was also one of the founders. He also found time to serve as Surf City’s mayor for 30 consecutive years, from 1934 to 1964. It was Thomas’ father, William P. Thomas, who was the first-generation real estate agent in the family. William Thomas was a World War II veteran who landed in Cedar Run—just across the bridge from LBI—with his parents, after a long recovery from a war injury. Ready to make a living, William Thomas started a building company in 1947 called William P. Thomas Builders,


focusing on oceanfront homes in the North Beach section of Long Beach Township. He built an office building for his business in Ship Bottom that also housed Zachariae Realty.

which are proudly still with the company today. By the 1990s, there were five branches, with a new office replacing the old in Manahawkin, and a Forked River office, all of which are still in business today.

A few years passed, and Zachariae and William Thomas, along with Frank Hanle, Zachariae’s son-in-law, teamed up for business, with William Thomas earning his real estate and broker’s licenses in the 1950s. As the real estate business picked up, William Thomas wound down his building company. And in 1964, he purchased Zachariae’s shares of the company, becoming co-owner of Zachariae Realty with Hanle and his wife, Dorothea Hanle.

In 1994, Zachariae Realty joined the Prudential umbrella under their real estate business as an independently owned and operated franchisee, officially becoming The Prudential Zack, Realtors. “The way my father expressed it was, ‘The Computer Age was going to change things. People would have access to information remotely.’ It was important to have a name out there that was recognized and respected,” Thomas says. The partnership proved to be fruitful: By joining a trusted, household name like Prudential, out-of-towners looking for a home in the LBI area found comfort in doing business with Zack Shore. After all, a local broker’s name is only as good as his or her reputation’s reach. Prudential allowed their agents’ excellent track records to extend to clients in the tri-state area and beyond. Meanwhile, Thomas was finishing up his law degree at Seton Hall Law School in Newark. After being admitted to the bar in 1981, he actively practiced law up until 1998, when he finally joined Zack Shore as Vice President. “During my last year of practicing law full-time, I was asked to assist with some issues at my father’s business,” Thomas recalls. “I ended up getting involved much more thoroughly than I even imagined! My secretary even pointed out that I was spending more time in LBI than in the law office. The dynamic was interesting to me—real estate is much more of a people business than the law is,” he adds.

In 1970, Zachariae passed away in Boca Raton, Florida, where he had retired. Hanle remained an owner in the business until he passed away in the early 1970s. In 1977, William Thomas acquired all of the company shares, becoming the sole owner of Zachariae Realty. Between the 1980s and mid-1990s, Zachariae Realty saw its fair share of highs and lows, Kevin Thomas recalls. During these two decades, the group relocated from their original office and opened three new locations on LBI—Barnegat Light, Beach Haven Gardens, and Ship Bottom—in addition to a Manahawkin office, with about 50 employees and agents across all locations, some of

The next decade for Zack Shore saw great expansion followed by a return to their roots, fueled by the 2008 financial crisis. “We made an acquisition in Monmouth County in 2006. Well, what looked like a good idea back then, didn’t seem like such a good idea by the fourth quarter of 2008,” Thomas explains. “We ended up closing up shop and moving back down to Ocean County, where we remain today.” It was around this time that Thomas’ daughter, Seton McKeon, joined the family business, working in between college classes. “I’ve done every role you could do,” McKeon says. “I started as a marketing coordinator, helping agents in the office with different tasks. When the market turned, I started working full-time and got more involved out of necessity,” she shares. McKeon went on to earn her real estate license in 2009 and her broker’s license in 2012. bay-magazine.com 85


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Thomas takes this tenet to heart. “Our clients are our agents. We don’t inject ourselves into the actual users of our real estate services—the buyers, sellers, landlords and tenants. The relationship that is most important is the relationship between our agents and their clients. Our priority is making sure that our agents are well-enough educated to meet their fiduciary and professional responsibilities to their clients,” he says.

Giving Back to the Communities That Built Them

And so Zack Shore marched on. The firm was offered another franchise opportunity, this time with Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices, after Warren Buffet and his famed firm purchased Prudential Realty in 2012. After taking time to observe the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices organization as an outsider, Thomas made arrangements to join as a franchisee in December 2015. “When an astute businessman like Warren Buffet lends his name and feels strongly about real estate services, you know he regards it as an important asset—one he is committed to promoting, growing and protecting,” Thomas says. Today, across its five offices, Zack Shore holds the largest market share on LBI, but you won’t catch the group resting

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on their laurels. “The data and our reputation is important to our agents. We use it to attract new people who will be able to keep the business running for the next 95 years,” McKeon says.

Leading through Service Though the company’s name may have changed slightly over the decades, their commitment to hiring and retaining top-notch talent has remained a constant. Zack Shore’s 115 agents are also empowered to establish their own ways of working, whether it’s independently or in teams. “We’re here to support our agents. They handle their clients better than anyone else. If they need support, we’re here to offer it. We are all about them,” McKeon says.

It’s clear that after nine and a half decades, community is a crucial component of Zack Shore’s success. “We believe that community is built by the people who live in it,” McKeon says. As part of this belief, Zack Shore is a Mission of Hope Giving Partner with David’s Dream and Believe Cancer Foundation, a non-profit organization that raises funds to provide financial assistance, wellness services and hope to New Jersey families affected by a cancer diagnosis. This means that for every transaction and lease that is written, Zack Shore and its agents donate a percentage of their money. In 2019, Zack Shore and its agents donated nearly $30,000. “We are happy to support an organization that helps members of our community every day,” McKeon says. With its rich history, family-oriented culture, and strong community values, Zack Shore will undoubtedly continue to evolve for decades to come, helping individuals and families with all of their real estate needs on LBI and beyond.


Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Zack Shore, REALTORS has dominated the real estate market on Long Beach Island for decades.

We Are LBI! Celebrating Over 95 Years in Real Estate!

www.ZackShore.com 29th & Central Avenue 609-494-1776

2900 S LongBeachBlvd. 609-492-7277

Forked River Office 1031 Lacey Road 609-631-1055

675 Route 72 East 609-597-6464

1000 Long Beach Blvd. 609-494-7272

ŠBHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently owned and operated franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. Ž Equal Housing Opportunity.

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Keeping an Eye on 40 The Reynolds Family of Businesses Celebrate a Milestone Birthday Written by Elaine Sisko, Reynolds Landscaping

Photo by Ann Coen

In 1980, Mark and Peg Reynolds entered married life on a stable foundation; Mark had a good job in the Atlantic City casino industry while Peg contributed to the family income working as the surgical assistant to a local doctor. Things changed one day, however, when Mark called Peg at work. “I think I’m going to quit this job,” Mark announced, “the smoke in here is killing me.” Peg considered his decision and asked, “but then what will you do?” “I’m going to be a landscaper,” he had decided.

during the winter months. In season, Peg made routine trips to Bayville—buying flats of flowers with her young family in tow and placing them on the laps of her young children for safekeeping on the ride home. As time went on, Mark and Peg were able to expand and diversify their plant offerings to shrubs, perennials and annual flats on a small plot of land given to them by Peg’s parents, on the site of what was once the family golf course on Bay Avenue. Reynolds Landscaping and Garden Center had become a reality.

She may not have been exactly sure at the time what this involved, however, the seed for what would eventually become Reynolds Landscaping and Garden Shop was planted. Thirty-nine years later, the Reynolds family of businesses has grown and morphed into a multi-dimensional ‘one-stop-shop’ retail/service center stretching over 4 store fronts on Bay Avenue in Manahawkin. Yet throughout this evolution, the guiding principles in the birth, growth and success of this thriving family business have remained the same--steadfast reliance on family, the kindness of friends and an unwavering ear to the wants and needs of the community.

Their small business survived and thrived and, eventually, relocated to its present location on Bay Avenue. Dedication, hard work and tireless energy made this dream a reality, however, Mark and Peg Reynolds both acknowledge that, without the help of the Cullen family (Peg’s parents), none of their hopes and aspirations would have been possible. They provided child support, unloaded trucks, assisted with clients, drove tractors and swept floors—doing whatever they could to lend a hand. The success of Reynolds Landscaping and Garden Shop is a tribute to them and their unwavering support and belief in the dreams of their children.

In the beginning, as with all fledgling businesses, times were tough and business was slow. Mark supplemented the meager family earnings by chopping firewood

The sale of plant material grew to include garden-related merchandise and seasonal offerings of fresh-cut Christmas trees and Halloween pumpkins; as a need

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was realized in the community, so was the ability of Reynolds to fill a void and satisfy client demand. Their willingness to listen to the wants and needs of the customer extended to landscape services as well, with the establishment of landscape installation and design, automatic irrigation and garden maintenance services—built upon the cornerstone of impeccable service and customer satisfaction. The purchase of land comprising what would eventually become Reynolds Garden Center included several buildings and accessory structures. Again, by listening to their customers, Mark and Peg discovered an under-serviced need in the local community for high quality and unique interior home furnishings and accessories. Taking to heart their customer feedback, these series of out-buildings and barns were conjoined to create the quaint and inviting Reynolds Garden Shop. Unique, one-of-a-kind home décor supplemented by indoor house plants, women’s clothing, jewelry, children’s clothing and pet accessories—the Reynolds family expanded their inventory to keep pace with emerging trends in the marketplace. Outdoor showers and kitchens, pergolas and fire features—Reynolds Landscaping honed their expertise and skill set beyond landscaping to include exterior construction and accessory structures. Again, detecting an opportunity to expand construction services to the home and interior, Reynolds created a new company—Mark Reynolds Project Management Inc—to address the needs of existing clients for quality home renovations, new home construction and additions—flawlessly bridging the gap between interior and exterior living. When asked about their greatest success, however, Mark and Peg Reynolds both cite the growth and development

of their children as being their most prized accomplishment. Pride is palpable when they speak of the growth and development of their family from toddlers to adult with individual talents and interests of their own. Untapped potential was always encouraged in their children and led to new specialty niches in the Reynolds business. Emerging skills were nurtured as both parents and children learned from each other. Daughter, Katie, expanded upon talents learned while working alongside her mother in the Garden Shop to manage the Reynolds Floral Market—offering fresh-cut flowers and bridal floral/design services. Her husband, Tanek Hood, developed the Reynolds low-voltage outdoor lighting division. Son, Luke, took over the installation aspects of Reynolds Landscaping and together with his father, Mark, created The Reynolds Group. Licensed through G. Anderson, the firm assists clients with the buying and selling of local real estate. Meanwhile, bay-magazine.com 89


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daughter-in-law, Ashley, became merchandise buyer for the Garden Shop, while daughter Ashley, a teacher by profession, continues to lend a hand at the family business during summer breaks.

tradition in his footsteps. His charming personally and incredible charisma, however, will be hard to replace and he will be undeniably missed by the avid members of his Garden Center ‘fan club.’

With an emphasis on exemplary custom service, quality craftsmanship and steady communication, Mark and Peg credit the long-term success of Reynolds Landscaping and Garden Shop, in part, to their core group of dedicated, hard-work and reliable employees—many on staff for over 30 years. More like extended family than employees, and encompassing in some cases several generations of family members, staff members stand ready and willing to offer expertise, education and years of experience. They create an environment of collegiality and teamwork so evident to any and all customers of the Reynolds family of businesses. Any talk of Reynolds’ tight-knit family of employees would be incomplete without mention of their beloved and iconic figurehead Ronald, patriarch of the Jamaican contingent of this devoted Reynolds family. With Mark and Peg from inception, Ronald retired last year at the age of 82 from Reynolds Landscaping and Garden Shop, though leaves behind two generations of family members ready to carry on the family

Looking back over the past forty years, Mark and Peg are grateful for the kindness and support they have received from those in the community who have followed their progress and participated in their journey. They have delighted in watching the development of their children and young employees from teenagers to adults with new families of their own. They continue to derive great pleasure and boundless satisfaction coming to work each day and serving their patrons and the community they love. As they enter into a new unprecedented future forever scarred by the effects of an unprecedented pandemic, Mark, Peg and the entire Reynolds family continue to endure, standing firm behind the principles that have guided their success and longevity for thirty-none years—strength from family and service to community. As they inch their way toward forty years of business, Mark and Peg Reynolds are fill with the hopes of a continued recovery and the promise of a dedicated, lasting partnership with the community they serve.

LOYAL TO THIS ISLAND.

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Beach Barn Boutique Gifts . Clothing . Antiques & more I n t he hea rt o f S hi p Bo tto m

when y ou are look ing fo r so m ethi ng o ut o f the o rdi na ry

La Colombe Coffee & Baked Goods

1920 Long Beach Blvd Ship Bottom | 609.467.7170

LA Colombe Coffee & Baked Goods 1920 Long Beach Blvd Ship Bottom Inside Beach barn Boutique! themermaidroom_lbi

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GET THE LOOK

Simpler Times

Photography | Michael John Murphy Photography Styled by | Alexandra Conn | Blonde & Blue Boutique Clothings | five 0 Six Surf Boutique Hats | Mod Hatter Hair | Molly Tanzillo @mollys_chair Makeup | Madison Ramirez @madmakeupofficial Model | Nicki Lee Campoli bay-magazine.com 93


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clothing swimwear accessories gifts

a boutique for women of all ages.

images courtesy of The Sandpaper

506 N LONG BEACH BLVD, SURF CITY NJ (609) 467 5306 – five0sixboutique.com

@506boutique

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LIVE LIMITLESS apeironyoga.com

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SUMMER SCORES

GET THE LOOK

by Lisa Simek

This season, it’s more important than ever to #ShopLocal and support LBI’s small businesses whether it’s for beautifying balms, home wares or sweet treats. Here are a few of our favorite things: Owned by a pastry chef trained at the Culinary Institute of Florence, Side Door Donuts is the place to go for the most divine donuts (from flavors like cinnamon sugar, and honey vanilla bean to cookies and cream and watermelon. Don’t forget to pair them with a perfect little espresso. $18 for a baker’s dozen. Available at Side Door Donuts French Girl believes that the plant kingdom offers us all the tools we need to achieve radiant health and organic beauty. For effortless beach waves, Rose Sea Spray, $18. For moisturizing while adding a pop of color to lips, Le Lip Tint, $18. Available at Little Bungalow

Miller & Mare The Charleston Oyster Dish was handpicked out of the bays of Charleston, SC for it’s natural beauty and gilded for an elegant finish; makes a perfect holder for jewelry, soap, or even salt and pepper. Available at five0six surf boutique Karla Colletto ruffled high neck swim suit, $295. Available at Society Beach

Pink Pineapple Custom Surf City 100% Cashmere Sweater, $250. Available at Society Beach

home

|

life

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found

1 7 0 0 l o n g b e a c h b l v d . s u r f c i t y | 6 0 9 4 9 4 1 8 0 2 | @ s h o p l i tt l e b u n g a l o w

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VINTAGE HOME DECOR | RESIDENTIAL INTERIOR DESIGN | EVENT ST YLING | CREATIVE DIRECTING

Alexandra Conn | 609.353.3263 | www.blondeandblueboutique.com | @blondeandblueboutique

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HEALTHY LIVING

Nevertheless, We Persisted

A Health & Wellness Check for Your Body, Mind and Small Business on Long Beach Island Written by Katie Ribsam

