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RECYCLING PRODUCT NEWS

TOUGH ENVIRONMENT, TOUGH EQUIPMENT PUBLICATIONS MAIL AGREEMENT NO. 40069270

FOR B.C. COMPOSTER, DURABLE MACHINERY THAT CAN WITHSTAND HARSH CORROSION AND WEAR IS KEY PAGE 18

ROBOTICS, AI AND THE FUTURE OF THE MRF PAGE 24 2020 TOP INTRODUCTIONS PAGE 36 November/December 2020

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WASTE

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ORGANICS

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AMACO EQUIPMENT 5804 Datsun Road, Mississauga, ON L4W 1H2 Phone: (905) 670-3440 Toll Free: 800-668-5355 info@amacocei.com

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CONTENTS NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2020 | Volume 28, Number 8

FEATURES 18 COVER STORY TOUGH ENVIRONMENT, TOUGH EQUIPMENT B.C.’s Central Composting relies on uptime of Doosan wheel loaders to weather harsh operating conditions

22 MANAGING CANNABIS WASTE

Green Mountain Technologies’ Earth Flow composter is the solution for Toronto producer

24 YOU CAN’T MANAGE WHAT YOU CAN’T MEASURE: RECYCLING WITH AI- POWERED ROBOTICS

18

cover story

AMP Robotics’ Rob Writz talks robot power and material intelligence

32 WILL 2021 BE THE YEAR WE SOLVE THE MATTRESS RECYCLING PROBLEM?

34 2020 TOP 10 STORIES 36 2020 TOP INTRODUCTIONS 42 Q&A WITH TOM SZAKY, CEO OF TERRACYCLE 46 LAST WORD REVERSE VENDING IS THE WAY TO INCREASE PLASTIC BOTTLE RECYCLING RATES By Leon Farahnik, CarbonLITE Recycling

24 On the cover: A Doosan wheel loader moving material in harsh conditions at Central Composting in Abbotsford, B.C.

FOLLOW US @recyclingpn

November/December 2020 www.recyclingproductnews.com

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CONTENTS

RECYCLING PRODUCT NEWS

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2020 VOLUME 28, NUMBER 8

EDITOR Keith Barker kbarker@baumpub.com; 604-291-9900 ext. 305 ASSOCIATE EDITOR Lee Toop ltoop@baumpub.com; 604-291-9900 ext. 315 EDITOR IN CHIEF Kaitlyn Till ktill@baumpub.com; 604-291-9900 ext. 330 DIGITAL EDITOR Slone Fox sfox@baumpub.com; 604-291-9900 ext. 335 ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Sam Esmaili sam@baumpub.com; 604-291-9900 ext.110

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ACCOUNT MANAGER David Gilmour dgilmour@baumpub.com; 604-291-9900 ext. 105 ADVERTISING PRODUCTION MANAGER Tina Anderson production@baumpub.com; 604-291-9900 ext. 222 DESIGN & PRODUCTION Morena Zanotto morena@baumpub.com; 604-291-9900 ext. 325 CIRCULATION baumpublications@circlink.ca; 1-855-329-1909 PRESIDENT / PUBLISHER Ken Singer ksinger@baumpub.com VICE PRESIDENT / CONTROLLER Melvin Date-Chong mdatechong@baumpub.com FOUNDER Engelbert J. Baum

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Published by Baum Publications Ltd. 124-2323 Boundary Road Vancouver, BC, Canada V5M 4V8 www.baumpub.com Phone: 604-291-9900 • Toll Free:1-888-286-3630 Fax: 604-291-1906

DEPARTMENTS 10 UPFRONT 14 SPOTLIGHT

22 42

18 COVER STORY 22 ORGANICS RECYCLING

Recycling Product News is published eight times yearly: January/ February, March, April, May/June, July/August, September, October, November/December. Advertising closes at the beginning of the issue month. One year subscription rates for others: Canada $33.50 + 1.68 GST = $35.18; U.S.A. $40; other countries $63.50. Single copies $6.00 + 0.30 GST = $6.30; outside Canada $7.00. All prices are in ­Canadian funds. Recycling Product News accepts no responsibility or liability for reported claims made by manufacturers and/or distributors for products or services; the views and opinions ­expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of Baum Publications Ltd. Copyright 2020, Baum Publications Ltd. No portion of this publication may be reproduced without permission of the publishers. We acknowledge the financial support of the Government of Canada.

24 MRF TECHNOLOGY

Printed in Canada, on recycled paper, by Mitchell Press Ltd. ISSN 1715-7013. PUBLICATIONS MAIL AGREEMENT NO. 40069270.

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MATTRESS RECYCLING

Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to: Circulation Dept., 1242323 Boundary Rd., Vancouver, B.C. V5M 4V8; e-mail: baumpublications@ circlink.ca; 1-855-329-1909 or fax: 1-855-272-0972.

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INDUSTRY LEADER Q&A

44 WEB HIGHLIGHTS

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6 Recycling Product News November/December 2020

LAST WORD



FROM THE EDITOR

intelligent automation, Data and the evolving MRF

T

AS WE LOOK TO THE FUTURE, IT’S AI THAT OFFERS GREAT POTENTIAL TO CONTINUE TO TRANSFORM RECYCLING, DELIVERING MORE VALUE TO MRFS AND BEYOND.

ROB WRITZ, AMP ROBOTICS

he 2020 MRF Summit held in November included the session “Improve Efficiency and Productivity Through Technology,” which reflected poignantly on one of the key positives our industry can take away from an otherwise extremely challenging year. That is while our industry may be changing rapidly with respect to the types of materials and degree of contamination in our inflowing recycling streams, and continues to deal with very complicated labour, global market and geopolitical issues, the advances being made in automation technology and data capture may very well be the most important factors that will drive us forward. Of course, there are a variety of monumental tasks at hand for our industry: building sufficient available local end markets and establishing true design for recycling at the manufacturing and supply level, not to mention educating consumers and businesses on how to help reduce contamination in the stream at the source. While all of these are progressing in small steps, they still seem a long way off from being a part of our reality. It is technological progress then, combined with our effective use of data, that will provide the most gains in worker safety, cost efficiency, and the ability to create in-demand recovered materials with the precision and purity required, through this next decade. At the MRF Summit, the technology session was moderated by industry veteran and consultant Michael Timpane from Resource Recycling Systems (RRS), and included speakers from AMP Robotics, Machinex and GFL Environmental. To start things off, Timpane set things up with a discussion about key trends that are working to drive the rapidly shifting focus at today’s material recovery facilities. He pointed to drastic changes in the waste stream overall, especially with respect to plastics and paper, packaging and food waste, in composition, size, volumes and density. “Just five years ago, there were still MRFs being built to sort newspaper,” he said. “So the bulk of

the mechanical sorting up front had to do with focusing on about 50 percent of the flow – newspapers, magazines and graphic papers – that they were trying to capture from the rest of the stream.” Newsprint is now far from the most common or valuable material flowing through a MRF. In 2020 there has been a significant increase in OCC due to massive increases in online shopping, for example. In our waste stream there are now dozens of different types of material with potential value, compared to about one decade ago, when this total was less than 10 categories on average. Timpane also pointed to other current MRF trends, including the dynamic shift in end market demand, as well as the devaluing of some highrevenue materials such as post-consumer resins and sorted office paper. In addition, costs for energy, labour and many other factors have risen significantly, overall by an estimated 75 percent since 2010. Meanwhile, Timpane said contamination of incoming residential streams in the U.S. has gone from somewhere around seven percent in singlestream systems, to about 25 percent, on average in 2019, based on recent data from The Recycling Partnership. These numbers are similar for Canada. With all of this in mind, the MRF Forum technical session went on to focus mainly on the rise of artificially intelligent robotic sorting technology. According to speaker Rob Writz from AMP, rates are currently at about 70 picks per minute per robot, and there are currently hundreds of installations around the world, a number that has risen in North America at least two-fold in the last year and continues to accelerate. Going forward, it is the advancement in automated robotic sorting, combined with the improvement of data capture and usage, that will drive our industry forward. See our article this issue “You can’t manage what you can’t measure: recycling with AI-powered robotics” in which we dig down with Rob Writz into the nature, progress and promise of this relatively new frontier in recyclables sorting technology at the MRF.

Keith Barker, Editor kbarker@baumpub.com 888-286-3630; 604-291-9900 ext. 305

CANADIAN ASSOCIATION OF RECYCLING INDUSTRIES

8 Recycling Product News November/December 2020

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CREATE

HIGH-QUALITY COMPOST

CHOOSE

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UPFRONT //

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MRF NEWS

UPGRADED WASATCH MRF USING CP SYSTEM UNIQUE IN FLEXIBILITY TO PROCESS RFD, MSW AND SINGLE-STREAM Wasatch Integrated Waste Management District has partnered with CP Group to undergo a large upgrade at their municipal solid waste (MSW) facility in Layton, Utah. According to Wasatch, the opening of the new facility is the result of three years of planning, engineering and construction, with commercial operation begun this past June. The Wasatch MRF is capable of processing 40 tph of MSW or 15 tph of single-stream commingled recyclables, and through system design flexibility it can process both material streams on the same line. OCC, OMP, PET, HDPE, AL, steel and fines are recovered, while

non-recyclable plastics and mixed paper are combined to create an engineered fuel, and organics fines are recovered for potential use as a feedstock for anaerobic digestion. According to CP Group, which designed, manufactured and installed Wasatch’s sorting system, this MRF is unique in its flexibility to produce engineered fuel or Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF). At multiple locations in the system, including at two of three MSS optical sorters, materials for RDF production can be recovered, depending on material feed composition and the requirements of the end-user.

The system also features a new CP trommel with bag opening knives and anti-wrapping 3D holes, a 160-inch wide CPScreen, an MSS FiberMax optical sorter, two MSS PlasticMax optical sorters, two over-belt magnets, a drum magnet, an eddy current separator and a baler, as well as new conveyors and platforms. Additionally, CP integrated the existing infeed system (including a presort platform, multiple conveyors and a fines trommel) into the new system, as well as a new controls system, and a CP SCADA package to track throughput, black belt, burden depth, run time, downtime and production.

PLASTICS

MICHELIN AND PYROWAVE PARTNER ON MICROWAVE TECHNOLOGY Pyrowave has entered a joint development agreement with the Michelin Group. Using microwave-based chemical plastics recycling technology, the company with operations in Ontario and Quebec says it is possible to generate recycled styrene from plastics found in packaging, insulation panels and household appliances. This recycled styrene is an important monomer for use in the production of polystyrene and synthetic rubber for tires, and a large number of consumer products. Pyrowave says that recycling plastics using microwaves, unlike current thermal processes, enables the transformation of plastic waste into high-quality raw materials. It also provides higher yields while being more accurate than conventional technologies to replace virgin raw materials from the oil and gas sector. The joint development agreement will result in the implementation of new value chains, account for investment of over $20 million, and provides the potential for the manufacture of new packaging and products made from recycled plastics for the automotive, electronics and tire sectors.

NEWS BRIEFS Clean Earth targets 13 million aerosol cans by end of 2020 Clean Earth, which operates across the U.S., expects to process 13 million aerosol cans by the end of 2020, an 85 percent increase from the company’s rates in 2015. According to Clean Earth, this milestone is in part a result of their unique recycling system and technology specifically designed to service all industries that produce aerosol, loose spec paint and other consumer commodity waste.

10 Recycling Product News November/December 2020

China bans solid waste imports as of January 2021 The Chinese government has revised and passed new policy that forbids all solid waste imports into China as of January 1, 2021. Notably, the definition used for “solid waste” in this instance does not include scrap materials, based on updated guidelines published by the Chinese government for the importation of brass, copper and aluminum, in effect as of November 1, 2020.


