Recycling Product News October 2021, Volume 29, Number 7

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SCRAPPING PLANES, TRAINS AND AUTOMOBILES SLM IS DRIVING GROWTH WITH A BOOTS ON THE GROUND APPROACH

PRODUCER RESPONSIBILITY AND THE ONTARIO BLUE BOX TRANSITION OCTOBER 2021 recyclingproductnews.com PUBLICATIONS MAIL AGREEMENT NO. 40069270

SIX CONSIDERATIONS FOR DESIGNING A TRANSFER STATION


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COVER STORY SCRAPPING PLANES, TRAINS AND AUTOMOBILES

24

PRODUCER RESPONSIBILITY AND THE ONTARIO BLUE BOX TRANSITION

32

SIX CONSIDERATIONS FOR DESIGNING A TRANSFER STATION

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STORMFISHER IS GROWING WITH DEMAND FOR FOOD WASTE RECOVERY


October 2021 | Volume 29, Number 7

FEATURES

DEPARTMENTS & SECTIONS

16

8

From the Editor

10

News Room

Scrapping planes, trains and automobiles

24

Producer responsibility and the Ontario blue box transition: a conversation with GFL’s Patrick Dovigi

28

Easing the transition to electric power

32

Six considerations for designing a transfer station

36

Expanded StormFisher facility in Ontario to satisfy growing demand for sustainable food waste recovery solutions

38

Material handlers for scrap recycling

40

Recycling vacuum bucket helps save money on C&D sites

14 Spotlight 16

Cover Story

24

Hauling & Collection

32

Transfer Stations

36

Organics Recycling

38

Equipment Roundup

40

C&D Recycling

42

Last Word

46

Advertiser Index


OCTOBER 2021 | VOLUME 29 • NUMBER 7 SENIOR EDITOR Keith Barker kbarker@baumpub.com 604-291-9900 ext. 305 EDITOR IN CHIEF Kaitlyn Till ktill@baumpub.com 604-291-9900 ext. 330

ADVERTISING PRODUCTION MANAGER Tina Anderson production@baumpub.com 604-291-9900 ext. 222 DESIGN & PRODUCTION Morena Zanotto morena@baumpub.com 604-291-9900 ext. 325

DIGITAL EDITOR Slone Fox sfox@baumpub.com 604-291-9900 ext. 335 ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER/ VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Sam Esmaili sam@baumpub.com 604-291-9900 ext. 110

PRESIDENT/PUBLISHER Ken Singer ksinger@baumpub.com 604-291-9900 ext. 226 VICE PRESIDENT/CONTROLLER Melvin Date Chong mdatechong@baumpub.com

FOUNDER Engelbert J. Baum

Published by: Baum Publications Ltd.

FROM THE COVER: STEW LEHMANN AND KYLE DUNCAN AT SLM RECYCLING IN WELLAND, ONTARIO A boots on the ground, hands-on approach is key for SLM, one of the most diversified scrap recyclers in the business.

124 - 2323 Boundary Road Vancouver, BC, Canada V5M 4V8 Tel: 604-291-9900 Toll Free: 1-888-286-3630 Fax: 604-291-1906 www.baumpub.com www.recyclingproductnews.com @RecyclingPN FOR ALL CIRCULATION INQUIRIES Phone: 1-855-329-1909 • Fax: 1-855-272-0972 e-mail: baumpublications@circlink.ca

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One year subscription rates for others: Canada $33.50 + 1.68 GST = $35.18; U.S.A. $40; other countries $63.50. Single copies $6.00 + 0.30 GST = $6.30; outside Canada $7.00. All prices are in ­Canadian funds. Recycling Product News accepts no responsibility or liability for reported claims made by manufacturers and/or distributors for products or services; the views and opinions ­expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of Baum Publications Ltd. We acknowledge the financial support of the Government of Canada. Copyright 2021 Baum Publications Ltd. No portion of this publication may be reproduced without permission of the publishers. Printed in Canada, on recycled paper, by Mitchell Press Ltd. ISSN 1715-7013. PUBLICATIONS MAIL AGREEMENT NO. 40069270.

WE’D LIKE TO HEAR FROM YOU Do you have a story, equipment or technology innovation, commentary or news that our readers in the recycling industry should know about? Drop us a line any time. Contact: Senior Editor Keith Barker at kbarker@baumpub.com or 604-291-9900 ext. 305

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FROM THE EDITOR

FROM THE EDITOR THERE IS NO SIMPLE SOLUTION TO DETERRING CATALYTIC CONVERTER THEFT

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catalytic converter is an exhaust emission control device that reduces toxic gases and pollutants from an internal combustion engine, and it contains a significant amount of very valuable precious metals. Some of these metals, like platinum, are currently comparable in price to gold as a commodity. Due to such a high return, thousands are stolen around North America yearly, and reported incidents have risen by upward of 300 percent or more in some regions between 2020 and 2021. According to the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries (ISRI), thieves target all types of vehicles and a single stolen catalytic converter can garner anywhere from $US50 up to $US875, depending on its type and precious metals content. For recyclers and law enforcement, curbing this kind of metal theft is very difficult. Catalytic converters do not have serial numbers, which makes it difficult to prove a unit is stolen. To address this part of the issue, ISRI is currently working in partnership with the Catalytic Converter Theft committee of the International Association of Auto Theft Investigators (IAATI) on a vigorous public education and information campaign that encourages vehicle owners to uniquely identify their catalytic converters. The two organizations suggest using high-temperature paint, marking units with an engraving and/or using a non-destruct label that will break into pieces if an attempt is made to remove it. In this way, the catalytic converter can be associated with a vehicle, which will deter theft and make the job of law enforcement easier. But this is only one step toward a solution. According to Cliff Hope, senior account manager at PMR, which specializes in catalytic converter recycling, “Unique markings on converters could deter some thefts, but without a consistent national database which tie the markings on the converter to the ownership of the vehicle, it will be very tough to stop illegal sales.” He says that consistent laws and regulations for buying and selling catalytic converters also need to be in place, in both the U.S. and Canada, or thieves will just go to the next county, municipality, state, province or country – wherever the market continues to exist. Scrap industry veteran Brad Rudover, co-founder of Scrap University and owner of Vancouver-based Detroit Scrap Consulting Services, agrees that there simply is no easy solution to

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The foundation for improving the way we recover used materials comes back to design for recycling. the issue of catalytic converter theft. “Given the current price levels of platinum, palladium and rhodium, there is no doubt converter theft will continue to be a problem for the foreseeable future.” He also agrees that while adding identifying marks to a catalytic converter by consumers is a good step and will help, the solution – outside of changing consumer and professional behaviour and establishing consistent data, laws and regulations – really lies in rethinking the initial stage of producing goods. At the design stage, he says, OEMs could help immensely by simply altering the positioning of catalytic converters and make them less accessible to thieves by bolting or welding in a cover to restrict access. This really sounds simple enough. Once again, it would seem, the foundation for improving the way we recover used materials comes back to design for recycling. Designing our goods and packaging, all products for consumers and industry, with their end-of-life in mind, is clearly the first step in making a real shift toward sustainable, efficient recycling systems for all materials, from plastic packaging to catalytic converters.

KEITH BARKER Senior Editor kbarker@baumpub.com recyclingproductnews.com


Model 4 The new model 4 E-Z log Baler is just what mid size scrap yards have been asking for! Priced right for any yard — small, mid size, or large! Like the Model 3, the NEW Model 4 has no set up time and a very low cost to operate. The one man operations are all handled from the newly designed cab. With the 400º rotation crane and a reach of 27’ adding the continuous rotation grapple, it makes loading the larger chamber a breeze. Taking your loose scrap to a highly sought after shreddable log.

— Cycles in under 2 minutes! — Produces up to 70 tons per day. — Fully portable in the closed position. — New seat design for more operator comfort.


NEWS ROOM

REPUBLIC OPENS CALIFORNIA’S FIRST SOLAR-POWERED COMPOST FACILITY

R STAY CURRENT www.recyclingproductnews.com CONNECT WITH US

@RecyclingPN

epublic Services has opened California’s first fully solar-powered compost facility which will recycle food and yard waste from the San Diego region. The new Otay Compost Facility will help communities meet the requirements of a new state law mandating diversion of all organic waste from landfills, while operating completely off the grid, using alternative energy. The Otay Compost Facility utilizes solar power to run composting operations at the site, including fans that aerate the organic material as well as oxygen and temperature sensors, and it also uses an advanced compost windrow cover system. The facility can process 100 tons of organics per day, recycling materials into a high-quality, nutrient-rich soil amendment, while helping preserve natural resources and reducing water consumption. Republic Services has plans to double capacity by the end of the year.

NEXUS REPORTS 177 PERCENT GROWTH IN CIRCULAR WASTETO-VIRGIN PLASTICS BUSINESS

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exus, which uses a proprietary technology to convert a broad range of landfill-bound plastic waste into liquids which can then be converted into virgin plastics, has reached 177 percent year-over-year production growth, with 47 percent of its total production occurring in recent months. The first in the world to receive the International Sustainability and Carbon-Plus Certification (ISCC Plus) producing at this scale, Nexus’ process is 100 percent circular and can be repeated infinitely. To date, the company has diverted close to 3.8 million pounds of broad-based, landfill-bound plastics for conversion back into new plastic material.