Think back to January 2020—the time of New Year’s resolutions. When, like clockwork, we committed to being better people to ourselves and others. For many, that commitment included our health; we vowed to eat better, workout more, and stress less. Fast forward just a few short months later, and those plans were universally derailed. While most often the fault of not keeping our resolutions falls on ourselves, this year it wasn’t due to our lack of motivation, but rather a global pandemic. It abruptly closed the doors to all local gyms, studios, group fitness centers—and delivered quite the blow to our collective 2020 health and wellness goals.  Then just as we thought things couldn’t get any worse, a few weeks later the situation deepened and a new normal emerged. Days of working from home, learning new technology, providing the kids home school support, and worrying about elderly or vulnerable family members left little time for self-care. Until one day, before you knew it, you felt your body weak and rigid—and your mind even more so.  108 BAY MAGAZINE SUMMER 2020

Photos by Viynl Media

Quarantine life and social distancing has taken a toll on all of us to one degree or another and when it comes to LBI and small business, we too, are not immune to its impact. LBI is built on small businesses. You won’t find a big box store, chain restaurant or franchised fitness center anywhere on this little island. When you look around you see family-owned and operated boutiques, mom-and-pop surf and sport shops that have been around for generations, eateries sourcing the freshest regional farms and local fishermen, and galleries run by the native artists themselves. Even the fitness industry on the island, including Yoga Bohemia, has engrained its entire existence within the unique and distinctive, community-powered lifestyle of Long Beach Island. Each one of the local businesses lining the Boulevard and beyond are owned by small-town visionaries with small-town hearts and, in many cases, small-town wallets. They are hardworking, dedicated and committed proprietors who are passionate about their product,


see their employees as extended family, and know their clients as personal friends. Small business is one of the reasons why our LBI community is so incredible, and it is interconnected with that well-known “sigh of relief” our residents, summerers, and visitors all experience as they cross over the causeway. However, small-town businesses in seasonal towns like ours are disproportionately the underdog. Under normal circumstances, most of our business needs to take place in just 10 short summer weeks. Surviving our short season amidst a new socially distanced world will mean that we will likely take an exceptionally harder hit this season. But we are ready to tap our ingenuity, adaptability, flexibility and a whole lot of resiliency to persevere through it all. As a yogi, we spend hours upon hours and days after days working to hone these exact qualities. We do this through focused meditation practice. We do this through disciplined physical postures and exercise. We do this through mindful breathwork. These practices help us stay even-keeled and focused with each passing storm; they help us stay compassionate to ourselves and others in times of adversity. However, yogis are not the only ones who can harness these qualities. People find “their yoga” in many ways. Whether it’s on a surfboard, in the garden, in the kitchen crafting the perfect meal or hitting the pavement for an all-out run; maybe by sitting with a jigsaw puzzle or chasing the kids or grandkids around for playtime. There is no doubt that however we do it, moving our bodies and centering our minds in a focused manner hones the discipline needed to weather difficult storms—and having worked a lifetime to build these qualities, I, along with many of LBI’s small businesses, are ready. Ready to adapt. Ready to get flexible and ready to bounce back stronger than ever. So, what does being adaptable, flexible and resilient mean to an LBI small business? It means that our quarantine experience happens to be sans extra time getting our house organized, and avec more intense brainstorming sessions to deliver our product in new and unique ways. It means calling our local, state and federal representatives to advocate for ourselves, our business and employees who we love. It means learning new online tools for which many of us have no background in navigating. It means a strong-willed focus for ingenuity and creating community over competition by sharing resources with our fellow small business owners so that we all survive. And while many small businesses will not survive this blow, many others will—and I, for one, am betting on LBI.  As our island reopens, our undercover ingenuity will shine through to the masses. Our boutique shops will

welcome more personal shoppers and facilitate for private viewings of collections, our restaurants will reimagine new and creative ways for patrons to dine al fresco (along with more take-out and delivery services to make up for restrictions on indoor dining), and our fitness studios and gyms will offer more outdoor classes on the beach and bay, along with virtual broadcasting to extend live classes to anyone who cannot get into a physical, albeit socially distanced, studio space. Whether we like it or not, our collective new reality has been forced to evolve and as Charles Darwin once said, “It is not the strongest that survives, nor the most intelligent, but the one that is most adaptable to change.” And while I cannot speak on behalf of the behind-thescenes prepping for all of the industries on the island, I can speak for myself on behalf of Yoga Bohemia. While some would say your local gym or yoga studio is a nonessential business, I, along with many in the wellness industry, believe that to be a false statement. What we offer is essential—providing avenues so that people can safely maintain their physical and mental wellbeing. It is not only a necessary component to existence, but should be of continued priority as a measure of longevity and health for our entire community.  So, what does safe and socially-distanced physical and mental maintenance look like for the people and visitors of LBI in the coming months? As with everything in life, evolution continues and this answer changes almost daily. But what we do know for certain is that people not only need physical movement and mental clarity, but they also need community in order to thrive. Therefore, as we welcome in another summer, consider how you can safely get your mental, movement, and community needs met, all while helping to support the small businesses of our island. If you find it challenging to get into a yoga or fitness class abiding by distancing norms, work on honing those qualities of flexibility and look both outside and inside for the solution. Beach and bay front yoga & fitness have always been a thing in LBI and as long as beaches are open to the public, you can count on people moving their bodies in nature with many of these opportunities guided by our local professionals. Check with your local studios and fitness centers for opportunities to move outside in a safe and socially distanced way, including guiding paddleboard tours, a surf lesson, a beach yoga session or an outdoor fitness class. If getting outdoors or to a studio is not an option, simply bring the instruction to your home virtually! Two examples of technological ingenuity brought to you by your LBI wellness professionals are already here. bay-magazine.com 109


HEALTHY LIVING

The first is designed by Black Sheep Studios, of the Haven Beach studio location, and has a new “On Demand” platform with over 50 hours of signature workouts that you can take anytime, anywhere (https://blacksheepondemand.com). The second, by Yoga Bohemia, with two studios, in North Beach Haven and Surf City, is by means of a virtual third studio. This new online studio space entitled “Yoga Bohemia Live” features both pre-recorded classes available on-demand from any device and live broadcasted classes—so students can select whether they wish to interactively engage with their teachers in real time or not—right from one easy online portal. (https://yogabohemialive.com). As humans we are creatures of habit, we like what we like, and learning new ways of being is not always easy. However, being adaptable means we go with the times; being flexible means we bend but

110 BAY MAGAZINE SUMMER 2020

don’t break; and being resilient means, we get back up each time we are knocked down. It is 2020 and as your LBI small businesses take on yet another challenge of resilience, I welcome you to do the same with your personal wellbeing. It is easy to say “the gym is closed” or “my class sold out its limited spaces—I’ll sit this one out,” meanwhile our body and mind suffer the consequences, and the trickle-down effect towards our families and communities quickly follows. Now is the time for your own ingenuity for wellness and to keep moving amidst the new socially- distance world we live in. So, are you up for the challenge? Katie is a soul-searching, sun-loving yogi residing in beautiful Long Beach Island. You can find Katie teaching yoga in one of her two Long Beach Island Studios, in North Beach Haven and in Surf City—or online at her debut virtual studio, yogabohemialive. com. For more information on Katie go to yogabohemianj.com


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HEALTHY LIVING

Black Sheep Does Wellness

Popular Fitness Studio Debuts a Wellness Division, and We are Ready to Dive In Written by Lisa Simek

At Black Sheep Studios, butt-kicking workouts and a new digital platform for interactive, contactless gym memberships aren’t the only exciting ways that owner Devon Karvan is thinking outside of the gym this season. Since physical activity is but one mere element of complete body wellness, Karvan has integrated a wholistic approach into her establishment and opened up Black Sheep Wellness—an extension of the cult-favorite local fitness studio, focusing primarily on nutrition, extensive bodywork and a new, hip IV therapy lounge. Intravenous (IV) injections used to only be associated with hospital visits and the unwell. But the tides have changed, and wildly popular services inspired by 114 BAY MAGAZINE SUMMER 2020

Manhattan’s I.V. Doc have been popping up all over the tri-state area—LBI being the latest hotspot. IV therapy is the easiest and fastest way for delivering health and wellness solutions such as hydration fluids, minerals, and vitamins to keep studio patrons feeling their best whether it be after a late night out or post-excruciating workout. “The power of this therapy lies in the delivery system,” shares Kelly Toffoli, DNP and APRN-BC, who spearheads the Well Hydrated division of Black Sheep Studios. This doctorate-holding, board certified nursing practitioner has spent the last few decades of her career in the Southern Ocean Medical Center ER, as a Drexel Univer-


sity Assistant Clinical Professor and as a local tending family nurse practitioner. She explains, “taking oral supplements requires a trip through the digestive tract, which means lost time waiting for supplements to hit your bloodstream and the potential for a significantly reduced absorption rate once they actually do. With IV therapy, on the other hand, it is an easy way to get the full dose of hydration fluids and nutrients into your system directly and rapidly.”

which is comprised of fluid and electrolytes and is offered with the option to add on different selections of anti-nausea, anti-inflammatory, and antacid formulas for extreme dehydration or hangovers. The second is a B12 Boost, which is not an IV, but a B-vitamin injection offering the system a quick, easy and beneficial vial o’ vitamins to combat ailments such as fatigue and brain fog. The third is a Glutathione IV, which gets rid of the free radicals produced by your body while it fights stress, and it protects cell mitochondria. Not only does it repair DNA and increase muscle recovery, but it also protects your skin and muscles against the aging process, so it help you look better and feel younger too. Finally, there is the Vitamin Bomb IV, which is a multivitamin infusion comprised of over 12 essential vitamins including Vitamins A, C, D3, E, K and all of the B complex vitamins, and folic acid. In addition to IV therapy, the wellness division also has a wing dedicated to bodywork and professional stretching services, offering a gentler form of group fitness: the stretch studio. Promising patrons professional guidance on this oft-neglected component of fitness, clients can take a Yin yoga class in a collaborative initiative with instructors from Yoga Bohemia, or opt to have their bodies stretched via active isolated stretching by a kinesthesiology professional, who will work with the body’s natural physiological makeup to improve circulation, increase blood flow, elasticity

Toffoli’s infusions are offered as four separate categories. The most popular one is the IV hydration,

Photo by Ann Coen

Patients need not be gym members to request IV therapy, as private sessions are scheduled not unlike a routine visit with your typical medical professional, in a dedicated space above the workout studios at Black Sheep. While the benefits of IV therapy tout wellness and beauty advantages, appointment times in highest demand happen to be Sunday morning slots— as the therapy has received an enormous amount of buzz as the “miracle cure to hangovers” in addition to decreasing oxidative stress within the body. But on an ordinary day at Black Sheep Studios, patrons utilize this therapy to increase energy, for instant post-grueling workout hydration, and to promote faster muscle recovery/cellular repair when an old-fashioned ice pack and a Gatorade just doesn’t do the trick.

of the muscle joints and fascia. Picture your tight, sore self relaxing on a table while a therapist stretches you professionally for 30 minutes or an hour. Sounds like a dream for any post-quaratiner’s tight muscled and restricted blood flow, achey bod.

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HEALTHY LIVING

Finally, in line with the bodywork described above, the wellness division will also have a full-time massage therapist on staff. Aside from the obvious bonus, massage therapy is proven to reduced muscle tension, improve relaxation, increase range of motion, improve soft tissue function, decrease muscle stiffness and fatigue after exercise and prevent injuries. The summer is here and although it may seem a little different, the team at Black Sheep Studios is dedicated to ensuring that it be one for the books. Whether you attend a socially-distanced class in-studio or opt for one of their cutting-edge virtual fitness classes online, one thing is for sure—Black Sheep is here to help you with all of your health and wellness needs. 116 BAY MAGAZINE SUMMER 2020


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A Tribute T o O u r Health Care H e r o e s Written by Anne Green

As our community became impacted in many ways due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Hackensack Meridian Southern Ocean Medical Center continued to serve as a place we can turn for outstanding, high-quality and compassionate care. Backed by New Jersey’s largest, most comprehensive and truly integrated health care network Hackensack Meridian Health, Southern Ocean Medical Center was well-prepared for this crisis and is even stronger now. Whatever your health care needs might be, the medical center is ready to care for you and your family.

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Kenneth N. Sable M.D., MBA, FACEP Regional President, Southern Market

Michele Morrison, MPH, BSHA, RN Chief Hospital Executive

“I’m so grateful for this group of incredible

“I am proud of our doctors, nurses and team

individuals, and all our team members, who

members who transformed into everyday

have worked tirelessly to meet the challenges

heroes on the front lines of this pandemic,”

of this pandemic and continue to provide

says chief hospital executive, Michele

essential, high-quality health care to the

Morrison, MPH, BSHA, RN.

“Patient safety is our highest priority and I’m

grateful for the opportunity to be part of many evidence-based research studies that has led to positive change in the delivery of care.”

Carey provides excellent care in the state-ofart catheterization lab which has expanded to diagnose and treat more interventional

vascular and cardiac conditions for patients in the community, thanks to a generous donation from a community member.

“This is my home, my community, my friends

and neighbors. I’m grateful to be part of Southern Ocean Medical Center and to be able

southern ocean community.”

Carey Cranmer, RN, BSN, CCRN-BC

John Bergen, RN, CCRN, CFRN, NRP to contribute.”

As a critical care nurse and educator, John

has directed several clinical programs that

have resulted in improving overall patient

care and safety, including a video monitoring system for patient safety and playing a

leading clinical role in the newly constructed COVID-19 patient rooms.

Evan Brody Lenkowsky, D.O., MBA “I couldn’t be more proud to be part of Hackensack Meridian Health. Network resources and support enabled our team to provide outstanding care during the COVID-19 pandemic.”

As medical director of the Intensive Care Unit, Dr. Lenkowsky guided the transition to a 24/7 multidisciplinary Intensivist Program that provides high-quality seamless care to critically ill patients.

Tara Conroy,

Laboratory Supervisor, Medical Technologist, ASCP “I am proud to work with such an amazing laboratory team who is willing to do everything to ensure the best care for our patients.” Tara supervises the lab at Southern Ocean Medical Center making sure each sample

is processed correctly so physicians receive

accurate results. During the pandemic, she im-

plemented the Rapid COVID-19 Test providing physicians with results within 24 hours so

patients could receive treatment without delay.

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Sara Scheimreif,

Distribution Associate “Over the last 18 years, I am proud to have worked with my fellow team members but seeing everyone band together in the time of crisis, has filled me with such admiration and pride to work for Southern Ocean Medical Center.” Sara and her fellow materials management team members make sure all departments are well stocked with the supplies they need to take care of patients. During the pandemic, the storeroom expanded its hours to provide nursing units extra support by delivering Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and checking inventory needs daily so they were prepared to properly care for patients.

Kevin Jester, RRT, Manager of Radiology “Working at Southern Ocean Medical Center for the past 22 years has been a real pleasure. You

become part of a family and it makes me proud

to watch how our team members take care of the community and each other.”

Over the past few years, Kevin has been instrumental in the development of advanced, digital radiology services including a new CT scanner and Fluoroscopy room. An experienced team provides patients with the highest quality service in a safe atmosphere.

