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RECYCLING PRODUCT NEWS

RUNNING STRONG MORE THAN A CENTURY ON KIMCO STEEL RELIES ON UNPARALLELED SERVICE AND CUTTING-EDGE EQUIPMENT TO STAY COMPETITIVE IN SCRAP PAGE 24

BUILDING USED OIL RECYCLING IN B.C.

PUBLICATIONS MAIL AGREEMENT NO. 40069270

PAGE 32

GREENTEC LEADING E-WASTE RECOVERY IN ONTARIO PAGE 42 March 2020

SCRAP

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ORGANICS

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CONTENTS

FEATURES

MARCH 2020 | Volume 28, Number 2

24 COVER STORY RUNNING STRONG MORE THAN A CENTURY ON

Staying competitive in the ever- evolving world of scrap recycling

58 MACHINEX REACHES MILESTONE

Canada’s only turnkey MRF provider celebrates 50 years

32 BUILDING THE MODEL FOR USED OIL RECOVERY IN B.C.

BCUOMA program provides incentives to recyclers to collect and responsibly manage used oil and antifreeze materials

38 FOCUS ON FERROUS Our recycled commodity market

update from ISRI’s Joe Pickard

42 A QUARTER CENTURY IN ELECTRONICS RECOVERY

No signs of slowing down for Greentec, after 25 years managing IT assets and processing e-waste

48

THE PLASTICS INDUSTRY IS CHANGING BECAUSE IT HAS TO

24

In Europe, the shift from large- scale mechanical models for EOL plastic to smaller-scale, localized chemical recycling is well under way

52 ISRI 2020 SHOW PREVIEW On the cover: Gregg Rosen, president of Kimco Steel Sales, with son Cody and their new Liebherr LH 50 scrap handler. FOLLOW US @recyclingpn

42

cover story

62 LAST WORD IMPROVE RECYCLING TO HELP THE PLANET

by Tony Martins, CARI


CONTENTS

RECYCLING PRODUCT NEWS

MARCH 2020 VOLUME 28, NUMBER 2

EDITOR Keith Barker kbarker@baumpub.com; 604-291-9900 ext. 305 ASSOCIATE EDITOR Lee Toop ltoop@baumpub.com; 604-291-9900 ext. 315 MANAGING EDITOR Kaitlyn Till ktill@baumpub.com; 604-291-9900 ext. 330

18

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Lawrence Buser lbuser@baumpub.com; 604-291-9900 ext. 310 ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Sam Esmaili sam@baumpub.com; 604-291-9900 ext.110 ACCOUNT MANAGER David Gilmour dgilmour@baumpub.com; 604-291-9900 ext. 105 MARKETING & BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MANAGER Arnie Gess agess@baumpub.com; 604-291-9900 ext. 115 ADVERTISING PRODUCTION MANAGER Tina Anderson production@baumpub.com; 604-291-9900 ext. 222 DESIGN & PRODUCTION Morena Zanotto morena@baumpub.com; 604-291-9900 ext. 325 CIRCULATION baumpublications@circlink.ca; 1-855-329-1909 PRESIDENT / PUBLISHER Ken Singer ksinger@baumpub.com VICE PRESIDENT / CONTROLLER Melvin Date-Chong mdatechong@baumpub.com FOUNDER Engelbert Baum

