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on every level.

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Walters Architecture, LLC. - Lic # N.J. AI19884


Architecture. Custom Homes. Realty. With our three divisions, we offer all-inclusive services that seamlessly bring your dream home to reality. We are experts in the homebuilding business and have streamlined the process from beginning to end — saving you time and money. We’ll take great care in ensuring that your new home is designed around your lifestyle and be there for you every step of the way.

Don’t wait, start building your dream home today. Visit waltershomes.com and click “price project” to begin the process virtually.

Let’s talk. 609.597.6999 waltershomes.com 500 Barnegat Blvd. N., Barnegat NJ 08005 (Building 400) ALL HOMES ARE TO BE ENERGY STAR® CERTIFIED Look for high performance homes built to EPA’s ENERGY STAR Homes Program. ENERGY STAR Homes offer enduring quality, value-adding energy efficiency features and a combination of materials and equipment that deliver better performance and an overall superior level of quality. New Jersey’s Clean Energy Program™ is brought to you by the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities and does not endorse any one particular builder. bay-magazine.com Information can be 3 found at NJCleanEnergy.com.


Contents Open House 18

All-American Coastal Style

26

From Landscaper to Home Builder

32

Experts Weigh In

38

The Ultimate Backyard Oasis

46

Homebuilding simplified on the Jersey Shore

52

Ask the Decorator

56

One Team to Do it All

62

Dos and Don’ts of Off-Season Entertaining

68

When Dreams Become Reality

74

Born Into The Business

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ROBOTIC SURGERY

SMALLER INCISION. FASTER RECOVERY.

Get back to your life - faster - with robotic-assisted, minimally invasive surgery, now available at Southern Ocean Medical Center. This includes weight-loss surgery, as well as treatment for hernia, gallbladder, female pelvic floor, and lung and chest conditions. Benefits include:  Shorter hospital stay  Less blood loss  Fewer complications  Less need for narcotic pain medicine  Faster recovery  Smaller incisions associated with minimal scarring To learn more or find a robotic surgeon near you, call 844-464-9355 or visit HackensackMeridianHealth.org/Robotics.

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Contents Healthy Living 79 The Proper Warming Up 82 Turning the LBI Yoga Scene Upside Down in Aerial Silks 88 First Robotic-Assisted Surgery 92 Gender and the Gym 97 Heart-Centered Leadership

Get the Look 98

Maximize your Wardrobe

102

To everything there is Season

114

Fall’s must have Shoes

Feature Story 120

Catch of the Day

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Boutique Design Studio specializing in bespoke cabinetry and hard finishes for the home. RED BANK, NJ | 732.345.1441 | TOWNANDCOUNTRYDESIGNSTUDIO.COM Design by appointment | Visit website for Mercantile Shop hours

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Contents Weddings 142 Wedding Bliss One 150 Wedding Bliss Two 158 Fairytale Ending 166 A Gift for the Groom-to-Be 170 The Perfect Picnic

Feed Your Mind 175 Feed Your Mind 190 Let’s Shellabrate! 194 From Seasonal Locale to Official Franchisor

Did you Know? 200 Local Talent 207 Explore LBI 208 Tiny Islands, Big Impact 212 Drive to Build Community 218 Telling the Story of You

Off Season 220 Off Season

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Dominating the real estate market on Long Beach Island for decades.

We Are LBI! Celebrating Over 95 Years in Real Estate!

www.ZackShore.com 29th & Central Avenue 609-494-1776

2900 S LongBeachBlvd. 609-492-7277

Forked River Office 1031 Lacey Road 609-631-1055

675 Route 72 East 609-597-6464

1000 Long Beach Blvd. 609-494-7272

©2021 BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently owned and operated franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of Columbia Insurance Company, a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate. ® Equal Housing Opportunity.

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bay bay magazine

magazine

LEISURE & LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE ADVERTISING | SUBMISSIONS | GENERAL INQUIRES

bay magazine

CO-FOUNDER | CHAIRMAN PUBLISHER GARY HENDERSON CO-FOUNDER | EDITORIAL CREATIVE DIRECTOR FARRELL DUNLEAVY VP OPERATIONS

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info@bay-mag.com

LUELLEN HENDERSON CONTRIBUTING EDITORS LISA SIMEK CONCEPT & STYLING WEDDINGS JEANNE COON-BOGATH BOGATH WEDDINGS AND EVENTS CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS MICHAEL JOHN MURPHY JOHN MARTINELLI RANDY TOWNSEND BRITTON SPARK ANN COEN SHEENA LYNN LJ HEPP CHRIS DELANEY CHRISTOPHER HURTIG CAROLYN DENTZ ALLY JORDON ALLIE GREY LEANNA THERESA CHARLES GRAVENER CALLA ANISKI-BOYD

ADVERTISING SUBMISSIONS GENERAL INQUIRES info@bay-mag.com

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS LISA SIMEK DIANA LENTINI SARAH HODGSON CAROLYN MIJAL ELAINE SISKO ROBIN CHASE SUSAN VON BRACHEL ANNE GREEN MATT BURTON KATIE RIBSAM THOM SWEENEY GINNY PADUA ASHLEY WILLIAMS JAYME PILONE LIANNE CARP ANNA PANACEK BRITTON SPARK AUSTIN SCHWERZEL LORI PEPENELLA SUSAN FIELD

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For a digital copy of bay magazine visit our website at www.bay-magazine.com. All rights reserved. No part of this periodical may be reproduced without express permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed by writers commissioned for articles published by bay magazine are not necessarily those of the magazine.

Copyright © 2021 LBI Publishing Inc. bay magazine ™ Open House Magazine ™ Feed your mind cookbook™ Wedding Bliss Expo™ The Book ™


THE EXPERTISE YOU WANT. THE CUSTOMER SERVICE YOU NEED.

CABINETRY CLOSETS FLOORING WINDOWS DOORS MANAHAWKIN 609-597-1118 ADDITIONAL LOCATIONS: LAKEWOOD, POINT PLEASANT BEACH, SHREWSBURY* *Kitchen & Closet Design Center only

WOODHAVENLUMBER.COM

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FOUNDERS NOTE

One for the Record Books! Of all of the bewildering events that have occurred over the past few seasons, this summer certainly was one for the record books. So many amazing feats have been accomplished: from the reemergence of countless longstanding local businesses (albeit, many under new ownership and with fresh ideas), to the Barnegat Bay collectives leading a renaissance of the New Jersey oyster aquaculture. Numerous local nonprofit organizations and pop-up cafés have reaffirmed the goodness in our community members’ hearts; the Stanley Cup even graced our island with its presence this summer with LBI goers having the chance to celebrate and drink from its bounty for the ultimate #summer Instagram photo. To add to that, the lifeguards from each one of our municipalities have proven time and again at the various beach patrol competitions up and down the entire coast of NJ, that not only are our scallops and our oysters, even our chowder, absolutely superior in the North East, but, now, even our collective LBI lifeguards are named the best in the state. Regardless of the great weather and the promise of our local small businesses continuing to build our healthy economy, it is important to emphasize to residents and visitors alike that being involved with organizations like Alliance for a Living Ocean and Reclam The Bay, among a slew of other conservation-themed nonprofits, is so important in order to maintain the health and integrity of our favorite little barrier island and its surrounding marine life. In addition to providing us with a homegrown delicacy, the oyster farmer initiatives also help keep the bay clean (did you know that every oyster filters up to 1 gallon of bay water each day?). We hope that you enjoy our feature on the Tiny Islands that help protect and keep LBI as an island—as they too need our help and protection. We’ve been fortunate enough to receive so much bounty from LBI, from sunny beach days to boat sunset cruises, fishing, crabbing, and everything in between, that we owe her a little ecological assistance. By working together as a community to make a difference one day at a time, our actions can and will have a meaningful impact for much longer than just the seasons to come.

The

Founders

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You won’t find them in ordinary kitchens. Or at ordinary stores. Sub-Zero, the preservation specialist. Wolf, the cooking specialist. Cove, the dishwashing specialist. Find them exclusively at your local kitchen specialist. 1968

491a Main Street West Creek, NJ 08092 609-597-3571 anchorappliance.com Monday & Thursday: 9 am – 8 pm Tuesday, Wednesday & Friday: 9 am – 6 pm Saturday: 9 am – 4 pm

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NJ ARCH LIC# 21AI01038700 NJ PLANNING LIC# 33LI00413700 BLDR REG# 13VH04273700

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THE JERSEY SHORE’S #1 DESIGN-BUILD FIRM SINCE 1990

Build with an Architect™ 342 W. 9TH STREET, SHIP BOTTOM 609.361.0011 WWW.PAGNOTTA.COM bay-magazine.com 17


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OPEN HOUSE

ALL-AMERICAN COASTAL STYLE Written by Lisa Simek

Photos by John Martinelli

Nothing emulates that classic coastal home charm quite like a Shingle Style house. Although these timeless Americana abodes can be found across the country, the ones located on our little barrier island in particular do such a wonderful job integrating traditional design elements such as gambrel roof lines, convivial outdoor living areas including decks, porches and balconies, and seas of oversized windows with rustic accents such as cedar shake siding and other wood and stone elements that help the home blend seamlessly with its the natural surroundings. Classic yet informal, the look remains extremely popular for summer homes on the seashore, and renowned local architect Michael Pagnotta, of his namesake Architecture and Construction firm located in Ship Bottom, possesses just the Midas touch that adds a fresh, modern twist to this traditionally historic aesthetic. When Mike and Paige Burt’s beautiful bayfront Branch Beach home was first presented to Pagnotta, the homeowners came to him with a set of architectural plans – that were quite underwhelming compared to the current structure— and they initially requested that he build this predesigned house. Since his design-build firm only constructs homes that are designed by the Pagnotta architectural firm, he turned down the job—which subsequently piqued the interest of the astounded homeowners.

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OPEN HOUSE

The Burts had presented plans that were done by another architect; and the layout was parallel to the bulkhead, which is a normal layout for a traditional bayfront home. But as Pagnotta recalls, “this site was not your typical bayfront. It jutted out and had spectacular views in all directions. I felt the layout needed to be customized for this particular lot size and shape.” The home needed to be configured much differently to optimize its potential, and Pagnotta quickly sketched some conceptual ideas on tracing paper. Before the couple’s very eyes, the home started to take a much different shape: Instead of a simple shoe box massing, the new design would have a more organic form, and would bend to meet the different angles of striking views of the water. And the rest was history. Once the plan was developed, the home’s massing and exterior began to take shape, resulting in a unique, site-responsive design which would eventually have traditional Shingle Style elements. With so many angles, and since the home is visible from so many locations—especially from the water—the owners wanted their home 20 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2021


to be aesthetically pleasing from every vantage point. Even though the exterior reflects a complex plan, the façade deftly combines the varied forms and details into a warm and homogenous bayfront home. While the exterior was being resolved, the focus turned to interior design and the selection of finishes. The plan would naturally yield interesting opportunities for trim and built-in details, such as window seats, bunk beds and a unique mid-level bar. The mid-level was also configured so that each of Mike and Paige’s daughters, Skylar and Brooke, would also have unique bedrooms with ensuite baths, access to large covered decks and sweeping views of the bay. The Burts enjoy outdoor living and entertaining, and so their home reflects their active lifestyle. It has an in-ground pool, as well as a hot tub overlooking the bay. The ground level patio a lso has a luxurious outdoor kitchen that opens up to both the firepit and dock, providing the perfect setting to enjoy the beauty of Long Beach Island.

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OPEN HOUSE

Pagnotta’s firm approaches every site with the same process of maximizing views and solar orientation, although a majority of LBI homes are on smaller sites and may not provide as much design freedom as this particular site did. The firm considers themselves total creators of beach-homes, as they see the architectural design and construction of a house as intertwined processes that need to be provided by a singular source for a consistency of vision and expectations. When building your dream beach house, a superb architect will not only consider finishing touches such as built ins, ideal square footage or squeezing in as many bedrooms as possible. They will also optimize your views, placement and site orientation for energy efficiency, and help you navigate the unique features of any plot of land—no matter how big or small. And this stunning bayfront Classic American home is true testament as to why homeowners should give Michael Pagnotta a call, in order to design and build the seaside retreat of their dreams. bay-magazine.com 23


OUR REPUTATION IS BUILT ON SOLID GROUND

www.DolphinHomesLLC.com

Dolphin Homes has been building custom coastal homes for over 35 years along the shore. It’s what we love and it’s all we do. We use all high end, coastal friendly materials. Dolphin Homes offers total turn key services through the home building process .Our team will lead the way to your dream home.

The Jersey Shore’s New Home Headquarters Showroom: 1131 Bay Avenue, Point Pleasant, NJ Projects@dolphinhomesllc.com | 732-840-7911 24 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2021

#028276 Lic# 13VH00038100


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OPEN HOUSE

From Landscaper to Home Builder Written by Elaine Sisko

Unparallel customer service and well-honed communication skills have always been a hallmark of the Reynolds family of businesses. Service departments established in response to the wants and needs of a loyal customer base have resulted in a full-service Garden Center as well as landscape maintenance, low-voltage outdoor lighting design, women’s clothing, interior design, floral and bridal divisions and, most recently, the Café at Reynolds and The Reynolds Group, their real-estate division affiliated with G. Anderson Group. So, too, did the evolution of Mark Reynolds Project Management, the design-build construction division of Reynolds, result from this innate ability to listen, identify and satisfy—filling a void and expanding essential services. According to Mark Reynolds--owner of Reynolds Landscaping--it was unique, custom-built and highly personalized outdoor showers that ushered Reynolds into the sphere of construction management. Outdoor showers, typically built during a new home installation, were once considered a simple functional necessity— required only to wash off sand and chlorine after a day in the water. However, as new homes expanded and became personalized, homeowners sought to develop their showers into an extension of the primary residence—complementing architectural and aesthetics features in the home and creating a spa environment rather than a simple wash-off station. Listening to client priorities and referencing all unique attributes of the residence, Reynolds designed and installed multi-room cabana-like structures complete with luxurious changing rooms and over-sized shower stalls. High quality materials and hardware featuring IPE, mahogany and cedar wood treatments and natural rock facade walls and floors along with inset benches, select shelving and cabinetry, high quality plumbing fixtures 26 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2021


Photo by John Martinelli

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Photo by John Martinelli

and low-voltage lighting became synonymous with a Reynolds-built outdoor shower. These innovative design features added panache to an otherwise functional accessory, bridging the gap between interior and exterior living. The success of their outdoor showers, led to further exploration of additional design-built possibilities in the outdoor living environment. Homeowners sought to maximize the livability of their property, including under-utilized garage and utility areas. Creating a cohesive connection between interior and exterior living became a specialty of Reynolds Landscaping. By replacing standard garage doors with glass doors and removing garage walls to create open-air al fresco rooms—Reynolds utilized innovative design solutions to infuse light, air and warmth into inhospitable spaces and expand the possibilities for all-weather outdoor entertainment well into evening hours. Experience gained from each new design-build outdoor project prompted Reynolds to expand further into home renovations, both interior and exterior. Kitchen and bathroom makeovers, master bedroom suite, ensuite, and living room renovations, screened-in porches and raised outdoor decks became the new line of ser28 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2021

vices available from Reynolds. Loyal customers already familiar with their emphasis on high quality craftsmanship, innovative ideas and unparallel customer service did not hesitate to engage Reynolds Landscaping. As requests for design-build services expanded, Reynolds augmented an already established crew of highly trained carpenters, stoneworkers and quality specialty sub-contractors—eager to contribute their expertise to these innovative and challenging projects. Quality craftmanship matched by an innate ability to look beyond the box to tackle complex design challenges raised the bar for homeowner expectations. As word of mouth from satisfied clients grew, a decision was made to create a separate division devoted exclusively to highly personalized and inventive design-build projects. The result was the creation of Mark Reynolds Project Management (MRPM). The target group pursued by MRPM was the established Reynolds patron already familiar with the professionalism, unrivaled work ethic, open lines of communication and creative design solutions provided by Reynolds Landscaping—a select group of homeowners looking for and expecting a one-on-one personal connection with their Builder. The intention of


OPEN HOUSE Photos by LJ Hepp

MRPM was to cultivate an exclusive relationship with their client—a collaborative partnership with open and constant communication from the start of the design process through and beyond final Township approval process. Not long after its inception, MRPM received its first design-build contract for a new home construction—an impressive bay-front property in Loveladies, designed by Jay Madden, with commanding grand views over Barnegat Bay. The homeowners were already long-term clients of Reynolds Landscaping and knew firsthand, from previous outdoor projects, their focus on customer satisfaction, quality craftsmanship and design aesthetics. They were also aware from the interconnection with Reynolds Landscaping that a cohesive connection from interior to exterior living would be ensured. Despite change orders and design challenges, their new dream home resulted from a successful collaboration with their builder--true to the homeowner’s original aesthetic vision without compromise to functionally and livability. Always attentive to the wants and needs of their loyal patrons, the Reynolds family of businesses continues to evolve and expand upon values established long ago— unparalleled customer service, impeccable craftsmanship, innovative design and open communication. bay-magazine.com 29


INTRODUCING TOTAL WELLNESS

WE SELL AND SERVICE 2 FULL LINES OF F R E S H W AT E R & S A LT S Y S T E M S P A S 319 WEST 8TH ST. PO BOX 127 SHIP BOTTOM, NJ 08008 609.361.0221 | WWW.LBIHOTSPRINGSPAS.COM 30 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2021


UNMATCHED COASTAL CHOICES.

OCK D ST mes E T I ti LIM t lead due n e r r ed Cu xtend D. e e r a VI to CO OUR EY PLAC SOON! ER ORD

Our Ship Bottom NJ (Long Beach Island) store is your destination for everything coastal. Bring the sounds of the ocean, the warmth of sun and your beach memories inside with our coastal style furniture and accents. Ship Bottom NJ / 609-494-8127 101 W 8th St, Ship Bottom, NJ 08008 Mon-Sat 9-6. Sun 10-4. Also in Southampton, PA • oskarhuber.com bay-magazine.com 31


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OPEN HOUSE

EXPERTS WEIGH IN Oskar Huber’s industry experts weigh in on the interior design secrets everyone wants to know. Read on to see if your home décor questions have been answered. Written by Lisa Simek

Photos by Oskar Huber

When styling a new space, there are so many ways a homeowner can approach the design. They may want to inject some personality and play around with current trends, but also want it to be classic and stand the test of time. Even after months of thoughtful planning and pinning, it can still be a minefield of questions and intense decision-making. Despite their many differences, if there’s one thing all interior designers have in common, it’s that they tend to get asked a lot of design-related questions—often times answering the same question over and over again for different clients. And although interior design is highly personal, there are still a few basic guidelines, tips, and tricks to adhere to in order to achieve a truly remarkable space. That being said, we sat down with interior designer Therese Simon, one of Oskar Huber Furniture & Design’s most esteemed creatives, and compiled a list of the most common decorating queries she receives from homeowners. Whether you’re wondering which upholstery fabrics are right for you, how to ace that perfect modern coastal look, or even just how to navigate an interior design project, here are an expert’s answers to some of the most burning interior design dilemmas.