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Brandi Walls, CFER, Endoscopy Technician

Kaitlin LaVoie, BSN, RN, CCRN “Every day we strive to do what is best

for the patient and their families and so

“I am proud to be part of the many success stories and making patients and families healthier and happier.” Southern Ocean Medical Center Keeps Getting Better – Brandi works with new technology in the Endoscopy Lab to safely and efficiently assist physicians with their procedures.

often, we become our patients’ families. I

wouldn’t want to do anything else but be a nurse and I am proud to offer hope and encouragement to those fighting for the chance to live a healthier life.”

As a critical care nurse, Kaitlin works

with team members and physicians to ensure everyone receives the highest quality patient care.

Robert Polino, RN

Melanie Meyer, CST

“I am inspired by how this pandemic has brought all of us together. Our team members went from excellent to amazing.”

“I am overwhelmingly proud to be a part of the OR team. Our main focus has and will always be safe patient care.”

As an operating room nurse, Robert was deployed to COVID-19 patient rooms to assist other nurses when he was not needed in the OR. He is always ready to lend a hand wherever it’s needed most.

Melanie Meyer is a certified surgical technician who takes pride in assisting surgeons in the Operating Room (OR) to ensure that every patient procedure runs safely and efficiently.


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FEATURE

The Silen Against in the LB The Hunger Foundation of Southern Ocean County 501(c)(3) Celebrates 25 Years as It Braces for the Days Ahead

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nt Fight Hunger BI Region Written by Lisa Simek

Photos by Shannon Macphee

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FEATURE

In New Jersey, long lines at food pantries are becoming an all too familiar sight during these unprecedented times. As inconceivable as it may seem in America’s second wealthiest state, even before COVID-19 hit, nearly 14% of New Jersey households—that’s 1 in every 8 people and 1 in every 5 children— were already classified as food insecure. Food insecurity is when you are unable to provide enough food for every person in your household to live an active, healthy life. Within the LBI region in particular, where local pantries serve approximately 136,000 of our neighbors, almost half of those seeking meals from food pantries are actually children. In a more recent Hamilton Project/Future of the Middle Class Initiative Survey of Mothers with Young Children, researchers found that as of April, 40.9% of mothers with children ages 12 and under reported household food insecurity since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. For Ian W. Smith, the executive chef and chief instructor at the Ocean County Vo-Tech Culinary Arts program, a moment that shattered all stereotypical food insecurity assumptions that was burned into his brain 25 years ago. He was leaving from a long day’s work as then-chef at Bally’s Atlantic City. He watched brokenheartedly from across the street as a mother pushed her child in a stroller past a dumpster that collected leftover food waste which was intended to be carted over to pig farms and used as feed. As automobiles whizzed by, he watched her movements in flash photography frames through the breaks in traffic, when he would catch a clear glimpse of her after one bumper ended before the next vehicle drove by. She discreetly walked up to the dumpster, lifted the lid, and began scouring the large trash container for food. As soon as she gathered enough to put dinner on the table that evening, she vanished. She did not “look” poor, as later he would do his best to convey to the community. The gut-wrenching incidence had a significant impact on Smith, and he vowed, as a chef, to make it his mission to not only feed those who were hungry, but to help the impoverished families of our area who did not have access to their next meal, obtain food security in a safe and shameless way. Chef Ian learned that Southern Ocean County’s handful of food pantries (which is where families go to obtain food) were all a part of

124 BAY MAGAZINE SUMMER 2020


the same supply channel from a regional food bank (the storage facility that purchases and distributes food and resources to the local pantries). This food bank, itself overwhelmed, distributed food and resources to more than 300 food pantries and soup kitchens within Monmouth and Ocean Counties—including 8 in the LBI region. And in the early 1990s, food banks rarely distributed to pantries more than once or twice a month. Since local pantries do not have the means to organize proper fundraising, Smith brought together fellow members of the Southern Ocean County Chamber of Commerce and local neighbors to come together and created the concept of the Southern Ocean County Hunger Foundation, which is celebrating it’s 25-year anniversary this year. The mission of this entirely volunteer-run, grassroots 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization would be to generate capital and create the wherewithal for ongoing donations to each of the 8 local pantries of the LBI region that needed help keeping their shelves stocked. They planned a fundraising dinner in order to help fund the regional pantries. It takes food to raise money for hunger, they realized. The Chamber team entitled their event the Taste Dinner, and their vision was to donate 100% of the proceeds and distribute them evenly among the 8 pantries in Southern Ocean County who were in desperate need of more resources and funding in order to service the families walking through their doors.

The concept was simple: bring community members together for an opportunity to taste exquisite dishes (10 courses, to be exact) prepared by a collective of the region’s top chefs—putting competition aside as they harmoniously plated meals from a shared kitchen for one night only—volunteering their talents and donating the food. Pooling each chamber member’s individual talents, the group intended to raise money through ticket sales, raffles, auctions and donations, and be able to help fund local food pantries while gathering the community together for a fun night out. While that first year, the Taste Dinner earned a meager $3,500, by the time it’s 25th Anniversary rolled around, with the unwavering support of local restaurant establishments and the generosity of the community members, the foundation has been able to raise upwards of $120,000 for the pantries with its headlining event. Since its inception, the foundation has further added Bourbon tasting events, Holiday Dinners, Painting Parties and even a 5k run/walk event on Long Beach Island to their annual fundraising repertoire. To date, it has donated well over 1.5 million dollars directly to our local pantries in order to support hunger relief in Southern Ocean County. bay-magazine.com 125


FEATURE

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All of the money raised through the Hunger Foundation’s fundraising efforts are distributed equally to the following local food pantries in Southern Ocean County: St. Francis Center Food Pantry (Long Beach Township) Ocean Community Church Food Ministry (Manahawkin) Barnegat Food Pantry and Ken’s Kitchen at St. Mary’s Parish (both in Barnegat) St. Theresa’s Church (Little Egg Harbor) Greater Tuckerton Food Pantry (Tuckerton) St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church Food Pantry (Waretown) Lacey Food Bank Program(Forked River)

It is important to note that even before COVID-19, statistics in Monmouth and Ocean Counties showed that 27% of all households have an income less than $30,000 annually. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human services, the Federal Poverty Guidelines used to determine financial eligibility for certain federal programs such as SNAP, WIC and the National School Lunch Program only considers a family of 4 at the eligible poverty level if the household earns less than $26,200 a year. Our shore community has a relatively high cost of living—with the average rent for a 2-bedroom apartment in Manahawkin being $1,600 a month (which means that one-quarter of the households in our area, pay more than half of their income just to put a roof over their family’s heads) —even families earning twice the federal poverty level are still stricken with food insecurity. (This statistic coincided with an unemployment rate of 3.5% dated February 2020, according to the United States Department of Labor. In April 2020, at the height of the coronavirus pandemic, the unemployment rate rose to 14.7% (a 123.077% increase), and although there was no updated statistic regarding the number of food insecure people in the LBI region at the time this article was written, we have every reason to believe that over the past few months, the number of Southern Ocean County residents requiring assistance to provide food for their families has dramatically increased.)*

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FEATURE

Although there may not be enough direct access to fresh food in a state poignantly known for its gardens, the family of The Hunger Foundation of Southern Ocean County’s president, Peg Reynolds, has contributed to fighting hunger in the best way they know how—gardening. At the Stafford Community Garden at Lake Manahawkin, The Hunger Foundation’s Community Garden (sponsored in part by Reynolds Garden Shop, but operated entirely by volunteers), neighbors take turns donating their time to cultivate, seed, plant, water, prune, weed and harvest fruits and veggies from a garden that any disadvantaged member of the community can access at any time if they need some fruits or veggies. There is no gate, as the garden is open 24/7 and is accessible to anyone who is in need of fresh produce, day or night. In addition to the pantries and soup kitchens that The Hunger Foundation supports, the intent behind starting a Community Garden was to supplement all of the nonperishable boxed and canned items with fresh food that may not be stable for pantries to supply, but is equally as important in providing families with access to nutritious and delicious, seasonal produce.

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FEATURE

The Hunger Foundation of Southern Ocean County is in need of, now, more than ever, support and volunteers to help them continue to carry out their mission. The most cost-effective way to help is through a monetary donation, as it allows food banks and pantries to purchase from suppliers and farms at reduced costs, it lends flexibility, and it reduces waste. You can visit hfoso.org/donate to make a donation. You can also check the events tab on The Hunger Foundation’s website, hfoso.org/events, and attend any of their upcoming fundraising events. (If social distancing continues to disallow public events, the website will be updated with GoFundMe information.) Together with the Stafford Library, the Hunger Foundation also puts on events at the Community Garden for both children and adults such as a “Read and Weed” series on Tuesdays at 10am in the summer to encourage participation and volunteering to do garden chores, as well as Weekly Volunteer Hours for hands-on learning about composting, rain barrel water conservation, etc. on Wednesdays at 3pm. Educational opportunities are also available for scouts and other community organizations. Every $1 you donate can provide 3 meals to our neighbors. Food insecurity is an issue for children as much as it is for the elderly, and everyone in between. With Feeding America, the nation’s largest group of foodbanks, seeing a staggering 100% increase in demand at distribution centers, one cannot assume who is in need and who is not, especially now. There is still a stigma to needing assistance and in this time of crisis, our community is urged to show compassion for its members. Please help the Hunger Foundation of Southern Ocean County feed a neighbor, today. Visit www.hfoso.org for more information.

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CHILDREN SHOULD BE HAPPY...

NOT HUNGRY *19.3% OF OCEAN COUNTY’S CHILDREN ARE FOOD INSECURE *According to the latest numbers available from Feeding America

Please help us with our vision

“A COMMUNITY WHERE ALL OF OUR NEIGHBORS ARE FREE FROM HUNGER” To Support our efforts, and learn more about our activities. Your donations and participation are greatly appreciated!

The Hunger Foundation has hosted Fundraising Events and received Donations to provide much needed financial support to our local community food banks.

We Proudly Support

Barnegat Food Pantry, Fr. Ken’s Kitchen at St. Mary’s Parish, Greater Tuckerton Food Pantry, Lacey Food Bank Program, Ocean Community Chruch, St. Francis Community Center, St. Episcopal Church

Please visit our website - www.HFOSO.org bay-magazine.com 131


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First comes Love

Planner & Designer Bogath Weddings & Events

Carter and Richard saw each other for the first time while competing against one another at an ice dancing competition. They were sharing the practice ice, and couldn’t help noticing one another. It wasn’t until a year and a half later that they really met, when they tried each other out as ice dancing partners. And this weekend, they’re getting married! But wait, there’s a little more to this story, including the sweetest proposal and a stunning LBI Lighthouse engagement photoshoot at Ol’Barney.

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Photos by Idalia Photography


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WEDDINGS

wedding bliss one

Planner | Bogath Weddings & Events Photographer | Idalia Photography Ceremony & Reception Venue | Brant Beach Yacht Club Ceremony Music | Ceremonious Strings Catering | Kate and Ally’s Restaurant Liquor | Neptune’s Liquor DJ | Off Beet Productions Florals | Lily in the Valley Florist Photo Booth | Idalia Photography Hair & Makeup | Lavish Wedding Dress Shop | Jennifers Bridal Wedding Dress Designer | Pronovias Bride’s Shoes | Ninas First Dance Dress | Lulus Bridesmaids Dresses | Bella Bridesmaids Groomsmen Attire | The Black Tux Wedding Cake | A Sweet Memory Cake Shop and Tea Room Transportation | Lacey Limo Get-Away Car | Antique Limos NJ Invitations | Minted

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HOW THEY MET? These two met for the second time, when Carter was looking for an ice dancing partner. She was on a website called Ice Partner Search (it’s like Match.com for skaters). At the same time, so was Richard. It has never occurred to me that skating partners would have to try each other out, but it makes total sense when you think about it! And it is a lot like dating, right!?! You have to find the person you want to spend an enormous amount of time with and you have to have the same values and goals. Otherwise, it might not work. Carter was either going to find a new skating partner, or go to college. When Richard asked her to be his partner, she decided to defer college and continue competing. By the time they began dating, about a year into their skating partnership, they were already best friends.

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HOW HE PROPOSED? Carter and her family have spent a lot of time on Long Beach Island. Growing up, Carter (much like me) spent summers hanging out on the Barnegat Bay. Her grandparents had a small LBI bungalow in Harvey Cedars that has been in her fmaily for four generations! Richard grew up in England, and learned to love LBI while dating Carter. Richard knew that the dock overlooking the bay was a special place, so while on LBI for a day-trip with family and friends, he came up with a plan to pop the question. One of Carter’s friends (she was in on it) went out on the dock at sunset to take a picture, Carter went to join her, and Richard went as the photographer. Carter’s friend asked if she wanted a photo with Richard. She did. Richard handed their friend the camera, and said he had a great poses to try. With that, he dropped to one knee, and asked Carter to marry him! I can imagine how special that dock is. To Carter and Richard. To their families. And, to generations to come. 144 BAY MAGAZINE SUMMER 2020


Photo Credits: LoveSick, Inc. Photo, Bottom Right: Rebecca Potter Photography Venue: LBIF Ceremony: Barnegat Lighthouse State Park Rentals: Rustic Drift Tent: Sperry Tents Florals: Reynolds Garden Shop

www.BogathEvents.com (973) 477-1392 Jeanne@BogathEvents.com bay-magazine.com 145


WEDDINGS

wedding bliss two

Photographer | Melanie Cassie Photography Ceremony & Reception Venue | The Sea Shell Venue Day of Coordinator’s | Brittany Solon and Jaimee Hughes Make-up Artist | Carly Larrison Hair | Lavish Salon Flowers | Lily in the Valley Florist Cake | A Sweet Memory Cake Shop and Tea Room Dress | Nicole’s Boutique

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HOW THEY MET? We first met in Calculus class at Rutgers University. Jake sat in front of me, and his first words to me were “Are you always this organized?�. haha

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HOW HE PROPOSED? Jake proposed on a Saturday in February, on the beach in Surf City. We like to go shell hunting, especially in the winter, and this was a particularly warm Saturday for February. After eating breakfast at one of our favorite spots, I decided we should shell hunt near our old apartment on thirteenth street in Surf City. After thirty minutes of no luck with shells, Jake got down on one knee and proposed!

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Specializing in Advanced

Skin Care | Body Work | Waxing | Event Makeup | Blow Dry and Event Styling Bar

Now offering Skinceuticals, Living Proof Hair Care and Farm House Fresh Body Products Open all Year Beachhousespalbi.com | 609.342.1519 | 614 Long Beach Blvd | Surf City Photo | Ann Coen Photography

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WEDDINGS

What a Gem!

Explore the world of colorful gemstones, each as unique as the bride who wears them. Written by Diana Lentini

They say that diamonds are a girl’s best friend, but who’s to say that one should be limited to a single, colorless confidant? While diamonds remain as the top choice for engagement rings, they haven’t always reigned supreme. Intricate, delicate Edwardian engagement rings of the early 1900s—named after the English monarch Edward VII—often featured a center gemstone, surrounded by clusters of diamonds or other colored stones. This style transitioned into the Art Deco designs gaining popularity in the 1920s, identified by their striking geometric patterns, accentuated with dazzling colored gems, including sapphires, rubies and emeralds. In fact, according to the American Gem society, it wasn’t until the late 1940s that diamonds became de rigueur, with De Beers’ iconic “A Diamond is Forever” slogan spurring sales in the United States.