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COVID-19 NEWS

SURVEY SHOWS PANDEMIC-DRIVEN CONCERNS ARE CHANGING CONSUMER HABITS

POLICY NEWS

ISRI APPLAUDS EPA’S 50 BY 30 COMMITMENT

The Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries (ISRI) has applauded the announcement, made in November by U.S. EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler, of the agency’s commitment to the development of the 50 by 30 residential recycling goal. The goal to reduce residential waste to landfill in the U.S. by 2030, was announced during the EPA’s America Recycles Summit, as part of the agency’s activities commemorating America Recycles Day, held November 15. “We commend the EPA Administrator for his vision of a new goal to achieve a 50 percent residential recycling rate by 2030,” said ISRI President Robin Wiener. “ISRI is grateful to Administrator Wheeler and the entire EPA team for their personal dedication to enhancing recycling as well as their vision to create a National Recycling Strategy. We look forward to continuing to work with the America Recycles Network to successfully implement the strategy and achieve 50 by 30.”

SWANA’s SOAR rescheduled as face-to-face event for June 2021 The Solid Waste Association of North America (SWANA) has announced a rescheduled SOAR 2021 technical conference for government and the solid waste and recycling industry. Rescheduled for June 14–17, 2021, in Kansas City, Missouri, SOAR 2021 is now planned as a face-to-face technical event. “SWANA is excited about holding the first major in-person solid waste conference of 2021,” stated SWANA’s David Biderman. “We are hopeful that the distribution of vaccines will be sufficiently widespread by June 2021 to allow us to convene.”

In advance of America Recycles Day on November 15, Republic Services released a survey highlighting how the COVID-19 pandemic has acted as a wake-up call for consumers in the U.S. to live a more sustainable life. Conducted by OnePoll on behalf of Republic Services, the survey of 2,250 Americans — split evenly, geographically between nine major cities — revealed that about 65 percent feel that the pandemic has acted as a wake-up call for them to make sustainable choices, especially as they relate to recycling. Seventy-five percent of respondents recognized the importance of recycling, and 26 percent reported a lack of understanding about what can and can’t be recycled. Twenty-four percent reported a belief that their recycling isn’t actually recycled. Survey respondents also identified eco-friendly changes they’ve made since the pandemic started, including being more careful to purchase eco-friendly products (43 percent), working to waste less (41 percent), taking more time to sort their recyclables (30 percent), and composting more (26 percent). “These survey results reinforce that Americans can and want to be better recyclers,” said Pete Keller, Republic’s VP of sustainability and recycling. “In the face of a pandemic, Americans are rightfully thinking about the steps they can take to be less wasteful. Today, more than ever, we have a critical need for recycled cardboard, paper, rigid plastic containers, aluminum and tin for manufacturing and the supply chain in the face of COVID-19.”

November/December 2020 www.recyclingproductnews.com

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UPFRONT CORPORATE MILESTONES

MACHINEX INTRODUCES NEW TECHNOLOGY HUB AS PART OF VIRTUAL 50TH ANNIVERSARY PLASTICS

MERLIN PLASTICS JOINS INDUSTRY COALITION TO ADVANCE CIRCULARITY OF POLYPROPYLENE FOOD PACKAGING

Merlin Plastics, headquartered in Delta, B.C., has joined The Recycling Partnership’s Polypropylene Recycling Coalition. The company says its membership in the U.S.-based industry organization will allow it to utilize its 30-plus years of experience in the Canadian and U.S. recycling plastics sector to assist the coalition’s drive to improve the recovery and circularity of polypropylene (PP) plastic. “Merlin Plastics is honoured to partner with producers and manufacturers of consumer products packaged in PP and to support the Coalition in making PP circular throughout the value chain,” said Merlin’s founder and president Tony Moucachen. “Polypropylene packaging is a valuable resource that can and should be recirculated. We are enthusiastic about being part of this industry coalition to help lead the way to finding solutions to improve recovery and reuse. Polypropylene is a valuable resource. It belongs in the curbside recycling system.” Ali Blandina of the Recycling Partnership commented, “Merlin’s expertise in postconsumer recycling sorting and processing will enhance our overall understanding of these technologies and enable us to strengthen polypropylene packaging collection in curbside recycling programs.”

COMPOSTING

US COMPOSTING COUNCIL ONE OF MANY TO SIGN ONTO U.S. PLASTICS PACT

The US Composting Council is one of many recent signatories of the U.S. Plastics Pact, a pledge and project meant to bring together companies, government entities, nongovernmental organizations, researchers and other stakeholders to work toward a common vision of a circular economy for plastics. Targets of the U.S. Plastics Pact include defining and eliminating packaging that is problematic or unnecessary by 2021, and make all plastic packaging 100 percent reusable, recyclable or compostable by 2025. The project also aims to effectively recycle or compost 50 percent of plastic packaging by 2025, and by the same deadline, increase the average recycled content or responsibly sourced bio-based content in plastic packaging to 30 percent.

12 Recycling Product News November/December 2020

Machinex Industries hosted a virtual open-house on Thursday, November 12, to celebrate the Quebec-based recycling equipment manufacturer’s 50th year in business, and announce the official opening of the company’s new technology hub, manufacturing and R&D facility. With customers, business partners, team members from North America and the U.K., and media in attendance, Machinex’ virtual open house celebration and information session led by CEO Pierre Paré, reflected the great sense of pride the company has for what it has accomplished through its long history of recycling-industry-specific engineering innovation in Canada. Built next to the company’s headquarters in Plessisville, the new Technology Hub will house approximately 100 employees and includes a research and development department, along with manufacturing lines for high-tech equipment, such as artificially intelligent optical and robotic sorters. According to Machinex, the new hub is the culmination of significant growth the company has seen specifically with respect to increased demand for their MACH optical sorter line and the SamurAI robotic sorter, and is meant to create synergy between different divisions of the company, with an eye toward staying on top of an evolving, growing future in hightech, automated recycling.


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INTERNATIONAL INSTALLATIONS

LEFORT SHEAR BALER BOOSTS PRODUCTION AND DECREASES COSTS FOR DIMECA METALS IN MEXICO

Dimeca Metals in Monterrey, Mexico, recently installed a new LEFORT shear baler, a model SB800 with an added loading table designed to increase production up to 20 percent. This marks the third and largest LEFORT shear baler that Dimeca now operates in Mexico. Ricardo de la Pena, CEO of Dimeca, says they are very happy with their new shear baler, the production rate of the new shear baler has exceeded his expectations, and they are cutting materials that allow them to save significant cost. Most importantly he says they finally have been able to process some very large stockpiles of scrap they had previously not been able to deal with. The newly commissioned LEFORT SB800S stationary shear baler in Monterrey provides 800 tons of shearing force, two-times 355-tons-per-lid force, and a 200-ton pusher ram. This machine

also features a 23-foot (7 m) box, a 230 kW electric motor driving state-of-the-art Bosch Rexroth pumps, and a LEFORT engineered hydraulic system. LEFORT shear balers are designed for cutting and baling all types of ferrous or non-ferrous scrap, and come standard with an automatic shear and box lubrications system, hydraulic bottom blades fastening system, modem for off-site troubleshooting and a remote control system allowing for oneperson operation. The SB800S is available in stationary, portable, crawler or towable configurations.

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SPOTLIGHT //

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JAWMAX 200 MOBILE JAW CRUSHER NEW FOR SBM

With its new electric-powered JAWMAX 200 mobile jaw crusher, introduced in October, SBM’s Mobile Crushing and Screening Solutions division now offers a compact, easy to use and powerful entry model. With this introduction, SBM says it is repositioning its sales strategy in the field of mobile processing plants. Ideal for application in both C&D recycling and aggregates, the JAWMAX 200 has a transport weight of only 27 tons, a large feed opening of 1,000 mm x 600 mm (which means this plant can be used as a primary crusher) and automatic soft start and remote control operation for easy, safe operation, making it good for rental. “Our new mobile jaw crusher JAWMAX 200 is a completely new development by SBM,” says sales manager Helmut Haider. “Due to its sophisticated kinematics, it is even more powerful and offers further improved feed possibilities than comparable

models.” Additionally, he says “operation is extremely comfortable and simple without the need to dismount or mount anything after transportation, and the plant is immediately ready for use.” Other machine highlights include: fully automated gap adjustment, overload protection, radio remote control, magnetic separator and lowerable discharge conveyor. Electric-power is supplied either by a 200 kVA Diesel three-phase power generating set or directly from the grid.

TEREX ECOTEC PARTNERS WITH ERIEZ ON MOBILE METAL SEPARATOR FOR ORGANICS AND BOTTOM ASH Terex Ecotec has introduced the TMS 320 metal separator plant, offering operators application flexibility, increased production rates and serviceability for application in metal recovery from compost, biomass, IBA (Incinerated Bottom Ash) and waste. The TMS 320 mobile plant incorporates an Eriez RevX ST22 eddy current separator (ECS) and rare earth drum magnet. The ECS has a premium 22-pole neodymium rotor, which spins at just 3,000 rpm, and which is encased in an ultra-thin carbon fibre shell, and a thin but durable PVC belt. This ensures the intense field produced by the ST22 is fully employed to provide the most effective separation results. The two-m-wide high-strength neodymium radial pole magnet is utilized for optimum iron recovery. The TMS 320’s efficient drum magnet and eddy current rotor, combined with good material flow, are designed to ensure accurate material separation, and the unit’s metal separator is quick and easy to set up, and ready to process in minutes with no tools required. Plus, an intuitive push button control panel, variable speed drum magnet and eddy current belt, combined with a splitter system that offers accurate real-time adjustment, enables operators to easily configure the machine to suit a wide range of applications.

14 Recycling Product News November/December 2020

LATEST FROM LYTX ADDS AI TO FLEET TELEMATICS

Lytx, the specialist in machine visionand artificial-intelligence-powered video telematics, analytics, safety and productivity solutions for fleets in waste and recycling and various industries, has released a new driver-powered approach to safety. The new solution is designed as a simple but powerful way for drivers to be more proactive and accountable for their own improvement, while giving management the necessary visibility and data to effectively monitor and intervene if needed. The system employs an “inattentive” trigger, which uses proprietary machine vision and artificial intelligence (MV+AI) to detect when the driver’s attention may be unfocused, or the driver may be experiencing a condition such as fatigue or drowsiness. It issues real-time in-cab alerts for five different risky driving behaviours: cellphone use, eating and drinking, smoking, no seatbelt, speeding and inattentiveness. Plus, behaviour duration reporting, which uses MV+AI to track and quantify both the duration and percentage of drive time a driver was engaged in a risky driving behaviour, provides a more holistic view of persistent risk for managers.


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CUSTOM-BUILT TRUCKS FROM AUTOCAR FIRST TO FEATURE ULTRA-HIGH-STRENGTH-STEEL FRAME RAILS

Autocar originally announced the release of its DC-64R – a completely reinvented truck for severe-duty refuse applications designed to integrate with various bodies – in 2019, marking the company’s first new conventional collection truck for the brand in 31 years. This year, the trucks have officially “hit the road.” According to Tim Thornton, vice president of strategy and commercialization at Autocar, “Through our Power of One integration, each truck is built as one complete tool – not only at

the engineering stage but extending to the installation of body components as well. This unique process offsets numerous issues typically encountered with mass-produced vehicles, enhancing uptime and ROI for waste haulers.” The Autocar DC-64R is the first truck ever built to feature ultra-highstrength, 160,000-psi steel frame rails,

completely eliminating the need for frame liners in nearly all refuse applications, a significant weight savings for haulers.