32 DEPARTMENTS 12 UPFRONT 18 SPOTLIGHT 24 COVER STORY 32 USED OIL RECYCLING 38 COMMODITY FOCUS: FERROUS

42 E-WASTE RECYCLING 48 PLASTICS RECYCLING 52 ISRI SHOW PREVIEW

52 8 Recycling Product News March 2020

56 HEALTH & SAFETY

60 62

WEB HIGHLIGHTS LAST WORD

Published by Baum Publications Ltd. 124-2323 Boundary Road Vancouver, BC, Canada V5M 4V8 www.baumpub.com Phone: 604-291-9900 • Toll Free:1-888-286-3630 Fax: 604-291-1906 Recycling Product News is published eight times yearly: January/ February, March, April, May/June, July/August, September, October, November/December. Advertising closes at the beginning of the issue month. One year subscription rates for others: Canada $33.50 + 1.68 GST = $35.18; U.S.A. $40; other countries $63.50. Single copies $6.00 + 0.30 GST = $6.30; outside Canada $7.00. All prices are in ­Canadian funds. Recycling Product News accepts no responsibility or liability for reported claims made by manufacturers and/or distributors for products or services; the views and opinions e­ xpressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of Baum Publications Ltd. Copyright 2020, Baum Publications Ltd. No portion of this publication may be reproduced without permission of the publishers. Printed in Canada, on recycled paper, by Mitchell Press Ltd. ISSN 17157013. PUBLICATIONS MAIL AGREEMENT NO. 40069270. Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to: Circulation Dept., 124-2323 Boundary Rd., Vancouver, B.C. V5M 4V8; e-mail: baumpublications@ circlink.ca; 1-855-329-1909 or fax: 1-855-272-0972.


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FROM THE EDITOR

New alliance focused on plastics recycling progress

ADDRESSING PLASTIC WASTE IN THE ENVIRONMENT AND DEVELOPING A CIRCULAR ECONOMY OF PLASTICS REQUIRES THE PARTICIPATION OF EVERYONE ACROSS THE ENTIRE VALUE CHAIN AND THE LONG-TERM COMMITMENT OF BUSINESSES, GOVERNMENTS AND COMMUNITIES.

AEPW VICE-CHAIRMAN ANTOINE FRÉROT

T

he recently formed not-for-profit Alliance to End Plastic Waste (AEPW), made up of nearly 30 multinational corporations that make, use, sell, process, collect and recycle plastics, is working hard to address the ongoing challenges around efforts to keep plastic waste out of our environment. According to a statement from AEPW, “Managing materials after they’ve been used worldwide, keeping waste out of the environment, and getting materials to the right places to be used for recycling and resource recovery is a real challenge because infrastructure, culture and opportunities vary dramatically from nation to nation.” The newly formed alliance is focusing on four key pillars: infrastructure and development; innovation (including in reduction and reuse); education and engagement; and plastic clean-up projects. The companies involved in AEPW include large corporations such as P&G, Nova Chemicals, Imperial Oil (via ExxonMobil), Dow, BASF, Veolia, and many more, along with industry organizations including the Canadian Plastics Industry Association (CPIA). The AEPW says they have directed their innovation, strategic skills, networks and technology to eradicate plastic waste in all forms from land and waterways and have already made a $1 billion commitment earmarked by the partners to the work of the Alliance, along with a promise to bring at least $1.5 billion

worth of initiatives to life. So far, specific key initiatives planned include: developing integrated waste management systems in large urban areas that currently lack the infrastructure to manage waste in a sustainable way; providing funding to support new technology development; establishing a global information-sharing network; training governments and community leaders; and preventing waste before it enters our waterways. “CPIA and its members have long been working to enhance the sustainability of plastics and to benefit from the carbon footprint reductions that the materials offer, when managed responsibly, commented Canadian Plastics Industry Association VP Sustainability, Joe Hruska. “But we recognize that opportunities to do this aren’t universally available and fully support and look forward to the advancements to come through this groundbreaking partnership.” According to AEPW Vice-Chairman Antoine Frérot, also CEO of Veolia Environmental Services, “No one country, company or community can solve this on their own. Addressing plastic waste in the environment and developing a circular economy of plastics requires the participation of everyone across the entire value chain and the long-term commitment of businesses, governments and communities.” Visit endplasticwaste.org for more information about the AEPW and current initiatives.

Keith Barker, Editor kbarker@baumpub.com 888-286-3630; 604-291-9900 ext. 305

CANADIAN ASSOCIATION OF RECYCLING INDUSTRIES

10 Recycling Product News March 2020

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UPFRONT //

For all the latest industry news, visit recyclingproductnews.com or subscribe to our weekly eNewsletter at recyclingproductnews.com/newsletter-info

MRF NEWS

WM AND MACHINEX CELEBRATE PLANT OPENING IN LAVAL On February 24, Machinex representatives attended the official grand opening ceremony of the Waste Management recovery facility located in Laval, Quebec, near Montreal. The ceremony was held with the Quebec Minister of the Environment Benoit Charrette and Waste Management’s VP Eastern Canada Aaron Johnson. The new WM MRF in Laval, with system designed and installed by Machinex, will process about 50,000 tonnes yearly of plastic, paper and metals. Operating for the past few months, the system has been processing recyclable material from the industrial, commercial and institutional sectors of the greater Montreal area. Machinex, which celebrates its 50th year in business in 2020, supplied the plant’s turnkey sorting system, including an OCC screen, disc separators for fine particles, a magnetic separator and a Machinex II-Ram baler. “The expertise developed by Machinex through its many projects around the world has enabled us to create a highperformance sorting system in Laval which directly aligns with our objectives of equipment efficiency and production quality,” said Jean Beaudoin, Waste Management director of Quebec sorting facilities and