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“What’s old always becomes new again,” says Chris Biele, owner of Atlantic City Jewelry, a family-owned business with locations in Tuckerton and Bayville. As a third-generation jeweler with 30 years of experience, Biele has seen—and designed—it all. “Designing a custom engagement ring with a colored gemstone is the perfect option for a bride looking for a unique piece that’s unlike anything else out there,” Biele says. “Colored stones are also a great option for adding a special touch to a diamond rings—or vice versa, where the diamond serves to accentuate a stunning colored stone,” he adds. On the topic of gemstones, one of the world’s most famous engagement rings immediately comes to mind: Princess Diana’s 12-carat, oval, blue sapphire ring, surrounded by 14 diamonds, now worn by Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge. “Sapphire and diamonds are one of the most popular pairings that my clients ask for,” Biele shares. Sapphires make an excellent choice for fine jewelry because of their high rating on the Mohs hardness scale, a universal scale for measuring the hardness of minerals. At 10, diamonds take the top spot as the hardest naturally occurring substance on Earth, that can only be scratched by other diamonds. But at a 9, the sapphire is ranked highly, too, making it durable and able to withstand reasonable daily wear. Though harder stones can handle more accidental dings and bumps than softer ones, Biele is passionate about educating his clients about proper jewelry care and maintenance. “Just because something is highly-valued, does not mean it’s indestructible,” he explains. While the color blue is quick to come to mind when one hears the word sapphire, these gemstones actually come in every color of the rainbow. Pink sapphires, though rare, are growing increasingly popular among his clientele, Biele notes. In his shops, he carries an extensive collection of loose stones in every color, shape and carat imaginable, often opening up a world of new options and inspiration for shoppers. Another popular sparkler for an engagement ring that’s guaranteed to be a show stopper. The red ruby, measuring alongside the sapphire for a hardness of 9 on the Mohs scale due to their similar mineral composition. “Rubies are especially popular among those who desire a vintage looking ring, recreating the styles that were trending in the 1930s

and 1940s,” Biele says. Paired with diamonds, a ruby engagement ring is perfect for the bride inspired by the glamour of Old Hollywood. It’s important to note that sapphires and rubies are not necessarily a cost-savings alternative to a diamond ring. On average, a diamond will be priced higher, but a large, high-quality, sapphire or ruby ring will occasionally run higher than a diamond ring. A third gemstone that’s a popular engagement ring request at Atlantic City Jewelers is the incorporation of an emerald, a 7.5-8 on the Mohs scale. Not as hard as the diamond, sapphire or ruby, those looking for a hint of green may fare better using the stone as an accent, rather than the main attraction. And for the edgy bride looking for a spin on the traditional diamond, consider a black diamond. Like their clear counterparts, black diamonds are naturally-occurring, but get their striking dark color from minute mineral inclusions, including carbon, graphite, hematite or pyrite, which don’t burn off in the crystallization process, Biele explains. Alternatively, for a bride who is set on the sparkle of a traditional, large diamond but needs to make the most out of a budget, moissanite is an option – a gemstone that’s naturally occurring, but more frequently lab-made. And at 9.5 on the Mohs scale, it’s right behind a diamond in hardness and comparable in sparkle and color, ideal for scenarios where size is the most important design factor. Of course, there’s a colorful world of gemstones that spans beyond these selections. Biele recalls a custom engagement ring he created for a client featuring a 200-year old, oval purple amethyst, a family heirloom passed down for generations. Surrounded by a halo of diamonds and a sparkly band to match, the final product was a beautiful way for the bride to hold her family close to heart, every single day. An engagement ring should be unique as the person who wears it. Selecting a jeweler who is experienced, knowledgeable and passionate about jewelry is the only way to ensure that your vision is brought to life. Biele is happy to welcome you into his Atlantic City Jewelry family, serving all of your needs, from custom design, appraisal, insurance, gem certifications and more. “Just like you have a family doctor or lawyer, consider us your family jeweler,” Biele says. bay-magazine.com 153


Donut Wall Rental

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437 Route 9 Bayville, NJ 732.269.6699 | 110 E. Main Street Tuckerton NJ 609.294.6699 chris@atlanticcityjewerly.com Estate Buyers

Photo by Delaney Dobson Photography

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WEDDINGS

Statement Florals C r e at i n g a n U n f o r g e t ta b l e E v e n t S e t t i n g Written by Katie Hood

Photo by Ann Coen, Long Beach Island Beach, Planner, Bogath Events 156 BAY MAGAZINE SUMMER 2020


Photo by Alex Rivera, Mallard Island Yacht Club

This beautiful fountain is an ideal location for a photo opt. It is located right under the arches at the stunning outdoor cocktail hour space at Mallard Island Yacht Club. This event took place in November, when nature provides us with some of the most beautiful elements in floral design, leaves changing color, flower pods, and berries. We created an overflowing display of natures bounty to welcome guests to this stunning estate. Photo by Jessa Schifilliti, Bonnet Island Estate

Photo by Ann Coen location, Smithville Inn

The organic floral towers form a magical cove for the sweetheart table to nestle in. We used a background of locally foraged greenery highlighted with soft timeless blooms such as roses, hydrangeas, spray roses, and delphinium to achieve the ultimate quaint and romantic setting. The table is surrounded with lanterns, pillar candles, and loose greenery creating an enchanted garden feel for the VIP’s of the night.

This custom made “mobile” of flowers truly pops off of the white matte paint on the vintage VW Bus photo booth. We used a variety of brightly colored blooms including peonies, roses, and carnations to welcome guests into the vehicle. The combination, of florals and props created an unforgettable space for guests. bay-magazine.com 157


WEDDINGS

Photo by Ann Coen, Long Beach Island Beach, Planner, Bogath Events

Bonnet Island Estate’s boat house chapel is the most romantic setting to exchange your vows. The exposed white beams, authentic barnwood floors, and stone fireplace together create an architectural masterpiece. One of favorite mantles to decorate is in this chapel. For this particular wedding we used a gold gilded gold framed mirror to create an almost regal vibe. We then toned it down by creating a whimsical display of flowers and locally foraged greenery. The arrangements were full of spring’s finest white blooms including peonies, snapdragon, sweet pea, and garden roses. Below the hearth was filled with an overflowing presentation of candlelight, allowing for the most beautiful glow in the barn like chapel. 158 BAY MAGAZINE SUMMER 2020

Photo by Jessa Schifilliti, Bonnet Island Estate

The husband and wife team “Rustic Drift” created these stunning barnwood pillars that we couldn’t wait to decorate. The pillars welcomed guests onto the beach for a waterfront Bat Mitzvah ceremony. We loved the combination of the brass footed bowls atop of the rustic wooden columns. We then created garden inspired arrangements with the hint of a masculine vibe, mixing white blooms, overflowing greenery, and strong textural elements such as oversized air plants and thistle. We simply added a few coastal chic lanterns to create the finished look of this welcoming display.


Photo by Sasithon Photography, Spray Beach Chapel

This beautiful brass compote vased arrangement adorns a vintage pillar in the most quaint Spray Beach Chapel. This intimate setting doesn’t allow for an overabundance of florals, so we decided to go with a beautiful statement piece embracing the style of this chapel built in 1894.

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Hotel, Dining, Weddings & More Hotel LBI offers the charm of a summer home paired with world class amenities. Relax in your well-appointed room, enjoy a cocktail and watch the sunset on the rooftop, or escape for a day of fun in the sun on our majestic island.

HOTELLBI.COM | @HOTELLBI

Ann Coen Photography

Ann Coen Photography

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Ann Coen Photography

Ann Coen Photography


Our collection of grand estate properties is designed for a singular purpose, to host the most distinguished of wedding celebrations. Our unparalleled service will ensure the bride and groom, their families and their honored guests, an unforgettable experience. W E D DI NGSOFD I STI NCTI ONN J.CO M | @WEDDIN G SO FDIST IN C T IO N N J

Ann Coen Photography

Ann Coen Photography

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WEDDINGS

Summer Solstice

PLANNER | Bogath Weddings & Events PHOTOGRAPHER | Delaney Dobson Photography HAIR & MAKEUP | Beach House Spa BRIDE’S DRESS SHOP | Free Love Bridal INVITATIONS | Crisp Designs by Britt JEWELRY | Atlantic City Jewelry VENUE | Sea Shell Resort and Beach Club CEREMONY ENTERTAINMENT | Ceremonious Strings FLORIST | Reynolds Garden Shop CAKE | Sweet Melissa/The Goodness Café RENTALS | Rustic Drift TABLE TOP RENTALS | The Vintage Table Company MODELS | Emilie and Will

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Shot by Delaney Dobson Photography, this shoot was a reflection of bohemian inspiration and the summer solstice. We chose a palette of soft yellow and green with stone and wood touches to enhance the natural feel. Pulling it all together with a small touch of lavender. The invitation suite from Crisp Designs by Britt, featured soft line drawings of florals. It tied perfectly with the stunning lace gown and soft veil from Free Love Bridal, in Cape May. We incorporated authentic solstice details, including materials, stones, and florals that will make your summer-heart swoon. Oh, and a dessert display from Sweet Melissa that will make you drool. It featured sugar crystals to highlight the crystals used during summer solstice celebrations. Out table settings were designed by The Vintage Table Company with soft floral accents that complimented the color palette perfectly. Oh, and that engagement ring from Atlantic City Jewelry, it features diamonds in a sunburst-inspired setting. And omg, it’s just enough to make me wanna go shopping!

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WEDDINGS

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WEDDINGS

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Brides

CALLING ALL

Wedding Bliss Expo is a new brand in the world of exquisite and luxurious weddings. The Wedding Bliss Expo show is for brides with high attention to detail and interests in the finest design-led products and services. Our stunning centrally-located venue of Hotel LBI will be transformed into a wedding wonderland to delight both couples and the industry alike as attendees are introduced to the area’s top creative professionals, industry leaders, planners, entertainers and vendors while enjoying a chance to network, exchange ideas and walk away empowered and inspired. 

S AV E T HE DAT E NOVEMBER 8, 2020 HOTEL LBI

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FEED YOUR MIND

Feed your Mind

Recipes and photos by Susan Von Brachel and Robin Chase www.robinandsue.com

If there was ever a summer more deserved, it’s this one. Let’s celebrate our return to everyone’s special place, Long Beach Island, with a menu filled with flavor, but easy on the cook. Simple but delicious recipes are what this Feed Your Mind section is all about. Highlighting the best seafood the Jersey coast has to offer and some of our state’s favorite farm fresh items, it all comes together in a breeze. That means more time to enjoy for you, your family, and friends—in the place we all call home. Let’s all raise a glass (perhaps with this refreshing Rosemary Gin Spritz?) Enjoy!

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Rosemary Gin Spritz Ingredients: ½ cup gin 2 T. fresh lemon juice 2 T. rosemary simple syrup (recipe below) ⅔ cup seltzer 2 lemon rinds 2 rosemary sprigs Rosemary Simple Syrup: 2 rosemary sprigs ¼ cup sugar ¼ cup water Directions: Shake gin, lemon juice and rosemary simple syrup

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in a cocktail shaker filled with ice. Strain into a glass filled with ice. Add seltzer. Garnish with lemon rind and rosemary sprig. Rosemary Simple Syrup: Combine sugar and water in a small pan and bring to a boil. Cook, while stirring, until the sugar dissolves. Remove pan from the heat, add rosemary, and then let steep for 1 hour. Discard the rosemary sprig. Recipe can be doubled.

Arugula Salad

with Pramesan, Olive Oil and Lemon

Ingredients: 2 bunches fresh arugula ¼ cup olive oil ½ lemon, juiced Salt and black pepper Shaved Parmesan Cheese Directions: In a large serving bowl, place the arugula and drizzle the olive oil, add in the lemon juice. Salt and pepper to taste.. Mix well. Using a peeler, shave thin pieces of Parmesan cheese on top of salad and serve.


FEED YOUR MIND

Grilled Corn with Lime, Smoked Paprika, Chili & Parmesan Ingredients: 6 ears corn, husks removed ½ tsp. chili powder ½ tsp. smoked paprika Salt and pepper, to taste 2 T. vegetable oil Zest of 1 lime Ÿ cup chopped cilantro Grated Parmesan

Directions: Preheat grill to medium heat. Brush corn with oil and season with salt and pepper. Mix together chili powder, smoked paprika and rub on corn. Place corn on grill; cover and cook, turning occasionally, until corn begins to char and becomes tender, about 12-14 minutes. Place corn on platter and sprinkle with lime zest, cilantro and grated Parmesan. Salt and pepper to taste.

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FEED YOUR MIND

Grilled Bread with Garlic Butter, Parsley & Lemon Zest Ingredients: 1 loaf Italian or French Bread, cut at an angle Olive oil 4 T. unsalted butter, at room temp 1 large garlic clove, minced Ÿ cup chopped Italian parsley ½ tsp. Salt Zest of 1 lemon

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Directions: Preheat grill to medium heat. Rub both sides of bread with olive oil and place on grill. Turn over and grill the other side. Remove when well toasted and place on serving plate. In small mixing bowl, combine butter, garlic, parsley, salt and lemon zest. Serve with grilled bread.


Long Beach Island Lobster & Clambake Ingredients: 1 loaf Italian or French Bread, cut at an angle Olive oil 4 T. unsalted butter, at room temp 1 large garlic clove, minced Ÿ cup chopped Italian parsley ½ tsp. Salt Zest of 1 lemon

Directions: Preheat grill to medium heat. Rub both sides of bread with olive oil and place on grill. Turn over and grill the other side. Remove when well toasted and place on serving plate. In small mixing bowl, combine butter, garlic, parsley, salt and lemon zest. Serve with grilled bread.

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FEED YOUR MIND

Ice Cream Sandwiches Ingredients: 1 gallon vanilla ice cream, softened 12 store-bought chocolate chip cookies, large 1 package chocolate chips Directions: Fill a plate with chocolate chips. Scoop a large size of vanilla ice cream and place in center of cookie and top with another cookie and roll in chocolate chips. Repeat until you have 6 cookies and place on small cookie sheet lined with parchment and place in freezer to harden. 176 BAY MAGAZINE SUMMER 2020


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FEED YOUR MIND

The O ys t e r Re n a i s s a n c e Written by Sarah Hodgson

Photos by The Barnegat Oyster Collective

In the early 1900s, New Jersey was one of the largest oyster producers along the East Coast. From our sparkling little estuaries emerged millions of oyster bushels that were sold and shipped across the country. This small-but-mighty crop built communities, created jobs, provided sustenance and boosted the economy. Coastal communities flourished. But like most empires, disaster raced on the heels of New Jersey’s success and the oyster’s reign crumbled in the 1950s. It was overharvesting and a disease called “MSX” that would decimate the industry and set it back for years to come. Fortunately for our community, local farmers are working tirelessly to return New Jersey’s Barnegat Bay to its former, fruitful glory. One of those ambitious farmers at the helm of this noble ecological cause is our very own Matthew Gregg, owner of Forty North Oyster Farms. Gregg was raised in Monmouth, New Jersey, just one coastal county north of where he would eventually set up shop with Forty North Oyster Farms. “I spent all my time fishing, surfing and hanging out on the beach as a kid,” said Gregg of his aquatic upbringing. The salty, brackish water of the Barnegat Bay courses through the bayman’s veins. He worked in fish markets, on fishing boats and at oyster farms throughout his youth before heading off to school to study Aquaculture, Fisheries Science and Marine and Coastal Policy at the University of Rhode Island. If there was one common thread woven through Gregg’s aqueous upbringing it was mariculbay-magazine.com 181


ture. In 2011, after a brief-yet-successful (and seemingly random) stint working for a prestigious NYC talent agency, Gregg trekked home to New Jersey with resolve and a mission: he would pursue his dream of oyster farming and he would succeed. He set out on his own and developed “Forty North Oyster Farms,” a ten-acre plot nestled in the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge, so named for the degree of latitude at which Gregg first began harvesting oysters. It’s here, tucked away in the salt marshes amongst the osprey, Atlantic brant, ducks and piping plovers, that Gregg makes his environmentally-friendly mark. This noble business venture would lead Gregg to become Asbury Park Press’s first Small Business Innovator of the Year in 2017. A fitting accolade given the trove of advantages a new oyster farm would have for not only the local economy, but the health and quality of Barnegat Bay. With the help of en182 BAY MAGAZINE SUMMER 2020

trepreneurs like Gregg, the bay’s ecosystem can be restored to its original splendor - the way that nature intended. “We’re seeing, and science is proving, that oyster farms can bring important species back to the bay,” said Gregg. Oysters are essential contributors to their habitats and their fellow organisms. Without oysters to feed on algae, the destructive sea plant grows out of control and blankets the bay, thereby blocking sunlight and preventing the growth of wigeon and eelgrass - vital sustenance for aquatic species. These critters even improve the quality of the bay by pumping water through their bodies and removing unwanted nutrients and sediments. Just one oyster has the power to clean fifty gallons of water a day. Oysters act as natural (and delicious) filtration systems that increase biodiversity by making our beloved bay habitable for other fish and crustaceans.