Model 4 The new model 4 E-Z log Baler is just what mid size scrap yards have been asking for! Priced right for any yard — small, mid size, or large! Like the Model 3, the NEW Model 4 has no set up time and a very low cost to operate. The one man operations are all handled from the newly designed cab. With the 400º rotation crane and a reach of 27’ adding the continuous rotation grapple, it makes loading the larger chamber a breeze. Taking your loose scrap to a highly sought after shreddable log.

NEW SHEAR JAW OPTION FOR MASSIVE C&D PROCESSOR

Designed for demolition applications requiring a large hydraulic processing attachment, LaBounty has added a shear jaw option to its UPX 1800, the largest in the company’s UPX platform. This line of processors features high power-toweight ratios, a streamlined design and increased stress flow, which compliments the increased power of newer, highperformance excavators. “These large, highly productive and versatile attachments are helping contractors complete big infrastructure projects faster,” said Michael Moriarty, STANLEY Infrastructure.

— Cycles in under 2 minutes! — Produces up to 70 tons per day. — Fully portable in the closed position. — New seat design for more operator comfort.

November/December 2020 www.recyclingproductnews.com

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SPOTLIGHT CALHOUN SUPER STRUCTURE RELEASES SIDE ENTRY AND GABLE BUILDING PROFILES Calhoun Super Structure has launched its Side Entry line of building profiles and its Gable line of building profiles, now available globally. The new Side Entry (SE) line consists of five profiles ranging in size from 20 feet wide to 30 feet wide and with different leg heights, while the new Gable (GB) line consists of 14 profiles ranging in size from 32 feet wide to 100 feet wide and with different leg heights. “The Side Entry line was developed to provide a storage solution for any customer that requires multiple stockpiles of product and needs quick access to each,” said Allan Ball, Engineering Manager for Calhoun Super Structure. The new Side Entry line features an opening width up to 45 feet wide, and ranges in height from 10 to 35 feet tall. The SE line also features a sloped roof,

tall back eave, and optional steel leg heights from 2 to 10 feet. The new Gable line features a standard 8- or 10-foot-high leg height and gable style truss arch for customers in need of greater interior height clearance and an aesthetically pleasing look. Both product lines come with Calhoun’s standard hot dip galvanized steel frames and 12 oz high-density polyethylene one-piece fabric cover.

“We are very pleased to be able to provide our customers with even more profile options of our premium highquality fabric building product,” said Deanna Hope, Calhoun Super Structure. “The launch of these two new product lines will further drive Calhoun’s revenue growth that we have already so far seen over the past five years, and allow us to meet the needs of new consumer markets while remaining competitive.”

PRECISE ADDITIVE METERING FOR DUST AND ODOUR BossTek has introduced a new model with a dosing pump to precisely meter additives such as surfactants, tackifiers, odour treatments and disinfectants. Ideal for composting, recycling yards and a wide range of dusty, odourous applications, the DustBoss DB-30 Injektor provides a standard coverage area of more than 6,100 square feet (566 square metres) and adjustable stroke length and frequency (from one per hour to 100 per minute), When equipped with optional 359-degree oscillation, the coverage area is increased to 31,000 square feet (2,880 square meters). “Many customers use DustBoss equipment in various dust-generating industries but also need a separate piece of equipment to neutralize odour in the air,” explained Jason Lesch. “They wanted one piece of equipment that could do both, so we created a new and retrofittable system that could act as a dust control and dispersing system for additives, using water as the vehicle.”

16 Recycling Product News November/December 2020

ELECTRIC-POWERED KITCHEN COMPOSTER

German startup KALEA has created the first of its kind indoor electric kitchen composter that turns organic waste into garden-ready fresh compost in just 48 hours. Plus, it can be filled continuously – other devices require a user to wait until one processing cycle is completed, so smelly food scraps never linger. KALEA’s technology can handle fruit and vegetable leftovers, dairy products, cooked food, coffee grounds and even small bones. Its super-efficient, automatic process uses two chambers to shred, dry and store material, and then compost using an accelerated, odour-free process to convert food waste into usable compost.


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ECO GREEN KRUMBUSTER MILL USES HYDRAULIC POWER TO MAKE CRUMB RUBBER

ECO Green’s latest innovation, the Krumbuster is designed to meet demand for better and faster production of crumb rubber using a hydraulicpowered mill. The compact Krumbuster turns tires into ground-up rubber for use as artificial turf and playground surfaces, and because it is powered by a hydraulic motor and pumps, it is not bound by the same constraining friction ratios as traditional mills for this application. These units produce high volumes, while allowing for output as fine as 40 mesh in commercial quantities. “Different sizes of crumb rubber often require a different set-up or even a whole different machine, but the Krumbuster allows our clients to move between mesh settings without any changes to the set-up or any extra effort,” comments ECO Green’s Brad Swenson.

PORTABLE TRUCK SCALES WITH DIGITAL SMARTCELLS

Cardinal Scale’s ARMOR Portable Digital Truck Scales can be moved to multiple locations, using a modular design with expandable bulkheads to vary platform sizes. This scale features IP69K-rated waterproof digital SmartCell load cells, capacities up to 135 tons, heavy-weight 50-ton CLC, 5/16-inch-thick checkered steel deck, top-side access to all electronics, and NTEP and Measurement Canada approval. ARMOR Portable Truck Scales also feature an extremely low 18-inch profile, and the versatile design allows for easy set up for changing environments, and easy washout below the scale. The scale may be set on compacted ground surfaces or concrete piers, and a floating centre module makes it easy to add or remove sections to fit application requirements.

November/December 2020 www.recyclingproductnews.com

17


COVER STORY

TOUGH ENVIRONMENT

Zelko Fuduric, GM and facility director at Central Composting in Abbotsford, B.C., with Doosan DL420-3 and DL420-5 wheel loaders outfitted with forked buckets.


NT, TOUGH EQUIPMENT TO MAKE THE COMPOST USED TO GROW CULINARY MUSHROOMS, EQUIPMENT AND PEOPLE ARE REQUIRED TO WITHSTAND HARSH WORKING CONDITIONS BY RENA SLETTEN

W

hen people imagine the journey of how mushrooms make their way into a tasty dinner entree, its likely they picture something close to people walking around a forest harvesting fungi off rotting logs and in marshy meadows. They probably don’t imagine that at the beginning of it all is compost material made from organic waste, mixed in a mixing line and eventually spread into tunnels, or windrows. The truth is, growing mushrooms en masse takes a lot more work than foraging in a forest. There are many steps and hours of work put into producing those hearty, earthy delicacies. Central Composting is a company located in Abbotsford, British Columbia, that works alongside their parent company, Champ’s Fresh Farms Inc., to help with the process of growing mushrooms. According to Zelko Fuduric, Central’s GM and facility director, their heavy equipment, including a pair of Doosan wheel loaders, is the backbone of their composting operation.

CREATING COMPOST

The main job of Central Composting is to create the compost for growing Champs Fresh mushrooms and transport it to the company’s farming locations. This process begins with employees combining a variety of ingredients to start the compost mix. But this compost isn’t just any random mixture. It turns out that mushrooms can be picky about what they

eat, which means Fuduric, who has been at it for about eight years, has to get the composition just right. “The compost is a mushroom substrate,” he says. “It’s wheat straw, chicken manure and gypsum powder mixed with water. It’s a special recipe for mushrooms. It’s the only substrate mushrooms will grow in.” All the ingredients for this magic mixture come from local and regional sources. “The chicken manure and gypsum are local, and the straw and wheat straw come from Washington and Oregon,” Fuduric says. Once all the materials are assembled, it’s time to mix it up. The Central Composting team adds ingredients to a large mixer to combine everything together and create the substrate that will become fertilizer for growing mushrooms. To move ingredients for creating compost and for transporting finished material, Fuduric’s operators use Doosan DL420-3 and DL420-5 wheel loaders, outfitted with forked buckets, which he says are absolutely vital in their process.

HARSH CONDITIONS FOR WORKERS AND MACHINES

Mushrooms thrive in a damp, dark place with decomposing material that they can feed on. To create this setting, Central Composting uses tunnel farms for the fungi. Employees deliver composted material as fertilizer, which is kept moist for the mushroom crop.

November/December 2020 www.recyclingproductnews.com

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COVER STORY While this may be the ideal environment for the fungi, it certainly makes things hard for the crew and machines. The biggest challenge for the company’s 25 employees is the harsh environment in which they work and operate their wheel loaders. After the team makes the compost that is used as the fertilizer to grow the mushrooms, the next step is to transport composted material to the farming tunnels. There are 12 farms in the Fraser Valley area where compost is placed in special growing tunnels. There, they have enough shade and moisture to create the right growing conditions for the mushrooms. Unfortunately, this process produces high amounts of ammonia, which further contributes to a tough environment for both workers and the machines. “It’s like having equipment in a salt mine,” Fuduric says. “The environment that we work in is extremely harsh. The machines corrode very, very rapidly. It’s like putting your car in a salt bath. The ammonia eats away at

IT’S LIKE HAVING EQUIPMENT IN A SALT MINE. MACHINES CORRODE VERY, VERY RAPIDLY. THE AMMONIA EATS AWAY AT THE METAL, IT EATS AWAY AT THE JOINTS, IT EATS AWAY AT THE ELECTRONICS . . . I NEED EQUIPMENT THAT DOESN’T FALL APART.

ZELKO FUDURIC

the metal, it eats away at the joints, it eats away at the electronics. “My guys all have to wear special monitors and masks,” he continues. “That’s why the biggest challenge is the actual working halls and the conditions of the equipment. Corrosion is a big part of that, so I need equipment that doesn’t fall apart.” He adds that not only is their work environment harsh, but the crew often has long days, sometimes 10- to 12-hour shifts, six days a week. But while the workers can wear protective gear, the machines are directly subjected to the damp, ammonia-filled environment. Because of this, Fuduric and his team must constantly keep up with routine equipment maintenance to make sure their wheel loaders are ready to work. While routine maintenance helps to keep the machines running day to day, anything beyond the basics, he says, is handled by their local Doosan construction equipment dealer, Westerra Equipment. According to Aaron Kleingartner, product and dealer marketing manager, Doosan Infracore North America, “Ma-

20 Recycling Product News November/December 2020

In harsh conditions like those at Central Composting, operators can keep dust and other debris out of the DL420-5 wheel loader cooling system by activating a reversible cooling fan from the cab. chines in this application may acculumate more hours than other industries. It’s important for customers in this line of work to closely monitor the machine and keep up with preventive maintenance.” He says customers can monitor their machine’s performance with DoosanCONNECT telematics. “For example, an owner can see when a scheduled maintenance is coming due. The telematics system also alerts owners if there’s an issue with the machine, and they can access the system on their smartphone or on a desktop computer. They can also be alerted via email when an issue arises and can track the operator’s machine usage. “They can see if an operator is letting a machine idle when it’s not being used. Unnecessary machine idling wastes fuel and burns through warranty hours.”


Kleingartner says operator and productivity benefits of these machines for composting applications are many, “Wheel loader operators need exceptional visibility from inside the cab when they’re handling material, which is especially true if the wheel loaders are working in or around buildings and other objects. Doosan wheel loaders provide enhanced visibility from inside the cab.” He says Doosan wheel loaders can also be equipped with a rearview camera, and operators can activate the camera and see the view on the LCD screen, which can improve jobsite safety. Plus, many Doosan wheel loaders are available in a high-lift configuration. “This feature provides additional dump height and reach for the operator, which can improve productivity when loading material into mixers or trucks.”

grow by producing the compost needed, they let the fungi do their thing. Once they are grown and harvested, Champs Fresh mushrooms are sent off to be packaged and delivered to grocery stores and restaurants. The mushrooms that Fuduric and his team help to grow with their compost are mainly portobellos, criminis and white buttons. He says with their efficient process, they are able to crank out about one million pounds of mushrooms per week to be distributed for culinary purposes, and there’s a whole team of hard workers, specific knowledge and heavy equipment behind them. So the next time a mushroom is on your fork, think of composters like Zelko Fuduric – and maybe a wheel loader or two.