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ISRI HIGHLIGHTS RESOURCES FOR RECYCLERS DURING FIRE PREVENTION MONTH

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ecognizing the importance of fire safety and prevention resources in honour of National Fire Prevention Month this October, the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries (ISRI) is providing its members with online classes to help employers and employees understand hazards associated with fires in recycling and materials recovery facilities. Related to these efforts, ISRI has been named a recipient of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) grant to fund education and training on hazard recognition and prevention. ISRI says it will use the grant to continue working on its Hazard Recognition and Fire Safety and Prevention programming. Classes are scheduled until the end of the year, with more expected to take place in 2022.

GFL COMPLETES 31 ACQUISITIONS IN 2021 AS OF OCTOBER 1

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etween January and October 2021, GFL completed 31 acquisitions across its North American platform, according to a recent report from the company summarizing its year-to-date M&A activity. According to CEO Patrick Dovigi, with 31 acquisitions closed as of October 1, together with another acquisition closing in mid-October, the company has exceeded revenue from expected opportunities and sees more ahead. “At the beginning of the year, we provided guidance that included opportunities to acquire up to C$280 million of revenue through incremental M&A,” said Dovigi. “We still see upside opportunities ahead of us for the fourth quarter resulting from the robust M&A pipeline that we manage. As we look to the end of 2021, we will continue to execute on our acquisition strategy . . . We will also remain focused on organically growing our business, realizing operational efficiencies and extracting synergies from our scalable platform, all with a view to increasing our free cash flow and creating long-term value for all of our stakeholders.”

EPAX AND MACPRESSE SIGN DISTRIBUTION AGREEMENT ON HEAVY-DUTY BALERS

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pax Systems has expanded its product offerings to include the complete line of MacPresse balers and other equipment for municipal solid waste facilities and recycling plants. These machines feature capabilities for the compaction and baling of cardboard, PET, MSW, RDF and C&I waste. In addition to balers, MacPresse also manufactures a wide variety of auxiliary equipment, including sorting stations, industrial shredders, conveyors and stretch wrappers.

EASING THE TRANSITION TO ELECTRIC POWER This October, Mack Trucks announced that its Ultra Service Agreement will come standard with the Mack LR Electric refuse model, helping further support customers beginning their journey into owning batteryelectric vehicles (BEVs). Specifically tailored to battery-electric trucks for waste and recycling collection, Mack’s new uptime package is designed to help relieve uncertainty in making the switch to electric power from diesel, building efficiencies in scheduled and preventive maintenance, towing, and repair, and including battery monitoring and Mack’s connected uptime services. For more on this story, turn to page 24.

OCTOBER 2021 | recyclingproductnews.com

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NEWS ROOM

MORE NEWS www.recyclingproductnews.com

UPDATED GUIDANCE FOR PE FILM FROM APR TO HELP CLOSE THE LOOP ON PACKAGING

OVER 57 MILLION TONS OF E-WASTE EXPECTED AS GLOBAL TOTAL FOR 2021

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ctober 14 marked International E-Waste Day 2021, a day when leading experts, producer responsibility organizations and the WEEE Forum called on households, businesses and governments to get behind efforts to get more end-of-life or unused plug-in or battery-operated products to facilities where they can be either repaired or recycled to recover valuable materials and reduce the need for new resources. According to the WEEE Forum, this year’s worldwide mountain of waste electronic and electrical equipment will total an estimated 57.4 million tonnes – greater than the weight of the Great Wall of China.

$8.7 MILLION FUNDING IN MANITOBA TO HELP SUPPORT CIRCULAR ECONOMY FOR ORGANICS AND OTHER MATERIALS

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he Manitoba government is providing $8.7 million to municipalities, companies and organizations for waste reduction and recycling support for organics and other materials, according to an announcement from Conservation and Climate Minister Sarah Guillemard. The funding includes: • $50,000 to increase education and communication with stakeholders around recycling priorities; • $6,977,600 to support recycling rebates in municipalities and Indigenous and northern communities that operate WEARS-registered landfills and/or have a contract with a WRARS registered landfill for disposal of municipal solid waste; • $800,000 to support residential hazardous waste management; • $894,000 in Manitoba compost support payments to participating compost facilities.

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he Association of Plastic Recyclers (APR) has updated and improved the APR Design Guide for Plastics Recyclability for PE Film Packaging. Developed by a working group of APR’s Film Reclamation Committee, the updated guidance reflects the consensus of a diverse group of stakeholders including film recyclers, converters and brands. According to APR, the guide updates are part of a larger initiative to improve the capture and recovery of film plastic packaging supported by The Recycling Partnership’s Film & Flexibles Coalition. Other objectives include encouraging more residential collection and recovery of films, developing design guidance for polypropylene films, and researching the suitability of curbside recycling for film plastics.

DS SMITH EMBEDS CIRCULAR DESIGN METRICS ACROSS ALL PACKAGING SITES

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S Smith has embedded its circular design metrics across all of its packaging sites to support the transition to a circular economy. Using these metrics, DS Smith can now measure and quantify the sustainability performance of each of its packaging designs across eight key indicators: carbon footprint, design for reuse, supply chain optimization, recyclability, planet safety, material utilization, renewable source and recycled content. As more than 80 percent of a product’s environmental impact is made at the design stage, data from the metrics enables brands and retailers to compare different design solutions, helping them to reduce waste and pollution and keep materials and products in use for longer.


MODIFIED SHIPPING CONTAINER SETUP BRINGS NEW, CONVENIENT WAY TO RECYCLE ON UNIVERSITY OF B.C. CAMPUS

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tudents, faculty, staff and residents of the University of British Columbia community and surrounding area can drop off their empty beverage containers to be recycled at the campus’ first Express & GO recycling station. The recycling station is housed in a 20-foot repurposed shipping container and supports a growing need for contactless, innovative recycling infrastructure in a wide range of communities – from large urban centres where commercial space is at a premium, to less accessible rural locations. Through the Express & GO system, British Columbians have a contactless way to recycle their unsorted empty beverage containers in under a minute. Deposit refunds are uploaded through the user’s free online account, which can be redeemed by Interac e-transfer or cheque. Students, faculty and residents also have the option of donating their refunds directly to local charities or student groups.

LET’S JOIN FORCES!

THE BEAST® 3680T 35” Capacity Horizontal Grinder

Since 1983, Bandit has been providing equipment for a multitude of wood waste processing markets. Our vision since the beginning is to manufacture quality, highly productive, easy to maintain equipment providing years of dependable service. The commitment for quality, innovation and dedication is instilled in every Bandit employee and is one of the main reasons why Bandit became an Employee-Owned Company (ESOP) in 2018. These core values ensure each Bandit machine will leave the factory ready to exceed your expectations. With the most diverse product line in the industry backed by our extensive parts, sales and service team supporting our highly trained global dealer network consisting of over 235 locations, we are a force to be reckoned with! For those who have joined, we thank you. If you are wondering what this could mean for your business we have one question:

Are you ready to join forces? To locate an authorized Bandit Dealer in your area please visit www.banditchippers.com or call Bandit at 800-952-0178.

OCTOBER 2021 | recyclingproductnews.com

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SPOTLIGHT

SPOTLIGHT

INTRODUCTIONS & UPDATES

Screener conveyor

Access platform

Rotochopper

SCREENER CONVEYOR PROCESSES UP TO 350 YARDS PER HOUR

The newest addition to the Rotochopper equipment lineup, this Screener Conveyor features a screen hole size up to three-quarter-inch and production up to 350 yards per hour in organics and C&D applications. Units are designed to separate fines from desired end product seamlessly, minimizing the need for additional handling equipment, operational processes, and the amount of colourant required for mulch-producing applications. This new Screener Conveyor can be used as a stand-alone screener or part of a larger system, will seamlessly create two products in one pass, and can also create a second marketable product, such as soil amendment, animal bedding, or solidification material.

Flexicon

Harris Waste Management Group

Flexicon has introduced a new line of anti-slip access platforms designed to allow workers to safely reach elevated process equipment in recycling and a range of applications, eliminating the need for ladders, scissor lifts and forklift cages. This modular system includes braced frames which can be bolted to the floor and are stackable, connectable 48-inch-square (1,220 mm square) deck sections. Stairways have elevations up to 96 inches (2.4 m). This line uses upper grab rails and mid-height rails bolted to stairway stringers and deck perimeters, together with auto-closing hinged safety gates and anti-slip grating on treads and decks to maximize personnel security.

The GPS Series Predator ferrous scrap baler is the latest from Harris Waste Management Group’s line of ferrous and non-ferrous scrap processing equipment. Developed in partnership with G.P.S. Great Scrap Processing Solutions, Harris says this new machine is the fastest and most powerful ferrous baler in its class, designed to handle a range of materials from automobile shells and sheet iron, to white goods, stainless and heavy-melt steel. Key features of the Harris GPS Series Predator scrap baler include a three-arm compression system which maximizes box folding speeds and bale/log weights, and a frame that provides very high levels of strength, compression force and durability.