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OPEN HOUSE

Q: How can I make my home feel Coastal & Modern? A: Typical coastal has a very easy breezy beachy feel, and, although some of the design elements are similar with Coastal & Modern, the latter pushes the boundaries by mixing in a more contemporary feel. Coastal-Modern creates a more polished design aesthetic that makes your average coastal feel just a bit more sophisticated. Drawing inspiration from the native landscape of the island, the Coastal-Modern style incorporates natural materials such as bleached wood and woven textures, lots of whites, and then incorporates little punches of dark blue or black accents with modern angles to give it that contemporary feel. It’s still serene, yet visually interesting. Coastal & Modern styles can be easily combined using minimalism and cleaner lines when selecting upholstery, accent furniture and accessories. Selecting bright, crisp colors for fabric and area rugs will keep the room feeling

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fresh and airy. I suggest that customers collect inspiration pictures from Pinterest, Instagram, or Houzz, to help them define the look that they are trying to achieve for their space. Q: How do you make your Shore Home livable without worrying about the way the upholstery handles high traffic, pets and relaxed coastal living. A: Sunbrella & Performance fabrics are the way to go for every aspect of your life—at home, outdoors or even in the water. If a room gets a lot of sun, the best choice is Sunbrella or Inside-Out fabrics to avoid the risk of fading. The same goes for ottomans and couches that get a lot of traction or not-so-careful children. And before you shy away from the old stiff stereotype of these types of fabrics, let it be known that these aren’t grandma’s old porch furniture fabrics. The industry has really advanced


in the past few years and there are so many choices for performance fabrics in terms of color, texture, and pattern—you can even order Chartres Silk Sunbrella fabrics if that is your thing—you’d never even know it was Sunbrella. The versatility of these types of performance fabrics allows homeowners to take risks and go for the look they love, without any of the worry. Q: I have an open floor plan (family room & kitchen/dining), with a need for plenty of seating and want everything to flow. Where do I start? A: Beach houses often call for impromptu gatherings. To accommodate everyone, it’s important to be strategic with seating. I usually advise clients to go bigger with seating, and smaller with tables. A big couch can seat more people than a cluster of chairs (and it looks less cluttered!), while small, portable tables won’t trip anyone up in navigating a small space. To sneak in even more seating, try adding a window seat, or

tuck a pair of ottomans beneath a console table. In your dining space, if a large kitchen island that pulls double duty as a dining table is not an option, then choosing a round dining table is your next best bet. A round table is easier to walk around in a tight space, and it allows you to squeeze in an extra spot or two when you have drop-in guests. If it’s glass-topped, all the better — clear materials like glass take up zero visual space and make your room appear larger. All in all, however, I suggest making an appointment with a designer here at Oskar Huber who can guide your through this entire process from start to finish and create a customized plan that’s right for you and your family. We can help you design the entire floor plan, coordinate fabrics & furniture, finishes with flooring, help you with wall colors, etc.—truly a one stop shop. All the designers here are great, so whoever you decide to work with will get to know your style preferences for color and lifestyles needs, and the end result will be nothing short of fabulous. bay-magazine.com 35


CLEANING SERVICE

Cleaning Service LBI’S PREMIER CLEANING COMPANY, OPEN YEAR ROUND. FAMILY | VETERAN OWNED & OPERATE FOR 10 YEARS

CALL TODAY! 609.342.0208 518 CENTRAL AVE. SHIP BOTTOM DRILLSERGEANTCLEANING.COM INFO@DRILLSERGEANTCLEANING.COM

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OPEN HOUSE

THE ULTIMATE

BACKYARD OASIS How Proper Planning Today, Will Save You Time, Money and Aggravation Tomorrow Written by Lisa Simek

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Photos by Sheena Lynn


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Preparation is imperative in order to create an ideal outdoor sanctuary. Whether you’re wanting to add functionality to your property or simply improve curb appeal, proper planning not only paves the way for a seamless process, but it also helps to avoid potential pitfalls. It saves time and money by lessening the chances of delays when landscaping begins, creates an ideal environment for introducing new and additional features, and helps you determine the project’s budget by uncovering any land conditions that could cause additional expense when the work starts. Below, David Ash, owner of the award-winning New Jersey landscape design and construction company, David Ash Jr. Landscape Contractors, outlines what to consider before the much-anticipated summer landscaping, hardscaping, custom inground pools, and yard maintenance undertakings this season.

Design.

Before homeowners even begins to source contractors, one of the first things to do is to sit down and spend a significant amount of time looking through magazine websites, outdoor living Pinterest boards and various galleries for inspiration to see which styles, textures and colors tend to grab their attention. “A good contractor will keep the architectural style of your home in mind to ensure your design ideas can be implemented tastefully and harmoniously with your home’s color tones and design aesthetic,” advises Ash “the experience shines through when the designer can effectively translate any idea into a cohesive interpretation with the current existing property structures.” 40 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2021

Another interesting facet of proper planning regarding design is the anecdotal experience of experts, because more often than not, the consensus usually is that you will need more space than you think. For example, ample functionality for walkways or parking cars is usually something homeowners tend to wish they allotted more space towards after living and using the space after a season or two. Patios sometimes are initially planned for furniture but often times overlooked for the flow of traffic and other gathering spaces will be needed around the furniture or swimming pool areas for example. “For those who like to entertain, you will want to plan enough space for multiple conversation zones. And if you’re planning an outdoor kitchen, remember to plan for food prep and serving space as well,” notes Ash.

TiminG.

Since most projects are executed in phases, it is important to predict proper start and duration time in order for your project to be completed by the season (presumably Spring/Summer) that one intends on utilizing the space for. “All outdoor projects are subject to weather conditions so it’s important to consider this when gauging how long a project will take,” shares David. To his point, it is easy to assume that installing a drop-in fiber glass pool takes 1-2 days, but excavating the property, letting the earth naturally settle, considering winter weather or working through a particularly rainy season may surely delay the ability to prepare the property properly before the pool is installed.


The same goes for product availability. It’s important to note the delivery time of materials for the scope of the project, as many popular items can be backordered during busy seasons, as well as add-ons. If you add features in halfway through the construction phase, it is only to be expected that such changes would delay the schedule and add to the overall cost of the project.

OPEN HOUSE

Placement.

If you have an overall vision for your property and know you can’t do everything at once, you should still plan everything before breaking ground on the first project. Doing so can save you a lot of money and headaches down the road. For example, if you’re installing a pool and plan to add a cabana and an outdoor kitchen later, put in column footings and any needed electrical and gas lines under the pool deck now. It will cost a little extra on the front end but will save significant money and time later so you won’t have to dig up the ground after your landscape has already been manicured. “A contractor who understands the overall vision you present will guide you in these types of decisions and help you plan the best way to proactively place things such as gas and water lines now, if there is a chance you will want to utilize these down the road with additional construction,” says David.

Budget.

After creating a reasonable plan for the features you would like in your yard, organizing your priorities and your budget will dictate exactly how to execute or alter your dream project to meet those budget restraints. If the scope of a project is too much to handle financially in one season, many times planning the project in phases helps to alleviate some of that overwhelming stress in order to fall in line more with a seasonal budget. “Certain details such as utilizing a linear design as opposed to curves or winding features can make or break a budget,” David Ash notes. “Sometimes a homeowner needs a little guidance and relies on our expertise to suggest alternative perspectives or unique substitutions for features they didn’t even know were an option for their space,” he adds. This is where sourcing the expert opinion of someone who has been contracting outdoor landscapes for decades comes in handy, as their ability to look ahead into the scope of a project and what it entails will give homeowners a better, more realistic idea of what it will really take to get the job done, right.

For more information or to receive a free estimate for your next backyard oasis project, please visit LBILandscaper.com or email info@davidashlandscaping.com. bay-magazine.com 41


L A N D S C A P E | H A R D S C A P E | P O O L S & S PA S L I G H T I N G | I R R I G AT I O N | M A N A G E M E N T S U R F C I T Y, N J | 6 0 9 . 4 9 4 . 7 0 0 7 | L B I L A N D S C A P E R . C O M 42 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2021


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Introducing The POWER OF ONE from Valley National Bank Valley's unique POWER OF ONE construction financing program combines the construction phase and the permanent phase into one convenient process. Now you can build the home of your dreams and: • Gain peace of mind knowing you only have to go through the loan process once • Enjoy one defined rate structure for the life of your loan • Count on professional support from a team of banking and constructing professionals who want to make sure your home is delivered on time

A lender that's there for you For more than 90 years, Valley has provided buyers with specialized lending knowledge along with exceptional service. If you're interested in a free mortgage consultation, pre-qualification or preapproval, please reach out to us. We'd like to help turn your dream of building your next home into reality

Rick Butera Home Loan Consultant NMLS# 263964 561 Atlantic City Boulevard/Rt 9 Bayville, NJ 08721 O: 877-914-9500 C: 732-241-2678 F: 732-358-0302 rick@rickbutera.com

 



2021

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HOMEBUILDING SIMPLIFIED ON THE JERSEY SHORE Walters offers one-stop shopping to homebuyers. Time is valuable – especially when it comes to building your dream home. That’s why Walters prides itself on providing a stress-free homebuying experience by offering a full suite of services all under one roof. The award-winning homebuilder encompasses three separate divisions that include Architecture, Realty and Custom Homes. Together, Walters represents a truly one-stop shopping experience for homebuyers. “We want to provide our clients with a full range of services from architecture and realty to custom homes,” said Matthew Gaudet-Walters, Director of Business Development for Walters. From traditional shore colonials to contemporary marvels, Walters offers a customized approach to homebuilding. “Our experienced team will transform your property into your dream home using modern innovations and technology that fit your vision, budget and style,” said Gaudet-Walters.

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From start to finish, Walters takes care of everything –beginning with a complete lot analysis on the prospective property. If you’re in need of land, Walters will partner with you and your realtor to advise you on finding the appropriate property to fit your new home. Based on the results of the lot analysis, Walters will help you select a home design based on your own personal preferences. And since Walters is an ENERGY STAR® Certified Homes Market Leader, you can rest easy knowing that your new home will meet the stringent standards of the United States Environmental Protection Agency for energy efficiency. When it comes time to design your dream home, you will have the option to utilize the services of Walters Architecture. This allows home buyers to work with in-house architects and designers to establish a working knowledge of the property in order to design the perfect home using the latest technology and quality building materials. Home buyers receive a complimentary first meeting with preliminary draft and one revision. Once your home is designed and floor plans are finalized, Walters will help you determine your initial working budget. You will also have the opportunity to visit a Walters Homes Design Center to select all the finishes and colors for your new home. “We take great care in ensuring that your new home is designed around your lifestyle and how you’d like to enjoy it,” said Gaudet-Walters. Behind the scenes, Walters does it all. “You don’t need to coordinate anything throughout this process,” said Gaudet-Walters. “At Walters, an onsite Project Manager keeps you in the loop every step of the way from construction through to the final walkthrough.” 48 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2021


The best part of building a new home is living in it, but it doesn’t end here. You will enjoy your new home with the peace of mind that Walters is just a phone call away to help fix any issues that arise in the future. “If there are any issues with your home after move-in, our Warranty team will help you resolve them,” Gaudet-Walters added. Walters offers a 10-year warranty on structural issues; a twoyear warranty on mechanical issues and a one-year warranty on any other issue.

“We take great care in ensuring that your new home is designed around your lifestyle and how you’d like to enjoy it.” – M AT T H E W G A U D E T -WA LT E R S , DIRECTOR OF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

Don’t wait, start building your dream home today. Visit waltershomes.com and click “price project” to begin the process virtually.

About Walters Walters has been building quality homes at the Jersey Shore since 1984. The company offers three divisions, Architecture, Custom Homes and Realty, to offer all-inclusive services that seamlessly bring a homebuyer’s dream vision to reality. Walters Architecture is a completely complimentary service that allows homebuyers to work with in-house architects to design the perfect home with the latest technology and quality building materials. Walters Realty offers full-service brokerage experts that help homebuyers find the right homesite depending on their desired location. Walters Custom Homes offers newly designed custom home plans that help homebuyers through the homebuilding process. Every custom home built by Walters meets or exceeds the energy efficiency requirements for ENERGY STAR® certification. Walters is located at 500 Barnegat Boulevard North, Building 400, Barnegat, NJ 08005. To learn more, call 609.597.6999 or visit waltershomes.com. bay-magazine.com 49


T C A TR N O C ER D N U BEACH HAVEN GETAWAY

Immaculate first floor unit offering private, fenced yard including outdoor shower. Park your car and walk to all that the queen city has to offer. Pride of ownership shows here along with a solid rental history with many repeaters. Spacious living/dining/kitchen. Winterized and shut down approximately November - April. Sold turn key.

Contact Michele Timlin

mtimlin@ganderson.com cell

609-661-3146

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LD SO

LD SO

SO

LD

office 609-492-1277


Beyond Investing. Connecting.

No matter where you are in life—just starting out, in your peak earning years, nearing retirement, or contemplating your legacy—we are here for you. CONTACT US TO DISCUSS HOW WE CAN HELP YOU CONNECT YOUR LIFE AND FINANCES. Peter is a resident of LBI and available for local appointments. PETER L. COSTANZO, JR., CFP®, CRPC®, AWMA®, AAMS® Executive Vice President / Wealth Management, Financial Advisor 1650 Crooked Oak Drive, Suite 100, Lancaster, PA 17601 717.519.4188 | CostanzoWM@janney.com | www.CostanzoWM.com © JANNEY MONTGOMERY SCOTT LLC • MEMBER: NYSE, FINRA, SIPC • REF: 235410-0321

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OPEN HOUSE

Ask

THE DECORATOR Q & A with Thom Sweeney

Photo by John Martinelli

Thom Sweeney is founder and owner of Thom Sweeney Interiors, an award-winning full-service interior design studio specializing in contract design and residential business. With a well-trained and careful eye for quality, craftsmanship, and statement-making furnishings & textiles, Thom is recognized for his bold and elegant, yet timeless and classic styled designs.

WHY HIRE AN INTERIOR DESIGNER? Many people can navigate basic design to some extent, but most don’t know where to find the right accessories to finish the job if they aren’t found at Home Goods. Thom Sweeney has more than 35 years of interior design experience and is member of the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID). His company, Thom Sweeney Interiors, has a 3,000 sq ft showroom that houses furniture, textiles, hand-picked accessories –not to mention a plethora of catalogues that clients can browse through— everything needed to select just the right design piece for a perfect wall, table or floor. A refined designer with a well-trained eye, his primary goal is to bring a space to life with the most stunning, curated finishing touches that pull together an exquisite design vision. Below, one Bay Magazine reader asks Thom a popular design question with an all-too-familiar theme: Question from our Reader: Q: How can I avoid the eventual obsolescence of a design trend? Thom Sweeney’s Response: A: You can’t. Nothing lasts forever. Think of all the styles and trends that have come and gone: Art Deco, Danish Modern, Mid Century Modern, American Country, Country French, Shabby Chic, Williamsburg, Industrial, Primitive Farmhouse—the list goes on. Time changes everything. 15 years ago, you couldn’t 52 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2021

have enough swags and jabots edged in miles and miles of tassels. Now tearing them down makes your home instantly more relevant. Because, as with fashion, things in the design world have gotten a lot more casual too. Think about it: three of the most influential brands have changed the way we describe our style; they are Restoration Hardware, Pottery Barn and Fixer Upper Farmhouse. They all have a commonality, a kind of simplistic, natural, non-fussy approach to design. Restoration Hardware pushed hard to combine classic shapes, linens and natural fabrics and reclaimed wood into a high-end package. Pottery Barn has produced a colorful fresh approach to a comfortable and affordable design. Both of these companies have been very influential on design. But Joanna Gaines, the HGTV phenom, has had the most profound influence in recent history. Who ever heard of shiplap before she introduced it and pushed its use single handedly? And she is also totally responsible for popularizing the black and white esthetic which is currently sweeping the country. Colors (dark tones, peach, mauve), finishes (bright brass), and patterns (floral), are all of our favorites at the moment. But things inevitably change. So, enjoy your current favorite design while you can. Because the day will surely come when it will not be called “au courant” any more!


THOM SWEENEY, ASID

INTERIOR DESIGN FURNITURE B E D & BAT H L I N E N S LIGHTING W I N D OW T R E AT M E N T S

THINK

NEXT SUMMER Over the winter, let’s do what it takes to get your LBI home done the way you’ve always wanted it. Whether it’s remodeling or just

redecorating, we can do it. It all starts with a phone call from you.

OUR WORK SPEAKS FOR ITSELF

THOM SWEENEY INTERIORS Gunning River Mall

1 0 1 2 C E N T R A L AV E , S H I P B O T T O M 609.361.9297 BET WEENTHESHEETSNJ.COM INFO@BET WEENTHESHEETSNJ.COM

849 West Bay Avenue Barnegat, New Jersey 08005 609.622.2950

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LET’S BUILD A HOME

W E ’ V E B E E N D E L I V E R I N G R E L A X I N G C O A S TA L E S C A P E S T O L B I FA M I L I E S F O R O V E R 4 0 Y E A R S , CUSTOM BUILDING A WIDE RANGE OF DIVERSE & BEAUTIFUL HOMES. RECOGNIZED WITH R E S I D E N T I A L W A R R A N T Y C O M PA N Y ’ S ‘A W A R D OF DISTINCTION’ FOR BUILDING EXCELLENCE & S U P E R I O R C U S T O M E R S AT I S FA C T I O N , O U R C L I E N T- C E N T E R E D T E A M W I L L W O R K W I T H Y O U F R O M D E S I G N TO C O M P L E T I O N A N D B E YO N D.

L e t T h o m a s J. K e l l e r H e l p Yo u E n v i s i o n T h e Po s s i b i l i t i e s

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Thomas J. Keller BUILDING CONTRACTOR LLC

4 N . L O N G B E A C H B LV D . S U R F C I T Y, N J 609.494.2215 | THOMASJKELLER.COM NJ REGISTERED BUILDER LICENSE #042471/HIC#13VH04329200

CHOOSE ANDERSEN AND NOTHING LESS “ANDERSEN” AND THE AW LOGO ARE REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OF ANDERSEN CORPORATION

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OPEN HOUSE

One Team to Do It All Written by Diana Lentini

Photos by John Martinelli

In a world where home projects and updates seem to happen in the blink of an eye on social media, planning a project may feel daunting as a homeowner. How do you get started? What materials are needed? How do you find someone you can trust in your home to make sure the job is completed correctly and safely? For residents of Long Beach Island and surrounding towns, all three questions can be answered by Woodhaven Lumber & Millwork, a 56 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2021

one-stop shop with a vast selection of products, in-house experts capable of designing custom plans, and experienced installers ready to make your dream home come true. With showrooms in Manahawkin, Lakewood, Point Pleasant and Shrewsbury, Woodhaven’s Installed Sales teams are ready to help you plan your home projects from start to finish, whether you’re redoing a kitchen, replacing floors, windows or doors, installing a stair railing or optimizing a closet to fit your lifestyle. Here’s what you need to know.


Windows & Doors The biggest advantage of working with an experienced Installed Sales team is the relationships with the vendors, says Bill McDermott, Residential Supply and Install Manager for Woodhaven’s Windows and Doors department. By using a company like Woodhaven to purchase your materials and products and then install them, you never have to worry about contacting a manufacturer with questions during the renovation process—you can just count on your personal project manager to find out the answers for you, including inquiries about care and repairs.  Woodhaven is a certified dealer of top-of-the-line window and door brands, including Andersen Windows & Doors and Therma-Tru Doors, earning the elite certifications of Certified Contractor and Certified Door System Installer, respectively. The benefit of these recognitions for you? By purchasing and installing through Woodhaven, you receive an extra year of warranty for certain products, in addition to the standard two-year labor warranty on most of their installs.

Kitchens Kitchens are often one of the costliest, time-intensive renovations you’ll make to your home, so trusting the team managing your project is a must.    “At Woodhaven, we provide a one-on-one intimate setting for our customers—you need to feel comfortable with who you’re working with,” says Evamarie Sibila, Kitchen Design Specialist. In an ideal situation, the professional measuring your kitchen for cabinets, countertops and hardware should also be the one managing the ordering and installation of your products, rather than subcontracting the labor out. “Construction isn’t an exact science,” Eva explains. “There can be unforeseen changes that impact measurements that can’t be accounted for up front.” By working with the same team from start to finish, these small nuances don’t go unnoticed.  “It all falls on our plate,” says Melody Ann Wells, Kitchen Design Specialist.“We can get answers and updates for you. For example—while we don’t sell appliances, we work with local appliance retailers on the island. We’re also available when it’s convenient for our clients, even at night and on weekends if needed,” she adds. bay-magazine.com 57


OPEN HOUSE

In the case of a total kitchen renovation, where new windows and floors are needed, it’s easy enough for the kitchen specialists to liaise with their counterparts on the other Installed Sales teams at Woodhaven, leaving you with one crew that works cohesively.  

widely available. As a certified White Glove Service Partner with COREtec floors, a waterproof product built for any lifestyle, Woodhaven customers enjoy a range of exclusive benefits and special touches not available anywhere else.