IT’S ABOUT THE MUSHROOMS

Rena Sletten is a strategic communications professional and writer based in Des Moines, Iowa.

After Fuduric and his team lay the groundwork for the mushrooms to

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November/December 2020 www.recyclingproductnews.com

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ORGANICS RECYCLING

MANAGING CANNABIS WASTE A BY KEITH BARKER, EDITOR

merican and Canadian cannabis growing operations face stringent regulations for proper disposal of the large volumes of organic waste their businesses create. For cannabis producers, this can add extra labour costs, disposal costs and most available options are not environmentally sustainable. One approved disposal method currently is to shred plant material and mix it with an inert substance, such as cat litter, sand, plastic waste, or sawdust, until it’s deemed “unrecognizable and irrecoverable,” at which point it can be landfilled. Incineration is another option. Neither of these methods are ideal. In 2018, in Washington State alone it was found that landfills had accumulated close to two million pounds of cannabis industry organic waste, a significant increase since legalization in the state came into effect in 2014. Flowr is a long-time cannabis products producer with headquarters near Toronto, and growing operations in B.C.’s Okanagan. The company needed to find an affordable option to process their cannabis waste and one that would comply with regulations. They also were on a tight timeline. Flowr reached out to Green Mountain Technologies (GMT) a specialist in the design of industrial compost facilities for over 25 years, also based in Washington state. GMT, with more than 30 municipal and commercial compost facilities in North America, ranging from 3,000 to 200,000 tons per year, with systems designed specifically to compost materials ranging from curbside collected yard debris and food waste, to biosolids and agricultural wastes, had the solution Flowr was looking for.

THE GREEN MOUNTAIN TECHNOLOGIES CANNABIS WASTE SOLUTION

At the end of 2019, GMT provided Flowr with a 32-foot refurbished custom steel vessel Earth Flow machine. This composter includes a computer-controlled auger and a continuous flow design, allowing Flowr to add new material every day and harvest finished product every seven days. The fully automated, enclosed system is designed to reduce both labour and disposal costs, and creates high-quality compost quickly and easily. The Earth Flow system also provides excellent control over moisture, odours, vectors and leachate. It uses an auger to mix, break up and aerate compost, producing a rich, friable (light and fluffy) mix, and reaches pathogen-killing temperatures of 55 degrees C (131 degrees F). The entire process from unloading to discharging the final product takes between 14 and 21 days. Since they began operation, according to Flowr, their Earth Flow solution cut down on their labour and disposal costs, as well as manufacturing time, significantly, and they can now effectively manage their organic waste. Plus, they now have access to a nutrient-rich, pathogen-free soil, available as a substrate for continued growing operations, and which eliminates the need to buy new soils and fertilizers. RPN

22 Recycling Product News November/December 2020

GMT’s award-winning Earth Flow is an automated in-vessel composting system with integrated mixing and aeration.


MORE THAN $10 MILLION UP FOR GRABS IN FOOD WASTE REDUCTION CHALLENGE

The Honourable Marie-Claude Bibeau, Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food, recently launched the first two streams of the Government of Canada’s Food Waste Reduction Challenge, part of the Food Policy for Canada. According to estimates, more than half of Canada’s food supply is wasted annually and $49.5 billion of that wasted food is avoidable. Food is wasted from farm to plate, through production, processing, distribution, retail, food-service and at home. Challenge Streams A and B are currently open for concept applications with a closing date of January 18, 2021. Up to $10.8 million will be awarded to innovators with a new business model that can prevent or divert food waste at any point from farm-to-plate. The Food Waste Reduction Challenge will use a stage-gated approach to move innovators through the process of developing and deploying their solutions. At each stage of the challenge, an external group of subject matter experts will recommend which applicants move to the following stage and receive funding. For Challenge Streams A and B, at the last stage, one winner per stream will be awarded a grand prize of up to $1.5 million. Funding will be awarded to those whose innovative solutions have the potential of reducing the most amount of food waste, with a focus on new innovators looking to accelerate and grow their solutions and who may not have the necessary resources. The launch of two additional challenge streams focused on technological solutions to food waste is planned for spring 2021.

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MRF TECHNOLOGY

You can’t manage what you can’t measure: recycling with AI-powered robotics AMP ROBOTICS’ ROB WRITZ TALKS ROBOT POWER, MATERIAL INTELLIGENCE, AND THE FUTURE OF THE MRF BY KEITH BARKER, EDITOR

A

t the 2020 MRF Summit in November, hosted jointly by ISRI and SWANA, Rob Writz, director of business development for AMP Robotics, was one of three panellists in a session titled: “Improve Efficiency and Productivity Through Technology.” Along with Will Herzog from Machinex; Brent Hildebrand, GFL’s director of recycling; and moderator Michael Timpane from industry consulting firm Resource Recycling Systems (RRS), the session focused on the very important role automation, artificial intelligence, and specifically, robotic sorting technology, have played so far, and will play, as our industry continues to evolve rapidly through the next decade. According to Rob Writz, while it has not been long since robots first made

inroads into recycling (since about 2016) the impact they’re having on the productivity and efficiency of materials recovery facilities (MRFs) is now clearly evident. “Robots address many of the central challenges the recycling industry currently faces, from worker safety and bale purity to labour shortages, all while lowering the overall long-term cost of recycling,” said Writz. Most recyclables sorting robots deployed today use some form of artificial intelligence software, combined most commonly with near-infrared or optical sensors. The latter is now more common and uses a video camera, not too dissimilar from what might be used in the average smartphone, but more industrialized. AMP’s robots are integrated with an optical sensor and AI to digitize objects that pass by on a conveyor belt. Colours, shapes, textures, logos and other traits are detected, and correlated with mate-

24 Recycling Product News November/December 2020

rial types so that the platform learns to identify objects in the same way a human does. According to Writz, AMP is the only robotics manufacturing company focused on the recycling industry (of which there are currently less than 10 major manufacturers globally) that has developed both their in-house artificial intelligence and engineering software, as well as the robotic hardware and components. AMP’s software is designed to understand the heterogeneity, value and contamination in solid waste streams, and it grows smarter and more effective over time as AMP’s fleet of AI-guided robots expands. “This is material intelligence – a new category of information,” wrote Writz in a recent blog. “The power of AI as a tool for boosting productivity and efficiency is still in its early stages, and we’re working with innovative customers like GFL Environmental on new


product development efforts. We’ve been successfully beta testing solutions that will help the industry take advantage of this burgeoning potential.” Artificial Intelligence is taking hold currently in many industries where material flow is a factor, including electricity, wastewater and water utilities. “Each developed and deployed a form of meter to cost-effectively count the movement of its material, then deployed various efficiencies to become ‘smart utilities,’” said Writz. “As its sophistication and value grows, AI technology powering robots can become the material flow meter for recycling, helping operators understand not just the what, but the why, behind changes in the material they’re processing.”

RISE OF THE ROBOTS

The first robots were a Cartesian design which moves in one dimension, relatively slowly. Most robotic providers today are using some form of a Delta robot suspended above the belt, which moves in three dimensions at once. AI-powered recycling sorting robots are now very accurate in detecting and capturing a wide range of core commodities at the MRF. Currently, AMP’s sorting robots can recognize about 35 separate categories of materials. This number is increasing with regularity as is the speed with which material is captured from a belt. “We’ve gone from about 10 to 20 picks per minute to where we are now, at 70 to 80 picks per minute, per robot arm.” In comparison, the average human picks at best 30 to 40 per minute, and this rate is hard for a person to sustain consistently over an eight-hour shift. Robots are not only increasing throughput at the MRF, they’re helping ensure worker safety by eliminating hazardous jobs, and keeping the MRF resilient to fluctuating macro economic and other influences. With all these benefits, relatively quick ROI depending on various factors, and easy integration into existing facilities, Writz said they are being added at a very high rate around the world. “There’s probably several hundred robots deployed now in North America, for single-stream and dual-stream applica-

tions and also some in C&D,” said Writz. “That’s probably two to three times the number of installed units, compared to where we were at this time, last year.” Since the onset of COVID-19, demand for AI and robotics technology has definitely accelerated. Writz said businesses are increasingly turning to automation to keep employees safe amid social distancing requirements, navigate

ongoing labour shortages to remain operational, and adapt to spikes in residential volume and evolving material types caused by abrupt shifts in consumer buying patterns. Through 2020, AMP has seen a significant increase in orders and interest in deploying its technology on a larger scale to address these challenges. The company’s robotic deployments now span North America, Asia and Eu-

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MRF TECHNOLOGY

THE AI TECHNOLOGY POWERING ROBOTS CAN BECOME THE MATERIAL FLOW METER FOR RECYCLING, HELPING OPERATORS UNDERSTAND NOT JUST THE WHAT, BUT THE WHY, BEHIND CHANGES IN THE MATERIAL THEY’RE PROCESSING . . . TODAY’S MRF WILL EVOLVE FROM MATERIAL HUBS INTO INFORMATION HUBS.

ROB WRITZ, AMP ROBOTICS

rope. Within the United States, AMP’s footprint covers more than 20 states, including California, New York and Florida, and their first North American deployment of robotic sorting of construction and demolition debris is planned to be up and running in early 2021. This latest milestone for AMP follows the achievement of one billion picks for its fleet of AI-guided robots over a 12-month period, as of earlier this year. In 2020, the company also received recognition including Fortune’s “Impact 20,” Forbes’ “AI 50,” and Fast Company’s “World’s Most Innovative Companies.” In November, AMP announced that the company has signed a long-term agreement with Waste Connections to deploy 24 AI-guided robotics systems throughout the U.S. The deal is AMP’s largest to date, and Waste Connections plans to deploy the systems on container, fibre and residue lines across numerous materials recovery facilities. At Waste Connections, AMP’s AI platform will precisely identify different types of plastics, including polyethylene terephthalate (PET or PETE), highdensity polyethylene (HDPE), low-density polyethylene (LDPE), polypropylene (PP), and polystyrene (PS), sorted

26 Recycling Product News November/December 2020

Three-dimensional robotic arms combined with optical sensor technology records video of the material on the conveyor belt in the MRF, and uses artificially intelligent pattern recognition software to register all shapes, colours and logos, all the unique, visual aspects of objects, down to near-pixel level. It then recognizes and infers in real time what those objects are, and whether they should be picked, at rates up to 70 per minute. further by colour, clarity and opacity, along with different form factors – lids, tubs, clamshells, cups and more. Commenting on their new relationship, Matanya Horowitz, founder and CEO of AMP Robotics, said “We’re thrilled to be supporting Waste Connections’ commitment to expanding resource recovery as we extend our efforts to modernize recycling operations and advance a more circular economy. To see such a robust expansion of our pipeline and mark this milestone in a year upended by COVID-19 is a testament to our industry-leading technology.”