FEED YOUR MIND

A key player in the Barnegat Bay oyster renaissance is the Barnegat Oyster Collective, an organization whose sole purpose is to support and promote local farms like Forty North. “The Collective also handles the arduous logistics. Oysters, if not handled correctly, are dangerous to eat. We all work together to ensure that a confirmed cold chain is implemented,” said Gregg, also a co-founder of the Collective. Barnegat Bay is an ideal place for oyster development. Its shallow depths are manageable for farmers and its salinity levels are higher thanks to the neighboring Atlantic Ocean. The closer that oyster beds are to the sea, the saltier the oysters will be, enabling that quinnessential, savory taste consumers crave. But shallow, salty waters aren’t the only reason that the Barnegat Bay is a prime location for cultivating oysters. The estuary’s proximity to New York and Philadelphia give farmers access to ample markets.

“LBI and surrounding towns have an influx of people from those urban hubs, so we can access our customer base in the summer months when they eat in shore restaurants and then the other nine months out of the year in their favorite city restaurants,” said Gregg. The number of Jersey oyster farms steadily climbs as consumers continue to drive demand. People these days have a hankering for good, quality shellfish and local oyster farmers are more than happy to fill local, outstretched plates with their crop. “A decade ago there was only a small handful of oyster farms in NJ, now there’s about thirty,” said Gregg. Gregg likened the oyster industry’s growth spurt to that of the beer brewing trade. “I think people are appreciative of the process, they want to know their farmer and their brewer and their chefs. There’s a lot of support for local foods because it enriches the community and ensures freshness.”

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FEED YOUR MIND

Oyster farming is also a model for sustainability, an attractive quality in an increasingly eco-minded society. “We don’t incorporate any inputs, there are no fertilizers or pesticides. We just harness mother nature.” And harness mother nature they surely do. The oyster harvesting process is a tedious, strenuous waiting game for sustainable farmers like Gregg. Here’s how the operation works: in the springtime, licensed farmers purchase small oysters called ‘seed’ that were spawned in a hatchery the previous winter. These tiny oysters might start off small, but they grow rather fast. As Gregg puts it, “A million oysters in the spring will fit into a container about the size of a two liter bottle. By fall, they’ll take up an acre.” After about fifteen months, the oysters will reach market size (three inches) and take up a whopping five acres. While they are growing, farmers like Gregg are drying them out and selecting the largest ones to be sold. The entire cycle can take anywhere from fifteen to twenty-four months. “It’s a very intensive and laborious process,” said Gregg. Backbreaking labor aside, Gregg says one of the biggest challenges that oyster farmers face in their quest to harvest and revitalize the Barnegat Bay is the bureaucratic red tape. It took Gregg nearly five years just to obtain the necessary permits and licenses to establish Forty North. “It’s practically a separate job to make sure all of the permits, licenses, leases and compliance documents are in order.”

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All that painful paperwork is worth it in the end, especially for consumers like us, who get to enjoy this delicacy in its freshest form. At Forty North, Gregg harvests three different kinds of oysters: Sugar Shack, Rose Cove and Swan Point. Of the three, Sugar Shacks are the best sellers of the bunch. Hand selected at two and a half inches, these cocktail oysters start salty and finish sweet a surprising flavor profile for a bay-raised critter. In his efforts to rebuild the Jersey oyster industry and the bay’s ecosystem, Gregg also hopes to build a legacy for his family and set an example for future farmers. “I hope the farm flourishes and is a viable career option for my two-year-old son once he’s ready. We hope we can set an example for sustainability.” Gregg’s oysters can be found at The Arlington, Daymark, Black Eyed Susan’s, Delaware Avenue Oyster House & Bar, Parker’s Garage, Bistro 14, Stefano’s, Blue Claw Market, Pearl Street Market, The Old Causeway and Triton’s. For more information about Gregg’s farm, visit www.fortynorthoysters.com. bay-magazine.com 185


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FEED YOUR MIND

Written by Lisa Simek

Photos by Two Dopes from New Jersey

FIN-TASTIC DINING Everyone has that one favorite restaurant; it’s their goto for a special meal, always a gastronomical delight, with an ambience that makes them feel right at home. Even though Long Beach Island is bustling with an overwhelming amount of dining establishments these days—some of whom have been featured on Food Network or boasted surprise visits by celebrities—few and far in between are at the top of everybody’s “favorites list” the way LBI’s Yellowfin has been for the past 23 years; and we are about to find out why.

Maybe it’s the inexplicable magic that occurs when one sets foot on this little barrier island, or maybe it’s because our local seafood is just that good. But, “great food comes from great ingredients,” shares Gina Guardino, founder and owner of the eccentric fish skeleton-logoed restaurant situated on Long Beach Boulevard at 24th Street in Surf City. Born and bred on Staten Island and of Italian descent, she notes that, “in Italy, food is the culture, and with that culture comes delicious meals made only from the freshest of ingredients.” Her secret is in fact no secret at all— Yellowfin is known for using every single part of every animal or vegetable that comes through their kitchen. “And you better believe that we make everything from scratch—from the subtle broths enhancing our delectable dishes right down to the phyllo dough in our signature desserts.” 188 BAY MAGAZINE SUMMER 2020

Guardino grew up summering on LBI, and her love affair with our beloved island is a tale not unlike many others’: Cherish your summers, work hard, and plan for the day when you come back for good and call it your full-time home. By 1997 she was ready to see her dreams through and decided to open her intimate New York City-style restaurant at the beach. With a creative, seafood-focused menu, she would work with talented chefs to meld together a cuisine comprised of intricate classically-trained French techniques with a bold and sophisticated twist on quintessential seashore dishes— some embrace a more exotic, Asian-influenced essence, while others, more elaborate like court-dining masterpieces, and still yet, simpler dishes that emulate a humble, yet divine nod to the Amalfi Coast. One thing they all have in common: introducing Long Beach Island foodies to a much more nuanced understanding of its cuisine—in a way that is elevated and experimental, while still remaining approachable, in a chic-yet-casual environment. On any given day, a staple entrée at this BYOB hot spot is (naturally) the local tuna, which is delivered fresh, daily, out of Viking Village in Barnegat Light. Expertly seared and served rare, it is sliced into delicate strips and carefully draped over wasabi mashed potatoes, and accompanied by baby bok choy and a wakame miso puree. For patrons looking to try some-


thing salaciously delicious—the smash hit tuna pizza appetizer has been hitting the spot since day one. Combing the briny tang of fried capers with the sweet bite of red onions and chunks of soft, ripe avocado, topped with delectably seared tuna (because, really, is there any other right way to cook tuna?), served on grilled Moroccan flat bread and lusciously topped with a wasabi crème fraiche drizzle. But what would an LBI restaurant be without the infamous Viking Village sea scallops on the menu. Unlike bay scallops, the Mid-Atlantic dayboat scallops served at Yellowfin are of superior quality because they are noticeably sweeter, lighter textured, and have a brighter color. With peak quality, color and taste for local scallops being from April through August, all summer long, Yellowfin playfully adapts the sashimi-grade dayboat scallop specials based on the in-season produce of the moment; sometimes serving them alongside caramelized vegetables, beet-chive vinaigrette and a sweet potato hay, other times accompanied with a wild mushroom risotto and truffle butter. They’ve even been known to make an appearance in the now-infamous next level version of Yellowfin’s surf and turf: twin porterhouse lamb chops, grilled and drizzled with a red wine demi-glace, served alongside a sweet Jersey corn and lobster succotash, and topped with two sweet, buttery and delicate scallops. Yet another version of their surf and turf

summons all the voluptuous pleasure of haute cuisine with twin tournedos of filet mignon over a potato puree, layered with fresh asparagus, topped with a gigantic blue Hawaiian Prawn and smothered in a tobiko caviar hollandaise. Are you drooling yet? There are other types of fish on the menu as well, delivered everyday including Golden Tilefish, Chilean Sea Bass, Black Cod, Halibut, Sweet Kauai Prawns & Colossal Crab. Everything that is not local is flown in daily from the most elite distributers, such as Honolulu Fish Company, which sells only sashimi-grade, hook-caught fillets and ensures not only unbeatable quality and flavor, but also Support sustainable fishing practices. The restaurant also sources fresh, seasonal organic produce and meats from local farms through famed New York City distributor, Baldor, and certified natural and organic beef, chicken, duck (oh yes, there is duck on the menu), lamb and cured meats through Jersey’s esteemed, Vrola Meat Company. But it’s not all about the fish. When asked about the most memorable or most requested dish on the menu, both staff and customers unanimously agree—it’s the fried tomato appetizer. Don’t let the simplicity of its name fool you, because as many can attest, even a vine-ripened heirloom tomato during peak harvest season deserves some of that Yellowfin glory. Known as the establishment’s pièce de résistance since it opened its doors 23 years ago, this wildly popular signature appetizer has often been imitated, but never quite duplicated. A panko encrusted, flash fried, perfectly ripened heirloom tomato is smothered with a generous helping of an aioli-based, chilled lobster salad and then layered with smashed avocado, topped with freshly harvested microgreens and finally drizzled with a preserved Meyer lemon- olive oil-rosemary confit. “It’s one of my favorite restaurants of all time,” shares Veronica “Ronnie” Matule, a Loveladies resident who has been a regular at the establishment since its first year on the island. “Gina, herself, is an excellent cook and a master of her craft. Her level of perfection and attention to detail with every dish that comes out of that kitchen is just remarkable.” Mrs. Matule has been dining at Yellowfin for the past 23 years, and enjoys her summers in LBI by frequenting her beloved eatery. “I love the food, I love the staff, and I love the ambience—I feel at home enjoying the local seafood I adore, within a chic and modern, sophisticated environment.” It’s true, customers won’t find any taxidermy fish heads on the walls at Yellowfin. The inner décor is a muted grey, with warm accents and subtle wall pieces featuring the work of local artists. There is no question that Guardino is the bay-magazine.com 189


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master of dichotomy– creating an atmosphere that is both energetic and intimate while delivering quality food that is as creative as it is elegant. When questioned about the celebrities that are frequently spotted inside, Blake Scholey, who Gina affectionately refers to as her “right hand man” at the restaurant, is adamant in sharing that he tries not to pay attention to the hype. “It doesn’t really matter who comes into dine with us,” he notes, adding “we don’t care if you’re on TV or if you saved up all year just to spend this one special week on Long Beach Island and you chose to celebrate that milestone at Yellowfin. Everyone is a special guest in our dining room and we treat them as such.” With its ideal location and excellent cuisine, it’s hard not to be a local hangout for the likes of supermodels and Hollywood actors that frequent the island (and that includes the aforementioned prestigious Food Network chefs). The staff is highly trained and extremely attentive, sleekly donning an all black wardrobe without a tight-necked appeal. Guardino is certain to ensure that her staff doesn’t just provide food but an entire

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dining experience filled with affection and positive intentions. The atmosphere is cozy, the lighting dim, and the music playing in the background. If it wasn’t for the salt in the air, one could close their eyes and picture themselves inside of a trendy eatery in the West Village. One that is tasteful, intimate & friendly, with a hint of beach chic. Yellowfin is one of those LBI restaurants that is constantly getting stellar reviews from the people who dine there. Their upscale food and great service make it a perfect spot for an intimate date night or a night out with friends. Since it is always packed with crowds of happy people, many of them in line waiting to be seated on a bustling Saturday night, be sure to secure your reservations well in advance. This summer, the restaurant anticipates bringing 10% of its indoor capacity, outdoors to accommodate social distancing regulations. The chef-inspired menu offers many fresh seafood choices, and creatively infused local ingredients make for yummy signature dishes. Be sure to #YellowFinIt this summer for an unforgettable meal.


N E W YO R K C I T Y R E S TA U R A N T AT T H E J E R S E Y S H O R E

THE ORIGINAL

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Ann Coen Photography

COASTAL CASUAL Located at Hotel LBI on Long Beach Island, Salt provides upscale dining, driven by the bounty of our local farmers and fishermen.

HOTELLBI.COM | @HOTELLBI

Ann Coen Photography

Ann Coen Photography

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Boat Up Social The Boatyard is a gathering place to come together for casual food and drink, meet up with your family and friends, play games, and enjoy a day on the bay.