NEW ANTI-SLIP ACCESS PLATFORMS FOR RECYCLING

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Scrap baler

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FAST AND POWERFUL SCRAP BALER USES THREE-ARM COMPRESSION


Shredder

Impact crusher

Anaconda Equipment

Metso Outotec

Anaconda Equipment’s new I12-R impact crusher is a mid-sized plant designed to offer operators and contractors initial feed material reduction, continuous production and a consistent product shape. Engineered for both quarry and recycling applications, this crusher comes with a 43-inch-diameter (1,090mm) 4-bar rotor on a 45-inch-wide (1,140mm) impact chamber. The I12-R is also fitted with a large hopper area and a vibrating pan feeder with a two-tier grizzly section to help facilitate the movement of feed material toward the impact chamber and to stop fine materials and dirt from entering the chamber.

Metso Outotec Waste Recycling has expanded its line of M&J FineShredders for high-efficiency production of alternative fuels like RDF/SRF (refuse-derived-fuel and solid-recovered-fuel.) Three new models in the M&J F series, F140, F210 and F320, can be adapted to virtually all fraction sizes, with capacity up to 28 tons per hour for 100-mm material. These shredders feature unique, enhanced cutting technology, an innovative rotor, minimal maintenance requirements and low heat output, for high-efficiency fine shredding of qualified materials. Units deliver a homogeneous output, in sizes down to 10 mm, and leave a very small number of undesired fines.

MID-SIZED IMPACT CRUSHER PROVIDES CONSISTENT PRODUCT SHAPE

FINESHREDDER SERIES IDEAL FOR WASTE-TO-FUEL APPLICATIONS

OCTOBER 2021 | recyclingproductnews.com

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COVER STORY

SCRAPPING TRAINS, PLANES AND AUTOMOBILES SLM RECYCLING IS ONE OF THE MOST DIVERSIFIED SCRAP RECYCLERS IN THE BUSINESS BY KEITH BARKER, SENIOR EDITOR


Stew Lehmann and Kyle Duncan at SLM Recycling’s yard in Welland, Ontario, on top of baled post-consumer cans.


COVER STORY

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uring our phone conversation, Stewart (Stew) Lehmann, founder and President of SLM Recycling, apologizes for the intermittent background noise coming from his location. There is surprisingly little noise actually, considering he is sitting in a John Deere excavator cab fitted with a LaBounty mobile hydraulic shear, cutting and recovering derailed train cars. Lehmann is working in Parry Sound, Ontario, about two hours north of the GTA (Greater Toronto Area). His partner and SLM VP, Kyle Duncan, is also on the line, talking to us from the Niagara-Welland region of Ontario. SLM is in the business of collecting, sorting, processing and selling all varieties of used metal, and is one of the most diversified scrap recyclers in the industry, with respect to the types of recovery work being done. Outside of scrap and auto recycling, including a self-service auto parts resale business, the company specializes in mobile processing, including endof-life railcar and aircraft recycling, derailment cleanups, tire recycling, as well as commercial, industrial and residential tear-outs and demolition. Stew Lehmann started the company with his father Steve in 2001, after finishing high school. “We started with a truck and a trailer, a crane [material handler] and a car crusher,” explains Stew Lehmann. “Today, we have over a hundred pieces of equipment operating across six locations in Ontario and we have rail, truck and barge shipping capabilities.”

cally locate close to some of our current customers, as well as customers we wanted to access.” Today, even with a half-dozen scrapyards in Ontario, the strategy of going to the scrap remains a big part of SLM’s business. “I would say our mobile business still is 25–30 percent of our current volume,” says Lehmann. “For Kyle and myself, it’s in our blood to be on the road. We’re on the go all the time.” He continues, “We believe in being in tune with our customers’ needs, as well as helping manage every job site effectively, efficiently and safely, and being present, versus the stay-at-home model, which just doesn’t seem to work for our business.” Lehmann says this strategy definitely creates a lot of efficiencies in what they do. “Having an inside check and boots on the ground at any site allows us to be agile and make quick decisions that are holistic and all-encompassing. Not only are we there as managers of the company, but we also do the work. We both are capable of operating heavy equipment, have our AZ driving licenses (for heavy-haul trucks and trailers), and are pilots. We have a very hands-on approach.”

TRAINS

Most of SLM’s work in train car recovery, which they have been involved in for about a decade, is done as part of an emergency service when cars have left a rail line and need to be quickly dismantled on site and removed. Railcars weigh about 30 tons on average, and the material recovered is almost all ferrous. Some cars The biggest strategy I can pass contain aluminum, but it is a very low percentage of the overall volume. For train car recovery jobs, on would be to out-work anybody Lehmann says that along with their excavators and around you and you’ll enjoy the material handlers, their mobile hydraulic shears, grapples and magnets are their go-to tools, and he fruits of your labour. Don’t act adds that there is also some torching required for some of the heavy dismantling. blindly, act thoughtfully and work “We buy a lot of assets from rail lines, including twice as hard as your competition, hoppers, gondolas, flat decks and boxcars, and Kyle now operates one of the largest scrap dismantling and it’ll all come back to you. spurs for railcars in Ontario.” According to Kyle Duncan, “We are often called Stewart Lehmann to mobilize our equipment for processing endPresident, SLM Recycling of-life rail equipment at the derailment site, and often load that material into another railcar to ship directly to the mill.” SLM also has the option of using their private rail line which runs directly into one of their yards with storage Still – even with all of their equipment including 20 matecapacity for 50 railcars. In addition, through alliances with CP, rial handlers and about 40 hydraulic shear attachments, as CN and short lines (small or mid-sized railroad companies that well as multiple car crushers and balers, a fleet of trucks and operate over a relatively short network), they can line up 400 to railcars, and the capability to handle monthly volumes of 500 cars for recycling at a time if need be. about 25,000 tons of ferrous, just under one million pounds As far as the time it takes to cut up and recycle an individual of non-ferrous and 1,500 end-of-life autos – SLM, on their railcar, Duncan says they can process roughly 10 in a day, but if 20th anniversary in the business, does not see itself as a large there’s a larger package (amount of units to process), they can scrap recycling company. process upward of 20-plus cars per day when required. The material recovered from an end-of-life railcar is mainly ferrous, A HISTORY OF GOING TO THE SCRAP and typically a majority of that is plate metal. For the first six years of the business, SLM Recycling didn’t “We market it as railcar material,” says Duncan. “When we have a yard, so instead of material coming to the Lehmanns, sell to the mill directly, we position it as end-of-life railcars. their strategy was to go to the scrap. “We started with a mobile There can be a bit of cast knuckles or couplers, and there format and had trucks and trailers and mobile cranes, balers, could be the need for some upgrades on the composition of shears and everything else going from site to site. Then we wheels and axles, but the majority of it is plate steel, from the started to acquire our own facilities which helped us strategirailcar box and frame.”

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SLM has over a hundred pieces of equipment operating across six locations in Ontario, a large fleet of trucks and roll-offs, and rail and barge shipping capabilities.

He adds that there are not too many other scrap recyclers in the area, or even North America, that have the capability for this kind of recovery work. “You have to have a fairly large fleet of carriers and shears,” he explains. “We have a large and diversified fleet capable of handling any size or volume of railcars. Your small scrapyard, (handling around 10,000 tons per month) may have only one or two shears and they might be on a 40-ton carrier. We have carriers up to 80 and 85 tons that can lift a whole railcar.” When it comes to processing end-of-life cars for large operators like CN or CP, he says they not only have the infrastructure and years of experience required, they can mobilize very quickly, even the same day. “When they call Stew or myself, we know exactly where our trucks are and how to divert them to the site. We know exactly where our shears and excavators are. We don’t have to call a logistics manager, or a third-party carrier. We take action instantly, and when it comes to large tier-one companies, they appreciate the expeditious nature of our reactions.”

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Another interesting aspect of SLM’s business is the recovery of end-of-life aircraft, which they have also been involved in for about a decade. However, according to Duncan, there are not a lot of opportunities for recovery of end-of-life planes in Ontario, and aircraft recycling is a relatively small part of their business. “Any opportunity that is there, we are pretty much on the front lines, and it’s come about either through building relationships with airports or with some of the freight carriers,” says Lehmann. “Once there’s an endof-life jet or other plane to be processed, we get a call, and it’s just a referral at that point. It’s not a large part of the volume we do, and it also is really market-based. If aluminum prices are low, some companies would rath-

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COVER STORY

Outside of scrap and auto recycling, SLM specializes in end-of-life railcar and aircraft recycling, derailment cleanups, tire recycling, as well as commercial, industrial and residential tear-outs and demolition.

SLM has the capability to handle monthly volumes of about 25,000 tons of ferrous, just under one million pounds of non-ferrous and 1,500 end-of-life autos.

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er have a retired jet sit and do nothing until it absolutely needs to be done, or the market shifts up.” There are of course a lot of end-of-life planes around the world, just not many in Ontario or Canada. Wherever they are though, aircraft recycling is a lengthy, complicated process. “Once a plane ends its life in the passenger sector, they often get converted for cargo, or they go to other countries where regulations are lower, so generally they have a long lifespan,” explains Duncan. “I believe there’s a couple of places in the Southern U.S. where there are “jet boneyards,” where the airlines basically fly them in and that’s where they finish their life.”