From left: David Hébert, Machinex; Aaron Johnson, VP Eastern Canada, Waste Management; Pierre Paré, CEO of Machinex Group; and Guillaume Chevrette, Waste Management. transfer stations. “The team deployed by Machinex for the completion of this project was attentive to our needs and knew how to adapt to the high-quality standards which is expected by Waste Management.” David Hébert, project director at Machinex, commented, “We are very satisfied with the progress of this project and especially with the performance achieved by the turnkey system we provided. We have been able to count on an excellent collaboration with the client during all stages

of the process and we wish to be able to work again with Waste Management to develop other high-performance systems.” Celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2020, Plessisville, Quebec-based Machinex became the first company in Canada to design machinery for material recycling facilities, in the 1980s. Over the past 50 years, Machinex experts have designed and installed over 375 turnkey facilities in partnership with leading MRFs in Canada, the United States, Europe and Oceania.

NEWS BRIEFS Bunting appoints new Master Rep for Western Canada Bunting has contracted Chris Heming, co-owner of CPG Automation, to serve as their new Master Rep for Western Canada. “I am very pleased to be an official partner with Bunting for Western Canada,” said Heming who will be representing all standard Bunting products in western Canadian provinces, including material handling, magnetic separation and metal detection equipment.

12 Recycling Product News March 2020

AMCS acquires TRUX Route Management Systems At the end of January, AMCS, the U.K.-based global supplier of integrated software and vehicle technology for the waste, recycling and resource industries, announced the acquisition of Cambridge, Ontario-based software solutions provider TRUX Route Management Systems Inc. Commenting on the acquisition, AMCS CEO Jimmy Martin said, “The North American waste market is shaping up to be an exciting place for growth in the coming years.”


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ACQUISITIONS

NEW WAY TRUCKS ACQUIRES ROTO PAC FROM GINOVE, ESTABLISHES PARTNERSHIP WITH DURABAC

New Way Trucks, Inc., the Iowa-based refuse truck manufacturer, has acquired ROTO PAC’s auger-driven organics collection truck from Quebec-based Ginove. New Way has also begun a manufacturing and distribution partnership with Durabac to serve the Canadian market. “We are excited to be adding ROTO PAC and its complete product lineup to the New Way family,” said New Way CEO, Mike McLaughlin. “We have partnered with Ginove on developing ROTO PAC into the state-of-the-art product it has become today, and this acquisition will provide our team with firsthand access for continued innovation. It is the next natural step in ROTO PAC’s development.” In a separate transaction, New Way has partnered with Durabac, a Granby, Quebec-based manufacturer of refuse equipment, on products for the Canadian market. As part of this agreement, Durabac has acquired the former Ginove property in Saint-Casimir, Quebec, and will manufacture and distribute the ROTO PAC and other former Ginove products throughout Canada. “Durabac has a great reputation and we are excited about this partnership with them,” said Don Ross, New Way. “They already have a proven track record in Canada and, with their help, we can expand our footprint in the country.”

ESG acquires fleet management software specialist Soft-Pak Environmental Solutions Group (ESG) has expanded its family of companies with the addition of waste industry route and office software provider Soft-Pak, based in San Diego, California. According to a statement from ESG, “Soft-Pak’s contribution to our already comprehensive product offering, which includes Heil, Curotto Can and 3rd Eye, helps to close the loop for fleet owners who are looking for a completely integrated product – one that delivers the lowest total cost of collection.”