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For generations, Causeway Marina has been providing friendly and dedicated service to the families of Long Beach Island, NJ. We offer boat rentals, marina slips & storage, fuel for boats & personal watercraft and a fully stocked bait & tackle shop for crabbing and fishing on the bay. CAUSEWAYMARINAN J.COM | @CAUSEWAYMARINA

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BEST CHOICE FOR FRESH PRODUCE Family owned Since 1994

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Country Kettle Fudge

Serves Up 60 Years of Sweet History At This Iconic LBI Shop, Fudge Runs in the Family Written by Lisa Simek

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Wild blueberries are synonymous with Maine, southern Florida is known for its key lime pie, and the alluring scent of freshly made New Orleans beignets is anyone’s kryptonite. I mean, are you even in Hawaii if you’re not eating shave ice? However, further up the Eastern Coast, everyone knows that no visit to the Jersey Shore is ever complete without a good ol’ fashioned piece of salt water taffy and, most importantly, indulging in the iconic, fresh and creamy, handmade fudge. As luck would have it, Long Beach Island happens to be home to a charming family-run fudgerie that’s been revered as the ultimate local confectionary institution since 1960. Known for the best homestyle, hand whipped fudge this side of the Pine Barrens, John Maschal’s Country Kettle Fudge is celebrating an oh-so-sweet 60 years and three generations of artisanal fudge-making excellence this summer—and we couldn’t be more excited to learn about this heavenly, chocolatey tradition. Legend has it that fudge was first created in the late 1880s when the soft, rich confection we know

today may have been the result of “fudging” a batch of caramel, with the candy ending up creamy and crumbly instead of gooey and chewy thanks to the unintended formation of tiny sugar crystals. Apparently, the name “fudge” stuck for this accidental creation, and so did the recipe for this newfound decadent dessert. Although a young lady from Vassar College has been widely credited with inventing fudge while a student at the Poughkeepsie, NY, all-women’s school, the Vassar Encyclopedia begs to differ. It notes that, although Miss Hartridge’s letter describing the fudge was the first known documentation of an American-style fudge recipe, she had in fact acknowledged receiving instructions from a classmate’s cousin. Similar histories within the same timeframe also suggest that fudge could have just as easily been a European or South American invention, as Scotland was first recognized for cooking up tablet (taiblet in Scots) during those same formative years, and a little further east, the Polish cream fudge krówki became wildly popular as the candied version of dulce de leche, which originated in Argentina as far back as the 1820s. bay-magazine.com 197


the extra mile and it really shows in the caliber of fudge they produce. They pride themselves on the fact that their homemade fudge consists of fresh milk, cream, and cane sugar. It is cooked, cooled and whipped daily, carefully, by hand in small batches on premises in the traditional style (using copper kettles)—which yields that authentically fresh, melt-in-your-mouth taste. Prepared using this old family recipe, handmade copper kettles, and a wooden paddle, it doesn’t get more old school than Country Kettle Fudge. At first glance, making fudge may seem as easy as pie: one cooks milk, sugar and cream until it melts, and then simply lets it cool. Fat chance. This confectionary delight is more artform and science than it is a straightforward recipe. Cook it too long or neglect to cool it properly and your fudge will be tough, hard, or grainy. If you fail to reach the exact cooking temperature, you are left with a sticky, gummy mess that never sets. In order for the fudge to come out perfect, fudgeteers must carefully cook the ingredients to a precise temperature. John himself developed a distinctive skill of learning to count the rhythm as his thermometer slowly approached the precise [in candy making terms]

Nevertheless, it was during the summer of 1953 when the sweet life began for Mr. John Maschal. Under the tutelage of his Ocean City High School science teacher [who happened to own the famous Johnson’s Popcorn stand on the Ocean City boardwalk], John’s summer gig of making fudge on the boardwalk quickly turned into a quest for the perfect combination of ingredients to create a stellar recipe of his own. Blurring the lines between artistic chocolatier and curious scientist, he eventually developed a winning recipe based not only on the quality and freshness of ingredients, but moreover, a meticulous cooking and cooling technique involving old-fashioned copper kettles that has since been passed down to his children—and now grandchildren—who all hand-make his fudge the exact same way he did when he opened his sweet shop, John Maschal’s Country Kettle Fudge, sixty years ago on in Beach Haven. On any given day you’ll find a Maschal family member in the store, whether it’s John’s son, JB, or one of John’s four beach blonde granddaughters. Sparing no expense on the quality of ingredients, the Maschals go 198 BAY MAGAZINE SUMMER 2020

softball stage temperature. Then comes the finesse of carefully cooling the molten chocolate candy—where the science of controlling sugar crystallization comes to play. According to John, it must be done in small batches, in handmade copper kettles. This allows the gooey, hot fudge mixture to cool slowly and evenly until it becomes a super-saturated solution. Then at yet another precise temperature, the mixture is whipped with a large wooden paddle. This step requires skill, timing and technique. It is the slow cooling and rapid beating in the copper kettle that causes the mixture to change very rapidly from a super saturated mixture to the smooth, creamy fudge Country Kettle Fudge is famous for. The fact that each batch is hand-paddled in copper pots and takes up to six hours to carefully cool, results in a truly superior product.


FEED YOUR MIND

The shop itself is also a sight to see—it doesn’t hurt that making these extraordinarily intricate batches of fudge involves an element of spectacle too. Passersby stop dead in their tracks to watch through the windows and become mesmerized by the magic, observing the wooden paddle almost therapeutically mixing, pulling and stretching the thick chocolatey mixture within the shiny copper kettle. Like a siren’s call, the sweet perfume of warm fudge fills the air and lures in anyone who walks within a certain radius of the store; if Country Kettle Fudge could bottle the aroma, it’d be another best seller. Although John opened his first fudge shop in a tiny cubbyhole in Beach Haven (near where the Silver Sun shopping mall is today), he moved to another store in 1963 (where Schooner’s Wharf now stands), and eventually landed in Country Kettle Fudge’s present-day location in 1965, on the corner of 9th Street and Seagull Lane in Beach Haven. Eventually, John and family would go on to purchase the entire block where his fudge shop

had set down roots. And whilst maintaining its historic charm, the Maschals successfully revitalized that block of 19th century waterfront village into quite the mecca for one-of-a-kind shopping, delectable dining, and exploring all the sights and scenes of a quintessential summer at the shore by enjoying a seaside stroll through the iconic Bay Village. Not too long after, they also opened a second storefront that still stands today on at 20th Street in Surf City. Country Kettle Fudge has employees who have been making fudge for decades; these chocolatiers are truly masters of their craft at the shop. Like a script from any hit rom-com, the fudgerie has even held witness to employees who found their future spouses as a result of their summer jobs working together at the fudge shop (needless to say, the shop even made them delectable little fudge box wedding favors—which are available to any bride and groom upon request). John’s son, JB, made his first batch from scratch in the late 1980’s, and

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now with children of his own that very same age he was, the third generation is ready to jump in and take the reins of this endearing family legacy. JB’s daughter, Megan, who remembers being placed in the copper kettles as a child for the fudge shop’s fun advertisements, now has a forward-thinking succession plan with fresh ideas of how to carry on the fudge making legacy to a new generation of customers. With 16 standard flavors available plus the addition of seasonal or specialty offerings, customers can sample a delicious assortment of flavors including Oreo Crunch, Triple Chocolate, Chocolate Peanut Butter, Vanilla Nut, M&M, and Maple Walnut. But there is no denying that the original chocolate flavor, the quintessential fudge made with pure chocolate, is a showstopper all on its own. The store is famous for its fudge, but don’t forget it also sells salt water taffy and freshly made elephant ears. A few doors down in Bay Village they opened up Country Kettle Chowda. They sell their Chowderfest-Award-Winning New England and Manhattan Clam Chowders, as well as their famous Lobster bisque. It’s easy to see that Country Kettle makes truly artisanal products with a whole lot of care and love. For six decades now, Mr. John Maschal has reared a distinguished line of candy makers on Long Beach Island who work their magic in copper kettles and create a treat so sweet and creamy that it embodies the essence of bliss. Still considered an indulgent treat perfectly suited for a vacation, it also has old-fashioned appeal that plucks a nostalgic chord in many hearts, no matter their age. Pop in for a laugh, a smile, and a sweet taste, and enjoy the experience of a time-honored LBI tradition shared with loved ones of all generations. Allow yourself to be tempted by the little gourmand flame that dances in the eyes of all who watch the warm fudge being whipped and find even the smallest piece hard to resist. No visit to LBI is complete without a visit to this Bay Village staple, making fudge for generations of visitors and more to come— John Maschal’s Country Kettle Fudge. 200 BAY MAGAZINE SUMMER 2020


A vacation isn’t complete without a visit to Bay Village in Beach Haven. Country Kettle celebrates their 60th summer!

FRESH

creamy fudge Handwipped in COPPER KETTLES

B E A C H H AV E N

SURF CITY

B AY V I L L A G E 9 T H & B AY AV E N U E

2 0 T H S T. & L O N G B E A C H B LV D.

609 492 2800

609 494 2822

COUNTRYKETTLEFUDGE.COM

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COUNTRY CORNER FARM MARKET BEST PIE’S ON LBI

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DID YOU KNOW?

Explore LBI

Now Serving local favorites

Family Activities and Education

COVID19 restrictions have made things complicated, but getting good food, drinks and treats are not. Our Now Serving program was the first in the state to provide consumers with a comprehensive list of those in our area who are serving take out, delivery, pick up and more. Direct links and hours of operation, as well as addresses and phone numbers are indexed to provide you with dining options. Find it online at visitLBIregion.com and look for special features on @southernoceanchamber

The Passport to LBI is key to providing online and tools for in person adventures for you and your family. Learn about the Reclam the bay Clam Trail, virtual screenings, downloadable coloring sheets and local suggestions for an educational and interesting look at Long Beach Island. For a line up of non profit organizations ready to share their knowledge all summer long go to their facebook page Passport to LBI or their site Passporttolbi.org

Written by Lori Pepenella, CDME

The summer is here and we are happy to celebrate warm weather, new ways to explore and of course welcoming all by land and by sea! The Southern Ocean County Chamber of Commerce members are working to make sure you stay up to date on the latest information when making your plans. Here are our top tips to help you enjoy 2020

Explore the Region online with the launch of THE new version of visitLBIregion.com

Jersey Fresh Markets & Farm Stands

Our brand new interactive website features the businesses and organizations that help power our community. Jump on for real time updates and blogs with the latest travel insight and local information. Our community welcomes the chance to provide you a refresh for the upcoming season, and will be a one stop portal for planning a day out or a vacation. Bookmark visitLBIREGION.com to find out about what is available for every aspect of your next journey!

Everyone loves Jersey Fresh! This summer’s crop will be worth a trip to get locally sourced ingredients to make your favorite seasonal recipes. Many local businesses are extending their offerings to include extra supplies to help make shopping convenient. Towns are also planning their traditional weekly markets as well this season. Stay connected and watch for announcements on dates, times and locations.

Fall back in Love with us

Events to come later this year, such as popular festivals, Shop Small Saturday and Holidays Redefined programming will be announced throughout the summer and into early fall. Stay connected with us @LBIregion facebook and Instagram so you know the latest promotions that will be worth the trip back to see us bay-magazine.com 205


10TH SEASON ON LONG BEACH ISLAND

Since 1976

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DID YOU KNOW?

Element of Nature Q&A by Matt Burton

Artists often present a different perception of reality through abstraction. Abstraction in art is representing ideas or emotions. For artists this idea may include formal design elements such as line, space, form, color and texture. Abstraction can also challenge a viewers notion of what something is supposed to look like by representing it in such away that the subject is now unrecognizable. Historically, as observers of art, we have an established perception of how we normally see a represented object and understand there is a particular way it is to be rendered, this is how we were taught growing up, through mass media and personal experiences. However, through abstraction or a more nuanced approach to represent an object, our preconceived ideas of how an object is represented becomes more engaging. We can be taken out of our comfort zone, but just like visiting a new location or eating a new dish, we are pleasantly surprised by our new discovery. How is it that an artist can show us a new way of seeing something? Let us think of a tree, for example. A tree has green leaves, branches and a trunk and this tends to be how a tree is supposed to be represented. But an artist sees so much more than just a tree. There is space 208 BAY MAGAZINE SUMMER 2020

Artist Andrea Sauchelli

between the branches, texture on the trunk and lines on the leaves. When these elements become the focus of the artists intent, the lines take on a new meaning. No longer is it about a tree but now it is about the lines on the tree. The line is now the subject of the art work. The artist’s focus has become more about the formal design elements culled from observation and not so much the tree. The tree has been reduced to a means to an end. Just as one might find beauty from a representation of an old windswept cedar having grown twisting in the air from decades of coastal winds, there is the same beauty seen from lines placed on a canvas. The gesture of the lines can direct the viewers eyes the same way. The familiar motion of moving ones eyes triggers a latent memory. Like an old familiar face from our childhood but we can not quite place the name. A little bit of mystery. Dust off the cobwebs from old memories. There it is an interaction, a connection. Often times we take routine for granted or are even bored with the same thing. Another tree? Really? Keep moving. But wait a minute‌this new depiction is a little exciting. A change! As if seeing a tree for the very first time. I need to take a closer look and really take in what I am seeing here.


about and be inspired by. Among my favorite painters - Per Kirkeby, Joan Mitchell, and Anselm Kiefer. Poetry is also influential - Mary Oliver and Rumi are two favorites. MB: What do you want the viewer to see in your work or what reaction are you looking for from the viewer? AS: I want the viewer to be able to look at my painting and try to put their own pieces together. Where is this place? Is this even a place? This looks like something I’ve seen as a child. I don’t want any concrete images but more along the lines of something they might have experienced based on how they feel at that moment. Each series of works represents an idea or concern going on in my life at that moment and I want to share this with others. My

An artist focusing on line, color or shape can be an exploration of science. Laws of physics, biological examination, or how to stimulate the brain. These experimentations are recorded as a work of art. As the artist continues with their study over time eventually the desired results are achieved. Following the principles of design, manipulation of medium and an understanding of their subject the artist can create not only a new way of viewing a subject but also highlight the best of their discoveries. The artist uses these techniques and concepts to draw you in, either with mystery, an attraction to a highlight of color or optical stimulation to coax you to interact with the art. Andrea Sauchelli is one of those artists whose work I find interesting

and attractive. She draws abstract expressive landscapes with oil pigment sticks on canvas and paper. She is a graduate of College of Art and Design at Rochester Institute of Technology. She was always interested in the arts as a result of her father having a design manufacturing firm who had a minimalist and modern aesthetic. Matt Burton: What would you say is the inspiration behind your work? Andrea Sauchelli: Nature has always been the most inspiring. Just the act of walking in nature can bring about so many thoughts that bubble up and come to life on the surface of each painting. There are so many amazing artists out there and each have given me something to think

paintings are always evolving. They change and life changes. Painting for me, has always been a richer form of communication than talking. Talking feels awkward. MB: Early on your work was more representational, right? What was it that made you want to go abstract? AS: My work has always been abstracted in some way, but there has bay-magazine.com 209


DID YOU KNOW?