AUTOMOBILES

On the end-of-life vehicle side of the business, SLM is both a recycler and a Pick-A-Part self-service operator, but the latter is really a smaller part of their volume and is a relatively new part of the business. “We’ve been ingrained in the auto recycling business since inception,” says Duncan. “When Stew and his dad started with a single-car crusher, they would travel to almost every auto recycler around. When I came on board, it was like home was wherever the crusher was working, and it would just go to auto recycler after auto recycler, one to two per week. So we’ve been in that space for a long time and have lots of knowledge and relationships there.”

The reason we put our boots to the ground is so that we can pick up the slack and tow the rope when it’s needed, and our employees really see that and appreciate it. Kyle Duncan VP, SLM Recycling It was only about three years ago that SLM got into the self-serve auto parts business. “We had a bit of real estate at one of our facilities and just saw it as another opportunity for revenue,” explains Lehmann. “Because the demographic for this business is mostly public and a lot of do-it-yourselfers, we thought we owed it to the community in a sense. We had an opportunity to harvest a few more dollars from each vehicle that we were already purchasing, and also we wanted to increase our footprint in terms of volume for scrap autos. Now we can purchase another 30 or 40 cars that we may not have been acquiring as a scrapyard.” According to Lehmann, when new regulations first came into place in Ontario for depolluting end-of-life-vehicles, they purchased more mobile units than they needed at the time. They saw an opportunity to help educate and depollute yards that weren’t already doing it in the way that the standard was written. Today, most of their depollution fleet is Iris-Mec, and they have mobile SEDA machines as well. “Our SEDA set-ups use a roll-off container that flips open from the side, and everything for depolluting cars is there, and it is self-contained,” explains Lehmann. “We have also used this unit for derailments. We did a derailment a couple of years ago where 238 brand new vehicles were deemed end-of-life because

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COVER STORY

For SLM, material handlers, excavators, hydraulic shears, grapples and magnets are their go-to equipment for processing a wide range of scrap.

the boxcars they were in went on their side. We took that mobile unit to the site, depolluted right there and removed all the hazardous materials for proper transport. “I believe we’re the only mobile processor in Ontario and maybe the surrounding provinces that has that ability and that machine. It’s become less busy now because almost everyone in the industry has got up to best practices and proper standards, but certainly it was a very useful tool in the beginning.”

SCRAPPERS AT HEART

Duncan says even with all the heavy-duty work they do, they don’t consider themselves to be an industrial services company. “We do handle industrial accounts and we do have those relationships, but more than anything, the scrap that we source is from end-of-life autos, demolition, and is usually something that still requires processing, whether it be baling, shearing or torching, or sorting and segregating and finding the upgrades. Almost every ton that we buy requires processing, so I’d say the core of our business is processing scrap, whether it be cars or anything else.” “We’re very hands-on, boots to the ground,” adds Lehmann. “We are people that understand the challenges of day-to-day life as well as the global economy, and we’re down-to-earth. I don’t know how else to describe it, but it’s a very grassroots organization with a fairly modern handle on new technologies, innovations and investments. We have an old-school approach to a lot of things, a conservative approach, but we’re also very eager to reinvest when required. “The biggest strategy I can pass on would be to out-work anybody around you and you’ll enjoy the fruits of your labour. Don’t act blindly, act thoughtfully and work twice as hard as your competition, and it’ll all come back to you.” Duncan concludes, “We have a relatively fairly sizable foot-

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We believe in being in tune with our customers’ needs, as well as helping manage every job site effectively, efficiently and safely, and being present, versus the stay-at-home model, which just doesn’t seem to work for our business.” Stewart Lehmann President, SLM Recycling print in the industry, but it’s not our goal to be the biggest. We look at it like we have a hundred families to feed and everything we do is for our people. The reason we put our boots to the ground is so that we can pick up the slack and tow the rope when it’s needed, and our employees really see that and appreciate it. I have a saying that my grandfather taught me when I was young which is, ‘You never ask anyone to do something you wouldn’t do yourself.’ “He was a very successful entrepreneur, and I live by his mantra every day, and I know Stew does as well. He’s using a shear right now cutting up scrap while we do this interview, because we’re lean and we have a good opportunity, and we want the company to continue to grow and succeed. If we just sit back at a desk and count the dollars, then we’re not going to continue to grow and support our people – our families that we all work so hard for.” RPN



HAULING & COLLECTION

PRODUCER RESPONSIBILITY AND THE ONTARIO BLUE BOX TRANSITION: A CONVERSATION WITH GFL’S PATRICK DOVIGI BY KEITH BARKER, SENIOR EDITOR

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t the beginning of July, Vaughan, Ontario-based GFL Environmental announced the formation of the Resource Recovery Alliance (RRA), a producer responsibility organization (PRO) that will operate within the framework of Ontario’s newly introduced extended producer responsibility (EPR) regulations surrounding the provincial Blue Box residential recyclables collection program. The new regulatory landscape, to be phased in between 2023 and 2025, sets lofty diversion targets for residential recyclables and will require product and packaging producers to operate and fully finance the provincial program. The new diversion targets, which are set to come into force fully by 2026 across Ontario, include 80 percent for paper, 75 percent for glass and beverage containers, 67 percent for metal, and 50 percent for rigid plastics. As one of its first actions, the RRA entered into an agreement to purchase the assets of the Canadian Stewardship Services Alliance (CSSA), a national, not-for-profit organization set up to provide support services for packaging and printed paper stewardship organizations across the country, with years of EPR experience and extensive data collection and reporting capabilities.

EPR is the way of the future. The reality is it’s going to become a national issue and it’s going to become a North American issue. Patrick Dovigi

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Through RRA, GFL says producers in Ontario will have the option of partnering with an environmental services partner that can leverage economies of scale and efficiencies, extensive experience with EPR, as well as the most relevant industry data, positioning them to meet their responsibilities under the revised and consolidated Blue Box Program.

BECOMING A PRO

According to GFL founder and CEO Patrick Dovigi, forming the RRA in Ontario and adding producer responsibility organization (PRO) to their diverse portfolio of businesses was driven by several factors. Mainly, producers must now alter the way they design products and packaging and will be required to fund an entire system for its collection and processing. Those producers are looking for guidance and options. As a PRO, GFL will consult companies on how to best spend dollars to recover the products and packaging they produce, and will simultaneously help them drive recycling diversion numbers significantly higher than what they currently are – all at a lower cost. “The formation of the RRA is really a means to get a seat at the table and to pass on intellectual property to the broader organization, particularly around collection and processing, and to provide smaller producers and some larger producers, with alternatives,” says Dovigi. “Producers are looking for another opportunity, another option for them to think about or participate in, with respect to establishing an EPR-based program for their goods and packaging. They want to sign up with an organization that has experience and understanding of how collection works, and how processing recyclables works. What we are thinking about is creating a holistic environment for every one of the producers, big and small.” The establishment of a PRO by one of the largest waste management firms in Canada has some in the industry postulating that this could jeopardize a truly competitive marketplace, but Dovigi disagrees.


and many have expressed interest. Under their model, they would form a board and have governance attached to it, and it would provide a voice for producers to express how they think the program and the dollars should be spent. “We can pass on our knowledge of what it would take to actually do the collection and processing, and about how many people we would need to bring in to do it, and what are the costs involved. We have the front end figured out.”

CSSA ASSETS PROVIDE MISSING PIECE OF COMPLIANCE PUZZLE

GFL Environmental is the only major diversified environmental services company in North America offering services in solid waste, liquid waste and infrastructure development, as well as residential and commercial waste and recyclables collection.

“I don’t think it’s a concern because at the end of the day any one of us as operators can sign up to be a PRO, and the cards are fully in the producer’s hands. They have the ability to sign up with whoever they want, for as long or for as short a period of time as they want. I would say it’s now more competitive, and the producers are the ones that are fully in control because they can decide which PRO to go with. If my service offering isn’t good, they have the luxury to go in and deal with whoever they want to deal with, or whatever other PRO that exists out there. For our competitors, they have the ability to become a PRO too. You don’t have to sign up much volume.” To become a producer responsibility organization the requirement is to have a certain number of producers sign up, which represent the type of product, and which together are handling a minimum of 5 percent of the overall volume for that product group. “It’s not as if we became the only PRO in the province, or we are the only successful bidder, and so have created a monopoly. At the end of the day, it’s open. I think that’s the way the province dictated this program, which is a little bit different than B.C. In Ontario, they just rolled it out as if it was an open market. The rules are the same for everyone. As a PRO we can show them what we can offer. If they like it, they sign up. If they don’t, they have the ability to go wherever they want and do whatever they want with their packaging.” According to Dovigi, this is definitely not the first time a major waste management firm has used this model for the development of EPR. In Europe especially, there are similar models to the one used in B.C. and the one now in Ontario, and there are a number of operating companies that are managing an entire EPR program from cradle to grave. “This is not new, where a collector would actually be a PRO as well,” he says. “Our anticipation is that given where we are as a company, and how we got to this point, there will be a number of producers that sign up with the RRA Alliance.” He adds that a number of producers have already signed up

With respect to GFL’s purchase of Canadian Stewardship Services Alliance (CSSA) assets, expected to finalize by the end of 2021, Dovigi explains that it will provide the ability to offer producers a fully vertically integrated solution that will keep them compliant in the most cost efficient and effective way possible. Dovigi describes it as an acquisition of the organization’s data collection and reporting capabilities, regulatory compliance software, and its people that understand EPR and its challenges. “For us, it is about being able to offer to producers a fully vertically integrated solution that number one will keep them compliant, and number two, with our knowledge and intellectual property, keep them compliant in the most cost efficient and effective way possible.” He continues, “You can say all the right things, but then you actually have to go and do it, execute it, roll it out. Good human talent on all sides of the equation is going to lead to the best results, particularly when people have been there and done it before. All of that put together, we think, adds a great opportunity for all of us.”