Flooring and Stairs

“We’re customer oriented,” says Denise Morrone, Flooring Specialist at Woodhaven. “We receive so many referrals because we work with clients that are truly happy.”

When it comes to installing high quality flooring, there’s no comparison between visiting a specialist with custom options at every price point, and settling for inventory available at a chain retailer. The former can work with your vision and your home’s unique needs—a factor to take into consideration when living near the water and looking for solutions made to last against moisture and sand. A flooring project at Woodhaven starts with a visit to one of their showrooms, complete with take-home samples, followed by an in-home appointment to measure your space. Old flooring is removed and disposed of, leaving you with one less clean-up aspect to worry about.  Like with windows, purchasing flooring products through Woodhaven allows for exclusive benefits not

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Oftentimes, a flooring project will turn into a broader project that involves stairs in some fashion. Rather than dedicating time to finding a stairs contractor, your flooring designer at Woodhaven can partner with the stairs department to put together a cohesive plan. While Woodhaven manufacturers stairs, there is a dedicated Supply and Install team for stair railings and accompanying components including including balusters, newels, handrails, fittings and stair treads.  “A railing is like a piece of furniture – it’s one of the first things you see when you walk into a house. Expertise matters,” says Craig Smith, Stair Department Manager at Woodhaven. 


Closets Designing the interior space of a closet can mean utilizing a small space in a way that makes a large impact on your day to day life. The closets department at Woodhaven has over 35 years of experience of transforming spaces. Though closets are typically the most compact areas of a home, no job is too small for the team. “Woodhaven is able to use our buying power to the customer’s advantage for jobs of all sizes,” says Sandy Deckman, Closet Manager.   As with the other areas of the home, a closet redesign begins with a client meeting, measurements, and a conversation about what’s needed from the space. After creating a 3D template, Sandy and team design a custom solution made just for you, rather than trying to retrofit a one size fits all piece to work in your space.  Projects large and small require planning and expertise, and using one company to do it all can save time and money by ensuring it’s completed right, the first time. A recent customer in Manasquan put it simply: “Woodhaven really understood our needs and wants and created a design approach that put all those pieces in place.” 

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1418 Ship Bottom, Bottom,NJ NJ08008 08008 1418 Central Central Avenue, Avenue, Ship 609-494-0011 609-494-0011 www.franciemilanokitchens.com

www.franciemilanokitchens.com BEST OF HOUZZ BEST OF HOUZZ 2017-2021 2017, ‘18, ‘19, ‘20 & ‘21

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OPEN HOUSE

Dos and Don’ts of

Off-Season Entertaining Town & Country Design Studio Provides Seasonal Design Tips Written by Ginny Padula

Photo by Chris Delaney

Entertaining al fresco is a no-brainer in the balmy, summer months - what with the temperate climate, long days and staggering sunsets. But as we gently edge into autumn, it’s time to start thinking about transforming your hosting-style for the chilly seasons ahead. While a complete overhaul of your home decor might seem a tedious undertaking, at Town & Country Design Studio, we welcome the challenges that seasonal transitioning brings to interior design. Curating simple solutions for off-season entertaining is our speciality. So… let’s keep the party going beyond Labor Day! Check out our list of “Dos and Don’ts” for hosting in the coming off-season.

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Dos for Off-Season Entertaining

Do paint a thoughtful tablescape. Perhaps the most important aspect of your off-season get-together is your table: the backdrop for your food. In harmony with the season, you’ll want to curate a table that is both warm and inviting. This year for fall and winter we are leaning towards warm and cozy spice tones, but with a muted, modern touch. As for decor, we always love to accessorize with a nice blend of classic pieces with seasonal accents. We have a wonderful collection of handcrafted treasures at our boutique, T&C Mercantile, and are planning to showcase more festive pieces as the holidays approach. Do invest in chic linens. A great set of linens is something that can be used from year to year, season to season. In true Town & Country form, we gravitate toward neutral, well crafted textiles that can be versatile for your lifestyle. Our preference is to use these classic staples as the base and layer over with unique “themes” for the season or occasion. Do winterize your backyard. Not all entertaining has to be done indoors. Just because it isn’t quite sunny and 75, doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy the occasional al fresco gathering. With the right planning, outdoor spaces can be utilized well into the colder months. Deck your patio seating out with cushions and cozy blankets for warmth. Sprinkle tabletop fire options (candles, fire pots, etc.) throughout your dining area to evoke a cozy feel. We personally love lanterns combined with flameless candles. They offer a beautiful glow to any space, without the fire hazard.

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The

BOOK

L O N G B E A C H I S L A N D ’ S P R E M I E R R E A L E S TAT E M A G A Z I N E

P U B L I C AT I O N D AT E S & A D D E A D L I N E S

Publication MARCH 1,2022

The

BOOK

LONG

BEACH

ISLAN

D’S PR EM

AD DEADLINE 2/1/22 IER RE AL

E S TAT

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SPRIN

LUXUR

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G 202 1

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AT E P ROPE

RTY P .15

Publication JUNE 1, 2022 AD DEADLINE 4/24/22

Publication AUGUST 1, 2022 AD DEADLINE 6/22/22

TheOK BO

EACH LONG B

ISLAND

MIE ’S PRE

E S TAT E R REAL

MAGAZ

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SUMME R F LUXU WEEK O

R 2021

18 Y PA G E

Publication OCTOBER 1, 2022 AD DEADLINE 8/20/22

C O N TA C T gary@bay-mag.com

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OPEN HOUSE

Don’ts of Off-Season Entertaining

Don’t be afraid to get creative. Sometimes unexpected materials create some of the most interesting décor and tablescape combinations. Incorporate fringed blankets from your living room for table runners or centerpieces made with foliage from your yard. The possibilities are endless! Don’t over-complicate the event. Of course the goal is to create a perfect look, taste, and experience for your guests, but, as the host, it is easy to become overwhelmed and stressed in the pursuit of perfection. Remember it’s a party. Even the planning and preparing should be fun - so keep things simple! Before we go, we have one more “do.” Do visit our shop at tandcmercantile. com and follow us on instagram at @ tandc_mercantile. Be on the lookout for entertaining guides and tips for curating your ideal seasonal space.

Photo by Chris Delaney bay-magazine.com 65


Our goal is to help you pursue yours. It’s that simple. At Merrill, we’ll help you get ready for the future with a financial approach that’s designed for you. The Somers Group Skye J. Gibson, CFP®, C(k)P®, CPFA Vice President Wealth Management Advisor 609.484.7101 skye.gibson@ml.com

Merrill Lynch Wealth Management 3100 Hingston Avenue Egg Harbor Township, NJ 08234 609.484.7172 fa.ml.com/somersgroup

Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated (also referred to as “MLPF&S” or “Merrill”) makes available certain investment products sponsored, managed, distributed or provided by companies that are affiliates of Bank of America Corporation (“BofA Corp.”). MLPF&S is a registered broker-dealer, registered investment adviser, Member SIPC and a wholly owned subsidiary of BofA Corp. Investment products:

Are Not FDIC Insured

Are Not Bank Guaranteed

May Lose Value

The Bull Symbol and Merrill are registered trademarks of Bank of America Corporation. Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards Inc. owns the certification marks CFP® and CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ in the U.S. C(k)P® is a registered trademark of The Retirement Advisor University, Inc. © 2021 Bank of America Corporation. All rights reserved. MAP3494744 | AD-06-21-0345 | 470948PM-0421 | 06/2021 66 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2021


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OPEN HOUSE

When Dreams Become Reality Written by Carolyn Mijal

Photos by Christopher Hurtig

Builder: Michael Pagnotta Architecture & Construction

The warm, spicy smell of pumpkin pie fills the room as the sounds of cousins competitively playing a board game while football from the television and several different topics of conversations surround you. Your home is filled with laughter, food, family, and friends, all taking time to reflect on the past year and make up for lost time. After the chaotic year that was 2020, there is a collective agreement that the holidays this year hold a special and blessed space for all, small moments meaning so much more now than ever before. Long time clients of Between the Sheets (BTS), Kay and Ed Dineen of Ship Bottom have been working with BTS since their first home was designed years ago. When they had the chance to purchase a house on the ocean, they jumped at the opportunity and knew just who to call! This time around, they knew to reach out to the designers at BTS during the building phase, allowing for the designers to incorporate the Dineen’s unique taste and personalities into the materials and colors in the home. Together Between the Sheets and home builder Michael Pagnotta Architecture & Construction worked with the Dineen’s to manifest their dream home into an even more spectacular reality. bay-magazine.com 69


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Designed with intention, each and every room has magnificent views of the Atlantic. From the master bedroom to the family room, the beauty of the ocean acts as a natural backdrop to the rooms itself. Drawing inspiration from the captivating beauty that surrounds their home, the designers used the colors of the horizon at sunrise over the ocean as the color palette, allowing the interior of the home to flow seamlessly into the views of the ocean. Ashley Sbailo, the Senior Interior Designer at BTS who worked with the Dineen’s, was ecstatic that she was able to bring her clients personality into the spaces. “It’s not often that you find a client who isn’t afraid of color!” Sbailo said, “They have such bright personalities. Kay is inviting and bubbly and it was really import to us that the home reflected those traits.” The Dineen’s are located in Texas and reside in Ship Bottom for half of the year, and this home serves as a gathering place for the entire family. They knew that they wanted to create an intentionally customizable space that would cater to hosting family all year 70 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2021

round. While sitting at their kitchen island enjoying a cup a coffee, the open concept design allows you to easily visualize how the space is able to accommodate their large family. The 12.5’ dining table, fondly referred to as the “Game of Thrones” table by the Dineen’s, comfortable seats 12, while the breakfast nook in the kitchen easily extends, becomes the kids’ corner on holidays, allowing for 8 additional seats. The flexible seating in the living room from the comfy sofas with plush pillows, to the ottomans that function as a coffee table when not in use, allow for 12 or more people to sit to enjoy to view. One of the most subtle and spectacular details is the coral reef design in the two chairs overlooking the ocean, upon first glance you wouldn’t notice it, however, the elegant and effortless way it ties into the theme of the home showcases the perfect balance of how nature often influences design. Each and every age group within the family has a place within the home as well, once the turkey has been served and dinner has transition into that in-between time (post dinner and pre pumpkin pie)


the kids and teens of the family can make their way to the family room to watch a movie and hang out. The bedrooms are so chic and comfortable that for a minute you forget you are home and believe that you have been transported to a luxury resort on the beach, although the mystic charm of LBI is that it truly is New Jersey’s own jewel of the shoreline. Kay and Ed wanted their home in Ship Bottom to be filled with their family no matter what time of year. Each space provides a sense of relaxation and coziness where each family member from the smallest to the eldest can feel right at home for the entirely of their stay. Every space holds the most stunning details, but perhaps the most stunning is tucked away into a window seat in the stairwell. A marvelous, elegant, stained-glass window hangs in the pane. A gift from Kay to Ed, she and Ashley teamed up with Mary at Swell colors in Surf City to design a one-of-a-kind piece of art to be enjoyed by generations come. As rays of light pass through the colorful pane the dancing light creates a magical spot in the home to show case the sun and all of her glorious rays, carrying with it a sense of hope and delight to anyone who passes by. Kay and Ed‘s vision has been seamlessly delivered by the team at Between the Sheets, the women who design with homeowners as the focal point and are able to take anyone’s dreams and manifest them into reality.

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S E R E N IT Y DE S IGN Everything for the Home of your Dreams

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Born Into The Business Written by Ashley Williams

Garabedian is a second generation Broker-Builder. Matthew spent his summers on LBI, where he now lives and works year-round and is an integral part of island life. In his younger years, Matthew served as on Officer for the Long Beach Township Beach Patrol and was the Commodore for the Beach Haven Marlin & Tuna Club. His wife, Coleen, graduated from the Southern Regional School District. Today Matthew is a member of the Ship Bottom Fire Department and his company, Garabedian Real Estate Companies, has since become a familiar and well-respected name in real estate. “We are brokers. We are builders. We are real estate.” Matthew says. It’s one of a few of his working taglines, he says, and one that encompasses the pulse of his hybrid company’s focus. Awarded Top 30 Under 30 by age 24 in Realtor Magazine, Matthew credits his classic style street hustle and exemplary client communication practices for his long-standing success. He attended the executive program at Harvard Business School for Real Estate Finance and Development and the Construction Management Program at Columbia University. Even amid such Ivy League academic credentials, Matthew still cites experience as his best education. Matthew prides himself on working in the trenches and is heavily involved with both companies, in both of his office locations, South and North, each and every day.  Matthew’s successful world is held together in what he calls his Business Bible. This custom-made, hand-held planner allows him to track every day, every week and every month. He keeps it close beside him at all times and credits his proprietary planner with his ability to effectively operate his office and job sites. Everything Garabedian does is about managing goals and schedules; from his agents to his clients to his own personal life, he focuses first and foremost on setting a date and then coming in ahead of schedule with value as his top priority. When you work with either one of the Garabedian Real Estate Companies, you work directly with Matt. “Whether it’s selling, building, or buying… our clients’ equity and value positions are of the utmost importance. The average builder doesn’t have that kind of knowledge of the real estate market and the average broker doesn’t have that kind of knowledge of the construction side. That’s our difference.”

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Referring to the brokerage side of the business, Garabedian states, “We do things differently at Garabedian. We are about leveraging the market outside of the local area. As the only firm on Long Beach Island that is independently owned with offices also in North Jersey, it allows us to exhaust the exposure of a property to all potential buyers, not just strictly local.” He is also licensed in NYC. This exposure guarantees our listing clients the highest value for their property when selling.” This strategy seems to work well. Since the firm started in 2016, Garabedian claims he’s never had a residential listing fail to sell. The camaraderie, the culture, and the collective mindset may just be what keeps this lean brokerage firing like a small hedge fund. With twenty agents between the two locations, Garabedian is always pushing his team to succeed. Garabedian is not as concerned with the number of agents but rather in the quality and productivity for our clients. Whether on the brokerage or building side, our clients’ equity is always a top priority. It’s not important where we’re sitting, it’s what we’re doing differently to achieve the goal.

Recent construction client, Lynn Goldstein, affirms the notion that a smooth process from concept to completion is absolutely essential. She and her husband recently hired Garabedian to build their primary residence in Surf City. “We are ecstatic to be in our new home,” Goldstein says. Through a referral, we were impressed with Matt’s strong real estate history, so we gave the office a call. Matt called back within a matter of hours on a Saturday evening, so that truly set the stage. Matt’s a real go-getter and his company was a great choice for us.” “Matt was extremely proactive and very organized with files and spreadsheets, all of which were very clear,” Goldstein says. “He told us exactly what we were paying, juggled supply chain issues, followed up and followed through with vendors. He’s just very detail oriented so supplies were there and lined up. Contractors were stacked and ready to go from one phase to the next. Matt is really on his game, he made sure we didn’t incur higher costs.” This is one of the key differentiators Garabedian identifies for his business and allows Garabedian’s projects to keep moving smoothly.

On the construction side of the business, he credits the constant communication with clients with allowing him to be a creator of value. Garabedian assists clients in not only finding property, but also managing the build while protecting their equity. In addition, our architecture and interior selection specialists, included in our service, help bring ease to our clients throughout the process, allowing a new project to be enjoyable instead of a headache. All done under one roof.

Goldstein concurs, “We were in a time-sensitive situation, living in a long-term rental from October to June, so we appreciated Matt’s constant communication. His follow-up and turnaround time were great and it really made all the difference. Communication was key, and he delivered our project on time despite COVID delays. As a one-stop shop, having the architecture, interior selection specialist and working alongside Matt made the process enjoyable.”

Garabedian is currently completing and preparing several homes for immediate delivery, with more custom homes expected to break ground this fall.

Garabedian looks forward to brokering and building for generations to come on LBI and hopes one day his three daughters will choose to work alongside him and continue to grow the business.

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HEALTHY LIVING

The Proper Warming Up Written by Lisa Simek

One of life’s greatest treasures is good health. When healthy, one can fully enjoy family, friends, the fruits of your labors or just a wonderful day at the beach. If your health is compromised, life’s challenges can be very difficult at best. This is why being proactive in optimizing your current health status through exercise is so very important, and may be one of the best things you can do to improve overall health. A reasonable, consistent exercise program reduces the risk of chronic disease, improves balance and coordination, helps with weight control, reduces the risk of heart disease, strengthens bones and muscles and boosts self-confidence. Certainly, you can reap these benefits of exercise regardless of age, gender or physical ability. But keep in mind, if you currently have health concerns and haven’t exercised for some time, you should discuss initiating an exercise program with your primary care provider. There are basically two types of exercise: Aerobic and Anaerobic. Both types are excellent forms of exercise but are physiologically different. Aerobic exercise, also known as cardio or cardiovascular exercise, is physical activity of a higher intensity that requires the use of oxygen to adequately meet the energy demands of the exercises being performed via aerobic metabolism. This process is like a fire which requires oxygen to burn its fuel; our bodies will utilize oxygen to “burn” carbohydrates and fat in order to create energy for muscle contraction during exercise. Aerobic exercise is typically characterized by a period sustained exercise which improves cardiovascular conditioning, increases physical endurance and respiratory fitness. Some examples of aerobic exercise are walking, using a tread mill or stationary bike, jogging, cycling and swimming. Anaerobic exercise differs in that oxygen is not utilized to fuel muscle contraction; the body relies on other substances to create brief bursts of energy for a shorter duration, quicker, stronger muscle contraction. Anaerobic exercise utilizes glucose which is stored in our muscles as the primary source of energy which will develop a

Photo by Michael John Murphy

stronger muscle contraction. Some examples of anaerobic exercises are push-ups, sit- ups, circuit training, strength training and weight lifting. The two types of exercise differ in exercising time and the intensity of muscle contraction involved, as well as by how energy is generated to support muscle contraction. Both types of exercises are beneficial, which one is the best is up for discussion and probably a combination of the two is optimal, but for our purposes we will are going to discuss aerobic cardiovascular exercise. According to the American Heart Association, the best way to track the effectiveness of your aerobic workout bay-magazine.com 79


We restore healthy spine function and ENHANCE quality of life

Ted Siciliano, D.C. | Manahawkin Chiropractic Center 720 South Main Street Route 9 South Manahawkin, New Jersey 609-597-9333 | www.drtedsiciliano.com Non-surgical treatment of Spinal Stenosis | Herniated Discs of the Cervical or Lumbar Spine Degenerative Disc Disease | Neck pain with or without arm pain | Sciatica