DATA AND AI TO THE FUTURE

So, what’s next for AMP and AI-powered robotic sorting at the MRF? Writz says the next step in their product development is to further integrate AI and data collection into the MRF, allowing operators to, for example, graphically compare material stream data to historical baselines, define material count thresholds and create alerts triggered by movement above or below these thresholds. MRF operators will also soon be able to efficiently export data for further analysis and integration into business intelligence platforms. “The intention is to deliver real-time monitoring and analysis of material composition as it flows through a facility, providing visibility into and feedback about material streams.” According to Writz, with data and tangible metrics, operators can get ahead of mechanical or configurationbased issues and communicate much better with business partners or key staff in the facility. “You can’t manage what you can’t measure, and the industry recognizes this,” writes Writz in his recent blog. “As we continue to listen to and partner with the industry, we’re focused on enabling action based on data. The continuous improvement of our software infrastructure enhances these data-based capabilities, and we’re regularly adding new categories of material for identification.” Currently, AMP is working with some of their early adopters and beta customers on a new product scheduled for release at some point in 2021. “It’s in beta mode, with customers including GFL,” said Writz in a recent interview with RPN. “It will allow the MRF operator to better interact with the data to view all these different commodities in the MRF over different periods of time. For example, they could ask, ‘How much aluminum UVC has exited their point of last chance, or how much residue?’ They can then begin to quantify or understand the amount of material they may be losing and make changes in the system to capture more of a given material.” He continued, “It is something that we plan to roll out in 2021 to really help MRF operators access this data in

a way that we think they haven’t actually ever seen before. This is the material count information. In some ways we view it as “the missing link” of data that’s going to become really useful for operators as they understand the flow within their facility and at different points in the facility. “As we look to the future, it’s AI that offers great potential to continue to

transform recycling, delivering more value to MRFs and beyond. Today’s MRF will evolve from material hubs into information hubs. As we extend our efforts to deploy technology that shifts the economics of the industry and grows the circular economy, further embracing AI and the data and insights it yields will keep the industry moving forward.” RPN

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to maximize recovery and best serve our Presenting the local community,” James Mazza says. Presenting the newest technologies forfor Thenewest companytechnologies began the process cost-efficient recycling. cost-efficient recycling. by touring numerous recycling plants supplied by a range of companies. “The first thing I looked at was the trash line,” azza Recycling has roots dating back to 1964, when James James Mazza says. “If there were a lot of and Dominick Mazza’s grandfather started a demolition and scrap recyclables left on that, sometimes I just company. Since those early years, the Mazza family has developed left. 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We added its ownarobotic solution since 2005, NIR (near infrared) were simply better built, and clearly had a a verycamera simpleand commercial sort line, and we were off,” James Mazza says. and now offers the RoBB-AQC with materials identification system. lot more understanding of what it takes to Volumes continued to grow as the company saw tremendous opportunity in a camera and NIR (near infrared) But the customer also has the achieve and maintain production in the long Central New Jersey. materials identification system. choice to outfit the RoBB-AQC with to build a recycling plant. Initially we were reduction term. of ONP, increase filmtoand That stoodofout us.trash; We’d high upgraded “Three years ago, we began planning But theworld-renowned customer also has the Autosort TOMRA maintenance costs; and increasing end product our baling capacity a year ago to a Bolthinking of a commercial plant. The more we researched and looked into it, however, recognition. 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to maximize recovery andserve best serve to maximize recovery and best our our locallocal community,” JamesJames MazzaMazza says. says. community,” The company beganbegan the process The company the process by touring numerous recycling plantsplants by touring numerous recycling supplied by a range of companies. “The “The supplied by a range of companies. first first thingthing I looked at was I looked atthe wastrash the line,” trash line,” azza back to to 1964, when James James Mazza says. “If there were a lot ofadating azzaRecycling Recyclinghas hasroots rootsdating dating back 1964, when James azza Recycling has roots James Mazza says. “If there were lot of back to 19 and Dominick Mazza’s grandfather started a demolition and scrap recyclables left on that, sometimes I just and Dominick Mazza’s grandfather started a demolition and scrap and Dominick grandfather recyclables left on that,Mazza’s sometimes I just started a company. years, thethe Mazza family hashas developed left. As around, one thing became company.Since Sincethose thoseearly early years, Mazza family developed company. Since those earlybecame years, the Mazza fa left.I went As I went around, one thing a range of businesses. clear to me, the plants supplied by Van a range of businesses. clear atorange me, the supplied by Van of plants businesses. Dyk had less residue, and they were doing The current 55-acre facility in Tinton Falls, New Jersey, from which the firm Dyk had55-acre less residue, they were The current 55-acre facility in Tinton Falls, New Jersey, from which the firm The current facilityand in Tinton Falls,doing New Jersey, fro a better job capturing more recyclables operates, was purchased in the early 1980s. “My father and uncle operated here, job capturing more recyclables operates, was purchased in the early 1980s. “My father and uncle operated here, operates,a better was purchased in the early 1980s. “My father and and producing cleaner commodities.” primarily focused on the C&D transfer station, their demolition business, and producing cleaner commodities.” primarily focused on the C&D transfer station, their demolition business, and primarilyand focused on the C&D station, their demoliti Because Mazza Recyclingtransfer was coming also leasing a portion to a mulch producer,” James Mazza shares. Because Mazza Recycling was coming also leasing a portion to a mulch producer,” James Mazza shares. also leasing a portion to a mulch producer,” to the single-stream recycling business James Mazza sh “In 2016, my cousin Dominick and I bought the business from our fathers. Defining tonothe single-stream recycling business “In 2016, my cousin Dominick and I bought the business from our fathers. Defining “In 2016, my Dominick I bought with realcousin experience, thereand was a lot the business from the future trajectory of the business then became our responsibility,” he continues. with no real experience, there theJames future trajectory of the business then became our responsibility,” he continues. the future trajectory of the business became to learn. “I understood recyclingthen andwas the a lotour responsibi and Dominick Mazza were no strangers to the recycling industry. to and learn. “I understood recycling and the to the rec James andworking Dominick werewhen no strangers the recycling James Dominick Mazza were strangers commodities markets, but I did notno know James began withMazza his father he was 10toyears old. “He’dindustry. have commodities markets, but I did not James began working with his father when he was 10 years old. “He’d have James began working with his father when know he was 10 years single-stream,” James Mazza says. “The me work on whatever needed to be done. I’ve torn down buildings, operated single-stream,” James Mazza says. me work on whatever needed to be done. I’ve torn down buildings, operated Van Dyk helped a lot; they machines, cut scrap, and sorted cardboard,” he says. me work on team whatever needed to bewere done. “The I’ve torn down bu Dyk teamand helped a lot; theya werehe says. machines, cut scrap, and sorted cardboard,” he says.they began expanding veryVan knowledgeable. Pete Bond was When James and Dominick took over the business, machines, cut scrap, sorted cardboard,” knowledgeable. Pete was a When James and Dominick took over the business, they began expanding greatvery resource. HeDominick really worked with nearly immediately. They added roll-off service, then front-loader service for comWhen James and tookBond overus the business, they b great resource. Headded really roll-off workedservice, with usthen front-loa nearly immediately. They added roll-off service, then front-loader service for com- nearly to immediately. help build ourThey knowledge.” mercial accounts. Immediately, they saw the benefit of added recycling services. to continues, help build our knowledge.” mercial theybegan saw the benefit of added recycling services. mercial He “The Van Dyk plants “We accounts. purchasedImmediately, an old baler and direct baling cardboard. We added accounts. Immediately, they saw the benefit of added were simply better built, and clearly had a direct baling car a very commercial line, and we were off,” James Mazza says. He continues, “The Van Dyk plants “Wesimple purchased an oldsort baler and began direct baling cardboard. We added “We purchased an old baler and began lot more understanding of what it takes tohad a Volumes continued to growsort as the company tremendous in were simply better built, and clearly a very simple commercial line, and wesaw were off,” Jamesopportunity Mazza says. a very simple commercial sort line, and we were off,” Jame achievemore and maintain productionwhat in theitlong Central New Jersey. to grow as the company saw tremendous opportunity in understanding takes to Volumes continued Volumeslotcontinued to grow asofthe company saw tremendo term. That stood out to us. We’d upgraded “Three years ago, we began planning to build a recycling plant. Initially we were achieve and maintain production in the long Central New Jersey. Central New Jersey. our baling capacity a year to We’d a Bol-upgraded thinking of ayears commercial Theplanning more wetoresearched and looked it, however, term. That stood out ago to us. “Three ago, weplant. began build a recycling plant.into Initially we were “Three years ago, we began planning to build a recycling pl legraaf 120S, so we had some experience the more convinced we became that building a single-stream plant would allow us our baling capacity a year ago to a Bolthinking of a commercial plant. The more we researched and looked into it, however, thinking of a commercial plant. The more we researched and lo withlegraaf the quality their 120S,ofso weequipment.” had some experience the more convinced we became that building a single-stream plant would allow us the more convinced we became that building a single-stream p The recycling withnew the 26-ton-per-hour quality of their equipment.” plant opened in September 2020. recycling The new 26-ton-per-hour The Mazza Recycling plant features plant opened in September 2020. Lubo non-wrapping screens, a Lubo The Mazza Recycling plant features elliptical separator, Tomra optical sorters Lubo non-wrapping screens, a Lubo and numerous other components all inteelliptical separator, Tomra optical sorters grated by Van Dyk Recycling Solutions. and numerous other components all inte“We’re thrilled with the plant,” James grated by Van Dyk Solutions. Mazza says. “ItRecycling will allow us “We’retothrilled with the plant,” offer our surrounding James Mazza says. “It will allow us communities a far more to offer our surrounding economical recycling communities a far more solution; we’re very economical recycling excited about that solution;Recywe’re very opportunity. about that cling excited is the future, opportunity. and we’re thrilled toRecybe partcling of it is here theinfuture, New Jersey.” and we’re thrilled to be part of it here in New Jersey.”


VAN DYK NEWS NEWS

VAN DYK 10VISION-AR™ REASONS TO BUY A • • • •

Advantages of VAN DYK Vision-AR™ Receive immediate solutions with clear communication Eliminate service visits and associated costs Priority phone service (skip the line) Increased safety (our technicians can monitor and advise on safe practices found them to be consistently dependable. I while looking in on your plant) recently purchased my sixth one.” Rod Nicolls, Noise-canceling headphones (communicate clearly by blocking out plant noise) Vicedirectives President of Operations, Urban Impact 100% hands-free design lets you follow without halting communication “The flap allowed Problems that happen intermittently can bepre-press immediately solved us to bale with-

BOLLEGRAAF BALER

T

• ired of costly service visits? • Don’t want outside visitors in • your plant? VAN DYK Vision-AR™ out shearing, so maintenance costs improved ith the HBC140 we can run the same tonnage as a facility brings the most experienced and downtime was significantly reduced.” Joe twice our size. Rightplant off the bat, it added 25 percent to our SMICON – The ideal solution for source service technicians directly to your DiNardi, President, Colgate Paper Stock capacity with no signs of slowing down. The technological separated organics! at a moment’s notice. SMICON depackaging machines flawlessly separate metallic and plasticsymmetrical food packaging from “It produces dense, bales advancements on it are just tremendous.” Scott Jenkins, PresiThe system uses augmented-reality the organic material. Inputs can be grocery store or commercial food waste. The depackager to simulate an in-person service visit or that are perfect for export.” Michael “Recycle” dent, EFI Recycling decouples the packaging while screening theBenedetto, organics toPresident, create a pumpable organic stream. session. mechanic the part TFC Recycling “Ourtraining HBC120S truly isYour automatic andwears an integral of our high throughput and The packaging emerges as a relatively clean, dry material that can be sold to recycling fuel headset andare uses it to call the Van Dyk “The 120S model packs a lot betterorthan productivity. If you serious about throughput and quality, get a Bollegraaf.” Mike markets. The organics are ideal inputs for composting or digester operations. service Manager line. Via the camera, our our previous baler with a lot less downtime.” Ferro, General Cityheadset Carting/WTI MRF service desk streams your field of vision Dale Schmidt, Recycle Manager, Loraas Recycle “There are many things that set Bollegraaf balers apart from the competition, but in real time. Our technician sees what “The engineering, construction and in my opinion, it is the organization as a whole. From sales to service and parts, to you see and walks you through each step performance on the Bollegraaf is top of the ownership, Van Dyk stands behind their equipment and provides a level of support required to solve your issue. Augmented line—the Cadillac of balers.” Frank Sánchez, that is hard to find in the marketplace.” Kevin Duncombe, President, Western Pacific reality allows us to superimpose icons Vice President, Town Recycling LLC Pulp & Paper onto your field of vision (circles, arrows, “We have an HBC120 for containers and “Wetext soon realized we purchased much more than a piece of equipment designed boxes) to give you clear directions an HBC140 for fiber. Both exceed our expectato bale material. The Bollegraaf has brought a confidence with it that radiates through and be absolutely certain we get the fix Input: bagged bread Output: organic stream throughput and uptime for our the facility.” Biondi, Inc. right Rich the first time.General Manager, YES Recycling BeeFoam – Dust-free fortions upofto 12 days! 50tph wonders system.” to Brian Dubis, Operations “The first I saw a Bollegraaf I was amazed by how fast baling system works Wetime can also upload images operate, and videos The BeeFoam dustthe suppression reduce theMRF massive dust to your tablet screen so you Manager, RIRRCon the infeed conveyor to cycle was. In the 20-plus years thatcan wereference have been running Bollegraaf we have created in glass balers, beneficiation or C&D sites. Positioned them whenever you want. Saving equipthe system, the BeeFoam dust suppression system uses a minimal amount of water ment schematics or preventive maintenance mixed with a special liquid to create a foam that binds to dust and weighs it down videos can help you store troubleshooting for up to 12 days. This results in increased air quality in the plant while also increastips and best practices for the future. ing sorting efficiency and decreasing the cleaning frequency on optical units.