always been an element of nature in my work. The switch to more abstract occurred rather abruptly, as I came to a realization a year after my daughter was diagnosed with a traumatic illness. I was overwhelmed with many different emotions and the act of trying to paint for the market was exhausting not to mention annoying. I found myself in my studio painting intuitively yet I didn’t realize it at the time. I was just trying to get through the days. Painting for me was healing. It got me through those times, and it continues to get me through them. Even the littlest bit of scribbles in a notebook does wonders for me. I realized that painting was a necessity for me. Each series represent a jumble of thoughts that are my reflections of concerns, traumas, passions and interests. MB: What were the major concerns in making the decision to go in a more abstract style? What did you do to quell those concerns? AS: I was concerned that I would lose the interest of potential sales and customers. At one point, I tried to satisfy the market and myself. This was extremely difficult as it felt like I was being ripped apart. However, I was fortunate to have an artist/friend who encouraged me to keep going and to get into a zone of painting for painting’s sake. MB: Often people don’t understand abstract. What would you like to say to get viewers engaged in your work? AS: Mainly what I want for the viewer to understand is that everyone experiences a painting differently. Their experiences as an individual shape what they are able to “see” in context. I can look at a painting that I’ve viewed many times before but one day that same image may take on new meaning depending on any given point in my life. The same thing goes for poetry or maybe a 210 BAY MAGAZINE SUMMER 2020

book I’ve read. It’s quite interesting. Psychologically you move through stages and art moves with you. MB: What is the most difficult part of the creative process or the making process for you? AS: Knowing when the work is finished. I will always look at past work and see changes that I can make. It’s tricky as one simple line can change the course of the entire painting. I have painted over whole paintings as a result. I always take photos of my process and sometimes I’ll look back at them and think well, that was a great painting! I should have left it alone. Because this happens quite often, I will put aside a painting for a week and then come back with fresh eyes. The painting becomes clearer and the direction becomes manifest. Most of the time I will make only minor changes after that. MB: Where does your creative process take you? Is it an escape? AS: The process of my work is really more important to me than the end product. Of course, a painting has to come to its end in order to be brought to light, to be given to the viewer. But for me the joy in art lies in the making. It is taking something felt and either trying to recreate it or to make sense of it. When I am in a zone during painting everything else is faraway or numb. Although, I don’t realize it until I have been jolted out of it from a barking dog or phone call or something like that. MB: Is your work more about trying to solve formal art element problems? Or is it more about experimentation seeking a certain level or comfort zone with your work? AS: I would say my work is more about experimentation. Sometimes I am surprised at the results that unfold within a painting. I believe

this is why my work evolves over time. With each work brings forth new visions and areas to explore. It’s a constant flow of shaping my often, scattered thoughts. MB: When I look at your work I see you use line, form and color- a lot! What is it about those design elements that seems to become the focus in your work? AS: I love lines! I use line as a way to move through the painting and I almost always have a horizon line embedded in the painting for balance. In this particular series, my paintings have a lot of twisted, crooked, thick and thin lines, some applied heavily, and some quick wispy lines gives me a sense of being enclosed in the thick of branches or marsh grasses. Almost like a hideaway. It provides my paintings with an indistinct depiction of nature and the elements. My paintings are very organic therefore I like to focus mainly on positive and negative shapes and depth in my paintings. I sometimes use a more discordant color scheme in order to get the sense of urgency in some of my paintings. Often times I will go in the direction of a more harmonious style depending on the work. I prefer a darker color palette and I love the color blue. It’s definitely my dominant go to color. It’s peaceful it’s moody, and it is a very healing color. MB: You work in series, right? Can you tell me about a few of them and what are you working on now? AS: The series I’m working on now are primarily based on my observations out in nature, the changes in the environment that we may not be aware of. The series prior to that was from trying to make sense of biologic medications and where they even came from. They are scary drugs and yet they were a saving grace for my daughter. I started thinking about the Yew tree and its


importance in creating these strong medicines. From there I started thinking more about the trees themselves and climate change and how many species of plant life are out there that we still don’t even know about. Now the series has morphed into an awareness and profound respect for trees. MB: Are you trying to create an atmosphere, some kind of feeling? AS: Yes, in this current series I am trying to create the feeling of being embraced by nature. Like a blanket. Like how a bird feels in its nest or a mouse in a burrow. I want that feeling of being surrounded by nature. Calming but there is a little bit of uneasiness to go with it. MB: I have seen you do plein air (paint outside) is that a thing? Plein air abstracts? Is it just to get the essence of a location? What’s the attraction of those locations? AS: Plein Air in Pine Air as it’s called is a monthly plein air event where members of The Pine Shores

Art Association get together and paint outdoors in various locations in NJ. For me It is a way to get outside with the camaraderie of a group of artists and to indulge in the act of doing any kind of creative activity out in nature. Photography, poetry, sketching etc. I mainly take in the surroundings of the environment and it becomes more of a moment of reflection than the act of capturing on canvas what is around me. The location of these events is focused more on the Pinelands. I am hoping to get more people interested and aware of what we have. It has been designated an International Biosphere Reserve. Its global significance is fascinating, and I’d like more people to see that. I’ve been here for 17 years and only recently have found this out. MB: Where do you see your work sgoing? How do you see it changing? AS: I can’t really say. I have taken a large interest in the preservation of nature and my work is more of a reflection of being out in nature. Maybe I will focus more on a more

targeted subject regarding the Pinelands. I won’t really know until I get to that point which could be next week or even next year. Sometimes a revelation is small, but significant on a personal level. Like seeing something we take for granted through a different lens and coming to an understanding. An understanding that a composition of lines, forms and colors can possibly effect our subconscious. A stimulating awakening, which is to say what we are actually looking at may seem like not a big deal but for some reason has our brain thinking. What we are thinking may not be known and is maybe, at first, a mystery. But what if we took this same approach and began to look at everything we know or thought we knew and look through this new lens? What happens then? When we stand on the dunes and see ocean waves? When we watch the sun slowly set across the bay? When you stare into your partner’s eyes? What do you really see?

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Keeping LBI in Business is Their Business A Peek Inside the LBI Chamber of Commerce Written by Sarah Hodgson

Photos by Tony Coon

In 2012, Superstorm Sandy wreaked near-irreparable havoc on Long Beach Island’s infrastructure. Homes were destroyed, businesses flooded and flattened. Sand seeped into the streets and dwellings were shredded to bits. The financial future of Long Beach Island looked grim from the battered dunes. Who would visit the island? What homes would they rent? What businesses would they visit? The beach was in no shape for sunbathing and small businesses were far from their summer splendor. But out of the sandy muck and flotsam rose a juggernaut of leadership and determination. A coalition of business owners and town officials united, in a very A-Teamesque fashion, to form the LBI Chamber of Commerce.

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Long Beach Township Mayor Joe Mancini formulated the idea for the LBI Chamber of Commerce in 2013. The island in repair needed an organization to guide it back into its former glory. To market the barrier island and its specific needs with undivided, razor-focused attention. And so the Chamber was formed. The original team was made up of mayors from each LBI municipality as well as active LBI business owners and entrepreneurs. Since then, the team has been streamlined into a five-member Board of Directors: Kevin Bergin as President, Brian Wainwright as First V.P., David Wyrsch Jr as Second V.P., Dan Malay as Treasurer and Megan Kurtz Maher as Secretary. In addition to these key directors, the Chamber consults with a Mayoral Advisory Committee and contracts a Destination Marketing Manager, Calla Aniski Boyd of Perchal Media. “We have a great team of really sharp people who understand what our mission is and what it is not. It helps us stay on task, be efficient, and get the job done,” said Bergin. According to Bergin, the role of The LBI Chamber is simple: market Long Beach Island as the premier travel destination that it is. “It’s a special opportunity to give back and help support the growth of such a great tourist destination,” said Bergin. While the Southern Ocean Chamber of Commerce’s long standing role has been to attract tourists to the Southern Ocean County region as a whole, the folks at

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the LBI Chamber of Commerce work to attract people to LBI specifically. The Southern Ocean Chamber gets tourists to the door, and the LBI Chamber nudges them through it. “We often say that every time a car crosses the bridge eastbound, it is ‘mission accomplished.’ We then hand the ball off to town-level merchant associations and private enterprises to get those LBI-goers into hotels, rentals, eateries, and storefronts,” added Malay, Chamber Treasurer. Aniski-Boyd added, “The regional chamber does a great job in many different areas. They are an incredible networking resource for local businesses, they have strong relationships at the state tourism level and they provide coverage in areas we don’t typically dabble in. Our focus is primarily marketing Long Beach Island as a tourism destination.” While the goal of the Chamber may seem simple, this 18-mile island we love isn’t all scorching beach days, pastel sunsets and musical ice cream trucks. A seasonal barrier island presents its marketing hurdles like any other region. One of the biggest challenges for the Chamber? Remaining business neutral. “The challenge, and our commitment, is to remain business-neutral. By promoting LBI as a whole, every LBI entrepreneur has the opportunity to benefit from our efforts. In the end, our goal is to get people here and then let the business owners take it from there,” said Aniski-Boyd.


DID YOU KNOW?

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As Chamber Treasurer, Malay was quick to identify the financial conundrum of promoting a seasonal resort destination within a snug budget. After all, how do you decide where to allocate marketing funds?

So how does the Chamber do it? How does the Chamber market Long Beach Island, a unique, seasonal destination that shuts off its traffic lights, lowers its speed limits and shutters nearly half of its businesses come winter?

“The biggest challenge in tourism promotion is determining how to spend your dollars wisely. It’s been said, ‘I know 50% of my marketing dollars are working, I just don’t know which 50%.’ So for us, it’s a strategic wrestling match to determine where to spend what in order to garner the highest level of return for our LBI entrepreneurs.”

Aniski-Boyd has a plan in place. “The LBI ‘off-season’ is our high season for marketing. Recognizing that a large number of LBI visitors make their travel decisions in January and February, we plan our promotional campaigns around the goal of reaching our target geographical locations during this time of year.”

He added, “But judging by the significant growth in LBI tourism the past few years, I’d say things are going well.” Malay would be right in that assumption. Each year since Hurricane Sandy, the New Jersey Division of Travel and Tourism has reported a steady climb in tourism and visitor spending throughout New Jersey. Last season alone, tourism in Ocean County increased by over four percent from the previous year. Whatever the LBI Chamber of Commerce is doing… they’re doing it right.

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It’s a practical, common sense approach: remind people of sunshine and island living when they’re trudging through snow and itching for warmer days. In addition to the “wish you were here, weather is beautiful” approach, the LBI Chamber has formulated an event of their own to circle tourists back to LBI past Labor Day: LBI FLY International Kite Festival. The LBI Chamber was pitched the kite festival concept in early 2015. The event would gather kite fliers from all over the world to convene on our shores and release their kites into the salty breeze. If successful, the festival would stretch the shoulder season beyond Chowder-


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fest weekend and LBI merchants would benefit from an additional week of business. Since agreeing to host the LBI FLY International Kite Festival with the assistance of local professional kite flyer Lisa Willoughby, the event has grown into one of the largest kite festivals in North America. Folks flock to LBI every fall to enjoy cooler beach days and to ogle at the breathtaking spectacle of kites splattered colorfully across the sky. But perhaps the greatest feat to date for the Chamber is its partnership with Long Beach Township in creating the LBI Shuttle service. Covering all eighteen miles of the island, the air conditioned LBI Shuttle service trucks tourists and locals from street corner to street corner. Bergin, Malay and Aniski-Boyd said the service has spread out viable rental homes, since proximity to amusements and restaurants isn’t a concern with an affordable shuttle service. Tourists can choose rentals off the beaten path without sacrificing convenience. The LBI Shuttle brings the island to you. “The shuttle service has been an epic ‘win’ for LBI, and we’re grateful for Long Beach Township’s spear-heading of it,” said Bergin.

“Oh it’s been big. And boy was I wrong about it at the beginning, as Kevin likes to remind me. Getting people moving around on LBI has benefited everyone, no doubt about it. It’s next-level kinda stuff for LBI,” added Dan. Though busy year-round creating promotional campaigns that stimulate tourism and commerce, the Chamber board members still find time to adapt to curveballs. The latest one being COVID-19 - a pandemic as unwelcome as Hurricane Sandy. In emergency situations, the Chamber’s role shifts from destination marketing, to information-gathering and advocacy. The organization does its best to gather important updates that its members need, get that information disseminated through social media and email platforms while simultaneously advocating for the needs of their merchants at the municipal level. So things may not be business as usual on LBI this summer, but the Chamber is working hard to find creative solutions that benefit our community and keep it thrumming into the next season. For more information about the LBI Chamber of Commerce, visit www. welcometolbi.com. bay-magazine.com 219


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The Show

Must go on!

The Saying Goes, “There’s No Place Like Show Place,” as Surflight Theatre Celebrates 70 Years of A Time-Old Tradition Under the Most Unimaginable of Circumstances Written by Lisa Simek

With the fate of their livelihood lying in the hands of the upcoming 2020 season, the staff and crew of LBI’s infamous Surflight Theatre brace for the days and weeks ahead. As one of the few theatres in the entire country that may have ingeniously figured out how to potentially be allowed to operate this summer, they’d be the go-to destination for the plethora of eager tri-state area theatrical production devotees looking to get their show fix since the abrupt closure of NYC’s Broadway theaters in midMarch. But if history has any way of repeating itself, then one thing is for sure: anytime the Surflight Theatre had been faced with past adversity, in the end, it always came out on top—often times bigger, better and stronger than before. 222 BAY MAGAZINE SUMMER 2020


Surflight Theatre has quite a fascinating history. The concept of summer stock theaters was booming in its heyday in the early 1920s. Since summer stock theaters only presented their productions during the summer (hence, the name), stars of Broadway, film, and television would regularly spend summers performing in summer stock theater. But it was one man in particular named Joe Hayes, who would leave the hustle and bustle of Broadway behind and bring a little bit of that beloved New York City theater atmosphere to the sleepy seaside resort town of Beach Haven, NJ and change the course of this little island’s cultural history forever. It was a beautiful starry night in the summer of 1950 when the Surflight Theatre made its debut in a makeshift open-air amphitheater in a vacant lot adjacent to what is now Kubel’s Too on the main boulevard in Beach Haven Crest. Mr. Hayes had created something spectacular, and became wildly popular with the residents of this small beachside community who were all looking for some excitement during the hot, lazy months of summer. By 1954, Joe moved his theater to a more permanent location, an old abandoned mechanic’s garage on Engleside Avenue. In 1987 a new theatre was built next door to the garage, and the old garage (later rebuilt) would be used as a scene shop and costume shop. Over the years, Joe and his team grew the theatre into a successful entity, debuting 10 shows a summer, with 6 performances of each new show every week. Hits of their day included Oklahoma, The King and I, The Sound of Music, My Fair Lady and Guys and Dolls. Soon after, they purchased the bakery next door to the theatre rolled-out a “show before the show” with the introduction of The Show Place Ice Cream Parlor. A novel idea, the concept was to serve up milkshakes and ice cream, all while the wait staff sings and perform, in the vintage style parlor. To this day, The Showplace Ice Cream Parlor is still one of the most sought out, old fashioned sing-and-dine attractions by families and visitors on Long Beach Island. An absolute must-see, the dessert show is entertained by a troupe of talented performer/servers and is open 7 days a week with nightly shows beginning at 6pm, 7pm, 8pm, 9pm (but get there early, because the line wraps around the building!). The entire experience is an exciting evening of cabaret, ice cream, and “waitri” singing and dancing to you and with you as you enjoy theatrically themed ice cream concoctions with names like the Sound Of Music, Annie Get Your Gun, The Phantom of the Opera and many, many more, as guests sing, dance, and act a little crazy for their ice cream. For example, if someone at your table orders the Peter Pan, be prepared to crow for your ice cream! It is surely an experience on Long Beach Island that one will never forget—the only place where the waitstaff match the retro red ’n’ white-striped wallpaper! When Hayes died in 1975, the theatre was taken over by his business partner in Show Place, Scott Henderson of HML Productions, and its’ successor, Show Place Inc. In 2001, the nonprofit Joseph P. Hayes Theatre Inc. purchased the complex and Surflight became a nonprofit Arts institution. It was on the upswing through the 2000’s when the Board decided to change leadership in late 2010. The result was a sharp downturn, both artistically and financially. Superstorm Sandy added to the difficulty and in early 2015, the Board declared Bankruptcy. There was an unsuccessful auction and in early 2017 The Surflight/Show Place Complex was purchased by NJ-native movie producer, Al Parinello, who immediately leased it to Steve Steiner’s nonprofit Ocean Professional Theatre Company. bay-magazine.com 223


DID YOU KNOW?