BATTERY RECYCLING

CALL 2 RECYCLE REPORTS RECORD HIGH BATTERY COLLECTION

Canada’s national consumer battery collection and recycling program, Call2Recycle Canada, has announced the highest battery collection numbers since inception. Call2Recycle says due to increased participation of Canadians, almost three million kilograms of household batteries were recycled in 2019, a nine percent increase over 2018 results. Call2Recycle Canada has also reported a more than 10 percent increase in batteries collected in regulated provinces, where it serves as the stewardship program: B.C., Manitoba, Prince Edward Island and Quebec. According to a 2019 Ipsos study (commissioned by Call2Recycle) an average of nearly 80 percent of residents in regulated provinces are aware that old batteries need to be recycled, while 68 percent actually recycle their old batteries. “Strong partnerships with purposedriven retailers, recycling depots and provincial governments across the country in 2019 have contributed to yet another record-setting year for Call2Recycle,” said Joe Zenobio, president of Call2Recycle Canada. “We are extremely pleased with this achievement and proud to see that Canadian consumers are more mindful than ever of the important connection between battery recycling and a sustainable environment.” According to Call2Recycle numbers, with nearly 3 million kilograms of household batteries collected nationwide, B.C., Manitoba, PEI and Quebec posted the highest collection results. Quebec residents collected the most for a third year in a row, recycling more than 1.2 million kilograms of used batteries – an eight percent increase over 2018.

March 2020 www.recyclingproductnews.com

13


UPFRONT UPFRONT ELECTRONICS RECYCLING

V4.0 E-STEWARDS CERTIFICATION INTRODUCED

The e-Stewards Certification Program has launched the 4th Version of its Ethical Electronics Recycling and Refurbishment Standard. The new, more streamlined version of the standard has been under development by a special drafting committee since the summer of 2018 and most recently underwent two lengthy open stakeholder comment periods. “The revision process was smooth and very constructive, and the result is a standard that is easier to read and execute and at the same time has probably become more rigorous in the areas

that matter most – human health, export controls and data security,” said Jim Puckett, the founder and executive director of BAN, creator and administrator of the e-Stewards program. “At a time when ethical behaviour continues to be challenging for some, and a time when the industry is getting more complicated by the day, this version should be a welcome tonic for all stakeholders.”

LABOUR NEWS

SWANA REPORT INDICATES INCREASED FEMALE RECRUITMENT KEY TO SOLVING INDUSTRY DRIVER SHORTAGE According to the Solid Waste Association of North America’s (SWANA) Applied Research Foundation (ARF), the latest trucking statistics show that the shortage of over-the-road (OTR) truck drivers in the U.S. is at the highest level it has been in 15 years, a shortage mirrored in the waste and recyclables collection industry. According to a new report done by ARF, Recruiting Personnel for Solid Waste Collection Services, causes for the driver shortage include an aging workforce, occupational danger, increased demand for trucking services due to industry growth and low participation of women in the industry.

The report estimates that about 1,000 women are employed in waste and recyclables collection, which equates to about one percent of the 116,000 sanitation workers in the U.S. According to Jeremy O’Brien, SWANA’s director of applied research, “This report highlights the potential for women to play an increasingly important role in the provision of solid waste collection services and the valuable benefits that these jobs offer – such as regular hours, no time away from home, and the universal and permanent need for skilled employees in this industry.”

MATTRESS RECYCLING

MRC PROGRAM SURPASSES FIVE MILLION MATTRESSES RECYCLED IN CALIFORNIA SINCE 2016 As of the end of 2019, five million mattresses have been recycled by the Mattress Recycling Council’s (MRC) Bye Bye Mattress program in the state of California since the program began in 2016. By recycling this number of mattresses, according to the MRC, the program has helped California keep about 168 million pounds of material, including steel, foam, fibres, wood, cardboard and plastics and out of landfill. “California is a global leader in mattress recycling, as evidenced by this significant milestone achievement,” said Mike O’Donnell, managing director of MRC, which operates the Bye Bye Mattress program. “We continue to build on this leadership

14 Recycling Product News March 2020

by growing no-cost mattress recycling options statewide and helping ensure a greener California.” Bye Bye Mattress operates through a statewide network of permanent collection sites, public collection events and collaboration with solid waste providers, nonprofit organizations and small businesses. Collected mattresses are transported to regional facilities that dismantle and recycle mattress components. Mattresses are also delivered to recyclers through Retailer Take-Back and Commercial Volume Pickup programs. The Bye Bye Mattress program is funded through a recycling fee charged at the point of sale.