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to maximize recovery and best serve our local community,” James Mazza says. The company began the process by touring numerous recycling plants supplied by a range of companies. “The first thing I looked at was the trash line,” azza Recycling has roots dating back to 1964, when James James Mazza says. “If there were a lot of and Dominick Mazza’s grandfather started a demolition and scrap recyclables left on that, sometimes I just company. Since those early years, the Mazza family has developed left. As I went around, one thing became a range of businesses. clear to me, the plants supplied by Van Dyk had less residue, and they were doing The current 55-acre facility in Tinton Falls, New Jersey, from which the firm a better job capturing more recyclables operates, was purchased in the early 1980s. “My father and uncle operated here, and producing cleaner commodities.” primarily focused on the C&D transfer station, their demolition business, and Because Mazza Recycling was coming also leasing a portion to a mulch producer,” James Mazza shares. to the single-stream recycling business “In 2016, my cousin Dominick and I bought the business from our fathers. Defining with no real experience, there was a lot the future trajectory of the business then became our responsibility,” he continues. to learn. “I understood recycling and the James and Dominick Mazza were no strangers to the recycling industry. commodities markets, but I did not know James began working with his father when he was 10 years old. “He’d have single-stream,” James Mazza says. “The me work on whatever needed to be done. I’ve torn down buildings, operated Van Dyk team helped a lot; they were machines, cut scrap, and sorted cardboard,” he says. found them to be consistently dependable. I found them to be consistently dependable. very knowledgeable. Pete Bond was Ia When James and Dominick took over the business, they began expanding recently purchased my sixth one.” Rod Nicolls, recently my one.” Rod Nicolls, greatpurchased resource. Hesixth really worked nearly immediately. They added roll-off service, then front-loader service for com- Vice President of Operations, Urban Impact with us Viceto President of Operations, Urban Impact help build knowledge.” mercial accounts. Immediately, they saw the benefit of added recycling services. “The pre-press flapour allowed us to bale with“The pre-press flap allowed to bale withHe so continues, “Thecosts Vanus Dyk plants “We purchased an baler and baling cardboard. We added out shearing, maintenance improved ith old the HBC140 webegan can rundirect the same tonnage as a facility out shearing, so maintenance costs improved ith the HBC140 we can run the same tonnage as a facility were simply better built,reduced.” and clearly a very simple commercial sort line, and James Mazza says. and downtime was significantly Joehad a twice our size. Right offwe thewere bat, it off,” added 25 percent to our and downtime was significantly reduced.” Joeto twice our size. Right off the bat, it added 25 percent to our more understanding what it takes Volumes continuedcapacity to growwith as the company sawdown. tremendous opportunity in DiNardi,lotPresident, Colgate Paperof Stock no signs of slowing The technological DiNardi, President, Colgateproduction Paper Stock with no signs of slowing down. The technological achieve and maintain Central New Jersey.capacity “It produces dense, symmetrical bales in the long advancements on it are just tremendous.” Scott Jenkins, Presi“It produces dense, symmetrical bales advancements on it are just tremendous.” Scott Jenkins, Presiperfect forstood export.” dent,“Three EFI Recycling That outMichael to us. “Recycle” We’d upgraded years ago, we began planning to build a recycling plant. Initially we were that areterm. that are perfect for TFC export.” Michael “Recycle” dent,“Our EFI Recycling Benedetto, President, Recycling HBC120S truly is automatic and an integral part of our high throughput and our baling capacity a year ago to a Bolthinking of a commercial plant. The more we researched and looked into it, however, Benedetto, President, TFClot Recycling “Our HBC120S is automatic and an integral part of our throughput and “The 120S model packs better productivity. If youtruly are serious aboutthat throughput quality, gethigh a Bollegraaf.” legraaf 120S, so we ahad some than experience the more convinced we became buildingand a single-stream plant wouldMike allow us “The 120S model packs a lot better than productivity. If you are serious about throughput and quality, get a Bollegraaf.” Mike our previous baler with aoflottheir less downtime.” Ferro, General Manager City Carting/WTI MRF with the quality equipment.” ourSchmidt, previousRecycle baler with a lot Loraas less downtime.” Ferro, General Citythat Carting/WTI MRFbalers apart from the competition, but Dale Manager, Recycle “There are Manager many things set Bollegraaf The new 26-ton-per-hour recycling Dale Schmidt, Recycle Manager,and Loraas Recycle “There are many things that set as Bollegraaf apartto from the and competition, “The engineering, construction in my opinion, it is the organization a whole.balers From sales service parts, to but plant opened in September 2020. “The engineering, construction inownership, my opinion, is the organization as a equipment whole. From to service parts, to performance onMazza the Bollegraaf is top ofand the Vanit Dyk stands behind their andsales provides a leveland of support The Recycling plant features performance on the Bollegraaf is top of the ownership, Van Dyk stands behind their equipment and provides a level of support line—the Cadillac of balers.” Frank Sánchez, that is hard to find in the marketplace.” Kevin Duncombe, President, Western Pacific Lubo non-wrapping screens, a Lubo line—the Cadillac of balers.” Frank Sánchez, that is hard to find in the marketplace.” Kevin Duncombe, President, Western Pacific Vice President, Town Recycling LLC Pulp & Paper elliptical separator, Tomra optical sorters Vice Town Recycling LLC and Pulp“We & Paper “WePresident, have an HBC120 for containers soon realized we purchased much more than a piece of equipment designed and numerous other components all inte“We have an HBC120 for containers and “We material. soon realized we purchased much more than a piece equipment designed an HBC140 for fiber. Both exceed our expectato bale The Bollegraaf has brought a confidence with itofthat radiates through grated by Van Dyk Recycling Solutions. tions throughput andBoth uptime for our facility.” RichThe Biondi, Generalhas Manager, YES Recycling Inc. an of HBC140 for fiber. exceed our expectatothe bale material. Bollegraaf brought a confidence with it that radiates through “We’re thrilled with plant,” James 50tph Brian Dubis, MRFthe Operations “The firstRich time I saw aGeneral Bollegraaf operate, I was amazedInc. by how fast the baling tionssystem.” of throughput and uptime for our the facility.” Biondi, Manager, YES Recycling will Operations allow us Manager, RIRRC Mazza cycle was. Intime the 20-plus that we have been Bollegraaf balers, have 50tph system.” Briansays. Dubis,“ItMRF “The first I saw ayears Bollegraaf operate, I wasrunning amazed by how fast thewe baling to offer our surrounding Manager, RIRRC cycle was. In the 20-plus years that we have been running Bollegraaf balers, we have communities a far more economical recycling solution; we’re very excited about that VAN DYK RECYCLING SOLUTIONS Recy360 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Dr., Norwalk, CTopportunity. 06854 DYK RECYCLING P:VAN (203) 967-1100 | F: (203) 967-1199SOLUTIONS cling is the future, 360 Dr. Martin| VDRS.com Luther King Jr. Dr., Norwalk, CT 06854 info@vdrs.com and we’re thrilled to P: (203) 967-1100 | F: (203) 967-1199 info@vdrs.com | VDRS.com be part of it here in New Jersey.”

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10 REASONS TO 10 TO BUY BUY AA BOLLEGRAAF BALER BOLLEGRAAF BALER

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NEWS


MATTRESS RECYCLING

Will 2021 be the year we solve the mattress recycling problem?

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BY ED DONOVAN

ike many other bulky waste streams, end-of-life mattresses notoriously prove to be a headache for the resource sector. Given their size, and because they contain multiple composite materials, they are tricky to store, handle and recycle. Some operators would even go so far as to say they are economically unshreddable. However, at the same time, mattresses represent a growing waste problem. In the U.K., for instance, The Furniture Recycling Group states that 167,000 tonnes of mattresses – or 7.5 million units – are sent to landfill, every year. In the USA, the figure is estimated to be closer to 20 million. Disposal costs are mounting, space on landfill sites is ever depleting and illegal dumping is on the rise. Furthermore, given the undeniable need to work toward a greener, more sustainable, closed loop society – and because a number of recyclable materials remain locked in unwanted mattresses – action is needed, and quickly. Even expertly manufactured mattresses with lengthy warranties are going to reach their end of life, so considering them as nothing more than waste is no longer an option. Thankfully, technological innovation is occurring at a similar quick pace. Carefully engineered recycling lines can now mechanically dismantle

a mattress in as little as 30 seconds, ‘unlocking’ the multifaceted materials that would otherwise remain trapped inside. Consequently, over 80 percent of a mattress can be recycled into new consumer and industrial products.

THE RESOURCES LOCKED INSIDE

Mattresses range in dimensions, from small, infant-sized products through to super-king size and above. The composition of mattresses is also extremely varied, not least because pocket sprung items – which represented only 10 percent of the market 15 years ago – are now exponentially common. Flexible, robust equipment, capable of handling multiple input materials is crucial. If we invest in the right shredding technology and downstream separation equipment, it is possible to extract metal for smelting and remanufacturing. The foam can be broken down and transformed into carpet underlay or animal bedding. The wood can be separated and shredded to produce landscape mulch or a biomass resource. The textiles/fibres can be salvaged for reuse in oil filters. For alternative fuel manufacturers with a strong environmental agenda, it is even possible to re-shred any residual material down to a 13/16-inch clean flock. With its high calorific value (30mj), this can be mixed to create a solid recovered fuel (SRF). This means the process achieves a 100 percent recovery and landfill diversion rate, while reducing the world’s reliance on ever-depleting fossil fuels. The million-dollar question is how to achieve all of this.