80 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2021


HEALTHY LIVING

is to monitor your heart rate. Monitoring your heart rate will help you document your rate of cardiovascular improvement and helps you hit that pulse rate bullseye so you can get maximum benefit from every workout. Even if you are not an exercise fanatic, knowing your heart rate or pulse rate can help you determine your fitness level. Initially, you want to get a base line of your resting heart rate. Your resting heart rate is the number of times our heart beats per minute (bpm) when you’re at rest. The best time to check your resting heart rate is in the morning after you’ve had a good night’s sleep, ideally before you get out of bed and certainly before you have your first cup of coffee or tea. The average resting heart rate (bpm) of an adult is 72 bpm with a normal range of bpm from 60 to 100. When it comes your resting heart rate, lower is better. This usually means your heart muscle is becoming stronger, beating more efficiently and doesn’t have to work as hard to satisfy your body’s need for oxygen. Research shows that a higher resting heart rate can be linked with lower physical conditioning, higher blood pressure and body weight (BMI). In order optimize your aerobic cardio workouts and achieve your fitness goals, it’s important to have a target heart rate (bpm) when exercising. Your maximum heart rate varies with age and is lower as you get older. You can figure your maximum heart rate from activity by taking 220 and subtracting your age. So, if you are 50 years old, your maximum heart rate is 170 bpm with a target exercise heart rate (bpm) of between 50% to 80% of your maximum heart rate, depending on your desired level of training. The higher the target heart rate percentage is, the more intense your workout will be. For example: 220 minus 50 years equals a 170-bpm maximum heart rate multiplied 70% (.70) which is considered a good aerobic workout, will give you a target heart rate of 119 bpm, 60% (.60) is gives you a target heart rate of 102 bpm which is considered an easy fat burning workout and 80% (.80)) gives you a target heart rate of 136 bpm which is hard core training. A target heart rate of 50% of maximum heart rate would be considered a good warmup rate, a 60% target rate is good for weight control and is good for beginners, 70% target rate is endurance training and 80% would be considered a very intense workout which for a beginner is not recommended and please remember, you should never exercise at your maximum heart rate. With today’s technology, it’s easy to monitor your bpm with a fit bit or even your cell phone. Old school is to find your pulse at your wrist and count your pulses for 10 seconds then multiply by 6 to get bpm or count for 1 minute. The American Heart Association recommends a minimum of 30 minutes of some type of cardiovascular exercise 5 to 7 days per week. The American

College of Sports Medicine recommends a minimum of 3 sessions per week of moderate cardio exercise. Should your warm-up before exercising? The answer is, absolutely! It is essential for many reasons to perform some type of warm-up routine before exercising. In fact, the more intense your workout is, the more crucial properly warming up becomes. Properly warming up before exercising increases circulation to your muscles, ligaments and tendons, gently increases your heart rate and mentally prepares you for your workout. Warming up gradually improves blood flow to all the working muscles, your brain and nervous system, will reduce the risk of injury, increases flexibility, decreases muscle stiffness and can improve physical performance. A total warm-up should last between five and ten minutes. Don’t push yourself too hard as a warm-up should be done gradually. As your heart rate slowly increases, you maybe able to feel the effects of the increased blood flow as your body temperature gradually increases. To warm-up before walking, all you need to do is to start out walking slowly for about 10 minutes. After this warm-up, you can stop and do some static or dynamic stretching depending on your fitness level then gradually increase you walking pace. If you are a jogger, you can also start your workout by walking, then after about 5 to 8 minutes you can begin jogging slowly. If you ride a bicycle, you too can begin riding slowly then gradually increase your cadence after a half mile or so. Marching in place while slowly moving your arms or participating in a basic yoga program are great ways to warm-up. Before you come to at the end of your aerobic exercise workout, it is also beneficial to gradually reduce your intensity in order to cool down for 3 minutes or so before you completely stop exercising. This will allow you heart rate to slow down and return to a resting heart rate. Regardless what type of aerobic cardiovascular exercise you prefer, warming -up and cooling down are great ways to insure you get the maximum benefit from your exercise program and optimize your health. For more than 30 years, Dr. Ted has built a reputation helping the residents of our region find relief from back and leg pain without the need for invasive surgery. He is a leading practitioner for one of the most effective techniques used by chiropractors today, The Cox Technique, which is a non-force adjustment procedure that helps the spine heal naturally based on principles of both chiropractic and osteopathy. Below you will find his answer to the most popular questions asked by Bay Magazine readers. For more information about Dr. Ted’s practice, visit DrTedSiciliano.com. bay-magazine.com 81


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HEALTHY LIVING

TURNING THE LBI YOGA SCENE UPSIDE DOWN IN

Aerial Silks Written by Katie Ribsam, Jayme Pilone and Lianne Carp Photos by Carolyn Dentz

Last winter the old Dollar Parlor in Bay Village went through an incredible transformation. What was a funky little gag shop selling toys, rock posters and magic tricks became Yoga Bohemia’s third studio on Long Beach Island. Unique to this location is the energy of Bay Village, a bustling area of downtown Beach Haven filled with visitors from near and far. With vibrant shopping experiences, flavorful foods, and a whole host of exciting activities like amusement rides, mini golf, henna tattoos and even LBI’s own psychic reader, the energy of Bay Village sends the senses into overdrive. So, in creating the vision for our new location, it seemed quite obvious that the offerings should include an equally unique energy. Enter aerial yoga. Aerial yoga brings a literal and figurative levity to your yoga practice with the assistance of a u-shaped silk. Postures that can be challenging on a studio floor become accessible in the air. Students deepen into traditional poses like downward facing dog and warrior 2 all while experiencing grand new heights with supported handstands and creative inversions. Many therapeutic benefits are experienced in addition to a refined strength with movements designed for muscular conditioning. Plus, it’s fun and brings a new perspective to your yoga practice. Tweens and teens come flip and fly while adults recognize a tug on that “inner child” desperate to play! So it looks really cool. It sounds really fun. But who is aerial yoga really for? Yoga Teachers Amanda Mele, Lara Kessler and Dierdra Mcgrath demonstrate Supported Warrior 2. bay-magazine.com 83


HEALTHY LIVING

- The Beginner Student: Aerial yoga is accessible and beginner-friendly. Here on LBI many aerial students are first-timers to the practice, so when coming in as a newbie one finds themselves in good company! Plus, trying something new and leaving with a sense of accomplishment feels good and builds strength, flexibility and confidence in both the body and mind. - The Playful Student: Aerial yoga fosters a lot of communication between teacher and student, creating a fun and spirited environment to explore. Different from your traditional yoga class (which often lacks teacher/student communication in exchange for a more focused meditative tone) , aerial begs for communication as the teacher directs students into detailed technique so they can fine-tune each specific skill. Communication comes in robust form in aerial yoga, from simple question and answer to full belly laughs and cheers as the students accomplish each new posture! - The Therapeutic Student: Aerial yoga supports both the body and mind in a therapeutic way, particularly in inverted shapes. Supporting your body upside down in a silk allows you to defy gravity which releases serotonin, endorphins, oxytocin and dopamine: AKA the “happy hormones.” Further, inversions increase the blood flow to the brain, giving it more oxygen and nutrients thus making the brain function faster. This improves concentration, memory, observation and boosts clarity of thought. Being inverted also supports healthy circulation by moving stagnant blood from the lower extremities allowing a flow of new, freshly oxygenated blood to move through the body. Being upside down and completely surrendering into the support of the silk allows the muscles of the spine to release, reducing pressure and compression. It gives a lot of relief to the back and hips that you just can’t achieve when standing upright. But it doesn’t stop there. The silks trigger the body’s meridians; bringing energetic balance and tension release to the body’s pressure points. - The Athletic Student: Aerial yoga can be a full-body and strengthening workout. While in a silk, the practitioner has a 84 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2021

different relationship to gravity which requires the activation of more subtle muscles normally not called upon. This brings us to a deeper level of body awareness and a refined activation of muscles. Further, trusting the silk requires us to let go of holding on to control. In doing so, students challenge their mental capacity along with the physical. - The Meditative Student: A beautiful form of suspended mindful movement, aerial yoga is a way to find a meditative, flowing presence. The body moves in a dancelike expression with a sweet flowing form encouraging the student to let go of perceived limits and to be one with the movement of the class. Plus, the best savasana experience ever may just be in a silk! Laying fully supported in your aerial hammock cocoons the body completely providing for a perfect space for meditative introspection. Aerial yoga creates space in our bodies, breath and minds, rejuvenating the whole person. Yoga is a practice of awareness of both the body and mind. Thus, when we practice yoga we reap the benefits both physically and mentally. We become aware of the body through the postures we work to refine. We become aware of the breath while we move our body in synchronization with our inhale and exhale. This linking of movement and breath helps us focus the mind creating a tool to better manage thoughts and reactions. With practice, this awareness translates to all aspects of our lives helping us to cultivate sustainable peace and equanimity within our inner and outer landscapes. In a way, our physical practice becomes a reflection of the mental practice, and as life has shown us all, there is always a time when a new perspective is beneficial. Aerial yoga literally flips our physical perspective upside down but with time this newly achieved view point will translate to the way we operate mentally as well. Give it a try! Flip your world upside down, and watch and see what new perspective dawns. Katie Ribsam is a soul searching, sun loving yogi residing in beautiful Long Beach Island. You can find Katie at one of her LBI studios, Yoga Bohemia - one in Surf City, one in North Beach Haven and her newest location in Bay Village featuring Aerial Yoga!


Yoga Teachers Lara Kessler and Dierdra McGrath demonstrate inverted bow pose. bay-magazine.com 85


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Whether you’re in the mood to unwind under an ultraviolet palm, find your zen in the mountains or meditate under a midnight moon, our new yoga mat collection has everything you need to kick off the fall season in style. Shop the bay-magazine.com 87

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HEALTHY LIVING

FIRST ROBOTIC-ASSISTED SURGERY AT SOUTHERN OCEAN MEDICAL CENTER A SUCCESS Cutting Edge Minimally Invasive Technology Now a Standard of Care Written by Anne Green

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“As a young woman with a bright future ahead, bariatric surgery was the right decision to help guide Ashley to a new lifelong plan of healthy living,” said James Nangeroni, D.O., general and bariatric surgeon. “With gastric sleeve surgery, 80 percent of the patient’s stomach is removed to reduce their appetite and capacity for food, which typically results in excess weight loss.”

Ashley and Jack

When Ashley Dearing was scheduled for bariatric surgery, little did she know that she would be the first patient to experience robotic-assisted surgery at Hackensack Meridian Southern Ocean Medical Center.“I was shocked at first but after my bariatric surgeon, Dr. Nangeroni explained the procedure and assured me that he would assist Dr. Greco in the surgery, I felt extremely lucky,” said Ashley. The 28-year old of Forked River, New Jersey has battled with weight problems her entire life. Coping with years of dieting and exercise combined with a feeling of low self-esteem convinced Ashley to turn things around. She also knew that she had to make a serious lifestyle change after watching her mother suffer in a nursing home for years due to hip problems caused by her weight. In April, 2021, Ashley started her weight-loss journey with the bariatric team at the Center for Bariatrics at Southern Ocean Medical Center where she received medical, nutritional and exercise counseling prior to surgery.

After more than two months preparing for her surgery, Ashley was scheduled for a laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy on June 22. A week before her surgery, she received a call from the perioperative services team at Southern Ocean Medical Center to let her know that robotic-assisted surgery was now available to her. After consulting with Dr. Nangeroni and the surgical team, Ashley agreed that this was the best option and was grateful to be the first patient to undergo robotic-assisted bariatric surgery at the medical center. “While laparoscopic surgery offers many advantages to open surgery by using smaller incisions, robotic-assisted surgery brings minimally invasive surgery to the next level as a new standard of care,” said Richard Greco, D.O., general and bariatric surgeon. “Robotic-assisted surgery enables the surgeon to operate with more precision, steadiness and enhanced magnification across all body types and weight ranges with less strain on the patient’s abdominal wall thereby reducing pain and length of stay.” Ashley’s surgery went phenomenally well. She was able to leave the hospital after an overnight stay with very little pain and no complications. After a few weeks, she was back taking care of and playing with ‘Jack’ in her role as nanny. The medical center’s leadership, physicians and surgical team are extremely excited about this bay-magazine.com 89


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new addition to the medical center. “With the $2M investment in the da Vinci Xi™ Surgical System at the medical center, patients in the community have access to expanded surgical options with high-quality, minimally invasive surgical treatment and care ” said Michele Morrison, MPH, BSHA, RN, president and chief hospital executive, Southern Ocean Medical Center. The medical center is offering robotic-assisted surgery in general (bariatric, hernia, gallbladder) surgery, urogynecology and thoracic specialities. A month after surgery, Ashley has lost 35 pounds and continues to lose weight with a low-carb, protein rich diet and regular exercise activities. The Center for Bariatrics at Southern Ocean Medical Center is designated by the ACS-MBSA QIP as the most comprehensive quality bariatric program in the region. For more information, contact the Center for Bariatrics at 609-978-3202.

Richard Greco, D.O. General and Bariatric Surgeon

James Nangeroni, D.O General and Bariatric Surgeon

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To learn more about other robotic surgical specialties and locations, visit hackensackmeridianhealth.org/robotics.


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Gender and the Gym Closing the Gap Black Sheep Studios Seeks to Reach More Dudes Written by Sarah Hodgson Photos by Ann Coen

Ever wonder why the ratio of women to men is slightly off-kilter in a spin class? Devon Karvan, fitness guru and owner of Black Sheep Studios in Haven Beach, has set out to balance the scales. “While the classes have always been geared towards both men and women alike, I really wanted to reach a broader audience this year,” said Karvan, who sees a higher percentage of women than men frequenting her trendy, LBI-based studio. “After COVID, I felt the need to push men and women, young and old, beginner and advanced, to work out in a positive group setting,” said Karvan. The imbalance of men and women in studio-based classes can be partially attributed to personal preferences and goals: women typically strive for calorie-burners and muscle toners, while men aim for muscle builders and high-intensity workouts. The gender imbalance can also be attributed to misconceptions about the average studio-goer. A popular assumption is that mat-based classes are dominated by women and thus made for women. 92 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2021

Karvan is poised to quash this assumption. “We have a predominantly female staff, which presents the preconceived notion that we were a women’s only facility, which couldn’t be farther from the truth,” said Karvan. This year, Karvan has hired more certified male trainers and added a heap of equipment to the Black Sheep armory: kettlebells, medicine balls, boxing and strength training gear. Her goal is to show men that Black Sheep Studios can offer the high-intensity, competitive workouts they seek. The efforts are twofold: the studio owner will indulge crossfit connoisseurs and powerlifters whilst exposing them to highly-beneficial workouts like pilates, yoga, barre and TRX. These trend-forward exercises target neglected muscle groups while improving posture, core strength and flexibility. Karvan even launched the “Bring a Bro to the BARRE” promotion this summer which awarded a complementary class to anyone who, as the promo literally states, brought their “bro” to a barre session.


HEALTHY LIVING

Beginner and intermediate boxing programs and more rigorous boot camps and HIIT classes are among the new offerings added to Black Sheep’s menu. While the enhanced programming was prompted by the lack of men in the studio, Karvan wants to make it clear that anyone, male or female, can enjoy these resistance-training-focused programs. Scientifically speaking, men and women do not have anatomical differences that require specialized training. All muscles look and function the same way, regardless of gender. The National Strength and Conditioning Association even asserts that, “There is no sensible reason why resistance training programs for women need to be different from those of men.” Karvan vehemently agrees. “There isn’t any reason why men and women can’t take the same class and work to the best of their ability. I didn’t want to differentiate or segregate workouts in that fashion, just give a gentle push for men to feel comfortable working out in the building. The strength-focused programming will allow everyone the chance to push their workouts a bit harder than usual in a positive, goal-oriented fitness environment. “Some people want to simply get better at boxing, weight lifting, and spinning. Some are training for events. We have teenagers that are training for high school and college athletics. Our goal is to give all of those opportunities to everyone and have all resources available,” said Karvan. With a staff of conscientious, passionate fitness experts, Karvan is confident her team is more than capable of assisting clientele with their diverse wellness endeavors. “All of my trainers are truly incredibly smart and talented and devise their own programs for each of their classes following guidelines specific to each. They are responsible for cueing, correcting and making modifications for those who need them,” said Karvan. So guys… get in on the action! Black Sheep Studios’ enhanced programming is well-suited for any and all genders. bay-magazine.com 93


Meet the Trainers

Name: Hector Reyes Age: 28 What you teach: I teach boxing/kickboxing/muaythai. How long you have been training: I’ve been training since I was 19 years-old. I’ve been teaching for 5 years.

Name: Frank Kellogg Age: 33 What you teach: Kid’s fitness, beach bootcamp, kettlebells, personal training, cardio weights, HIIT, core and strength, kickboxing. How long you have been training: 20 years of personal fitness experience. I first seriously got involved in fitness in 9th grade in high school when I began playing football and doing martial arts. Been certified to coach fitness since 2016. 5 years professionally coaching. 94 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2021


HEALTHY LIVING

Name: Brody Selman Age: 21 What you teach: HIIT, strength and core training. How long you have been training: I’ve been teaching for 4 years.

Customer Testimonials

Name: John Moore Age: 66 Favorite class at Black Sheep: “The Go-Ryde Spin Classes are incredibly energized. All of the instructors are well-versed in the unique qualities of the Go-Ryde cycles which helps optimize the workout. This is time well spent!”

Name: Dave Ridley Age: 43 Favorite class at Black Sheep: “I do private training and boxing with Hector 2 times a week. I love it because Black Sheep is convenient, not pretentious and Hector is great. He’s got good energy, and is knowledgeable. I used to box but hadn’t in a few years because life got in the way, so while this isn’t Boxing

in the traditional sense of hitting people, it’s the motions and cardio exercise which not only allows you to release energy, but also makes the hour go by quickly.” Name: Al Salamone Age: 56 Favorite class at Black Sheep: “I do private one-on-one boxing with Hector Reyes. I like that it’s real boxing from a real former boxer and not just a person who teaches boxing that they were taught in some weekend fitness seminar and received a certificate for attending. He helps you accomplish whatever mental or physical goals you want to achieve while maintaining a place that’s professional with a personal bond touch.” bay-magazine.com 95


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Heart-Centered Leadership

HEALTHY LIVING

Everyone has been especially challenged by the events of the past year and I have had the chance to witness and be of help to leaders on both sides of “VUCA”. As you may already know, VUCA is the acronym first used in 1987 and introduced by the U.S. Army War College to describe the more Volatile, Uncertain, Complex and Ambiguous multi-lateral world we’d entered at the end of the Cold War. By early 2017, Bill George – prominent executive and Board member – wrote in Forbes that our uncertainties had increased so much that we’d entered VUCA 2.0. And that was long before the disruptions of COVID. Bob Johansen of the Institute of the Future has suggested that, instead, leaders should transform VUCA into Vision, Understanding, Clarity and Agility. C-suite leaders who have successfully shifted their focus achieved the shift by reviewing, repositioning and reassessing their organizations as a whole. In following this shift as part of my coaching practice, I have been coaching executives around six specific leadership challenges 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Honing effectiveness Inspiring others Developing employees Leading a team Guiding change Managing stakeholders

What if you could assess your executive team’s ways of thinking and help them discover productive new approaches for dealing with today’s VUCA 2.0? I’ve developed a model that focuses on “unpersonality” assessments and heart-centered leadership. It has been welcomed by many C-suite leaders and companies. One CEO calls it a “breath of fresh air.” I have a personal mission in this quest. I spent 21 years managing disability claims and lost five executives (3 VPs and 2 C-Suites) to cancer 10 years ago. I vowed to them all that I would leave the generalist space and become a preventionist to ensure that leaders could lead without jeopardizing their health and emotional wellbeing. Now in my 11th year, I know I made the right decision.

coaching C-suite leaders, executive professionals, teams, and business into a success. Deborah’s expertise includes leadership development, change management, human resources onboarding, diversity & inclusion practices, assessing and integrating high-performance teamwork, increasing personal skills, resilience and agile behaviours, emotional intelligence, and disrupting habits from a cognitive standpoint. She prides herself on leading as a heart-centered leader who thrives on helping people become successful and fulfilled. Deborah is an executive and business coach. She has 31+ years of global experience in top Fortune 500 companies in Canada, the United States, Europe, Asia, and Australia, leading and coaching C-suite leaders, executive professionals, teams, and business into a success.

With the large number of decisions, you make in a day (35,000 on any given day), let us revisit the strategies you must be an independent, vivid visionary with ease and qualities for you to sustain this level of leadership.

Deborah’s expertise includes leadership development, change management, human resources onboarding, diversity & inclusion practices, assessing and integrating high-performance teamwork, increasing personal skills, resilience and agile behaviours, emotional intelligence, and disrupting habits from a cognitive standpoint.