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HAULING & COLLECTION

ÉEQ SALUTES PLAN TO MODERNIZE CURBSIDE RECYCLING IN QUEBEC Éco Entreprises Québec (ÉEQ), the nonprofit organization representing thousands of companies involved in the collection and sorting of residential recyclables in the province, salutes the recent announcement made by the Government of Québec regarding curbside recycling reform. According to the ÉEQ, companies who produce and market containers, packaging and printed matter will be entrusted with the management of the updated system, which is key for the implementation of a true circular economy for recyclable materials in the province. “With the ongoing recycling crisis, this environmental, economic and social transformation project reflects the expectations of companies who already finance curbside recycling,” said ÉEQ President and CEO Maryse Vermette. “They are ready to take on the responsibility of a transparent system in order to reduce at the source and showcase recyclables as locally and efficiently as possible. “Over the coming years, the successful transformation of the system will rest on the greater responsibilities companies have regarding the management of their materials, as well as on a fundamental partnership with municipalities that takes regional specificities into account.” The decision to modernize curbside

recycling in Quebec is aligned with recent recommendations from members of the action committee for the modernization

of recovery and recycling in the province, including ÉEQ and other key stakeholders in curbside recycling.

March 2020 www.recyclingproductnews.com

15


UPFRONT UPFRONT

CONNECT WITH US

CORPORATE NEWS

SIMS RECYCLING SOLUTIONS TO REBRAND AS SIMS LIFECYCLE SERVICES Sims Recycling Solutions (SRS), the global specialist in IT asset disposition and data centre recycling, has announced that the company will change its name and branding to Sims Lifecycle Services (SLS). According to SRS, the change reflects exponential growth in data centre, redeploy, reuse and recycle sectors of their business. “The new brand name more accurately represents the wide array of services we offer, including redeploying and reusing IT assets and their components, to the final recycling of the materials,” commented SRS global president, Ingrid Sinclair.

E-WASTE

SUSTAINABLE PACKAGING

GLOBAL SHIP INDUSTRY CONTINUES TO USE DANGEROUS OPTIONS FOR RECYCLING

N2 LAUNCHES RECYCLABLE PAPERBOARD CONTAINERS FOR CANNABIS

According to data recently released by the NGO Shipbreaking Platform, 674 ocean-going commercial ships and offshore units were sold to scrapyards globally in 2019. Of these vessels, 469 large tankers, bulkers, floating platforms, cargo and passenger ships were broken down in primitive, substandard conditions on three beaches in Bangladesh, India and Pakistan, amounting to nearly 90 percent of the gross tonnage dismantled globally. “There is wide-spread knowledge of the irreparable damage caused by dirty and dangerous practices on tidal mudflats, yet profit is the only decisive factor for most ship owners when selling their vessels for breaking,” said Ingvild Jenssen, founder and director of the NGO Shipbreaking Platform. According to a 2019 report, at least 26 workers lost their lives when breaking apart the global fleet. Nationally, UAE, Greece and the U.S. top the list of worst offenders in 2019.

March 1, Cannabis packaging company N2 Packaging Systems, based out of Twin Falls, Idaho, launched its new recycled paperboard can with child-resistant lid, which joins the company’s suite of process-patented, sustainable packaging for cannabis and cannabis industry products. N2’s new paperboard can for cannabis is made of up to 65 percent reclaimed paper from recycling centres commonly found near high-producing retailers including Target and Costco, and is 100 percent recyclable. Compared to the industry’s typical plastic packaging, or 4 oz. glass jar, the paperboard can reduces transportation and storage weight by up to more than 75 percent, while keeping products fresh in a sustainable, food-grade, recyclable, hermetically sealed package.

NEWS BRIEFS CONEXPO-CON/AGG 2020 hosts close to 130,000 visitors from all over the world March 9–13, 2020, CONEXPO-CON/AGG 2020 was held in Las Vegas, Nevada. The event, which is focused on construction and related industries worldwide, including C&D recycling, saw close to 130,000 visitors from all over the world. Look for Recycling Product News’ event in review in our upcoming April issue.

16 Recycling Product News March 2020

GFL Environmental goes public On February 25, Vaughan, Ontario-based GFL Environmental Inc. announced the launch of its initial public offering of 73,170,733 subordinate voting shares and its concurrent offering of 14,000,000 tangible equity units,with a stated amount of US$50.00 (or C$66.67) per unit. The initial public offering price for the subordinate voting shares is expected to be between US$20.00 and US$21.00 (or C$26.66 and $28.00) per share.