THE END GAME IN ONTARIO

The end goal of RRA in Ontario for GFL, according to Dovigi, is number one, to work collaboratively with all producers, and secondly, to meet or exceed the recycling diversion targets set by the province. With GFL’s experience, from collection to processing, he says they can be a value-added partner, not only to their PRO, but for other PROs and whoever else is involved. He also stresses that their services are not exclusive to their PRO, and that they are more than willing to work with any others formed in order to make the program work as smoothly and efficiently as possible for everyone in Ontario.

Patrick Dovigi, GFL founder and CEO.

OCTOBER 2021 | recyclingproductnews.com

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HAULING & COLLECTION

GFL’s Winnipeg MRF, an 80,000-square-foot facility built in partnership with Machinex, can process about 50,000 metric tonnes of MSW material yearly and is the recipient of the National Waste & Recycling Association’s 2020 Recycling Facility of the Year award.

“Maybe it comes down to where we can all figure it out and work together, and there becomes only one PRO,” he says. “That’s potentially an option, and if everybody is represented, then there’s no feeling of someone trying to corner a specific part of the market, which is not the intention.” He continues, “The consumer is paying anyway, and whether they’re paying through their municipal taxes, we’re already processing that material in a lot of markets. From our perspective, with EPR it’s not that the consumer is paying more, it’s just they’re paying differently. Today they pay property taxes, tomorrow they’re going to be paying a price-per-pound of packaging on the goods that they buy.” He emphasizes that there are opportunities to change the actual packaging, when cost is transferred to the producer and the consumer, and away from the municipality. And while getting a wide range of people thinking along the same lines is a challenge, at the end of the day, this is a regulatory issue and it is an exercise in procurement. Companies need to be compliant and meet lofty targets set by regulators, but also do it in a cost-effective way so it does not significantly drive up the cost of goods. And it must be done collaboratively. “We think we have the ticket to be able to do that,” says Dovigi. “The only way this works is if it’s done collaboratively. All of us are going to have to work well together. I don’t think anyone can do this on an individual basis, particularly on the collection side. Because these are very complicated collection contracts, particularly when I think about Toronto, Hamilton, Richmond Hill and Markham, Ontario, some of the larger communities, where the last thing we want is to put on double the trucks to collect the same amount of recycling.” He says for large municipal contracts, generally they are tendering those out 12 to 18 months in advance. “Particularly with COVID, and the delays to get equipment and other delays, there’s a lot that has to happen in a relatively quick period of time. We’re all going to have to get together really quickly to make this work and make it smooth, because the last thing we want to do is start by initially leaving recyclables at people’s doorsteps.”

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He continues, “On the processing side it is about achieving the diversion goals the provincial government has set for 2023. They’re high targets, the bar is high. It is doable, but it’s only going to happen if we’re all working together. We think it’s possible.”

EPR IS THE WAY OF THE FUTURE

According to Dovigi, advancing the recycling industry through EPR is synonymous with their company name: Green For Life (GFL). Since the founding of the company they have taken a big interest in building diversion programs, whether it be for C&D, food or municipal waste, or contaminated soil. “As our recycling businesses have evolved over the last number of years, particularly from 2017 to 2018, with a continued focus on Extended Producer Responsibility, coupled with the fact that China wasn’t receiving recyclable material from North American markets anymore, we decided to really jump into recycling with two feet. That started initially with the Canada Fibers transaction.” As an established collector of municipal as well as industrial and commercial recyclables, GFL’s growth in recycling also includes new and upgraded MRFs around North America, and has led to a deep-rooted involvement with extended producer responsibility, initially in British Columbia. Ontario has now chosen a different path. While the B.C. system for curbside residential EPR is overseen and managed by one organization: Recycle BC, Ontario has gone with more of an open market model, which allows for the formation of as many PROs as possible. Dovigi says there is a demand for PRO options in Ontario, and so far, the main options presented, outside of the RRA, involve programs run by some of the larger grocers, for example. Given the goal of achieving a vision of a holistic environment that is, in the end, beneficial to everyone in the system, when comparing the systems in B.C. and in Ontario, they do have different complexities. He says the B.C. model is more complicated out of the gate, because Recycle BC is responsible for the entire province as one entity, but it is an interesting model and does work well.


the baby boomer generation. There is a much higher focus today on ESG (environment and social governance) type initiatives, and EPR development falls squarely in the middle of that. That’s what we’re excited for.” While Dovigi is very optimistic about the future success of Ontario’s revised curbside collection program, he also agrees that as the new EPR-based program is rolled out in Ontario for residen-

tial recyclables, it is no doubt going to be a challenging shift. “There’s going to be a lot of different heads at the table with a lot of different ideas,” he says. “Our view is the only way this works is if it’s done collaboratively. Our hope is that everybody will work together, but it’s too early to know how it’s actually going to get rolled out. The reality is, 2023 is not that far away.” RPN

SEPARATE SELECTIVELY SORT YOUR MATERIALS

“Because of our experience in the industry and knowing all the players, we were able to help facilitate the B.C. transition to EPR relatively quickly and find out the appropriate players in the appropriate areas, and we determined where it would make the most sense to move volume from an economic perspective. We like the B.C. system because there’s one boss. RecycleBC is sitting on top, and if everybody can put their differences aside, the way to make the program as efficient as possible is to get everybody at the table.” He emphasizes also that whatever the model, extended producer responsibility is here to stay, is gaining traction, and by 2026, predicts that it’s going to be used across Canada, with the U.S. not far behind. “From our perspective, EPR is the way of the future. The reality is it’s going to become a national issue and it’s going to become a North American issue. We think if we can get a leg up from an experience perspective, and learn all of the different alternatives and options there are, it will position us as a company very favourably as these programs continue to roll out.” In the U.S., GFL currently has operations in Maryland, which has announced the adoption of EPR legislation. “It’s going to be slower, but it’s going to come,” he says. “We think it’s going to come fast and furious when people actually figure it out. The millennials are of a different view today than

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OCTOBER 2021 | recyclingproductnews.com

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HAULING & COLLECTION

EASING THE TRANSITION TO ELECTRIC POWER

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ack’s new uptime package, especially tailored to battery-electric trucks for waste and recycling collection, is designed to help relieve uncertainty in making the switch from diesel. This October, Mack Trucks announced that its new Ultra Service Agreement will come standard with the Mack LR Electric refuse model, helping further support customers beginning their journey into owning battery-electric vehicles (BEVs). According to Mack, its Ultra Service Agreement gives Mack LR Electric customers a unique uptime package tailored specifically for the technical needs of BEVs. It includes scheduled maintenance, preventive maintenance, towing and repair, a battery monitoring service and Mack’s connected uptime services in one package that can be included with monthly truck payments. The LR Electric and its batteries will also be supported by Mack GuardDog Connect, an integrated telematics solution that helps customers achieve peak operating conditions and maximize uptime. The connected service monitors battery health and performance, and checks for fault codes and defects reported by the battery and electrical components of the energy storage system. When a critical fault code is detected, Mack GuardDog Connect proactively contacts OneCall agents working 24/7 at the Mack Uptime Center in Greensboro, North Carolina. OneCall agents support customers by coordinating repairs and service with the North American Mack dealer network, for both planned and unplanned service events. “Through this new offering, Mack alleviates the uncertainties surrounding new technologies, allowing customers to deploy BEVs with confidence for refuse and recycling applications with the industry-leading Mack LR platform,”

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The Mack LR Electric features twin electric motors offering 448 continuous horsepower.

said Jonathan Randall, Mack Trucks senior vice president of sales and commercial operations. “Customers can feel secure knowing Mack, Mack Financial Services (MFS) and our extensive North American service network are equipped, aligned and ready to support the transition to electromobility with the Mack LR Electric.” The LR Electric features twin electric motors offering 448 continuous horsepower and 4,051 pound-feet of peak output torque available from zero RPM. The vehicle is offered with a two-speed Mack Powershift transmission, Mack mRIDE suspension and Mack’s proprietary S462R 46,000-pound rear axles. Four NMC (Nickle, Manganese, Cobalt Oxide) lithium-ion batteries, charged through a 150kW, SAE J1772-compliant charging system, provide vehicle propulsion and power for all onboard accessories, driven through 12V, 24V and 600V circuits. Plus, a two-stage regenerative braking system accounts for increasing loads throughout the day and helps recapture energy from hundreds of stops. As Mack celebrates its 100th anniversary in Canada in 2021, Randall says their new LR Electric uptime package, combined with other recent investments in technology and services, makes the company feel well-positioned to support and grow its diverse customer base for the next century. “Mack has all the necessary services and products to leverage its leading uptime, fuel-efficiency and safety technologies to support further development of Canada and its diverse regions for the next 100 years,” said Randall. “As the country focuses on infrastructure ambitions and a commitment to achieving net-zero emissions by 2050, our complete Class 6–8 product range and services can deliver advanced, clean technology solutions and exceptional total cost of ownership for our customers.”