Mr. Parinello and Mr. Steiner’s partnership has led the theatre to experience two of its most successful seasons yet. Surflight Theatre to this day performs both children-friendly abridged shows such as The Little Mermaid, Peter Pan, The Wizard of Oz and Frozen, and adult productions of such hits including Mama Mia, Ain’t Misbehavin’, Flashdance, Carmen the Opera, and many more. According to the Surflight Theatre, when outdoor dining is given the greenlight, they have a plan already in place for how to conduct proper social distancing, in an outdoor setting. Surflight is preparing an outdoor space with socially distanced groups of people, at least six feet apart. Please check their website www.surflight.org with up-to-date COVID-19 scheduling and any updated information regarding show times. And remember, “there’s no place like showplace!” 224 BAY MAGAZINE SUMMER 2020


MUSICALS • CHILDREN’S THEATRE CONCERTS • COMEDY www.surflight.org ∙ 609-492-9477 201 Engleside Avenue, Beach Haven

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Do You Believe In Piping Plovers Written by Jim Verhagen

Photos by Jim Verhagen

Of all the fascinating natural wonders of the Jersey Shore, can you guess which one made the biggest impression on the first Dutch explorers who landed here in the seventeenth century? It wasn’t the fine sands of our gorgeous beaches and it wasn’t the rich variety of marine life teeming in our bays. It was the eggs. The little bird eggs to be precise. Those early explorers found a seaside paradise so uniquely riddled with birds’ nests along the beaches and in the marsh that they were astonished. So abundant were these nests, when they took those first steps off their massive ships, their heavy, sea-soaked boots probably squashed dozens of them.

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The tiny chicks must navigate our beaches for almost month until they learn to fly, feeding themselves and trying to stay warm.

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DID YOU KNOW?

And so they named this place “Eiren Haven,” or “Egg Harbor”. Four hundred years later, that name remains but the awareness that tiny birds’ eggs are the original treasure and natural heritage of the shore is all but erased, vanished along with those same birds; most especially the crown-jewel species of the original denizens of our beaches who the Dutch encountered in such vast multitudes on that first visit: the Piping Plovers. When I was young I would walk along Barnegat Inlet with my parents (or “Barendegat, Inlet of the Breakers” as those same Dutch explorers had named it.) I remember being puzzled as to why small sections of beach were roped off to “protect birds.” It didn’t make any sense to me. Birds could fly. Why couldn’t they just fly away? And besides, birds live in trees and bushes. Why not fence the trees and bushes and let me play on the beach? I certainly didn’t see any birds. My parents didn’t know, or see anything, either. So I asked the old timers fishing along the inlet and they told me a secret. They told me those fences were put up allegedly to protect the beach nesting Piping Plover, but that the Piping Plover were in fact already long extinct. The scientists just kept putting up those fences so they could keep us away and have the beach all to themselves. I’d later ask the old timers at Holgate too, who would also tell me of a similar, but inverted, conspiracy. They whispered to me that they’d heard there were actually hundreds of thousands of Piping Plovers along the coast. But the scientists still put up those fences... just so they could keep us away and have the beach all to themselves. Over the years I’ve met people on the beach who even claim they hate the Piping Plovers: the tiny, beach-closing, fun-destroying, possibly non-existent bird; apparently public enemy number one to beach buggies and dog walkers everywhere. Hate is a strong word for such a tiny bird, yet I never doubted their feelings; especially those angry enough to create and wear cleverly inflammatory t-shirts proclaiming that Piping Plover “tastes like chicken.” Yet curiously, despite all the conspiracy and controversy, I had never met a single person who had actually ever seen a Piping Plover on the beaches of LBI, and only a rare few who could even describe for me in just modest detail what one looked like; myself included. 228 BAY MAGAZINE SUMMER 2020

Piping Plover chicks are precocial. Form the moment they hatch, they must feed themselves by walking the beaches looking for bugs, worms, and small invertabrates. The parents help protect the chicks, but do not feed them.


Piping Plover make their nests right on the open beach, in shallow impressions they dig called “scrapes.� Their perfect camouflage protects them from most predators, but not from us.

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It would appear that in just a few hundred years, our Piping Plover and their little eggs went from being something so abundantly and uniquely impressive that the Dutch named the whole region for them, to being something so hard to find that people don’t even believe they exist anymore. The Piping Plover had somehow become even less than a ghost or an apparition; more like some mythological delusion from distant centuries past. And that’s when I decided to set out and try to find a Piping Plover on Long Beach Island to see for myself.

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It took me decades to come to understand that the shore has its own mythologies. Some of this mythology is created to fill voids of honest ignorance; like all the things my parents couldn’t teach me about birds or the Island’s ecology simply because they didn’t know, so I created my own myths to answer my own questions and support my simplistic assumptions. And some is just sloppy nescience, as with all the people who will happily point at any of the dozens of abundant shorebird species who visit our Island and lazily call them “Piping Plovers.” And some is born of more intentionally devious and self


DID YOU KNOW?

serving motivations, like the conspiracies the old-timers fed me as a boy, probably hopeful to grow their ranks with a fresh recruit in a war against beach closures. Much of this mythology we just accept, and perpetuate, simply because we are busy and don’t really care all that much. I know I didn’t. Until one day, I suddenly did. While it wasn’t easy to find a creature nobody I knew had ever seen before and many had told me didn’t even exist, I would eventually prevail and the experience would change my life forever, astonishing me as deeply as those early Dutch explorers were when they first sailed into a harbor filled with little eggs. In the years since, I have immersed myself the real lives of our native Piping Plovers, dispelling the careless myths about them I had inherited and perpetuated, and rediscovering our Island’s enchanting natural heritage. Through their tiny lives I’ve glimpsed that unspoiled, egg filled paradise those early Dutch explorers saw. They’ve shown me an Island even more spectacular and captivating than the one I already love as much as something can be loved, and I’ve begun to imagine a more vibrant, secure, and beautiful future for our coast. I’ve witnessed first hand through their amazing adaptations just how precisely the Piping Plover were made for this Island and this Island made for them; a distinction we as a species could never claim for ourselves, no matter how much we might love this place; and a distinction which doesn’t lessen our dominion here, but leads us to be wiser stewards and brings us deeper joy and understanding of the Island we cherish. I can tell you for certain that the Piping Plover are not only very real, but they are one of the most beautiful, astonishing things you can experience down the shore. We buried these treasures of our Island, and it is time to dig them back up and restore our shore to its eggfilled glory. We’ll all be better for it. I encourage anyone who really loves LBI to rediscover the Island’s original locals, the Piping Plover.

Piping Plover chicks are only an inch or so tall yet must forage for worms right along the tideline.

But first, you have to see them. And if you want to see them, you have to believe.

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SHARING THE STOKE Waves of Strength Empowers Those with Special Needs Through the Experience of Surfing Written by Elle Mijal

Photo by Adam Tormollan

There are many wonderful organizations on Long Beach Island, from those that help the poverty stricken to the many that enrich our culture and values through the arts and sciences. But there is a new nonprofit unlike the others. Since day one, it has been making waves (quite literally) in the lives of regional children and young adults with special needs. This organization gives youth the opportunity to not only experience the healing power of the ocean, but even more so, to share the stoke—that is, the empowering feeling of riding a wave surfing—for those who may have a physical and/ or intellectual disability in and around the Long Beach Island and surrounding area. Founded in 2018 by a lifelong local surfer and father of three daughters, this registered 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization’s ultimate goal is to harness the healing power of the ocean and share it with youths from LBI and the surrounding area who may be battling a disease, living with a disability or experiencing an unfortunate 234 BAY MAGAZINE SUMMER 2020

circumstance that would otherwise prevent them from being able to partake in the surfing experience. The method used to help children with disabilities catch waves is called adaptive surfing. Unlike the traditional technique of standing on a surfboard and riding a wave, adaptive surfing calls for the assistance of experienced volunteers, an alternate position such as kneeling or laying down, and even using a specially commissioned board with attachments to help the child adapt to surfing in their own special way. As long as the student keeps afloat in the water or rides their wave onto the shore, they successfully surfed their very own wave—and the effects are invaluable. “No matter what the special need may be, we firmly believe that everybody can catch and ride waves, and enjoy the pleasures provided by ocean swells. That is the essence and the spirit of surfing,” shared Robert Simek, founder of the organization who grew up spending


summers in none other than Surf City. He called on his long-time friends, all lifelong surfers, many with stints in the pros, to volunteer for this community event which takes place ever summer on the handicapped-accessible 68th Street beach in the Brant Beach section of Long Beach Island. Local community members and businesses all come together to help sponsor the event, as it is held at no charge to the families in need. There were more than 40 children in attendance at 2019’s event, from all across the region. The disabilities ranged from cerebral palsy to blindness, down syndrome to deafness, even a child born with a congenital diaphragmatic hernia who has only one lung. Another first-time surfer was born without the lower half of her spine; her organs don’t function properly and she has no muscle use in her legs—but you bet your behind that all of these kids took to the waves like little water warriors. The founder of the nonprofit shares, “Catching and riding a wave in the ocean is an incredible experience. It empowers and builds confidence to take on life’s challenges. No matter if you surf on your feet, on your knees, seated or on your belly, or with a buddy, no one can deny the stoke of gliding on a wave, and it is impos-

sible not to let yourself be inspired by these incredible kids and their parents who defy the odds to make it happen.” Surfing’s healing properties have already been widely confirmed and recognized. Those who experience the magical ride over salted water notice dramatic improvements in their quality of life, not only in the body but also in the mind and soul. Waves of Strength truly believes in this transformative power of the ocean, in the concept of “surf therapy” and its positive effects on cognitive and physical development, self-confidence and personal growth, as well as stress relief and socio-emotional wellbeing for our younger generations. The weightlessness and rhythms of the ocean offer a therapeutic experience for those living with special needs. The sensational wonder of riding a wave, spending a day at the beach and soaking up the sun has the power to make the troubles in one’s life seem a little bit easier to tackle after a surf session in the ocean. Whether it be by commissioning a special-needs surf board, overcoming a fear or seemingly impossible circumstance, their volunteers ensure that every child can have a go at riding a wave in their own way.

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One of the organization’s board members, Anthony Guariglia, MD, participates as a ‘land’ volunteer and the chief on-site medic during Waves of Strength events. Dr. Guariglia happens to be the attending Pediatric Emergency Room Physician at Southern Ocean Country Hospital, and the organization couldn’t ask for a more qualified or enthusiastic partner to join them for these events. In addition to the 50 selfless volunteers who spent the day either coordinating on land or swimming into crashing waves alongside the kids, was the Harvey Cedars Beach Patrol Captain and another Waves of Strength board member, Randy Townsend, along with the lifeguard crew from his station on the island. The event’s “water” volunteers at some point in their careers have either been certified surf instructors or certified lifeguards with verified first aid and CPR certifications. The Waves of Strength organization is run by volunteers as well as the annual surf experience event that calls on surfers to assist out in the waves. Local real estate agent Logan McKenzie, who is one of the organization’s ‘water’ volunteers and a lifelong resident of Long Beach Island, shares of the event, “It was the most rewarding day I’ve ever had in my entire life.” He went on to describe how when the children first entered the beach, some of them had never even set foot in the ocean before. “At first, the parents and kids were naturally a little hesitant of the water, but as they entered the sea, most with two or more volunteers by their side, they gained confidence and became comfortable,” he shares. So much so, that kids who had never even gone swimming before ended up riding waves into the beach break—some even standing on their boards— with their parents sobbing tears of pride and happiness as they watched in amazement from the shoreline. McKenzie, who, himself, was an LBI surf instructor decades ago, adds, “The parents of these kids were coming up to us and they were just so stoked, and so thankful… they kept saying how their families really just had the best time ever at the beach. It was really incredible.” Another one of the volunteer surfers, Nhan La, shares of the group effort, “We all grew up together around here. We surf together. Now we help the kids together.”

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DID YOU KNOW?

The success of 2019’s event created such a ripple effect through local print and television media outlets, that Simek even received a personal call from the Governor’s office, acknowledging and commending him and his team on the efforts of the nonprofit’s mission and the immense impact it is making in young children’s lives within Southern Ocean County and the state of New Jersey. Although at the time of this article’s printing, the organizers of the Annual Surf Experience Event for Children with Special Needs were unable to verify an event date with the township due to current social distancing guidelines, they are continuously monitoring the situation. If permitted to hold adaptive surf lessons, but not a social event this summer on Long Beach Island, the organization plans at the very least to schedule one-on-one appointments for surf experiences for children with special needs on an inquiry basis. Please check out their website www.wavesofstrength.org for up-to-date information regarding available surf experience dates, and

to contact the organization to schedule a time for your child to experience the healing power of the ocean on Long Beach Island. If you or someone you know is interested in volunteering or becoming a personal or business sponsor please contact rob@wavesofstrength.org. The organization is a grassroots effort, built from the ground up and run entirely by volunteers. 100% of funding goes towards servicing families and hosting the surf experiences for children, and it relies on community funding to continue to offer their services to these families at no cost. In addition to insurance, this young nonprofit relies on donations in order to purchase and commission much-needed supplies such as specialty boards, safety equipment, tents for the events, etc. Donors can sponsor a family in need or volunteer their time at the event. The more Waves of Strength can grow, the more families in need it can service. Join the movement and deliver Waves of Strength to our community today.

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Ann Coen Photography

THE

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adventure park, go karts, arcade + more The Mainland Adventure Park is our newest and most exciting family attraction! With a heart pumping ropes course, zip lines, and go kart track, there’s something for thrill seekers of all ages to enjoy! THEMAINLANDNJ.COM | @MAINLANDADVENTURE

Ann Coen Photography


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The 54th Annual Seashore House Tour Architect+Builder Forum August 2, 10:00–11:30am

Sunday Join us for this special event and find out directly from House Tour architects and builders just how the beautiful homes featured in the Tour were created.

Learn the inspiration and ideas behind the designs, then how the ideas were implemented, what was done, how, and why. This tour will showcase five inspiring and beautiful homes and one magnificent, magical garden.

For the first time the House Tour will canvas the entire island from Barnegat Light to Holgate! Included are beach and bay front houses, old and new, modern and traditional. A special question and answer period will allow audience participation. Thank you to our 2020 House Tour Sponsor Woodhaven Lumber and Millwork.

Landscape+Interior Design Forum August 5, 10:00–11:30am Wednesday This presentation will focus on how interior designers, decorators, and landscapers bring the owner’s unique style and personality into the six featured beach homes and gardens. LBI professionals will share how they partner with each owner to bring their ideas to life. By taking this journey, presenters will inspire you to find and show your own creativity inside your house and 240 BAY MAGAZINE SUMMER 2020

outside in your garden. Along the way they will offer their own helpful tips, tricks, and traps for designing and beautifying. Thank you to all our homeowners, presenters, and advertisers for making these programs possible this year. The presentations will be in our Gallery with limited in-person seating and also available to view on-line. Please check our website for updates.


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LONG BEACH ISLAND FOUNDATION OF THE ARTS+SCIENCES

120 LONG BEACH BOULEVARD LOVELADIES NEW JERSEY 08008 609 494.1241 bay-magazine.com 241 LBIFOUNDATION.ORG


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WE ARE HERE TO HELP.

All Firefighters, Police, EMTs, Paramedics, 911 Dispatchers and Healthcare Professionals are eligible for a special discount on select new Buick and GMC vehicles.* It’s our way of saying thank you.

Family owned and operated since 1971. * see dealer for complete details reguarding first responder discount

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just 2 miles from LBI | 445 Route 72 East • Manahawkin | 609.597.4700 | barlowbuickgmc.com


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