DESIGNING A REVENUE-GENERATING RECYCLING LINE FOR MATTRESSES

It is estimated that the recycling of one million mattresses will result in the recovery of approximately 20,000–25,000 tons of steel wire, which can be sold, recycled and remanufactured. 32 Recycling Product News November/December 2020

By investing in machinery engineered specifically to handle this application, mattress recycling can quickly become a revenue-generating operation. Following 18 months of research, design and development, for example, an automated mattress recycling line is now in full operation at Textek in the U.K. Using two UNTHA XR3000C shredders


at its heart, Textek’s aim is to divert one million mattresses per year from landfill. The operation – pitched by the organization as the U.K.’s most advanced bulky waste processing plant – can mechanically dismantle a mattress in as little as 30 seconds, compared to the seven minutes it would take for a skilled worker to manually break down this complex product type. UNTHA’s robust machines – with an almost 9-foot 8-inch-wide loading aperture, perfect for this bulky waste stream – will shred mattresses with ease down to a <2-inch particle size to liberate the steel from the flock. Sophisticated downstream technology then separates clean flock from contaminated material which is fed back for re-shredding to ensure a 100 percent recycling rate. Commenting on their installation, Textek Director Allen Jackson said, “An estimated 7 million mattresses were disposed of in 2017, at a cost of at least £20m ($26.2m), before considering transport and handling. This, coupled with illegal dumping, not to mention the environmental and commercial cost of manufacturing new replacement products, means the impact of this waste stream is quickly spiralling. “While government initiatives are gradually looking at improved strategies for bulky waste handling, we identified a need to move faster, so turned our attention to designing our own automated line. “Following substantial investment, the facility is installed, tried and tested, and now stands to divert one million mattresses from landfill in the next 12

R

months alone. But we don’t want to stop there – already we’re thinking about the creation of additional dedicated bulky waste recycling lines in other parts of the country.” The industry needed a step change, and what Textek has done is truly inspiring. They rigorously vetted several shredders as part of the technology selection process, and the XR was deployed to the site for a one-week trial, to prove it could handle the variety of foam and sprung mattresses currently being disposed of in the U.K. Impressed with the results, Textek then took the machine back for a second trial to ensure the equipment could achieve capacity targets.

THE INNOVATION CONTINUES

Worldwide, it has been a monumental year for the environmental sector. While virtually every nation has been rocked beyond belief due to COVID-19, waste management contractors have continued to work hard, throughout it all, to collect household trash, keep materials

UNTHA’s XR3000C shredder is helping Textek in the U.K. move toward their goal of diverting one million mattresses per year. moving, and recycle, recycle, recycle. The industry has shown just how crucial it is to the global economy. When it became tougher to export and import resources, and a number of valuable recyclables were in short supply, many industry pioneers went back to the drawing board and innovated. As a result, other previously difficult waste streams – including tires, to give another example – are being re-evaluated for their resource potential. So, the best thing about all of this, is that new-found mattress recycling methodologies are extremely exciting. But they’re not the only game-changers set to transform what this industry can do, in 2021 and beyond. Ed Donovan is sales manager at UNTHA America.

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November/December 2020 www.recyclingproductnews.com

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2020 TOP 10 1

WINNIPEG MRF TAKES NWRA RECYCLING FACILITY OF THE YEAR AWARD

2

MACK ELECTRIC-POWERED COLLECTION TRUCKS BEGIN REAL-WORLD TRIALS

3

CANADIAN MILL IS THE FIRST IN TWO DECADES TO ACCEPT CARTONS FOR RECYCLING

4

GFL ENVIRONMENTAL GROWTH DRIVEN BY INCREASED M&A ACTIVITY

5

This award-winning facility designed and installed by Machinex and operated by GFL now houses one of the most advanced fibre and plastic recovery systems in Canada, with recovery rates of approximately 90 percent. At 80,000 square feet, the MRF features a 90 percent automated sorting system including SamurAI robotic sorting technology.

The New York Department of Sanitation was the first to begin real-world trials of the Mack LR Electric, which was followed by trials with Republic Services in North Carolina. Equipped with Mack’s integrated electric powertrain, these fully electric collection trucks for waste and recyclables lower GHG emissions and provide a significantly quieter propulsion system.

The Sustana Fiber paper mill in Lévis, Quebec, is the first in over 20 years to accept sorted recovered cartons in Canada. The move reflects an overall increase in demand for consumer paper products since the onset of COVID-19, coupled with a decrease in sorted office paper volumes as businesses have slowed down considerably.

GFL announced its initial public offering at the start of 2020, began trading on the Toronto Stock Exchange in March and grew its footprint as an integrated waste services provider in both Canada and the U.S. throughout the year, with operations now established in nine Canadian provinces and 27 U.S. states.

WM FINALIZES ACQUISITION OF ADVANCED DISPOSAL

After over 18 months in negotiations, Waste Management completed the acquisition of Advanced Disposal Services for $4.6 billion. The deal adds approximately 3 million new customers for WM in the U.S. and includes a divestiture agreement with GFL Environmental valued at $863.5 million.

34 Recycling Product News November/December 2020


RECYCLING

STORIES 6 7 8 9 10

PRODUCT NEWS

ARCELORMITTAL AND TRIPLE M JOIN FORCES TO FORM INTEGRATED METAL RECYCLING

Two of the largest players in Canada’s metal recycling industry are creating a joint venture in Quebec. The alliance will enable the new company to purchase a wider range of scrap grades, and recyclers will benefit from a larger, reliable end market.

QUEBEC TO INVEST $1.2 BILLION INTO ORGANICS COLLECTION AND RECOVERY BY 2030

With a focus on significantly improving the collection and recovery of organic matter in the province by 2030, this commitment will be managed in collaboration with RECYC-QUÉBEC. This includes $450.1 million available as of 2020 (through 2021) to be invested over the next decade into both municipal and private sectors.

RCO ANNOUNCES TRANSITION TO CIRCULAR INNOVATION COUNCIL The Recycling Council of Ontario (RCO) officially started its transformation and rebranding in 2020, a move which reflects the very quickly evolving waste and recycling landscape in the province. The organization says it will continue to champion effective waste policy and recycling programs, pilots and resources in Ontario, but with a wider focus on building the circular economy.

FEDERAL GOVERNMENT SETS SIGHTS ON ZERO PLASTIC WASTE BY 2030 In collaboration with provinces and territories, the Canada-wide Strategy for Zero Plastic Waste by 2030 initiatives include a complete ban on harmful single-use plastic items such as straws and grocery bags, as well as strengthening existing programs, supporting innovation and pilot projects, and increasing our overall national capacity to reuse and recover more plastics.

SUPPORT FUND EXPANDS ELIGIBILITY FOR WASTE AND RECYCLING PROFESSIONALS IMPACTED BY COVID-19

The Solid Waste Association of North America in partnership with Glad announced an expansion of the Sanitation Workers Support Fund. The initiative will provide financial assistance to a wider range of professionals in the U.S. and Canada who are adversely impacted by COVID-19, including haulers, dispatchers, maintenance and administrative staff, supervisors and recycling facility workers.

November/December 2020 www.recyclingproductnews.com

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RECYCLING PRODUCT NEWS

2020 TOP INTRODUCTIONS OUR PICKS FOR TOP TECHNOLOGY AND EQUIPMENT INNOVATIONS OF THE YEAR

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very year there is an impressive amount of new equipment and technology introductions for the recycling and waste industry. These advances are coming faster than ever and are paramount to the sustainability and profitability of our industry, even more so when we look back on a year as challenging as 2020. Artificial intelligence and automation continues to make its way into all aspects of our industry, as has electric power. Essential equipment to our industry, such as material handlers, shredders, grinders, screens, balers and automated sorters, just keeps getting faster, safer, more comfortable and more environmentally friendly – all while becoming more efficient. Here are our picks for the top equipment and technology introductions in 2020.

36 Recycling Product News November/December 2020

TOMRA NEXT GENERATION AUTOSORT Optimal recyclables sorting requires both speed and accuracy. Ultra-compact and highly versatile, intelligent and accurate, TOMRA’s new sensorbased sorting lineup includes updated advanced optical technology, SPEEDAIR high-speed throughput, and CYBOT AI robotic technology, which combines near-infrared, visible light spectroscopy, and DEEP LAISER artificial intelligence, as well as induction for ferrous and non-ferrous metals recovery.


2020 TOP INTRODUCTIONS

BOLLEGRAAF ROBB-AQC SORTING ROBOT Robotic sorting of recyclables continues to advance very quickly. Bollegraaf’s new RoBB-AQC fully automated, artificially intelligent robot is the first to combine the accuracy of NIR detection with the adaptability of AI-powered learning. Just one robot in a MRF can make up to 70 picks per minute on materials ranging from PET and HDPE to Tetra Pak and OCC.

MCCLOSKEY TRACKED PRIMARY SHREDDER The first offering from McCloskey’s recently created recycling division, the VTS95 mobile, track-mounted primary shredder is capable of effectively reducing virtually any type of material from solid waste to industrial and commercial waste, including materials which vary greatly in terms of size, composition and difficulty to shred. November/December 2020 www.recyclingproductnews.com

37


RECYCLING PRODUCT NEWS

DOOSAN WHEELED MATERIAL HANDLER

ECO GREEN ECORAZOR OFF-THE-ROAD TIRE RECYCLER Designed specifically to facilitate the efficient recycling of large mining and OTR tires, the new Eco Razor 63 is equipped with an articulating head that facilitates threesided rubber removal, and adjustable knives that allow for control of output size.

Doosan’s new wheeled material handler uses two arm cylinders to improve machine performance and control of material during lift and placement cycles. A droop-nose arm is standard, with an optional straight arm. A hydraulic cab riser provides enhanced visibility when loading and unloading material, and four outriggers add stability.

UPDATED ROTOCHOPPER HOG Rotochopper’s most recent updates to the FP-66 mid-sized horizontal grinder are meant to increase the capacity of materials that can be processed. These grinders include a larger 30-inch feed opening and are now available with a more aggressive powerfeed and either a 630- or 755-hp diesel engine to grind a variety of raw materials.

38 Recycling Product News November/December 2020


2020 TOP INTRODUCTIONS

NRT COLORPLUS WITH MAX-AI This next-generation optical sorter from BHS subsidiary National Recovery Technologies (NRT) integrates artificial intelligence (AI) into the ColorPlus optical sorter. The ColorPlus with Max-AI combines high volume and high accuracy capabilities with human-like identification decisions, employing a high-resolution RGB line-scan sensor to identify and sort recyclables by colour.

CATERPILLAR MOBILE MATERIAL HANDLER The new MH3040 material handler is the largest in Cat’s lineup, featuring boom, stick and other high-stress areas with thick, multi-plate fabrications, castings and forgings to withstand wear and deliver years of durable operation, reduced fuel and maintenance costs, as well as specially designed mountings on the upper frame to support a new heavy-duty cab.

November/December 2020 www.recyclingproductnews.com

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RECYCLING PRODUCT NEWS

TIGERCAT CARBONATOR FOR WOOD-TOFUEL

VERMEER ELECTRIC-POWERED TROMMEL Electric power is surely the future for recycling equipment of all stripes. Vermeer’s new TR5300EM trommel screen is powered by an industrialduty, fan-cooled 60-hp (44.7-kW) electric motor, and delivers a drum speed of 0–24 revolutions per minute to handle multiple organic material types. These mobile plants provide quiet operation with reduced exhaust emissions, noise levels and maintenance, and feature a low hopper infeed with a capacity of 5.5 cubic yards (4.2 cubic metres).

PRESONA TURBOCHARGED BALER The new Presona MP 270 MH baler creates super-high-capacity bales while being cost effective, allowing recyclers to potentially replace two balers with one. High performance is based on automatic self-optimization and parallel, simultaneous processing of two bales: one is precompressed while the second finished bale is produced.

40 Recycling Product News November/December 2020

This unique mobile plant allows for carbon sequestration from waste organics in a single step, requiring no pre-processing. The Tigercat 6050 carbonator reduces waste wood by up to 95 percent using an environmentally friendly process, and creates biochar, a highly efficient fuel source for various industries.


2020 TOP INTRODUCTIONS

LINDNER ATLAS TWIN-SHAFT PRE-SHREDDER Waste management never stops. Lindner’s next generation Atlas 5500 twinshaft pre-shredder is designed for automated 24/7 operation. These machines will reduce a range of input materials to the ideal output size and chunkiness for subsequent sorting processes with high energy efficiency, easy operation and remote-control capability. Plus, with its patented FX fast exchange system the entire cutting system can be completely exchanged in under an hour.