ADVANCING BEVERAGE CONTAINER RECOVERY IN ONTARIO

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ircular Materials Ontario (CMO), a not-for-profit, producer-governed organization created by 15 of Canada’s food, beverage and consumer products manufacturers, retailers and restaurants is partnering with the Canadian Beverage Container Recycling Association (CBCRA) to develop a comprehensive recycling program for beverage containers collected in blue bins and public spaces across Ontario. CMO and CBCRA are collaborating to provide beverage producers with the compliance services required to meet their obligations under the province’s newly updated Blue Box Regulations, which require them to assume responsibility for the collection and management of curbside blue box materials from municipalities between 2023 and 2025. The organizations will support pro-

ducers by establishing a collection system for beverage containers, including aluminum cans, glass bottles, milk cartons, juice boxes and plastic bottles, and by carrying out consumer promotion and education, as well as reporting to the regulator. The end goal is to help producers meet Ontario’s ambitious targets to collect and manage 75 percent of beverage containers supplied in the province by 2026 and 80 percent by 2030. “Both of our organizations share a vision of building Ontario’s blue box recycling system on a foundation of fair, open, competitive procurement, while expanding collection services to public spaces and special events to meet Ontario’s beverage container management targets,” commented Nicole Fischer, chair of Circular Materials. According to the CBCRA, because as much as 30 percent of beverage products are consumed away from home, CBCRA, in collaboration with CMO, will operate a supplemental collection and management system modelled after their very successful Recycle Everywhere program used in Manitoba, which CBCRA says has achieved the greatest recovery growth of any beverage container recovery system in North America, over the last 10 years. “In addition to its recovery growth achievements, CBCRA’s Recycle Everywhere program, which started with virtually no away-from-home recycling infrastructure, has become one of Manitoba’s most recognized brands,” said Jim Goetz, chair of CBCRA. “The organization intends to leverage its knowledge, experience and success to implement an expansive away from home recovery system in Ontario, including the provision of free collection infrastructure to the institutional, commercial and industrial sectors.”

OCTOBER 2021 | recyclingproductnews.com

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HAULING & COLLECTION

Compology’s smart cameras, mounted inside waste bins, leverage AI technology to identify contamination prior to collection.

CITY OF MIAMI FIRST IN U.S. TO METER WASTE INNOVATIVE PROGRAM IN PARTNERSHIP WITH COMPOLOGY AIMS TO REDUCE CARBON EMISSIONS AND EXPAND RECYCLING EFFORTS WHILE SAVING TAXPAYER MONEY

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n early October, the City of Miami announced the launch of a new partnership with San Francisco–based Compology, the sustainable waste metering specialist, to help improve management of its waste. The initiative will equip city dumpsters with rugged smart cameras that take photos of the inside of dumpsters to measure how much and what types of waste and recyclables are present. The effort is meant to modernize the city’s recycling infrastructure while reducing waste collection costs by a projected 30 to 40 percent. The cameras will be installed in dumpsters at municipal buildings, police and fire stations, as well as parks. “Compology’s technology reduces the number of miles garbage trucks need to drive and helps improve the amount of material that can be recycled – keeping it out of landfills,” said Miami City Commissioner Ken Russell, who led the initiative to bring Compology to Miami. “By modernizing our waste collection processes, we can reduce the City’s environmental footprint while also saving taxpayers’ dollars. It’s a win-win.”

The City of Miami’s embrace of innovative technology serves as a template for how municipalities can more efficiently manage their waste to drive both sustainability and cost savings. Jason Gates CEO, Compology

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According to Compology, their technology has helped some of the world’s best-known brands significantly increase recycling rates, lower carbon emissions and reduce operating costs. Compology’s smart cameras leverage AI technology that identifies contamination in recycling streams prior to collection, to deliver tailored recycling education and data that enables proper recycling practices and more waste diversion from landfills, thereby improving recycling rates. The City of Miami, as the first in the U.S. to implement Compology’s waste metering technology, says the move will reduce CO2 emissions, traffic congestion, noise pollution and illegal dumping, while improving code compliance and enhancing urban beautification efforts. The data from this initial deployment will be the foundation for designing a bespoke waste metering program for all municipal buildings and private businesses in Miami. The City’s partnership with Compology comes on the heels of Miami Mayor Francis Suarez’ announced commitment to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 60 percent citywide, and for Miami to become carbon neutral by 2050. “I am proud to work with Commissioner Russell and partners like Compology and Waste Management, in implementing common-sense sustainability measures that will help us reach our ambitious goal to be one of the most climate-friendly cities in the world,” said Mayor Suarez. Jason Gates, CEO of Compology also commented, “The City of Miami’s embrace of innovative technology serves as a template for how municipalities can more efficiently manage their waste to drive both sustainability and cost savings. Compology is committed to doing everything we can to support Commissioner Russell, Mayor Suarez and the City of Miami in their vision for smart, environmental stewardship by reducing truck traffic and helping divert waste from landfills, the third largest source of methane emissions in the United States.”


BYD PARTNERS ON MARYLAND’S FIRST BATTERY-ELECTRIC, ZERO-EMISSION COLLECTION TRUCK

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he City of Hyattsville’s battery-electric, zero-emission collection truck, the first of its kind in the State of Maryland, began service this October. The new vehicle, a BYD 6R Class 6 truck, is one of several fully electric or hybrid vehicles in the City’s fleet and is the first commercially deployed Class 6 refuse truck in the U.S., according to BYD. The company says their 6R battery-electric model is capable of working an entire shift without recharging, and with its short wheelbase, is also compact, allowing for excellent maneuverability on urban streets and where space is limited. In addition, the truck has over 200 KWh of battery capacity and is capable of 120kW DC CCS1 charging. All BYD trucks are also purpose-built and utilize proprietary safe battery technology that exceeds requirements for some of the most rigorous safety-testing programs around the world. Hyattsville’s 6R BYD truck is paired with a Curbtender Quantum eight-yard rear loader body designed to be lightweight and efficient. “We’re extremely proud to work with the City of Hyattsville to deploy the first Class 6 electric refuse truck into commercial service,” said BYD Motors Senior Vice President Patrick Duan. “Our innovative battery-electric truck will allow for a smooth, quiet and reliable solution to help the city reduce emissions and operating costs.” According to City Administrator Tracey Douglas, “This addition to our growing electric vehicle fleet is one of the tools Hyattsville is using to move toward a clean energy future. We are proud to lead by example and demonstrate our care and concern for both the environment and the health of our employees.” In addition to the environmental and employee health benefits provided by a zero-emission vehicle, Hyattsville anticipates significant savings in both fuel purchases and vehicle maintenance. The City’s Department of Public Works Director Lesley Riddle said she is most excited about the gasoline savings and the reduction in emissions that will be inhaled by DPW staff on the job, commenting, “Hyattsville is going green and there’s no going back!”

BYD’s 6R Class 6 battery-electric, zero-emission collection truck

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OCTOBER 2021 | recyclingproductnews.com

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TRANSFER STATIONS

SIX CONSIDERATIONS FOR DESIGNING A TRANSFER STATION BY JEFF ERIKS

The six top factors to consider when thinking about building and running a successful transfer station are location, efficiency, durability, flexibility, cost and safety.

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t its core, an MSW transfer station is about convenience. It is meant to be a better location to dispose of end-of-life material than the landfill. There are always commercial customers, haulers, residential customers and others looking for a convenient and cost-effective place to empty trucks. The key to having an optimal operation is based on many factors. The six top factors to consider when thinking about building and running a successful transfer station are location, efficiency, durability, flexibility, cost and safety.

1

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LOCATION

The location of the facility needs to be right for you and for your customers. If you own your own hauling company, your transfer station needs to be located so that your vehicles can easily get to it – in terms of access roads and expressways. It also needs to be located within an area of the market that is as centrally located as possible to maximize fuel efficiency, routes and drive time. If your own fleet of trucks are the priority, access and markets should be the primary factors in making

recyclingproductnews.com | OCTOBER 2021

the location decision, and third-party customers would be a secondary consideration. Another factor could be the towns or municipalities that you are dealing with. Each one has their own way of dealing with waste disposal and recycling and will have very different ideas on what a host agreement could look like. It is very important that you have these discussions with them individually, to see who wants you there and who doesn’t, how that impacts your ability to get a permit and how it impacts you financially. When it comes to your customers, they want a facility that is easy to get in and out of, has a quick turnaround time on-site, is cost-effective to tip at and is safe. You should work hard to identify who your potential third-party customers are before finalizing your location so you can work with them to establish agreements early in the process, and so that they can help increase your volumes and potential revenues. This applies to your larger customers. All the smaller “one-off” contractors and residential customers – if you decide to allow them on-site – will be a bonus.