Deborah is an executive and business coach. She has 31+ years of global experience in top Fortune 500 companies in Canada, the United States, Europe, Asia, and Australia, leading and

She prides herself on leading as a heart-centered leader who thrives on helping people become successful and fulfilled. bay-magazine.com 97


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Wardrobe Written by Carolyn Mijal

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Photos by Ally Jordan

There is an undeniable magic as the weather turns from hazy summer days to cool crisp fall nights, shorts are swapped for jeans and sweater weather is in full swing. 2021 has been a renaissance year for 90s and 70s fashion; the summer showed us that all of the iconic styles of decades past can flourish again with a modern edge. This new and practical approach gives the shopper more wear ability as well as the most versatile use of their wardrobe, maximizing it for years to come. Autumn in LBI is pure magic, the changing of the summer sunset with its deep, bright, rusty orange to the amber glow leading to the magical twilight lighting of the fall. The atmospheric changes create a melody that wraps around you like your favorite sweater. The indispensible beauty of the fall creates the perfect setting to showcase essential wardrobe staples and the power of layering pieces. Five 0 Six Boutique knows that fashion is so much more than what is “in Vogue”, it is about curating a wardrobe that not only allows for self expression but is functional and practical. Monochromatic styling was huge for the summer and there is no exception for its impact on your fall wardrobe as well. Monochromatic styling allows for wearers of any age, style, and price range to create sophisticated looks that transition through the seasons. Neutrals and creams are the perfect transitioning color as the shades, combined with the assortment of fabric textures, created depth within an outfit for layering pieces. A casual LBD, with white sneakers and a cream sweater vest take a style that only Andrea Zuckerman (BH90210) would wear and give it a fresh 2021 twist, perfect for picking up a salted caramel coffee at How you Brewing. Sweater Vests are one of the top trends for Fall 2021, unlike the structure of decades past the assortment of stylings are


more than your typical school uniform. Oversized over a dress to cropped over a button up with jeans, this super casual style option for any setting. Cropped Cardigans are also making a strong come back, just ask Five 0 Six owner Sarah Jordan “Knits in general I feel are making a strong comeback. I also have some sweater dresses on order - we are planning to style those with a blazer! Or belted, but cable knits, knits overall are definitely a strong trend and a super easy one that everyone can hop on and still wear a ton! I personally love sweaters, especially for fall on LBI so I’m down for this sweater vest/cardigan/knit everything trend!” For those who grew up during the 90s and would rather not relive some of those trends (a cropped sweater under overalls); the new approach allows for a level of sophistication and renewal for anyone who wants a “ do over” of the trend. For anyone who was too young in the 90s to follow the trends they now have a chance to created a look that’s unique and influence by one of the most nostalgic and still relevant decades in fashion. A trend that we saw over the summer that is still popular for the fall is the blazer. A blazer just makes sense in the fall, from a blazer that is totally Cher Horowitz to one that is so Ralph Lauren you can’t go wrong. There is something so familiar about a blazer in the fall, it is an investment piece for any wardrobe and whether you are going for a classic one to one that is purely for statement, putting a blazer over an oversized sweatshirt, a dress or graphic tee with jeans, elevates any outfit and makes business casual so much more fun. Five 0 Six has the perfect LBI themed sweater that goes perfectly with a navy blazer, straight leg jeans and ballet flats for drinks and sunsets at the Boat Yard. Another trend that saw a rebirth during wedding season is making its way back to mainstream fashion: the jean jacket / denim. I know, the huge debate between Millennial and Gen Z in regards to skinny jeans has us scratching our heads. From denim’s first appearance in the fashion lexicon as a purely functional and practical piece of clothing to now the subject of much heated, there really is a simple solution: wear what you feel comfortable in. Sarah Jordan has the shop well stocked with a variety of new denim styles so you can explore what works best for you. Boyfriend / over sized fit to boot cut or straight legged, the cuts, colors and over all style will allow anyone to curate an outfit that suites them best and if you still have a pair of skinny jeans… thrown on your favorite fall boots and throw on a oversized sweater in this seasons color: lavender. “We try to offer, more practical ways to use these trends - but one color that we will see start to become very big is lavender. We will start to see that come out later this summer as a pre-fall hit, and then it will carry into the fall. I like this color as a way to bring some fun and pop into our lives, but we aren’t committing to something crazy!” There is something so classic and romantic about this color that adds a sense of whimsy to your styling. Five 0 Six Boutique is located at 506 Long Beach Blvd in Surf City. Stop on in and see all the treasures their boutique has to offer, you will not be disappointed! bay-magazine.com 99


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To everything there is season Presented by Born by the Sea Photography & Little Island Media Written by Sarah Hodgson Photo by Michael John Murphy

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Void of umbrellas, tanners and towels, the off-season beaches are vast, blank slates. So blank, we can decode the various dog breeds, birds, sneakers and toy trucks that traipse through the sand. A Malamute here, a lime jeep there…

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The color pallet of winter is a whitewashed progression of milky hues and ashen greys. Submerged in these pallid tones we discover quietude, privacy and a bit of (much-needed?) isolation.

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When the sun makes a guest appearance, we whip towards it, face-up and beckon for Summer (that sinful season we wished away on the more sweltering days) - nostalgic for warmth and what it felt like to roam the sands, sans jacket.

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GET THE LOOK

FALL’S MUST HAVE

Shoe

…for Work, Wedding Season, The Holidays, or Just an Epic Night Out Written by Lisa Simek

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Photos by Pashion footwear


Have you ever found yourself lugging around a tote bag with a spare pair of flats, tried to skillfully stuff a pair of flip flops into your purse “just in case,” or even braved a perilous dancefloor barefoot, because, well, one can only rock a pair of killer heels for so long before they start literally killing your feet? Look no further, because one young female entrepreneur has invented the ultimate high-heeled shoe that converts into a flat in less time than it takes to reapply your favorite lip gloss.

GET THE LOOK

As with many inventions, the premise of Pashion Footwear came to fruition after the founder’s own shoeless mishap. One night out with friends, Haley Pavone was dancing barefoot after ditching her heels and eventually found herself impaled through the foot by another woman’s stiletto. Determined to find a better solution to such common high heel woes, Pavone set out to create convertible heels as a [then] college junior. Fast track a couple of years later, and she now has patent-pending status in 30 countries, including the USA, China and all member countries of the EU, has raised more than $3.5 million in seed money and has sold countless pairs of shoes despite the setbacks of last year’s pandemic. Pashion Footwear is a game changer as it is essentially two shoes in one. The innovative design features an outsole that allows flexibility between the heeled and flat silhouette. This bendable arch technology within the sole of every shoe allows the shoe to completely flatten out once removing the heel with nothing but the assistance of the wearer’s body weight. Then, no matter how long the shoe has been worn as a flat, the wearer just has to lift their foot off the ground and the sole will quickly ease back into the optimal arched shape for re-integrating the heel back into the sole. This “springy” arch actually happens to offer more support than the average flat as well. One of the supplementary advantages of investing in such a shoe is the fact that it allows for creativity when mixing-and-matching shoe separates. Essentially, customers purchase an upper (top portion) and a sole (heel), puts them together, and then has the option of buying additional uppers or a variety of extra heels (options range from jute espadrilles to spikey stilettos, bay-magazine.com 115


GET THE LOOK

snakeskin to block heels in an array of colors and textures, cork heels, wooden heels, metallic gold, rhinestone or pearl embellished—you name it), and then pick and choose your combo to make tons of other customized styles based on either the outfit of the day or the weather conditions. With just a twist and a snap, one easily expands wardrobe potential with just a few pieces that can be combined in multiple ways. The styles offered are totally on-trend and would fit seamlessly into any wardrobe. Think of how easy packing for a trip would be. Most of the shoes in the collection retail for under $200 and additional heels (depending on the heel height and materials) are available for less than $50 on their website. For a video demonstration of how easily the heels are attached and detached to form a flat, or for a sneak peek of their latest Nude Suite collection, log onto PashionFootwear.com or visit their Instagram page @pashionfootwear. So, the next time you contemplate your love-hate relationship with your high heels, try on a pair of Pavone’s comfortable, convertible heel-flats. As the founder of the company shares, “The badass women of today are doing it all. It’s about time their shoes do, too.”

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CATCH OF THE DAY Behind the Scenes at Viking Village, One of the Largest Commercial Fisheries of the North East, Located in Long Beach Island’s Very Own Backyard Written by Lisa Simek with Contributions by Anna Panacek, Britton Spark and Austin Schwerzel Photos by Britton Spark

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FEATURE

Before the sun’s rays beam out into the sky, just as the early bird wakes to prepare for its dawn chorus, while the rest of the earth remains in its tranquil sleep, our local fishermen are already en route towards their first catch of the day. They know their chances of catching that fish are far greater before the sun comes up, and their sole mission is to provide fresh, wild caught seafood to not only the community members of LBI, but to the entire world. Here we would like to give the public a glimpse into the life of a Viking Village fisherman.

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A DAY IN THE LIFE

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Commercial fishing is consistently ranked as the most dangerous occupation on Earth, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics; the fatality rate is 29 times higher than the national average. The public got a taste of the mortal perils of commercial fishing with Discovery Channel’s hit television series, Deadliest Catch. The fury of Poseidon was regularly put on display with the unique life-threatening hazardous situations of life at sea—vessel disasters, death-defying weather conditions, treacherous falls overboard, on-deck hydraulic equipment or high-tension line injuries, dredges, winches—you name it. Fighting to reel in a several hundred-pound fish, hauling up nets and pulling dredges weighing several tons is physically exhausting work. Add pelting rain, rogue waves and icy decks to the equation, and that work can become lethal. But every single boat that docks at Viking Village, day in and day out, is equipped with a crew that wouldn’t trade places with anyone else in the world. They are (yes, this is still a male-dominated industry) the sons, the brothers, the fathers—even grandfathers— of generations of seafarers and watermen; their families’ livelihoods have always been centered around the ocean and the bay, it was inevitable that they would be lured in by the irresistible song of the sea. For along with the tireless labors and exertions of operating a fishing boat, there comes a certain freedom rarely understood by the average individual; away from cell phone signals, unreachable by everyone you know and love, just being one with the sea. Before a long trip, the crew of any given boat goes to a local grocery store much like any other family in order to stock up on food. Since a fishing trip can last anywhere from 24 hours to multiple weeks, the order usually consists of 6 shopping carts full of necessities, produce, snacks and drinking water. The boats also have to load up on 10-15 tons of ice before each trip. Ships do have a kitchen area below deck, and usually the schedule consists of squeezing in meal time and even less sleep time in between the relentless exertions of trying to meet their quota before they run out of fuel, ice, food—and time. They brave the elements even in the dead of winter, sleep when they can, and work tirelessly hauling, cleaning and sorting, then casting out again. bay-magazine.com 123


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In the case of an emergency while out to sea, the captain, crewmembers and deckhands are all trained and thoroughly tested to ensure that they are able to put their survival suits on quickly. They have safety checks every year (sometimes more often) to certify that they are able to get their survival suits on in less than 60 seconds. Regardless of their trade skill or assignment, everyone on board has to be on their A-game to make certain that they are aware of what is moving around them. As things often break or fail at sea, the majority of Viking Village fishermen are well versed in diesel and hydraulic mechanics and possess the skills to keep the boat safely operating while out—or at least until the boat is able to return back home. There is always great danger fishing in busy areas as well, so captains have to constantly

be aware of their own boat as well as the boats around them to ensure that they are moving along safely and their gear is not being interfered with. Reading tides and the water is extremely important as it dictates how the fishing excursion will go. Sometimes if fog rolls in or a big thunderstorm is underway, a captain will change the departure time. High tide is an ideal time to depart the inlet since the boats have such deep bottoms, and experienced captains will alter plans just to ensure being in tune with the way the water moves as opposed to trying to set out against less-than-ideal conditions. Radar and other technology allow the boats to safely fish, but the experience, mutual understanding, respect and camaraderie amongst all fishermen is how everyone ensures the safety of their own crew and those around them.

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THE FLEET The fleet of ships that come through Viking Village consist of privately owned commercial fishing boats by the local fishermen of Barnegat Light, as well as those vessels owned by Viking Village and Lighthouse Marina. It’s important to note that these boats are, too, operated and run by local fishermen. The longline fishing boats in Barnegat Light are F/Vs Monica (owned by Dan Mears of Lighthouse Marina), Frances Anne (owned & operated by Rick Mears of Lighthouse Marina), Sea Farmer (owned & operated by Mike Johnson of Viking Village), Eaglet II (owned by Logan Puskas of Viking Village) and Alexandria Dawn (owned by Bob Brewster of Viking Village). As the name suggests, longlining is a commercial fishing technique that sets a long length of line out into the water (this line either floats on the surface or along the

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bottom of the ocean). From this main line, at interval distances, are attached secondary lines that then hang down into the water with baited hooks attached. They catch fish such as Bigeye Tuna, Yellowfin Tuna, Swordfish, Albacore (Longfin Tuna), Mahi Mahi, Tilefish, etc. Longline season here on LBI is from June through November for swordfish and tuna, and Barnegat Light is famous for its New York Big Eye (one of the most desirable of all the tuna species). Tilefish season is primarily concentrated in the spring and summer; known for its dense, mild, sweet flavor similar to Lobster, Golden Tilefish is the coveted fish of choice here during its peak season. With a crew consisting of 5 men, longliners are usually out to sea for 7-10 days, but sometimes up to two weeks for tuna and swordfish trips. Tilefish trips are usually 4-6 days long. NOAA Fisheries requires fishermen and dealers to obtain federal permits if they fish for, sell, purchase, or import Atlantic highly migratory


FEATURE

species (HMS), which include tunas, billfish, swordfish, or sharks. All longliner boats that sell through Viking Village possess the HMS permits required to catch these fish. The National Marine Fisheries Service, part of NOAA Fisheries, works with other nations through the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tuna (ICCAT) to conduct frequent stock assessments and to monitor catches from incoming boats in order to ensure a healthy and reasonable quota for all United States fishermen in these fisheries. Tilefish is an IFQ fishery, which means that each boat is assigned a certain amount of weight they can bring in each year. Not just any boat can go out and get a commercial tilefish permit. Golden tilefish IFQ allocations are issued for the golden tilefish fishing year (November 1-October 31) and represent a percent of the annual total allowable landings after adjustments for incidental catch are deducted. IFQ allocations can also be reduced because of an overage in the previous year.

Because of these factors, IFQ allocations can change on an annual basis. A vessel that was not initially issued an IFQ allocation, or does not currently own an allocation, can possess more than the incidental possession limit only by completing an allocation transfer with an IFQ allocation owner. Netboats are the second type of fishing vessels that provide fresh seafood to Viking Village. These boats have much smaller crews—usually just two—a captain and a mate. They typically complete their fishing trips in less than 24 hours, leaving very early in the morning and returning before the sun sets. The netboats that come into Viking Village with Monkfish and Skate primarily do so during the spring and late fall into the winter season. U.S. wild-caught monkfish is actually a smart seafood choice because it is sustainably managed and responsibly harvested under U.S. regulations, and currently above target population

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levels. Interestingly, most monkfish are kept headon by the crew after harvesting. They are gutted on the boat, some are tailed, and the heads and tails are packed, while the monkfish livers are also kept as they are a Japanese delicacy. Skates are also caught, but for their wing meat, which have long been a French favorite and are becoming increasingly popular with American cuisine as they discover just how moist, succulent and flavorful skate wings are. Additionally, Smooth Dogfish and Spiny Dogfish, which are actually small sharks, are caught in the late spring and later in the fall, respectively. In Europe, dogfish is commonly used as the fish in ‘fish and chips.’

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A dragger is a fishing boat that tows a weighted dragnet (otter trawler) across the bottom of the ocean to catch fish. Viking Village draggers in particular are smaller, dayboat draggers, so they do not complete long tows with giant draggers as commonly seen with commercial draggers elsewhere. These vessels also just have a crew of 2 people. All of the draggers in town are operated by private vessel owners. They are the F/ Vs Dream Warrior (Capt. Bill Leach), Viking Rose (Capt. Tim Brindley) and Scott Nathan (Capt. Shawn Hinds). Whereas New England or Southern draggers target a variety of species with their draggers, Viking Village primarily focuses on Fluke (Summer Flounder), one of the most sought-after fish along the Atlantic coast. Their otter trawlers also catch Black Sea Bass as well, which is a far better alternative to the popular Chilean Sea Bass (which in fact is not even a true sea bass, it is a Patagonian toothfish). As a substantially smaller fish, the Black Sea Bass has significantly lower levels of mercury. It also is more sustainable as it is currently above target population levels in the Mid-Atlantic; whereas its counterpart is so overfished in the Chilean waters that its stock around the South Atlantic Ocean is nearly depleted.     New Jersey has an annual set quota for all summer flounder permit holders. They break this annual quota down seasonally and each boat is told how much they can bring in per week. This

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is monitored closely to ensure sustainability. Using scientific data on the summer flounder resource and fishery, NOAA officials along with a partnership cooperative determine how much summer flounder can be harvested the following year. They allocate 60 percent of the annual catch limit to the commercial fishery and 40 percent to the recreational fishery. There are 9 full-time scallop boats in Viking Village that are trip boats, meaning they go out for weeks at a time. Much larger, usually ranging from 60-100 feet long, they are the Kathy Ann, Elizabeth, C.B. Keane, Madelyn, Virginia Lynn, Ms. Manya, Relentless, Grand Larson III, Capt. John. There are also 2 part-time trip boats (single-dredge): Lucky Thirteen and the Karen L. Additionally, there are 9 General Category Scallopers, meaning they are day-boats only going out for 24 hours: Sea Dog, The Gipper, Pretty Lady, F. Nelson Blount, Abbie and Holly, Kennedy Helen, Bear, Provider III, and Julianne. Since they go out for a shorter period of time, can bring back no more than 600 lbs. of scallops per voyage and therefore tend to stay closer to shore than the trip boats, most dayboats range approximately 40-60 feet in size.   Scallop boats usually are comprised of 5-7 people per trip. The captain runs and operates the boat. He is the link between management and the boat. The first mate is like the assistant manager of the boat, and is also responsible for the daily operational tasks of running the boat. Crew members consist of 3-5 deck hands. These individuals are the workforce behind the boat; whereas everyone “picks the pile” of scallops, the deck hands are the workers behind it all. When the gear is hauled back, and the scallops are dumped on the deck, the crew “picks the pile” by tossing scallops into bushel baskets while rocks and incidental catch are thrown back overboard. But then the scallops are hand-shucked one-by-one into buckets, rinsed, and placed in special muslin bags, tied off with wire. The fast-paced dredging, sorting and shucking, and packing process goes on and on for hours; the crew shucks tens of thousands of scallops per trip! Each boat crew of fishermen have varied responsibilities and skills, and although each crew is different, most are all equipped to run, repair, and work the trip. These skills include mechanical work, cleaning the boat, gear work, icing the boat, welding, packing the bags, and assuring the dredges have fresh shoe-steels on the dredge for proper scallop-collecting.  

Depending on the type of boat, it’s capacity and licensing, some boats catch smaller scallops while others are able to travel to unique spots in order to gather larger ones. All boats are capable of getting all size scallops, but bigger boats with more horsepower have advantages in some areas as it is easier to tow in harder bottoms. But generally, the Viking Village boats are after larger scallops since those are in higher demand. They are just as tender and tasty as smaller ones, and tend toward colder water. Since juvenile scallops are in their reproductive stage, by targeting larger scallops, scalloping is overall very sustainable. Most of the time, juvenile scallops actually sift right out of the dredge. The Marine Stewardship Council declared the Atlantic Sea as a certified sustainable fishery, and The New England Fishery Management Council and the Assistant Administrator for Fisheries (NOAA) regularly implements strict management requirements to address resource management and prevent the overharvesting of scallop fisheries.