November/December 2020 www.recyclingproductnews.com

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INDUSTRY LEADER Q&A

Q&A WITH TOM SZAKY, CEO OF TERRACYCLE BY SLONE FOX, DIGITAL EDITOR

T

erraCycle is a company built on the goal of “eliminating the idea of waste” by making that which is non-recyclable, recyclable. From coffee pods and pet food bags, to cigarette butts, consumer goods packaging and used PPE (personal protective equipment) TerraCycle collects and recycles a very wide range of waste types. Partnering with both individual consumers and major corporations, the company’s Zero Waste Box system allows the public to fill a themed collection box with otherwise hard-to-recycle used materials and packaging, in a convenient retail location. This collected waste is then sent to TerraCycle via a prepaid return label and processed to recover its value – whether through refurbishment and reuse, upcycling or recycling. TerraCycle was founded by CEO Tom Szaky in 2001, who was then a freshman at Princeton University. He had friends there who were feeding kitchen scraps to worms and then reusing the fertilized soil created by the worms to feed their plants. This is where the idea for TerraCycle was born. Beginning by packaging fertilizer made from worm poop in used soda bottles, it eventually lead to the launch of the Bottle Brigade, a program that aimed to collect additional used soda bottles to be used for fertilizer packaging. This then lead to the creation of the Drink Pouch Brigade, the Yogurt Cup Brigade and the Energy Bar Wrapper Brigade. Since its start, TerraCycle has won numerous industry awards and has added a long list of new consumer partnerships, all of which result in the efficient collection and recovery of what was previously not recycled. This year alone, TerraCycle has launched over 50 new partnerships. We recently caught up with Tom Szaky to ask a few questions about his business, recent successes, challenges, and how they are adapting to the new normal presented by COVID-19.

42 Recycling Product News November/December 2020

Slone Fox: Can you explain how TerraCycle has evolved the way it works from its inception up until now? Tom Szaky: Our mission has always been the same. How do we eliminate the idea of waste? We first started as a company that made products from garbage. Our first product was worm poop fertilizer in a used soda bottle. That was sold to Target, Home Depot and so on. We then evolved about four or five years in, from a company that makes and packages products in waste, to focusing on where we are now. Instead of focusing on the outcome of the material, we focus on the collection of the material. How do we collect and recycle things that are hard to recycle? Secondly, how do we integrate difficult to recycle material back into products? Third, how do we shift things from single-use to reusable? SF: What makes one program successful as opposed to one that might encounter challenges? TS: It doesn’t matter whether it is a reuse program or a recycling program. What makes something successful is that people participate and that work happens. If it’s something that’s convenient and accessible to consumers, we have the partners behind it that are really supporting it, not just with their money, but authentically supporting it and really putting a lot of effort behind it. SF: What are some of the most notable, successful partnership that have been established this year? TS: Some of the major things I would point to with a lot of momentum around them is PPE recycling, just because of COVID-19. We’ve been processing personal protective equipment for over 10 years, but it’s really exploded this year for obvious reasons. We are also seeing really good momentum in our Loop ecosystem. SF: Can you explain how TerraCycle has evolved the way it works from its inception up until now? TS: Our mission has always been the same. How do we eliminate the idea of waste? We first started as a company that made products from garbage. Our first product was worm poop fertilizer in a used soda bottle. That was sold to Target, Home Depot and so on. We then evolved about four or five years in, from a company that makes and packages products in waste, to focusing


on where we are now. Instead of focusing on the outcome of the material, we focus on the collection of the material. How do we collect and recycle things that are hard to recycle? Secondly, how do we integrate difficult-to-recycle material back into products? Third, how do we shift things from single-use to reusable? SF: What makes one program successful as opposed to one that might encounter challenges? TS: It doesn’t matter whether it is a reuse program or a recycling program. What makes something successful is that people participate and that work happens. If it’s something that’s convenient and accessible to consumers, we have the partners behind it that are really supporting it, not just with their money, but authentically supporting it and really putting a lot of effort behind it. SF: What are some of the most notable, successful partnerships that have been established this year? TS: Some of the major things I would point to with a lot of momentum around them is PPE recycling, just because of COVID-19. We’ve been processing personal protective equipment for over 10 years, but it’s really exploded this year for obvious reasons. We are also seeing really good momentum in our Loop ecosystem. We just announced McDonald’s, for example, and we launched with Tesco in the U.K. six weeks before that, and

A LOT OF RECYCLING PROGRAMS ARE GOING TO COME BACK AFTER COVID-19 MUCH MORE DETERIORATED THAN THE WAY PEOPLE REMEMBER THEM.

TOM SZAKY

there’s a lot of exciting launches coming up. We’ve also launched our foundation, the TerraCycle Global Foundation, which is doing river cleanups quite successfully in Thailand. We’ve launched 50 new recycling programs this year, ranging from Ocean Spray all the way to baby food pouches with Gerber, and just so many things in between. That would just be some highlights, but there’s a lot going on, which is quite exciting. SF: How can you tell if a company is authentically dedicated to a collection and recycling program rather than just looking for good PR? TS: If it’s a good PR scenario, a company is just going to want to have the program and make it as small as possible, because that’s what will get you good press, but then commit as little as possible to it. Other companies really understand how to create value for their organization. That is what really makes a program – when a company is leaning into it. So, it’s not just that they get it’s good for sustainability, but they get that it is good for their core business and is treated as such. SF: Can you tell us more about the Loop initiative? TS: The Loop is a global reuse platform. It’s live in the U.K., U.S. and France, launching in four more countries in the next nine months. It’s basically a platform where consumer product companies can create reusable versions of their goods. Your Häagen-Dazs is in stainless steel, or your Cascade is now in engineered plastics, whatever it may be. We’ve worked in the U.S. with retailers like Kroger, Walgreens, Ulta Beauty, and so on, who then make it available to their consumers. So, you can buy your Tide in a reusable container at Kroger and then return it to a McDonald’s, which has a Loop drop bin. You then buy your coffee in a reusable coffee cup. Then, you return that to a Walgreens, where maybe you buy shampoo in reusable packaging. SF: What have been some of the challenges and opportunities of the COVID-19 pandemic in regards to advancing the circular economy? TS: Let’s start with the good news, which is that the pandemic is creating momentum for the environmental movement at large. It’s the first time

TerraCycle uses collection boxes in retail locations to gather hard-torecycle waste at the source. in modern human history that we have taken our foot off the gas, if you will, globally. For a period of time, people have been producing less, and that slowdown in industry has lowered the impact on the environment. We’re noticing that emission levels are down, animals are showing up where they haven’t shown up before, and so on and so forth. People are even more aware of our collective impact on the environment, which is good for the environmental movement at large. I’d say that’s a huge positive. The negative is lower oil prices that are making an already strained business equation for recyclers, more strained. A lot of recycling programs are going to come back after COVID-19 much more deteriorated than the way people remember them. Consumers will be able to recycle less than they were able to recycle before, if I’m speaking plainly. In reuse, COVID has created a fork in the road where consumer-driven reuse models (where you have to refill the container yourself) have been very negatively affected because of health and safety risks. For professional reuse, luckily we have Loop, which is a model that has not been affected negatively. We got lucky, but it’s created a fork in the road, where one path will be negative and the other totally fine. RPN

November/December 2020 www.recyclingproductnews.com

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44 Recycling Product News November/December 2020

GFL Environmental reports revenue increase of 15.4% for Q3


ADVERTISER INDEX American Baler............................................................. 27

Paradigm Software....................................................... 44

Brown Bear Corporation.............................................. 21

Rawlings....................................................................... 33

ECO Green..................................................................... 4

R.M. Johnson Co......................................................... 15

ELV Select.................................................................... 13

SBM Mineral Processing................................................ 2

Gensco Equipment....................................................... 17

Scott Equipment........................................................... 23

Kensal Carbide............................................................... 7

SENNEBOGEN............................................................... 3

LBX Company.............................................................. 47

SWANA......................................................................... 45

Machinex........................................................................ 9

Van Dyk Recycling Solutions...................................28–31

Mack ............................................................................ 48

Vermeer........................................................................ 25

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LAST WORD

REVERSE VENDING IS THE WAY TO INCREASE PLASTIC BOTTLE RECYCLING RATES

W

BY LEON FARAHNIK

RVMS SHOULD SIT OUTSIDE OF EVERY SUPERSTORE AND BIG SUPERMARKET IN THE COUNTRY . . . WITH THAT KIND OF UBIQUITY, RECYCLING AND COLLECTION RATES WOULD INCREASE.

LEON FARAHNIK

e’ve read the statistics about plastics recycling, over and over. According to The Guardian, “Since the 1950s, some 8.3 billion tons of plastic have been produced worldwide, and to date only 9 percent of that has been recycled.” According to National Geographic, 91 percent of plastic isn’t recycled, and the Break Free from Plastic Pollution Act states: “Just 8 percent of plastic waste in the United States is sorted for recycling.” No argument here. These percentages are low. China’s 2018 National Sword policy, with its ban on imports of most plastics and other materials, added to a crisis in U.S. recycling. The pandemic, which saw many recyclers concerned over health and safety temporarily suspend service, hasn’t helped. A recent report by the Ellen MacArthur Foundation, which promotes a circular economy that reduces waste and keeps products in use, estimates that by 2050, there could be more plastic than fish in the world’s oceans. Yes, the picture is bleak. Recycling rates must improve. But some of the rhetoric has gotten out of hand. It’s not helping. More to the point: we have got to stop minimizing the contribution that recycling makes. A line from the important and devastating film The Story of Plastic goes: “We cannot recycle our way out of this mess.” We believe this insinuates that recycling serves no purpose and it could take the pressure off personal responsibility. Yes, there are those calling for an end to all single-­use plastic products. But we need to champion today’s recycling efforts and start saying things like “let’s do better,” instead of rhetorically draining a critical tool of its value. We also need to make recycling easier and more attractive for the consumer, particularly in the COVID-19 era. There is a way we can do this that may not be familiar to many North Americans: reverse vending machines (RVMs). RVMs accept plastic PET bottles (number one at the bottom of the bottle) for recy-

46 Recycling Product News November/December 2020

cling and automatically give consumers a refund or their container deposit back. Found around the world, they’re an automated way to collect, sort and handle the return of used drink containers. They’ve been around for decades and are typically installed in regions with robust container deposit laws, but many Americans don’t know about RVMs because only 10 of our states have such laws. But we don’t need legislation. RVMs could be paid for and maintained by beverage companies, who would then offer consumers discount coupons on their various products (not just beverages) inside the very store where the shoppers just recycled their containers. These coupons would have to offer a discount large enough to incentivize RVM use, but that’s the idea: RVMs should sit outside of every superstore and big supermarket in the country, making it easy for and incentivizing consumers to recycle. With that kind of ubiquity, recycling and collection rates would increase. TOMRA Collection Solutions, the world’s largest RVM manufacturer and distributor, plans to introduce RVMs that can accept over 100 beverage containers at a time by the end of 2020 in the U.S. The idea is to avoid any waiting in line while others pop one bottle at a time. Additionally, the overall RVM market is forecast to grow from $343.6 million, where it stood in 2018, to $685.1 million by the end of 2025, according to QY Research. As we tackle the pandemic as well as climate change, this news couldn’t come at a better time. RVMs require no human contact. And, by helping to increase recycling rates, we can make more new bottles from old bottles, cutting our collective carbon footprint and protecting our oceans and waterways from the scourge of plastic pollution. RVMs can make this as easy as grocery shopping. Let’s make it reality. Leon Farahnik is CEO of CarbonLITE Recycling, the world’s largest recycler of plastic beverage bottles, with plants in California, Texas and Pennsylvania.



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