2 EFFICIENCY

This is as simple as “get them in and get them out.” Whether it’s your vehicles, your third-party customers, or trucks for hauling out material, the key is to have a site designed so that you can get the vehicles in and out in 15 minutes or less. Questions to ask when designing your facility for efficiency include: • What are the total tons received on a daily basis and size of tipping floor to properly manage it? • What types of materials are received and how will each different one be properly managed most efficiently? • Is there enough tipping floor space to handle 1–2 days of materials and not impact the current day’s tonnage in case there are weather events, strikes or other factors that impact your ability to send material off-site? • Is there on-site queuing space prior to the scales? • How many scales and what types of weighing/ tracking technology will be used for vehicles (manual or RFID)? • Is there easy-to-read signage on-site directing people where to queue, where to tip and where to exit? • What is the number of tipping bays for customers and will there be dedicated bays for various vehicles? • What type of equipment is used to clean floors and load trailers? • Will there be live loading of outbound trailers or

pre-loading and staging? • Can you store weights for as many vehicles as possible to limit the number of vehicles required to scale on the way out? • How many outbound scales are on site? It’s important to take all these factors into account, and gather all the information you can prior to design or redesign. It is important to work with your design/build firm to make sure you right-size your facility to properly manage all of these factors, both for the short term and to handle potential growth in the future.

3 DURABILITY

The last thing you need to deal with when you are operating a transfer station is constant shutdowns for repairs and maintenance. There are many ways to make sure your facility is designed to handle the daily “torture” a transfer station endures, and an experienced firm that has a proven track record designing and building transfer stations can guide you through all the means and methods. With respect to building durability into a transfer station, the top seven factors that come into play include: • Tipping floor design – the right mix design, reinforcement, thickness, and wear layer, are very important. Many tipping floors can last 15-plus years using the right mix design, and we have tested many mixes over our long history. Specialty

The new tipping floor at the Germann Road Transfer Station in Chandler, Arizona.

OCTOBER 2021 | recyclingproductnews.com

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TRANSFER STATIONS

The Fall River transfer station in Fall River, Massachusetts.

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toppings have their place in some applications, but many transfer stations don’t require it. Push wall design – the right height, thickness, steel embeds, etc., will allow the push wall to last the life of the building. Building height and overhead door openings and protection – everyone is tired of repairing overhead doors. It’s easy to eliminate many of these issues when the building is designed the right way the first time. Loading pit design – depending on the type of pit, there are many decisions that can be made to make sure it will last for the long term. Properly managed leachate – avoiding floor trench drains is the key. There are options for designing your transfer station with a better, easier-to-manage leachate collection system. Site paving – depending on your traffic counts and type, you need to evaluate what the right paving solution is for you so you don’t have constant site maintenance. Yellow iron – yellow iron operating in a transfer station, in the hands of a poorly trained or careless operator, can cause damage. Money and time should be invested to make sure your yellow iron operators know how to properly manage the material pile in the facility and load trucks in a safe, efficient and careful manner. Otherwise, no matter how well you build the building, it will wear out quickly.

recyclingproductnews.com | OCTOBER 2021

4

FLEXIBILITY

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COST

Flexibility is all about being able to adjust your operations, building and equipment to accommodate changes in your marketplace based on the evolving material stream, customer base and increased tonnage. You want to design a transfer facility so that you can make future changes in a way that impacts your daily operations as little as possible. These modifications could mean building additions or changes, adding scales or many other things. Being cognizant of the fact that the market will change, you can design your facility for this by planning the structure with expandable steel frames, and by having space on site set aside for future expansion. You will not likely know what your future changes or growth may be, but you can come up with potential options for how the facility could grow and change over time. Be forward-thinking based on what you know today and what you have seen in the past, and use a design/build partner that has been around for a long time and is aware of the upcoming changes in regulations to help guide you through the process.

A construction budget must be stuck to and an operational budget must be hit in order to make a transfer station a feasible long-term solution. It’s important to be transparent with your design/build partner on what these budgets are so you can work together to stay within the parameters, while also accomplishing as much


as possible with respect to the efficiency, durability and flexibility of the facility. Many factors drive construction costs that are outside of your control, such as the area where you are located, site conditions, permit requirements, type of building construction and aesthetic requirements from local municipalities. On the flip side, there are many costs that are controllable, and you can explore many options with the help of your contractor. It’s important to do this early in the design phase so that you don’t have to make changes during the design process. An experienced transfer station contractor can present many different options and costs for you to make educated decisions and help maintain your budget. Operational costs can also be worked through during the design phase as you cover how many pieces of equipment you want to operate, how many employees you need to have, annual maintenance costs for the facility and other such items. Make sure you put together a comprehensive list of everything you want to work through with your design/build team so you can help design the facility within these parameters.

6

SAFETY

While we have touched on five of the most important factors above, the highest overall priority should be designing a facility that is safe to operate and safe for those that pass through it each day. Safety must be

at the forefront of all the decisions made above. This doesn’t just cover traffic patterns, signage, parking, employee walking paths and such items, it also must deal with how to handle emergency situations such as fires. These plans are important to put into place during the design process so you can incorporate them into your facility and have ways of dealing with events that can save your employees from harm and your building from damage. Utilizing the right team to walk you through the transfer station design/build process every step of the way is key in having a successful project that will serve you, your customers and employees from day one and for many years into the future.

JEFF ERIKS is president at Cambridge Companies, a designbuild firm working with the waste industry for more than 25 years. Cambridge, based out of Indiana and Arizona, carries licenses in over 30 states and has completed more than 165 solid waste design-build projects, including transfer stations, recycling centres, MRFs, maintenance facilities, landfill entrances and office buildings.

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OCTOBER 2021 | recyclingproductnews.com

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ORGANICS RECYCLING

Stormfisher’s team at the new 100,000-tonne-capacity organics resource recovery facility in Drumbo, Ontario.

EXPANDED STORMFISHER FACILITY IN ONTARIO TO SATISFY GROWING DEMAND FOR SUSTAINABLE FOOD WASTE RECOVERY SOLUTIONS

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tormFisher, a specialist in waste-to-energy, circular economy and decarbonization solutions, announced in July the expansion of its operations with the addition of a $20 million organics resource recovery facility in Drumbo, Ontario. The new facility, built in partnership with Generate Capital, receives and processes municipal source separated organics, IC&I waste, packaged food waste and both liquid and solid food waste to supply organic material to anaerobic digesters. “We are thrilled to expand operations so that our customers can broaden their environmental practices by diverting packaged food and green-bin materials sustainably,” explains Brandon Moffatt, vice president of finance at StormFisher. “The StormFisher Resource Recovery Centre in Drumbo is a purpose-built facility designed to serve the municipal green bin

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market and to process plastic contaminated food waste from restaurants, grocery stores and distribution centres. The facility can process over 100,000 tonnes of food waste per year that otherwise would be heading to a landfill.” Construction of the new facility was made possible by StormFisher’s partnership with Generate Capital, a sustainable-infrastructure-focused company which builds, owns, operates and finances solutions for clean energy, water, waste and transportation. “Generate and StormFisher are focused on bringing innovative solutions for food waste to the North American Market,” said John Dannan, principal at Generate. “We’re proud to partner with StormFisher to open this critical and innovative facility in Drumbo, Ontario, that will serve the community with new solutions for organic waste, while also creating clean energy and diverting waste.”


Guillon explains that at their Drumbo facility, waste food is processed, contaminants are removed and an engineered organic feedstock called cake is produced, which is shipped to their London, Ontario, biogas facility. “In London, we are able to take this feedstock and convert it into organic fertilizer and up to 200,000 gigajoules of renewable natural gas.” He says the natural gas they produce from food waste, water and energy can be used to power businesses, manufacturing plants, schools and other organizations, and will be of great benefit to surrounding municipalities, providing numerous new full-time positions as well as offering construction and maintenance contracts to dozens of contractors. StormFisher also supports major commercial processors like Ontario-based Maple Leaf Foods. “The food industry is often faced with the challenge of disposing packaged foods in a sustainable manner, and StormFisher’s resource recovery facility in Drumbo addresses this issue head on,” said Tim Faveri, VP, sustainability and shared value, Maple Leaf Foods. Recently, Moffatt says the economic and environmental benefits of food waste recycling have also been recognized by the Ontario Government, which has initiated regulatory changes to help support the growth of operations like theirs by easing the process for the development of onfarm biogas systems. According to Lisa Thompson, Ontario’s provincial Minister of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs, “By reducing regulatory burden for on-farm anaerobic digesters, we can provide economic solutions to divert more valuable food and organic waste from landfills, while maintaining environmental protections by encouraging the recycling of nutrients and reducing greenhouse gas emissions.” “At StormFisher, our mission is to help mitigate climate change and create a safe and clean planet for people around the world through decarbonization strategies and solutions,” concludes Guillon. “This diversion of food waste from landfills to our Drumbo facility is a big step in helping our partners reach their targets, according to Ontario’s Plan to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions by 2030. In the coming months, we plan on increasing our renewable natural gas production and continue promotion of RNG as a carbon-negative fuel option for transportation.”

End product, called Cake is transported to Stormfisher’s London, Ontario, facility to be turned into renewable natural gas, electricity and fertilizer.