THE BLESSING OF THE FLEET

The Blessing of the Fleet ceremony is an age-old tradition that can be traced back to the ancient times of Viking Village’s Norwegian roots. Barnegat Light’s first official public Blessing ceremony took place in 1978. Each year, on Father’s Day, boats parade past the dock where the local clergy from Zion Lutheran Church in Barnegat Light bless and support all of our local fishermen who work on the water and out at sea. This oceanic tradition marks a time when locals and churches come together to pray over each fleet vessel, the captains and crew members, and their families for safe passages, bountiful catches, and prosperity. In addition to services and ceremonial prayers, fallen fishermen and local legends are remembered as tribute for their contributions to the local coastal community. As captains and crew members gear up for the unknown encounters of daily deep sea fishing trips, anticipation of the annual fleet blessings draws locals and visitors to Viking Village. This beautiful tradition marks the beginning of a new season for Viking Village fishermen. Today the tradition continues as those who fish, both commercially and recreationally, seek blessings on their vessels for an abundant catch, as well as for all those who take to these waterways and seek protection upon the water and a safe return home. This annual event is open to all community members, family, friends and supporters of our local bay-magazine.com 133


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fishing industry and it displays the tradition, heritage, and culture of our local coastal community by observing a time of prayer and celebration of those who make up one of the largest fleets in our entire state. WHY Local? Locally caught seafood is not only good for the local economy of Long Beach Island, but it is much better for you, as the consumer. All of the product at Viking Village is 100% wild caught/harvested from the United States of America. According to NOAA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, approximately 84% of the seafood consumed in the U.S. is imported (mainly from China, Thailand, Canada, Indonesia, Vietnam, and Ecuador), and about half of that total is sourced from aquaculture (AKA fish farms). Do you know where the fish on your dinner table was caught, handled, and processed? Oftentimes, if you look closely enough, fish from a grocery store can actually be labeled as both “Alaskan” and “Product of China” on the same package, and most informed consumers know that the rule-following record of many of the import countries listed above are less than optimal. So, what is one to do?   Well, the seafood industry is actually quite similar to the common land animal meat industry as we know it: 134 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2021

Grocery store, conventionally raised beef or chicken often comes from factory farmed, corn, wheat and soy-fed industrial-sized feedlots, with the animals in crowded houses being given hormones and antibiotics to prevent diseases from running rampant, and to maximize their growth and food output. The only way to know exactly where your meat comes from is to get to know and support your local farmers, who strive to raise meat the conscious and traditional way—on pastures—and who process their own meat and sell directly to consumers or through other means such as a cooperative or local farmer’s market. The same goes for your fishermen. Viking Village fishermen and those in our entire community take great pride in the quality and methods of the traditional trade of fishing, and they are dedicated to providing a high-quality product for not only consumers, but their families and their neighbors who also subsist on their catches, day after day. These same fishermen have to fight every day to ensure that their livelihood has a future, as it seems there is always a constant threat by other countries who abuse the laws and those that do not pay heed to maintain a healthy ecosystem for the circle of life of any given fishery.  


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Their fishermen work with researchers and the federal government to keep fisheries data accurate and current, and sustainability is at the forefront of this industry not only in New Jersey, but in the entire United States. The fishermen collectively disagree and are deeply bothered by the practices of many nations whose fishery regulations are nearly nonexistent or lacking, and who are not only harming our oceans, but also tarnishing the reputation of honest, conscientious fishermen that work hard to keep their trade alive. The fishermen of Viking Village respect marine ecosystems and adapt their quotas seasonally to the reproductive rate of fish in order to maintain a balance and ensure the survival of all species. “The United States does not give the commercial fishing industry an option of whether to play by the rules or not; we have to prove, on a daily basis, that we are doing the right thing by our oceans. We (dealer & fishermen) are reporting every single landing, documenting that the catches fall within the allowable quota of said fishery, and are always subject to law enforcement (known as the conservation police) to ensure that our practices are proper. We are one of the very few, if not only, industries in the United States that has to be completely transparent from data reporting, to federal research observers on deck, to USCG boardings at sea, to surveillance cameras on vessels in HMS fisheries,” shares Austin Schwerzel, who is in charge of all incoming product (several million pounds annually) as the Receiving Manager at Viking Village. He adds that our local fishermen take pride in being leaders in a program emphasizing responsibly caught fish and scallops, ensuring minimal impact on the environment and fish habitat. They work closely with the National Marine Fisheries Service, including the Fisheries councils, and play a major role in the management and cooperative research process. With those ideals at the forefront, it is clear that our fishermen care about the ocean to extreme lengths as it is the means for their livelihoods. They practice sustainable fishing and reject the capture of any endangered species or those without commercial value, and they call on all commercial fishermen to do their part in responsible fishing and harvesting worldwide to ensure a high-quality seafood product for the generations to come.  

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As one can see, knowing exactly where your seafood is coming from is largely in the hands of the fisherman and fisheries you’re purchasing your fish from. It’s important to check your sources and ask questions of your local market on where they are getting their fish and decide whether or not it is sustainable seafood. Even fish that are caught in the wild can be at risk of overfishing by careless operations, or caught using methods that damage the natural habitat of the ocean, therefore putting other fish in danger. So just as important as the idea of “getting to know your farmer,” is the notion of “getting to know your local fisherman.” Take an early morning stroll through the docks of Viking Village and say hello to the crews that are coming and going. Ask them questions about their trip and see for yourself their plentiful bounty of fish or scallops. Check out the local island fish markets including Cassidy’s and Blue Claw—even Fresh Direct sources Viking Village for local items such as scallops. And remember, aside from the shorter supply chain, the fish you purchase will have the most remarkable, juiciest flavor you have ever tasted—because it doesn’t get much fresher than straight off the loading dock of a boat that just returned from a trip out to sea.

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THE LARSON LEGACY “It’s the thrill of being out there on the water that gets me- being with a crew of guys all working together in the middle of the ocean and catching fish, makes working at sea something I love so much.” - John Panacek, crew member of the F/V Capt. John based out of Barnegat Light, New Jersey.

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F/V Capt. John was built a few years back to honor the legacy that Capt. John Lason- left in Barnegat Light, at Viking Village, and in our family. His grandson, John continues to keep this legacy alive, while the other members of the Larson family around him do the same at the docks. John has learned so many different skills, tools, and ways of the water in working with his family over the past few years. I clearly remember our grandfather saying to us when we were kids, “there are no excuses, go to work!”. I asked John what he misses most about being away from home for so long. Since these guys are out fishing and working long hours at sea, it’s no surprise that their life is truly unique. John mentioned about just missing ‘home’, and how much he loves the feeling of being at home. During our interview, he joked that ‘Wendy’s’ is high on the list of things that he craves out there, but with no fast food in sight for miles we both got a good laugh about this. John loves to just hang out with family and loved ones close by when he is not working on the F/V Capt. John, spend time working on his house, and of course fishing for fun with friends around Barnegat Light. John works hard to keep the Larson legacy living on, and for the days to see that lighthouse in sight and make it home safely.

Capt. John Lason John Panacek, crew member of the F/V Capt. John based out of Barnegat Light, New Jersey. bay-magazine.com 139


Brides

CALLING ALL

Wedding Bliss Expo is a new brand in the world of exquisite and luxurious weddings. The Wedding Bliss Expo show is for brides with high attention to detail and interests in the finest design-led products and services. Our stunning centrally-located venue of Hotel LBI will be transformed into a wedding wonderland to delight both couples and the industry alike as attendees are introduced to the area’s top creative professionals, industry leaders, planners, entertainers and vendors while enjoying a chance to network, exchange ideas and walk away empowered and inspired. 

S AV E T HE DAT E OCTOBER 24, 2021 HOTEL LBI

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11AM TO 4PM

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R EG IS T ER F OR THE W E D D ING BLISS E XPO AT W W W.W E D D I N G B L I S S E X P O. C O M

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Wedding Bliss One

Samantha

Wedding Planning | Bogath Weddings & Events Photographer | Nina | Off Beet Productions Videographer | Off Beet Productions Photo Booth | Off Beet Productions Ceremony Venue | The Ocean | 68th Street, Brant Beach NJ Ceremony Music | Ceremonious Strings Cocktail Hour Entertainment | Ted Hammock Reception Entertainment | Be the Good, Inc. Officiant | Joe Mangino Florals | Reynolds Garden Shop Hair & Makeup | Lavish Wedding Dress Shop | Designer Loft Bridal Salon NYC Wedding Dress Designer | Rosa Clara Ring Bearer Attire | J Crew Groomsmen Attire | Canali Invitations | Crisp Designs on Paper Mobile Cigar Bar | The Mobile Cigar Lounge Trike Tap Bar | The Barrel Mobile Bar Ceremony & Specialty Reception Rentals | Rustic Drift Wedding Cake | Sweet Melissa Goodness Cafe Transportation | Arrive in Style Catering | Kate & Allys Tents | Ocean Tents

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and

Brennan


WEDDINGS

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WEDDINGS

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Samantha and Brennan reached out to me last fall to begin planning for their LBI Backyard Bayfront Wedding. We ended up working on not just their stunning tented backyard wedding on Barnegat Bay in Brant Beach, but also the planning for

the couple’s rehearsal dinner and welcome party at DaddyOs. The end result was a weekend full of love, laughter, family, not a little bit of partying... a lot!

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WEDDINGS

Samantha and Brennan recently renovated their

home and loved the idea of getting married there.

Our first project together was to design a tent layout that could seamlessly integrate their home and the beach on Barnegat Bay. We worked with Ocean

Tents to create the “venue,” from the ground up. A

series of three tents that worked to cover the property and extend over the beach. The tents were designed

twinkle lights around the edges and with draped interiors to cover the metal frame. With the venue built, wedding planning then moved to florals and sta-

tionary deign. We worked with Britt Larson, owner

of Crisp Designs on Paper, to create the most amazing invitation suite, signage and details. To comple-

ment the stationary, and custom watercolor map, we added signage and day-of details like ceremony programs, menus and the cutest match boxes. The design included stunning florals with Reynolds

Garden Shop. Show stopping floral installations

were suspended in two parts of the tent. As guests entered, there was an 8-foot long suspended piece

filled with bleached greenery, roses, and greenery.

In the waterfront section, we suspended metal orbs with florals and greenery to match with out begin to

matchy-matchy. We added clusters of large lanterns and florals to the bulkhead lining the beach along with cushions to create additional seating.

The wedding was held at the ceremony at the 68th

Street pavilion in Long Beach Township. From there, guests were transported to the reception at the cou-

ple’s home. Kate & Ally’s created multiple food stations for the cocktail style reception. Entertainment

was provided by guitarist Ted Hammond and DJ Nick Cavalari from Be the Good Entertainment.

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437 Route 9 Bayville, NJ 732.269.6699 | 110 E. Main Street Tuckerton NJ 609.294.6699 chris@atlanticcityjewerly.com Estate Buyers

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Photo by Jessa Schifilliti


2 2 5 J A C K S O N S T R E E T C A P E M AY, N J freelovebridal.com bay-magazine.com 149


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WEDDINGS

Wedding Bliss Two

Mallory

and C a m e r o n

Planner | Bogath Weddings & Events Photographer | Melanie Cassie Photography Catering | Kate and Ally’s Restaurant Liquor | Neptune Wines & Liquors Ceremony Venue | The Beach at 2nd Street Reception Venue | 101 Centre Street, Beach Haven, NJ Ceremony & Specialty Rentals | Rustic Drift Tent Rentals | Ocean Tents Officiant |Reverend Joe Mangino DJ | Unforgettable DJs Florals | Reynolds Garden Shop Hair & Makeup | Lavish Salon Wedding Cake | A Sweet Memory Cake Shoppe & Tea Room Invitations | Minted Wedding Dress Shop | Olivia Grace Bridal, San Antonio, Texas Wedding Dress Designer | Lillian West Bridesmaids Dresses | BHLDN Groomsmen Attire | Men’s Wearhouse

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WEDDINGS

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Mallory & Cameron met in Oklahoma during veterinary school in 2014, and got en-

gaged just after graduation in 2018. As you can imagine they have very close friends

and family from all over the country, about 15 different states! Mallory told me how she had always disliked the idea of everyone flying to one city for a single day of

celebrating. She and Cameron believed, and I agreed, that it wouldn’t leave much

time for socializing with long-missed family and friends. Instead, they had set their sites on a destination wedding in Cancun in April of 2020. And then, yeah... 2020.

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WEDDINGS

Mallory and Cameron found themselves in the same situation as so

many others and made the difficult

decision to postpone their wedding in Cancun until January 2021. But in

the fall of 2020, it became clear that January would not be the right time for international travel. So, again,

with the safety and comfort of their family and friends in mind, they

made the difficult decision to cancel their Cancun wedding and instead shift to a domestic destination. The

idea: rent a big beach house and in-

vite everyone who could make it to the celebration in New Jersey!

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Hotel, Dining, Weddings & More Hotel LBI offers the charm of a summer home paired with world class amenities. Relax in your well-appointed room, enjoy a cocktail and watch the sunset on the rooftop, or escape for a day of fun in the sun on our majestic island.

HOTELLBI.COM | @HOTELLBI

Ann Coen Photography

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Ann Coen Photography

Ann Coen Photography


Photo Credit: Off Beet Productions

www.BogathEvents.com (973) 477-1392 Jeanne@BogathEvents.com bay-magazine.com 157


fairytale Ending

PLANNER | BOGATH WEDDINGS AND EVENTS PHOTOGRAPHER | LEANNA THERESA PHOTOGRAPHY HAIR | LAVISH SALON CROWN | BE SOMETHING NEW MAKEUP | MAKE ME UP EVA BRIDE’S DRESS SHOP | FREE LOVE BRIDAL GROOM’S ATTIRE | THE BLACK TUX JEWELRY | ATLANTIC CITY JEWELRY INVITATIONS | CRISP DESIGNS ON PAPER RECEPTION VENUE | THE MAINLAND FLORIST | REYNOLDS GARDEN SHOP AND FLORAL MARKET SIGNAGE & CALLIGRAPHY | THE SHADED MAPLE - MODERN CALLIGRAPHY & DESIGN CAKE | THE GOODNESS CAFE BY SWEET MELISSA RENTALS | EVERYDAY FANCY MODELS | GABBY RAPP & CODY SCHMUTZ 158 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2021


WEDDINGS

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WEDDINGS

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HAVE YOUR

WEDDING AT THE

LONG BEACH ISLAND FOUNDATION OF THE ARTS + SCIENCES

120 LONG BEACH BOULEVARD, LOVELADIES, NJ 08008 lbifoundation.org // 609.494.1241 164 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2021

Photo credit: LeAnna Theresa Photography


Kitchen + Pub, hotel adventure park, WEDdings + more Welcome to the ultimate destination for fun with friends and family! Located just a few miles from the coast, this one-of-akind destination offers everything you need to kick back and have some fun! From beautiful weddings and events to our laidback Kitchen + Pub, thrilling Adventure Park and Arcade come explore everything The Mainland has to offer.

THEMAINLANDNJ.COM | @THEMAINLAND

Ann Coen Photography

@brownie.jpg

@brownie.jpg

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WEDDINGS

A Gift for the Groom-to-Be

HOW TO CHOOSE THE PERFECT WATCH Written by Diana Lentini

When it comes to wedding jewelry, brides typically take the spotlight, but there’s room for the groom to shine too. For a morning-of present that’s sentimental and timeless, consider gifting a watch to your husband-tobe. It’s classic, personal and will be treasured for years and generations to come. “When you give someone a watch, it always has a significance. It automatically says, ‘I want to spend time with you,’” says Chris Biele, owner of Atlantic City Jewelry, a family business with locations in Bayville. But picking a timepiece for a momentous occasion takes research and, ideally, guidance from an expert. Chris, a third-generation jeweler, shares his top tips for purchasing a watch that’s sure to be loved on your wedding day and ever after.   

Shop In Person

As a general rule, watches and fine jewelry are gifts that you’ll want to see and feel in person. Skip the online re-

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tailers and the big box stores and instead head to a local jeweler who can educate you about the various styles and work with your budget. Be sure to take advantage of any warranties your jeweler offers, and learn whether they offer repairs. “When it comes to repairs, be sure to ask whether they are done on-premise to avoid having your watch shipped to a third-party,” Chis explains. At AC Jewelry, all repairs are done on site. In addition to a robust inventory, Chris also offers a large selection of pre-owned watches, including brands like Rolex, Omega, Hamilton, Movado, Rado and more.  

Choose Your Movement

There are three primary types of watch movements, or the mechanism that makes the watch operate. Most commonly seen are watches with quartz movement, which is powered by a battery paired with a small quartz crystal; and automatic movement, which relies on motion while being worn on the wrist. Manual movement, which is considered to be the oldest type of watch movement, requires the watch to be wound daily.


Pick a Style Decide what sentiment you want to relay with this gift and how it will fit in with your groom’s lifestyle. There are two main categories of watches: sport and dress. There are no hard rules, but a sport watch is typically larger than a dress watch and may include various sub-dials on the face of the watch, and is usually accompanied by a metal strap. Dress watches tend to have a slimmer profile, are often constructed from precious metals and typically have a leather strap. “For your wedding day, you won’t ever go wrong with a classic dress watch,” Chris says. “Adding an engraving with your wedding date is the perfect touch to capture the significance of your day,” he adds.

WEDDINGS

Family Heirlooms

Brand new isn’t the only option—a wedding gift is the perfect time to repair a family watch that’s been out of commission for years or even decades. The most important thing to remember when refurbishing a vintage watch is to pick an experienced jeweler. At Atlantic City Jewelry, Chris and his team are specialists when it comes to repairing old watches. “We take your family’s jewelry very seriously and understand the memories that are tied to them,” Chris says. “We get to work with wonderful people.”

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WEDDINGS

The Perfect Picnic Photos by Allie Grey

Greg wanted to surprise Allison with the perfect proposal. They met on LBI and it held a very special place in their hearts. He knew the beach was the place to pop to question. He wanted to make a night to remember. He found Picnic Perfect and everything fell into place.

CAKE BY HONEYBLOOM BAKERY CHARCUTERIE TABLE SPREAD BY ONE BOARD BLONDE FRESH FLORALS BY REYNOLDS GARDEN SHOP PICNIC BY PICNIC PERFECT MODELS ARE WEARING SINK R SWIM PHOTOS BY ALLIE GREY

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@brownie.jpg

Boat Up Social, Marina, Outdoor Beer Garden, Boat fuel, Rentals + More The Boatyard is a gathering place to come together for casual food and drink, meet up with your family and friends, play games, and enjoy a day on the bay. We also offer boat rentals, marina slips & storage, fuel for boats & personal watercraft for crabbing and fishing on the bay.

THEBOATYARDNJ.COM | @THEBOATYARDNJ

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FEED YOUR MIND

FEED YOUR MIND

Recipes and photos by Susan Von Brachel and Robin Chase www.robinandsue.com

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FEED YOUR MIND

Balsamic Roasted Strawberries & Whipped Ricotta Dip 6-8 SERVINGS INGREDIENTS 2 lbs fresh strawberries, stems removed 2 Tbsp balsamic vinegar 2 tsp honey WHIPPED RICOTTA: 2 cups whole ricotta cheese ½ cup plain whole greek yogurt 2 T olive oil and more for drizzling Black pepper Fresh basil, chopped Crusty bread DIRECTIONS Preheat oven to 350F and line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Wash strawberries, slice berries in half and place on baking sheet. Whisk balsamic vinegar and honey, drizzle over strawberries and toss. Spread in an even layer and place in oven for about 30 minutes. In a food processor, blend ricotta, yogurt, olive oil, and pepper until smooth. Place in the fridge to chill. After strawberries are done roasting, allow to cool for 5-10 minutes. Transfer them to a bowl and place in the fridge to chill. Place whipped ricotta in bowl and delicately place roasted strawberries on top. Garnish with chopped basil and drizzle with olive oil and fresh ground pepper. Serve with bread.