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OCTOBER 2021 | recyclingproductnews.com

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EQUIPMENT ROUNDUP: MATERIAL HANDLERS

MATERIAL HANDLERS FOR SCRAP RECYCLING

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SENNEBOGEN 825 E

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DOOSAN DX250WMH-5

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LIEBHERR LH 60 M INDUSTRY LITRONIC

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TAYLOR MACHINE WORKS T40-MH

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VOLVO CE EW240E

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CATERPILLAR MH 3200 SERIES

SENNEBOGEN’s 825 E material handler is designed with high load capacity and extensive reach, an optimal view for operators, and a powerful electric drive that can reduce energy costs by up to 50 percent. As with all SENNEBOGEN material handlers, this model is engineered for ease of operation and maintenance, and is available with an optional 15 KW magnetic generator, as well as SENNEBOGEN’s Maxcab (which includes an all-round bullet-proof windshield) for optimal comfort and safety.

With an operating weight up to 134,500 pounds (61 tonnes) and engine output of 190 kW (255 hp), Liebherr’s LH 60 M Industry Litronic is designed for heavy-duty scrap handling. These machines feature hydraulic cab elevation, which can be variably adjusted for different loading situations, mounted cameras for optimal monitoring around the machine, as well as wide non-slip steps, gangways and platforms that allow optimum access to all maintenance points and ensure easy and safe entry and exit.

Volvo CE’s latest introductions are the all-new compact EW200E material handler, as well as an updated EW240E material handler with a longer boom. The 26-ton EW240E material handler has been updated with a 23-foot 9-inch straight boom, which is over two feet longer than the previous model; the new total reach is over 39 feet. On the latest EW machines, hydraulics are matched to the Volvo engine, allowing machines to find the “sweet spot” between speed and hydraulic efficiency. For hydraulic grapple attachments, vibration is minimized, stability increased, and the unit’s grapple control and soft swing system work together for instantaneous response and smooth precision.

recyclingproductnews.com | OCTOBER 2021

The new Doosan DX250WMH-5, 189-hp, wheeled material handler is designed for a wide range of material sorting and handling applications in scrap metal and recycling, demolition and solid waste management. A hydraulic cab riser allows operators to get a better view of the attachment and work area when unloading or loading containers or trucks. Available attachments include a grapple and a magnet, and DoosanCONNECT Telematics is standard on new models, allowing for efficient remote monitoring.

This material handler is built for reliable handling of the most demanding tasks found in scrap recycling operations. The T40-MH is a 40-metric-ton size class machine, with boom and stick providing 51 feet of horizontal reach and 56 feet of vertical height. The T40-MH is powered by a Cummins QSB6.7 turbocharged engine that meets U.S. EPA Tier 4 Final emission standards. Its cab is designed for operator comfort with ergonomically positioned controls. Standard features include a hydraulic cab riser with a sliding door and an easy-access platform.

This spring Caterpillar introduced its new MH3250 and MH3260 tracked material handlers, built to offer high efficiency in demanding applications such as scrap and C&D recycling. These next-generation models are built to provide high productivity, safe, easy, comfortable operation, and up to 20 percent overall lower owning and operating costs. These latest 3200 series machines also include full electro-hydraulic controls, based on Cat’s earthmoving excavators, for improved efficiency, increased cycle times and fuel and maintenance benefits.


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C&D RECYCLING

The Dynaset HRBV aids in cleanup of demolition sites.

RECYCLING VACUUM BUCKET HELPS SAVE MONEY ON C&D SITES

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evaset Oy is a company that specializes in demolition, established in 2015. When the company first started, it had one 30-tonne Doosan excavator and a single operator, owner and CEO Esa Mäntylä. Five years on, the company has about 20 employees and a variety of machines – and in the

With the new bucket, it is possible to sort the waste better which means less mixed waste. Because the waste management fee of the mixed waste is much higher than the fee for sorted waste, the bucket is a wise investment. Esa Mäntylä

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process, has helped develop a unique attachment for cleaning up demolition and other sites. The HRVB Hydraulic Recycling Vacuum Bucket from Dynaset started out as a concept surrounding a “trash magnet” after a Mevaset worker suggested during a site clean-up that such a machine would be helpful. Mäntylä gave that some thought, then gave Dynaset CEO Reijo Karppinen a call. Over lunch, the two talked about the concept of a trash magnet, and the path toward development of the HRBV began. The concept of the tool is simple: pick up the smaller pieces of debris that can prove problematic for recycling after demolition work is complete and clean the site better in the process. The HRBV is an excavator attachment that features an onboard vacuum and air blower. Weighing just over 1,000 pounds, the bucket needs a hydraulic flow of 23.8 gpm. A number of quick couplers are available. The unit can be used to scoop material into the chamber, or with the vacuum draw smaller material off the ground and into the bucket for cleanup. Pulling all that material together means it can be sorted far smoother and the amount of mixed waste generated is reduced. “With the new bucket, it is possible to sort the waste better which means less mixed waste. Because the waste manage-


ment fee of the mixed waste is much higher than the fee for sorted waste, the bucket is a wise investment,” said Mäntylä. Prior to having the HRBV, Mevaset would need to call in vacuum trucks to help with cleanup on demolition sites, Mäntylä pointed out. With the HRBV, material can be collected quickly and individually, reducing sorting time, either by using the machine to scoop the material or having an employee use a vacuum hose that attaches to the bucket. There are significant time savings to using the HRBV – notably reduced work hours for cleanup, Mäntylä said. Commonly, workers would need to collect small debris on demolition sites with rakes and bags, which Mäntylä said could take quite a lot of time and add to project costs. With the HRBV, that same job can be done with one worker, one bucket and one excavator. Plus, there are environmental benefits thanks to the ability to recycle more materials, Mäntylä noted.

A powerful vacuum draws material into the HRBV for disposal.

OCTOBER 2021 | recyclingproductnews.com

41


LAST WORD

LAST WORD WHY THE AUTO RECYCLING INDUSTRY NEEDS TO BE AT THE TABLE AS WE TRANSITION TO AN EV ECONOMY BY STEVE FLETCHER

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he electrification of the auto fleet in Canada is well underway. The discussions, webinars, investments and regulations to get drivers into electric vehicles (EVs), get the charging infrastructure in place, mine critical metals, build batteries, and assemble vehicles in Canada, have all been at a fevered pitch. But only now people are beginning to ask: what do all the EVs on the road mean for the end-of-life vehicle sector, including auto dismantlers, shredders and the scrap industry? The answer is complex.

What do all the EVs on the road mean for the end-oflife vehicle sector, including auto dismantlers, shredders and the scrap industry? The answer is complex. The term “electric vehicle” encompasses many different types of vehicles, with the two big categories being “hybrids,” powered by a mix of gasoline and batteries, and “plug-in,” powered mainly by lithium-ion batteries. Hybrids are considered a transitional vehicle – an easier way for the public to begin driving electric cars, but also a good introduction to the changes coming to the auto recycling sector. Hybrids still have a drivetrain and catalytic converters (expensive ones) and overall, material compounds are similar, including easy-to-recycle metals. However, these next-generation batteries are bigger, can be quite deadly for those dismantlers who don’t know about them, and require different paths for recycling.

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Full battery vehicles are the true game-changer. These EVs, compared to their ICE (internal combustion engine) counterparts, are heavier, with much of that weight contained in the battery and the vehicle structure needed to carry the battery. Much of the weight in EVs is still metals – it’s just different metals. If the auto fleet was all EV today, lithium demand from auto manufacturers would increase by over 2,800 percent, cobalt by almost 2,000 percent, and rare earth metals by about 655 percent. Additionally, demand for graphite, nickel, copper, manganese, and aluminum would increase. Conversely, demand for steel from auto manufacturers would decrease slightly, and PGMs (platinum-group-metals) would decrease by about 53 percent. The rare earth magnets in EV motors are of special interest. Valuable and geopolitically important, rare earths are difficult to separate from other metals because of their intense magnetism. They are however an extremely valuable commodity that should be extracted from every EV before it is crushed and shredded. The battery in an electric vehicle is a huge opportunity for existing and new players. They are also a huge challenge: heavy, dangerous, expensive and hard to recycle. This raises questions including: When do you recycle versus repurpose as secondary energy storage? Who pays for recycling when a battery is orphaned and costs upward of $1,000 to properly move and recycle? Electrifying the fleet is a global trend that will have significant and positive impacts, including the reduction of GHGs overall when viewed through a full life cycle lens. But looking at the full life cycle means considering responsible management at end-of-life now. This transition is upon us and it is critical to the health of the auto recycling industry that we participate in its development. Stakeholders throughout the supply chain need to know about proper end-of-life management, and our industry needs to supply that information and knowledge.

STEVE FLETCHER is the managing director of the Automotive Recyclers of Canada (ARC).


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A CONVERSATION WITH SENNEBOGEN PRESIDENT CONSTANTINO LANNES

Gensco Equipment.............................................. 41 Herbold........................................................................35 Industrial Magnetics, Inc................................. 45 Industrial Netting................................................. 45 Kensal Carbide........................................................23 Mack Trucks................................................................ 2 OverBuilt Inc.............................................................. 19 NOVA Products (A Peninsula Plastics Ltd. Company)...................................... 46 PMR Inc.......................................................................... 7 R.M. Johnson Co........................................................ 9 SENNEBOGEN.......................................................... 3 SWANA........................................................................ 43

E-WASTE BRINGS OPPORTUNITY FOR TRANSITIONING TO CIRCULAR ECONOMY

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