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FEED YOUR MIND

Focaccia with Rosemary & Olives 6-8 SERVINGS INGREDIENTS 2 cups warm water (105°F-115°F) 2 tsp. dry yeast 4 ½ cups all purpose flour 2 tsp. salt 3 T. olive oil 24 black olives, pitted & halved 1 T fresh rosemary, chopped

DIRECTIONS Place 2 cups warm water in large bowl. Sprinkle yeast over & stir with fork. Let sit until yeast dissolves, (10 min.) Add 4 ¼ cups flour and salt to yeast mixture and blend well (dough will be sticky). Knead dough on floured surface until smooth and elastic for about 10 mintues, adding more flour by tablespoonfuls if dough is sticky, 10 minutes. Form dough into ball. Oil large bowl and add dough, turn to coat. Cover with plastic wrap and let rise in warm area until doubled, about 1 ½ hrs. Punch down dough, knead into ball and place in same bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and let rise in warm area until doubled, about 45 minutes. Coat 15x10-inch baking sheet with 1 tablespoon oil. Punch down dough. Transfer to prepared sheet. Using fingertips, press out dough to 13x10-inch rectangle. Let dough rest 10 minutes. Drizzle 2 tablespoons oil over dough. Sprinkle olives and chopped rosemary evenly over. Let dough rise uncovered in warm area until puffy, about 25 minutes. Preheat oven to 475°F. Press fingertips all over dough, forming indentations. Bake focaccia until lightly brown and crusty, about 15-20 minutes. Serve warm.

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COUNTRY CORNER FARM MARKET BEST PIE’S ON LBI

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275 W 9TH STREET SHIP BOTTOM, NEW JERSEY 609 494 0667


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FEED YOUR MIND

Cioppino 6-8 SERVINGS INGREDIENTS ¾ cup butter 2 onions, chopped 2 cloves garlic, minced 1 bunch fresh parsley, chopped 2 (14.5 ounce) cans diced tomatoes 2 (14.5 ounce) cans vegetable broth 2 bay leaves 1 T. dried basil ½ tsp. dried thyme ½ tsp. dried oregano 1 cup water 1 ½ cups white wine 1 ½ pounds large shrimp, peeled and deveined 1 ½ pounds bay scallops 18 small clams 18 mussels, 1 ½ cups crabmeat 1½ pounds cod fillets, cubed DIRECTIONS Over medium-low heat melt butter in a large stockpot, add onions, garlic and parsley. Stir occasionally until onions are soft. Add tomatoes along with vegetable broth, bay leaves, basil, thyme, oregano, water and wine. Mix well. Cover and simmer 30 minutes. Add shrimp, scallops, clams, mussels and crabmeat. Stir in cod. Bring to boil. Lower heat, cover and simmer 5 to 7 minutes until clams open. Ladle into bowls and serve with crusty bread.

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FEED YOUR MIND

New York Sour 2 SERVINGS INGREDIENTS 4 ounce bourbon whiskey 2 ounce lemon juice 1 ounce maple syrup or simple syrup 2 ounce dry red wine Lemon twist

DIRECTIONS Add bourbon, lemon juice, and syrup to a cocktail shaker and fill with ice. Shake and strain the drink into a rocks glass with ice. Carefully pour the red wine over the back of a spoon just above the surface of the drink, creating a layer on top. Serve with a lemon twist.

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FEED YOUR MIND

Mini Lemon Meringue Tarts 6-8 SERVINGS INGREDIENTS 1 package frozen Mini Phyllo Shells 1 cup store bought lemon curd 2 large egg whites 3 T granulated sugar ½ tsp. vanilla extract Lemon zest for garnish

DIRECTIONS Preheat oven to 350°F. Place mini fillo shells on a baking sheet. Place lemon curd in a sandwich baggie with the tip cut off and pipe into shells. Set aside. In a small bowl whip egg whites until foamy. Add sugar and vanilla extract and continue to whip until stiff peaks form. Pipe meringue onto the tops of each mini pie (using a piping bag sandwich baggie). Bake for 5 minutes or until the tops of the meringue brown. Let cool and garnish with lemon zest.

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HUNGER F O U N D AT I O N of Southern Ocean

1 out of 5 children in New Jersey struggles with hunger.

The rates of food insecure children are higher in South Jersey than in all other areas of the state. The Hunger Foundation of Southern Ocean, with the support of our community, aims to end hunger in Southern Ocean County.

The Hunger Foundation of Southern Ocean is a 501(c)(3) non-profit, volunteer-only

organization which hosts charitable events to raise awareness about, and funds for, local food pantries as they help thousands of families each year in the Southern Ocean County area.

D O N AT E

VOLUNTEER WWW.HFOSO.ORG

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FEED YOUR MIND

Let’s Shellabrate! Written by Sarah Hodgson

Once upon a time, around 100 years ago, Barnegat Bay was brimming with oysters. The bay-raised critters were abundant in our coastal communities, making New Jersey one of the largest oyster producers in the East. But alas, overharvesting, disease and pollution nearly decimated the industry, leaving our salt marshes void of the crop. Since then, farmers, researchers and organizations have been working tirelessly to restore the oyster population to its former glory. One such organization is Long Beach Township, whose third annual “Oyster Shellabration” is slated for Saturday, October 9, 2021 at Bayview Park from 12pm to 5pm. The Shellabration will include fresh oysters, beer, wine, eats, shucking, live music and educational activities raising funds and awareness for the Oyster Recycling Program, a collective including Long Beach Township, Jetty, the Jetty Rock Foundation, Stockton University, Parsons Mariculture and LBI Region businesses. The collective’s primary mission is to replenish the oyster population in the bay by recycling spent shells from local restaurants and returning them to oyster reefs. Long Beach Township, a 2020 NJDEP recycling award winner for the innovative shell recycling partnership, provides staff and vehicles to coordinate the shell pick-ups from participating restaurants. The shells are then transported to a facility where they are placed in tanks with oyster larvae. After a month, the shells are trucked to a reef where they will harvest and grow to be full-sized oysters.

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Photos by C

harles Grave

ner


“We managed to still collect oyster shells from five different restaurants through COVID. It’s a bit of a rough year. We know everyone is short-handed so we were really pleased,” said Andersen. The Oyster Recycling Program was able to gather 410 bushels from participating establishments in 2020, equalling approximately 11 tons of shells. Since the initiative began in 2017, they’ve collected a whopping total of 4,600 bushels. That’s around 115 tons of shells diverted from the Ocean County landfill and returned to the bay. Despite the cancellation of last year’s Shellabraton, Long Beach Township and the partners of the Oyster Recycling Program were able to continue their revitalization efforts and are hopeful for 2021’s upcoming event. “Connecting people through the abundant, locally-grown oysters and clams in our bay that are served at our participating recycling restaurants closes the loop on bay-to-table-to-bay. Truly following the shell,” said Andersen. “We hope to see more restaurants come on board. More shells, more awareness. No shell left behind!” LBT Mayor Joseph Mancini is the only municipal leader in New Jersey putting resources behind this type of waste diversion for beneficial reuse of post consumer food waste. And this couldn’t be done without the cooperation and support of local businesses. Angela Andersen, the Recycling and Sustainability Coordinator for Long Beach Township, is eternally grateful for the restaurants who continued to donate bushels of shells throughout the pandemic.

All proceeds from the Oyster Shellabration will benefit the Oyster Recycling Program. For more information about the event, visit https://www.followtheshell. com/ or www.longbeachtownship.com or https://jettylife.com/pages/the-oysterfarmers-film

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OCTOBER 9, 2021 12pm - 5pm

Local Oyster & Clam Farmers Food • Beer • Wine • Seltzer Family Friendly Games • Environmental Education

BAYV IEW PARK Brant Beach, NJ

Proceeds benefit our Oyster Recycling Program

Contact info@jettylife.com for more information and sponsorship opportunities 192 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2021


1103 Long Beach Blvd Surf City, NJ 08008 609 • 361 • 0050

SA VE TH E DA TE OCTOBER 24, 2021 HOTEL LBI

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FROM SEASONAL LOCALE TO OFFICIAL FRANCHISOR Written by Sarah Hodgson

Photos by Michael John Murphy

While the precise origin story of coffee is unknown (legend traces it back to 700 AD, when an Ethiopian goat herder stumbled upon the beloved bean with his hungry trip), we can surely pin down the epic beginnings of Long Beach Island’s favorite, and perhaps most cleverly-named, coffee house: How You Brewin Coffee Company, an island staple founded in 2004 by high school sweethearts Dan and Lori Malay. It all started with a move to Fort Lauderdale. The Malays hit the road in 2002, crossing the Causeway bridge away from the quaint streets of LBI and on towards the buzzing Sunshine State. Dan had just polished off a 7-year career in law enforcement, retiring his badge after realizing that, while the force may have been the end-all for his father, it just wasn’t his cup of tea... or... 194 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2021

coffee (wink). That’s when he, Lori and the kids packed up their belongings and put rubber-to-road, thirsty for a change of scenery and pace. Blissfully unaware that the career shift leading them away from the Jersey Shore, would bring them right back. The newly-initiated snowbirds made quick work of settling into their Florida lives. Dan enrolled in college and worked at a private Christian school while Lori stayed home to raise the kids. With Dan’s academic schedule, summers were left wide open, leaving ample time to return to LBI and supplement their income through creative pursuits. A space for seasonal enterprise lay waiting. But what industry would they sink their teeth into? A bad experience at a coffee shop certainly helped fill in the blanks.


FEED YOUR MIND

“I said, ‘We’re opening a coffee shop.’ And Dan said, ‘I don’t drink coffee, but ok,’” remembered Lori. In May of 2004, a 500 square foot coffee bar in Barnegat Light named “Village Brew” was born. For those that have never had the pleasure of visiting Viking Village in Barnegat Light, the bustling fishing hub is the stuff of a film set: massive vessels clang against the docks while weathered fishermen lug loads of scallops to and fro. Dan and Lori’s Village Brew was a harmonious addition to the picturesque harbor. To this day, sharp scents of espresso and the whir of busy frothers mingle with the pungent aromas of fresh catch and the swish of the brackish bay against the bulkhead. Customers have the unique pleasure of sipping their gourmet coffee while an entire coastal industry hums around them. The small coffee bar proved to be not only a scenic success, but a seasonal one. Dan and Lori became migratory birds, venturing south for the winter and winging it back to LBI each summer to sling lattes, frappes and mochas on the North End of LBI. The pair worked shoulder-to-shoulder, Lori on operations, Dan tackling the administrative side of things. “Dan works on the business and I work in the business,” said Lori. “We’re good at such different things, so it truly is a great partnership and an extension of our relationship.” As if the Malays needed any other assurances from the universe that the path they’d embarked on was the right one, they were sent a sign in 2006. A small, Ship Bottom-based coffee shop dubbed, “How You Brewin?” was for sale. The owners approached Dan and Lori, who they knew to be fellow coffee industry entrepreneurs, and set forth a proposition: buy their brand. It was a no-brainer. Dan and Lori moved home to LBI in the winter of 2006, bought How You Brewin, relocated it from Ship Bottom to Surf City and the business formerly known as Village Brew became How You Brewin Coffee Company - the multilocation coffee brand we know and love (and depend on) today. The Surf City How You Brewin is a year-round enterprise, while the Viking Village spot remains a seasonal haunt. Since the acquisition of How You Brewin, the brand’s growth has been a steady, organic climb. This is in part due to the ever-increasing demand for coffee shops to do more than just provide coffee or be the pit stop on your daily route. The renaissance of the gig economy has necessitated amenity-packed, remote work environments. Dwindling are the days of bona fide office spaces

where water coolers and bathroom breaks provide a brief reprieve from workday doldrums. The proliferation of freelance workers and the increased emphasis on work-from-home roles has led to a greater need for places like How You Brewin, a homey, makeshift workspace. With an eye on the consumer, Dan and Lori gradually adapted their space to exceed the new expectations of the modern-day coffee shop. Originally half the size it is today, How You Brewin in Surf City was a cozy store with minimal seating. Each year, changes were made to optimize the space, but until the Malays physically expanded their location, there was only so much they could do. Luckily in 2018, they were able to acquire the real estate that housed their Surf City location for 11 years, and with it, the opportunity to double the size of the shop as a proof of concept for an oversized coffeehouse experience. The expansion included a stage area for live music, a sleek bar area for mocktails and quick service, an additional bathroom, chic garage doors that cut the shop in half for private parties and company events. The most trend-facing addition? A cold brew production corner where the team churns out keg upon keg of their famous house cold brew, nitro and rotating cold brew flavors. Multiple aesthetics (industrial, neutral, clean, modern, warm) meld effortlessly to depict a spacious and welcoming destination. One that invites meetings, or work. Dates, or pensive alone time in an oversized armchair. With contemplative design decisions, the Malays have achieved a multitude of vibes befitting any and all types of consumers. Genius? Yes. Accidental? No. “We want to be a mission-driven company. Everything we decide and do is informed by our mission of being LBI’s third place. As we visioneer outward from that starting point, it means a rabid environmental attention to detail. Comfortable seating. A spotless bathroom. The right music content that’s at just the right volume. Other details such as room temperature, and of course, a quality, consistent product that backs it all up,” said Dan. With this massive expansion came an overhaul of the How You Brewin brand. The pair multiplied their marketing efforts, audited their business model and established a comprehensive strategy for consistent, intentional growth. “We wanted to double down on the industry’s third place concept, literally and figuratively. It was a risk, but the decision has certainly been validated,” said Dan. Indeed, the year-round Surf City location is rarely void of guests. The tables are sprawling with a variety of bay-magazine.com 195


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clientele: musicians mixing tracks, workers tending to their Zoom meetings, old friends meeting for lunch, a club convening for a routine game of Mahjong. “One of the most rewarding aspects of being in the coffee industry is the social nature of it. We want that community-centric element of a coffee house to outflow as a legacy of community support for the things we are passionate about,” said Dan. Dan and Lori hope that others see their space as a template for their own hopes and dreams - a picture of what’s possible with just a little elbow grease and a lot of perseverance. “Discover your dream. Capture your calling,” said Dan. “That looks like the determining of two things, your giftedness and your passion. Where do those two things intersect vocationally? Park there. For some it may be as an employee in a field of interest. For others it might be business ownership, or freelancing. It has been wisely said that when you love what you do, you don’t work a day in your life.”

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So what’s next for this burgeoning brand? The Malays have their sights set on an east coast takeover. The exponential growth that How You Brewin has experienced since moving into a large footprint model has resulted in the decision to become a legal franchisor. “I was reluctant. But after numerous inquiries from interested parties, and urgings even from others in other coffee brands, we figured we’d give it a go,” said Dan. “It’s on our radar to continue to grow smartly, both in-market with a couple more corporately-owned locations, as well as a potential out-of-market growth strategy of selling franchises,” said Lori. “Both those lanes will be pursued carefully and thoughtfully, as we healthily preserve and grow the How You Brewin brand.” Regardless of where the road will lead, Dan and Lori are most grateful for their incredible staff members and for the unique opportunity to work with one another, sideby-side. For more information about How You Brewin Coffee Company, contact Dan and Lori at coffee@ howyoubrewin.com or visit www.howyoubrewin.com.


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DID YOU KNOW?

Local Ta l e n t Q&A with Matt Burton

Photos by Calla Aniski-Boyd

The past year put the kibosh on live music leaving many musicians playing live streams in their living rooms. It was also a time for musicians to lay down some tracks. Not having the commitments of playing live allowed many artists to record new material. The amount of new recordings coming out from the music industry has been monumental. Our local talent is no different from what is happening on the national scene. Little Egg Harbor musician, Allison Stella, is an English teacher at Barnegat High School during the week and on the weekends works her side hustle as a singing keyboardist. Often wearing a large brim hat during her performances she creates beats by snapping, or thumping, which she then loops. She is able to create a sound of a full band and can harmonize with herself without back up musicians. Allison released her debut album last year titled, “Echolalia”. “Echolalia” includes 13 original songs written, performed and produced by Allison. Her sound is a mix of blues, piano rock and a little jazz. Her lyrics and voice are sensitive and her music is layered with a variety of melodies. Matt Burton: Allison, what does “Echolalia” mean? Allison Stella: The first time I saw this word was in high school, reading The Great Gatsby when the narrator describes the somewhat inane chatter of Gatsby’s party guests. Echolalia is just the condition of repeating something you’ve just heard, often unconsciously or unintentionally. Since my songs spanned a few years and weren’t written with an album in mind, I named it “Echolalia” after a chance commonality: every song is based on something I’ve heard someone say or a sound that meant enough to stick in my head. Brief interlude: I sometimes teach about this idea, Harold Bloom’s “anxiety of influence,” that often stops writers (and other artists) from creating. To simplify, we’re all afraid that we’re subconsciously copying someone else. It’s the dreaded “Your song sounds JUST like {insert popular song title here}” when you show off something you just wrote and THOUGHT was original. Bloom studied the Romantics, though, and they had this thing for repurposing old stories on purpose - like Shelley’s rewriting of Aschylus’ Prometheus. bay-magazine.com 201


DID YOU KNOW?

Sometimes you’ve got to steer into the skid. This is why my lyrics have excerpts pulled from letter correspondences, melodies reminiscent of popular songs, and other things that I’m only just repeating after hearing elsewhere. I’m definitely influenced by my experiences, and I’m bound to echo them back out into the wild somehow; I figure this is just an artful and controlled way of reflecting all of that noise outward. MB: Can you tell me how “Echollalia” came to fruition and a little bit about the process? AS: Echolalia is a combination of all the songs I’ve written and liked enough to remember. This means that some were written when I was in college, some when I first moved out here to NJ, [from Philadelphia] and some during the 2020 quarantine. While I taught from home during those first uncertain months, 202 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2021

I replaced my evenings (Once booked with school concerts, theater productions, award ceremonies, live shows, etc.) with a plan to document those songs. 2020 brought a feeling of finality to a lot of people. My Nonna would say the lockdowns, masks and social distancing would last the rest of her life, I’m glad for my family she was wrong. For some people, I guess that’s how it did end, tragically. But I latched on to a bit of this and thought that it was now or never. If I didn’t get these songs down now, in the only time I’ve been forced to slow down in my life thus far, it would just never happen. I took a little battery-powered locked recorder and plugged my microphone and keyboard in. Even if I had a drum set, I didn’t know how to play one - so I took to a Cajon that I quickly learned to play

and added in some kitchen utensil sounds (see: shot glasses, wooden spoons, oven mitts, chopsticks) for the percussion. I (poorly) recorded a thunder storm one night and myself walking through the stone driveway while playing the concertina intro to “Safe Passage.” My fiancé must have thought I was insane when he walked in on me one day. As I expected, the results weren’t perfect. The mixing and mastering would have been better handled by a professional, but it’s a brutally accurate documentation of where I was at the time: alone, a bit desperate, and very determined. MB: What is your creative process like for writing music? Do your lyrics mostly reflect personal experiences? AS: It’s a mess. Often I start with a simple idea, maybe one line, put it


to music, and work the rest out from there. A few piano intros and riffs are things that I recorded ages ago and kept on a phone, but I force them into whatever song I can to keep them from dissolving forever. Each of my songs right now has a pretty personal meaning - mostly because I never considered playing them for anyone but myself anyway. The oldest ones are about the early crushes of a late bloomer, and the latest ones are about lessons I’ve learned and people/things I’ve come to value. MB: How would you describe your music, I guess besides as “Americana”- which seems to be a catch-all label. I personally not sure I like that label. Seems like an easy way of saying an amalgam of everything out there. AS: I agree! My own songs seem to be divided into three distinct categories: blues, folk, and piano pop-rock. With the exception of a couple of ballads, I can easily fit all of my own compositions into those somewhat distinct boxes. For example: “Find Me” and “Conviction” [Tracks from Echolalia] are influenced by folk songwriters like my personal favorite contemporary Josh Ritter. “Calendar Lines” and “Wanderlust” are straight out of my jazz training and my interest in the moody Melody Gardot: a blues singer. “Her Pitch” and “Boss Battle” comes from the ironic piano rock stylings of artists like Ben Folds. This is a semi-inevitable byproduct of performing as a cover artist over a wide range of distinct genres, but I hope to do a better job in the future of blending these three influences into something that feels more like a

personal trademark than a jukebox of love letters to artists that I admire. MB: When I first heard you play at the Plantation years ago I was captivated by how you set up your songs. You would tap the mic or snap your fingers and your keyboard would create a loop. Can you walk me through a typical start to a song when you play live? AS: Yes - thank you for noticing! If I have a song with a common sound, I start with that first. That can be a chord progression, a rhythm using snapping/tapping/ shaking/beat boxing, or even a single note. That moves on into whatever I want to set up for the song’s climax, which could be a bass line with a stronger beat, a choral backing, a piano pattern, or all of the above. I haven’t seen anyone do it exactly this way - at least not on piano - so for now it’s a bit of a signature approach. This is because piano sometimes fails to be as percussive as what my guitar friends accomplish with their strumming, and this setup allows me to feel more like a full band when the moment comes. I’ve been the only dance music at some weddings, so there has to be a bit more volume than the typical piano ballad allows. MB: Where can people find your music? AS: “Echolalia” is on most streaming platforms, particularly Spotify but also Amazon Music, iHeart Radio, and YouTube. Speaking of YouTube, you can hear over 100 of my cover versions as they’re played live around LBI on my own YouTube channel, Allison Stella Music BVCFGXC

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“School of Fish”, serving bowl and mug with “Lobster” tumblers by Matt Burton @mtburtongallery @19thst.potter

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33rd Annual

Since 1976

Sept 4 - Oct 3

LBI CHOWDERFEST PRESENTS

CHOWDERMONTH EVENTS 2021 SOUP UP & SUPPORT LOCAL

Become a traveling taster for this year’s month-long chowder cook-off and support restaurants directly by purchasing their competition chowder for dine-in or take-out; voting online for your favorite in Red, White and Creative categories from Labor Day Weekend to Saturday, October 2, 2021

FREE 2-DAY BAYFRONT FESTIVAL

After you help us soup up our local economy all month long, join us to close it out with our free 2-day Bayfront Festival on Oct 2 & 3 in Beach Haven. Celebrate with vendors, brews on tap, live music line up, and ChowderMonth champion announcements while we welcome fall in LBI style. The 2-Day festival will be a non-tasting event.

2021 Cook-off competitors

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Cluck'n Crabs Country Kettle Chowda Dune 18 LaBamba Mexican Restaurant Lefty’s Tavern Panzone's Pizza Polly's Dock & Clam House Quincy's Original Lobster Roll Roberto's Dolce Vita Scojo's Surf City Bistro The Chicken Or The Egg The Old Causeway Steak & Oyster House The Terrace Tavern

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Free Gift Wrapping OPEN ALL YEAR 22nd & Long Beach Blvd. Ship Bottom, NJ 609-494-7228 www.haymarketlbi.com For more information visit chowderfest.com 206 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2021


DID YOU KNOW?

Explore LBI

Keeping it Classic

Welcome the Dark Side

Written by Lori Pepenella, CDME

“Not to be Missed” Fall & Holiday Experiences The members of the Southern Ocean County Chamber want you to finish 2021 on a high note. Plenty of plans are underway with brand new events and twists on our population traditions. We know that the upcoming seasons typically have less crowds and plenty of options to make that lure of the shore last a bit longer:

Soup Up for ChowderMonth & Free 2 Day Bayfront Festival Need an excuse to spend some time at the beach? Here is the perfect reason to be on call from October 9 – Dec 12! The 67th Annual Fall Surf Fishing Tournament is 9 weeks of great fishing on Long Beach Island. New this year is the addition of Kingfish! Register to fish, win prizes and support your local bait & tackle shops. https://www.lbisfc.com

While planning upcoming weekends, add time to soak up something different. The Darkhouse Film Festival is a new genre event that will serve as the evil twin to the long-running Lighthouse International Film Festival Darkhouse will specialize in horror, sci-fi, action, fantasy, comedy and otherwise fantastic and outrageous films from around the world. Passes are available to attend films, film maker panels and networking events. Darkhouse screenings will take place in person November 11-14 http://www.lighthousefilmfestival.org/

Take a Holiday Pass to Shop Small

Fall into Farm Fresh Markets

Spend your September on the Chowder Trail as a Traveling Taster supporting local restaurants by purchasing competition chowder and voting for your favorite Red, White & Creative champions. Chowderfest will once again steer chowder purchasing to participating restaurants keeping dollars flowing directly to them and a chance to earn your online vote. Round out the month with closing ceremonies taking place at Taylor Avenue Bayfront Oct 2 & 3. This festival will be free, with no tickets needed to attend and will not have chowder on the grounds to sample. It will feature a juried vendor village, live music line up, brews on tap, seltzer on ice, food for purchase and where the 2021 chowder champions will be announced. https://chowderfest.com/

Many of our familiar Farmer’s Markets go well into the fall, with special Thanksgiving and Holiday pop ups to bring Jersey Fresh produce, locally baked goods, produced honey, roasted coffee, seasonal plants as well as unique gifts. Our specialty markets also offer platters, picnics and perfect pairings for every gathering! Get recommendations and schedules for next time you go to market https://www.visitlbiregion.com/attractions/find-your-favorite-farmers-market

November 27 is the official kick off to holiday shopping with region wide Shop Small Saturday offerings, including Santa visits and holiday shopping fairs. That is just the start, the entire holiday season brings opportunity to support local merchants with customized products for locally sourced giving. Also supporting our theaters, museums and environmental organizations with gifts of tickets, memberships and subscriptions. Add more the list with special events, holiday performances and special shopping hours. Find more at https://www. visitlbiregion.com/eat-drink-buy-lbi bay-magazine.com 207


DID YOU KNOW?

Tiny Islands, Big Impact Long Beach Township Launches Partnership Initiative to Prioritize Bay Island Preservation Written by Sarah Hodgson

Ever look out into the vast, sparkling Barnegat Bay that hugs our 18-mile-long barrier island and spot those little bits of green grass marsh? These “tiny islands” might seem insignificant from our substantially larger island, but they actually play an important role in the delicate, local ecosystem. And luckily, Long Beach Township is prioritizing the research and restoration of these marine habitats. Angela Andersen, the sustainability coordinator for Long Beach Township and Field Station Manager at the township’s new facility in Holgate, is at the forefront of the newly formed NJ Bay Island Initiative: a collective of agencies and nonprofits whose purpose is to inventory the bay islands from Manasquan inlet to Absecon inlet and examine their restoration potential. The NJ Bay Island Initiative strives to determine and expose the importance of the islands beyond their aesthetic value. “The marsh islands are as much a part of our past as they need to be for our future,” said LBT Mayor Joseph Mancini, who was the driving force to convene the group. “Without the marsh islands, storms and flooding will be much worse.” “They have a form and function when it comes to storm surge and flooding,” said Andersen. “They really lend themselves to coastal resilience. I feel like a lot of people 208 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2021

have been focusing on the beach and ocean fronts and replenishment, so it’s nice to have a lot of eyes turn around and look west at the back bay for solutions.” So what necessitated this turn west? After Hurricane Sandy in 2012, Long Beach Township voters passed a ballot question to establish an “Open Space Trust” that prioritizes public access to the Barnegat Bay/Little Egg Harbor estuary. This trust led them to turn their attention towards the bayfront parcels, which subsequently led to a further look out into the bay. To the tiny islands. Virginia Rettig, Refuge Manager at Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge and chairperson of the NJ Bay Island Initiative, is thrilled that so many are coming together to restore and protect these important spaces. “The islands of the coastal bays in our area have not been given much attention over the years. They provide great habitat for migratory birds and shellfish, reduce erosion to nearby marshes, and they can reduce storm impacts from wind-driven waves,” said Rettig. While most of the islands are owned by the federal government, Long Beach Township is looking to acquire some of the privately owned parcels in the bay. The township recently partnered with the Ocean County Natural Lands Trust Fund to secure Clam Cove Reserve: a 22 acre tract just south of their recently opened LBT Marine Education Field Station in Holgate where there


lies a wealth of knowledge relating to coastal marshlands for researchers and scientists. “It’s exciting to pull together the datasets that so many scientists and coastal managers have painstakingly collected to gain an understanding of our vulnerable bay islands,” said Kim McKenna, Associate Director of the Stockton University Coastal Research Center (CRC) and charter member of the New Jersey Bay Islands (NJBII) Initiative. Stockton University Coastal Research Center is an NJ Bay Island Initiative member organization responsible for developing a comprehensive tool for island restoration projects. “The CRC, together with E.B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge and The Nature Conservancy, developed a web-based decision support tool that categorizes island condition (e.g. edge erosion) and project planning (e.g. proximity to New Jersey waterways) data layers to identify the bay islands in greatest need of restoration. The CRC is proud to be part of this local effort that considers the Barnegat estuary and sub-environments as a regional system and holistically prepares for future changes,” said McKenna. The team of researchers, in concert with the NJ Bay Island Initiative, hope to restore the marshlands to their former glory. With well over 100 islands in the region, the highest concentration being in the Little Egg Harbor portion south of the Barnegat Bay, they surely have their work cut out for them.

But Andersen is hopeful. Given the close proximity of these habitats to Long Beach Island and its many residents, it should be fairly easy to raise awareness and support for this project. After all, many of these islands are in their very backyards. If the masses erode away, residents will notice and feel the direct impact: west winds, flooding, etc. “What we’ve always tried to do is make those connections with the community. Pointing out these near-shore islands is a great way to start,” said Andersen. In addition to the efforts of the NJ Bay Island Initiative, the Barnegat Bay Partnership conducts a “Paddle the Edge Project,” during which volunteers annually venture out into the bay and monitor a section of marsh. They snap photos of their tracts year after year and record observations to determine how and where the land is eroding. The resulting data tells an invaluable, trending story to researchers. Andersen herself paddles to nearby marshland to observe her local species and their patterns. “I live in North Beach Haven and I paddle around the western marshelder island all the time. And twenty-five years ago we always called it ‘Skimmer Island,’ but I haven’t seen a black skimmer there in ten years. They went somewhere else. Why did they do that?” The answer will tell us what’s happening on these tiny islands and how we can restore them to their former, habitable splendour. For more information about the NJ Bay Island Initiative, visit https://www.barnegatbaypartnership.org/protect/restoration/islands/.

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DRIVE TO BUILD

Community Written by Susan Field

Photo by Randy Townsend

Elizabeth Barlow Giglio leverages 50-year family car business name to help Southern Ocean County community thrive

Elizabeth Barlow Giglio, executive manager of Barlow Buick GMC of Manahawkin, believes in using her dealership’s resources to build a stronger community. Instead of spending all her funds on advertising, she’d rather invest in the community as much as possible. From David’s Dream and Believe Cancer Foundation, to the Southern Ocean County Chamber of Commerce, to the local police departments, the dealership is actively involved in partnerships with local charities and organizations to help the Southern Ocean County community thrive. The people-first focus of the Manahawkin dealership is a shared value with the other Barlow dealerships and commercial truck business, 212 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2021


DID YOU KNOW?

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“Everyone involved took so much away from the experience. It feels so good to be able to provide assistance [to local nonprofits and organizations]. All those efforts come back to the local community and make it stronger,” Giglio says. “This area is such a special community and I feel really lucky to be a part of it.” Giglio celebrated 10 years at the helm of the Manahawkin dealership in December. Her interest in carrying on the family legacy is what initially attracted her to the business.

which are located in Woodbury and Delran. The company was started in March 1971 by Giglio’s grandfather, Ed Barlow Sr., a WWII Veteran. Her father, Ed Barlow Jr., is the current owner and president. The company is celebrating its 50-year-anniversary this year. The Manahawkin location has been in operation since 2010. “The Barlow name is one people can trust. Elizabeth has used the name to provide assistance to anybody who needs help, or shed light on any cause that needs attention. She’s done a lot in the Southern Ocean County community,” says Ed Barlow Jr., who owns a home in LBI. In the Spring, the Manahawkin dealership spearheaded the Bridge the Gap Food Drive, in response to a news article about a local student, who told her teacher that she was hungry. The article hit home for Giglio, who resides in West Creek with her husband and two young children. She and her team immediately sprang to action. Giglio reached out to the Hunger Foundation of Southern Ocean, and to Chris Shwab, president of the Southern Ocean Chamber of Commerce, who coordinated the community-wide effort. “The amazing thing about this area is that when you have a cause, so many people get excited about it and jump on board to help,” says Giglio. “We filled a pickup truck in our showroom with food five or six times. We were making weekly trips to drop off food at multiple food banks.” For each truckload of food delivered to the eight local food pantries supported, the Hunger Foundation of Southern Ocean donated $11,000. Smaller monetary donations were provided to three in-school food pantries. In total, the Hunger Foundation distributed $90,200.

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After graduating from Villanova University, (where her father and brother are also alumnus), in 2008 with a Marketing degree, Giglio started working at the Delran dealership part-time. She decided to try it for two years, as an opportunity to learn more about what her father and grandfather did. By the end of the two years, she had grown to love the car business, and there was no doubt in her mind that it was her career path. When her father bought the Manahawkin dealership, Giglio was excited for the chance to manage and grow a dealership from the beginning. “I love talking to people and I love that every day is a new challenge. When I come to work, I feel like I’m part of something bigger,” Giglio says about the family legacy. “ I feel lucky that I have found something I really love doing.” The family business also includes Giglio’s brother, Ed Barlow III, executive manager at Barlow Chevrolet and Isuzu Trucks of Delran, and her cousin, John Barlow, executive manager at the Barlow Buick GMC of Woodbury. Two other cousins, Matt and David Barlow, are sales manager and pre-owned manager at the Woodbury location. Working in the family business, Giglio has not only gained a greater


DID YOU KNOW?

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DID YOU KNOW?

appreciation for her family history, she’s grown closer to her family members. “I’m so lucky to work with my dad and have him to consult with. I’m constantly talking to my brother, and my cousins. We have a strong line of communication and make sure our goals are aligning,” she says. “Essentially, at the end of the day, we are upholding the legacy that our grandfather started and my dad worked his entire life to uphold. We understand the bigger picture of why we are here, what brought us here, and how we can continue into the future.” The family legacy is rooted in the values that Barlow Sr., established: building relationships with customers and putting the customer first, treating employees well, and always doing the right thing. “In general, car dealers don’t have a good reputation, but I know my family, and I know the type of people we are, and I wanted to prove that wrong. I’ve worked my whole life to make sure we have a different reputation,” Barlow Jr. says. “We have heart and we work and play in the same community as our customers. We work hard to gain the trust of our customers and always do the right thing. Our business is nothing without our customers and our employees.” These driving values have created a strong, positive culture at each of the Barlow dealerships. Some employees have been with the company for more than 40 years. “People are generally in business to make a living. My dad’s created a culture that is so much more than that, runs so much deeper than that,” Giglio says. “In Manahawkin, We’ve created a place that people enjoy coming to. We feel good about what we’re doing and the people we’re helping.” When the whole family sits around the dinner table, invariably the conversation goes back to the business. Barlow Jr., who has no plans to retire anytime soon, feels fortunate that he can share this special experience with his family, and that they’re so passionate about carrying on the family legacy. “It really is a lot of fun to see the way they’ve matured into the business the way they have,” he says. “It’s an amazing feat and I’m really proud of them.” 216 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2021

Photo by Randy Townsend


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DID YOU KNOW?

TELLING THE STORY OF YOU Written by Diana Lentini

If a picture is worth a thousand words, then Michael John Murphy is a professional storyteller. Equipped with a camera and gifted with an eye for framing photos that bring his subjects to life, Michael has documented fascinating faces and landscapes around the world for more than 20 years. Now, he is returning to his New Jersey roots with his newest endeavor, Born by the Sea—a photography business dedicated to telling the story of you. With a career spanning two decades and a portfolio featuring models and actors representing major fashion houses and brands, it may be surprising to learn that Michael didn’t pick up a camera until his junior year of college at Rowan University in Glassboro, New Jersey. “I was accepted to Parsons [School 218 BAY MAGAZINE FALL 2021

of Design], but after some good talks with my dad I decided to pursue my BFA at Rowan and to leave some options open. I am so glad he had that conversation with me,” Michael says. It was at the halfway point of working toward a degree in painting and drawing that Michael picked up a camera, which was “a total game changer.”

Design], I may have not picked up a camera at all,” he says. Michael spent the next 13 years in New York City learning and refining his craft by assisting photographers, including renowned fashion photographer Bruce Weber. “School is great, and school will teach you a lot of things, but the best way to learn is to get busy and work,” Michael says.

A natural trailblazer, Michael advocated for himself to create his own degree path, focusing his studies on illustration through photography as a medium. Since there was no formal photography degree at the time, Michael sought out internships with Philadelphia-based photographers and headed to New York City after graduating in 2001 in order to gain invaluable real-life experience. “I thank Rowan for that. If I had decided to go to Parsons [School of

Around 2013, Michael decided that it was time for a change that would allow him to spend less time away and more time with his now-wife, Kelly, whom he married in 2016. Using his network of connections he had built up over the years, Michael made the decision to work for himself. The jobs came quickly but were accompanied by a learning curve to adjust to the self-discipline required for being one’s own boss.


After two years of working as a solo photographer, Michael’s life yet again hit a turning point in 2015, a mix of joy and sorrow. That year, Michael proposed to Kelly. Shortly after, Michael’s father Aidan passed away after a long battle with cancer. “My dad was a wind in the sails of my creative life,” Michael shares. “I felt burnt out.” And so Michael and Kelly headed out west to San Diego for a change of scenery—and a change in career path. He traded his camera for a badge, becoming a deputy for the San Diego County Sheriff’s Department. “It’s been a life-long dream of mine to serve in law enforcement,” he says. Michael remained in California until his first son was born in 2018, when he and his wife decided to reconnect with their East Coast roots, this time settling down in Beach Haven West instead of New York City. “I traded the 646 area code for a 609,” he says. Back in New Jersey, Michael returned to photography. “A lot of things pushed me back into the photography world, but I had to think about how it would fit into my new life as a father,” Michael says. Inspired by his newfound perspective, Michael found himself drifting away from commercial work in the city. With a refined focus on family, Michael founded Born by the Sea—a local photography company whose goal is “to tell the story of you.”

“Born by the Sea is based on family, and we hope to cover all things photography on LBI,” Michael explains. “Our goal is to convince people in this fast world to pause and take pictures. Families, weddings, you and your dog—I want to show that there is another way of providing photography services to tell the story of you. I’ll photograph you on a boat, I’ll go surfing with you, I’ll watch you take your dog paddle boarding to capture more than the traditional 8x10 photo hanging on a wall,” he says. In a world where everyone has a camera on their smartphone, Michael strives to remind people of the value of a good photographer: “It falls on the photographer to get you to do something that you wouldn’t do yourself. Direction and lighting—these two things are where a photographer needs to shine.” In addition to family and wedding photography, Born by the Sea offers photography for businesses, whatever their industry. “We’re a mini agency that wants to serve local small businesses. Instead of buying a generic stock image for their marketing materials, businesses can hire us and work with a local artist who understands your brand,” Michael adds. “Photography is the gift that gives back,” he says, “I just want to take photos of people that will be cherished for a long, long time.” bay-magazine.com 219


OFF SEASON Hunger Foundation of Southern Ocean County Thanks 4 Giving 5K Photos by Charles Gravener

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Bay Magazine Fall 2021  

​Bay Magazine’s clean, modern and unique design stands out from the rest. Our team will work together to create the best quality editorial m...

Bay Magazine Fall 2021  

​Bay Magazine’s clean, modern and unique design stands out from the rest. Our team will work together to create the best quality editorial m...

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