SPOTLIGHT //

For all the latest equipment, systems and technology introductions and updates, visit recyclingproductnews.com or subscribe to our weekly eNewsletter at recyclingproductnews.com/newsletter-info

VERMEER INTRODUCES NEW TROMMEL SCREEN Vermeer continues to expand its trommel screen product line with the introduction of the new TR6400 model, capable of separating up to 180 cubic yards (137.6 cubic metres) of material per hour with 0.5-inch (12.7-mm) screens installed and a material moisture content of less than 40 percent. This new portable screen is ideal for compost, woody biomass and topsoil applications and provides a powerful 100-hp (75-kW) Deutz 3.6L Tier 4 Final (Stage IV) engine. Other features include a 6.5-foot diameter (2 m) screen drum with variable speeds of 0-33.1 gallons per minute (0-125.3 L/min), a low hopper

infeed with a capacity of 6.5 cubic yards (5 cubic metres) and various service and operating enhancements. “The TR6400 trommel screen builds off the success of our recently introduced TR5300 model,” explained Jeff Bradley, product manager for recycling and

forestry equipment at Vermeer. “Its compact design allows for ease of transportation and maintenance. With a large drum diameter, hopper capacity and increased horsepower, teams will be able to produce large volumes of finished material with the TR6400 day in, day out.”

LATEST DUST SUPPRESSION INCLUDES VFD FOR EASY ADJUSTMENTS TO SUIT THE JOB

ROPAX JUMBO COMPACTS MATERIAL UP TO 80 PERCENT

The ROPAX Jumbo Rolling Compactor from Epax Systems uses a drum with sharp metal teeth to crush, macerate, tear, rip and compress waste in large open-top containers/ dumpsters. The Ropax Jumbo rolling drum weighs over two tons and is attached to an articulating boom which moves it from one end of the container to the other and back again, crushing and compacting material all along the way. The ROPAX Jumbo’s high compaction rate allows for significant improvement in container utilization with compaction as high as 80 percent on a wide variety of items including cardboard and other packaging, wood pallets and crates, cable reels, paper, film and foil, green waste, encapsulated polystyrene, household goods, light metals and other bulky items. Units feature an intuitive control panel and a range of drum configurations.

18 Recycling Product News March 2020

BossTek has introduced an optional Variable Frequency Drive (VFD) system for its dust suppression equipment which allows users to adjust air flow to suit a broad range of applications and working environments. The new BossTek VFD system is designed to reduce the need to purchase or rent different models to match the machines’ output to specific project requirements, delivering greater flexibility and reducing the total cost of equipment ownership. “Atomized mist technology has been widely accepted as an extremely effective approach to dust management,” said BossTek Sales Manager Mike Lewis. “This new development will allow users to tailor the fan speed to match the job. It’s useful in a number of different industries, but one good example would be demolition projects,” he said.


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BOLLEGRAAF ROBB-AQC ROBOTIC SORTER INTRODUCED According to Van Dyk Recycling Solutions, Bollegraaf’s new AIpowered RoBB-AQC is the first sorting robot that combines the accuracy of NIR detection with the adaptability of AI-powered learning (no other robot uses near-infrared technology). As a final quality control step on a container line, one RoBB unit will recover up to 70 picks per minute, which is higher productivity and better reliability than two human sorters. RoBB-AQC uses advanced technologies, sophisticated artificial intelligence and the new system is designed with durability and flexibility in mind. This robot uses a robotic arm construction developed over a decade, designed to be durable enough to last in tough MRF environments and which does not need daily replacement parts such as suction cups. For flexibility, this system can be placed on top of existing sort lines with very minimal retrofit costs and minimal downtime, and it allows users to adapt to changes in material streams or commodity prices. Material selection only requires the touch of a button and ranges through PET, HDPE, LDPE, PS and PP to Tetra Pak, OCC or paper/cardboard of various shapes and sizes. Additionally, the new RoBB-AQC robot can sort intermittently

or continuously, regardless of working conditions on site, and requires minimal supervision and little maintenance. This technology also includes modular configuration, enabling users to choose the number of sorting units required and simultaneously sort up to four different materials per module.

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March 2020 www.recyclingproductnews.com

19


SPOTLIGHT

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ROTOCHOPPER UPDATES HORIZONTAL GRINDER Rotochopper has updated its FP-66 horizontal grinder to increase the capacity of materials that can be processed by the mid-sized grinder. The larger 30-inch feed opening and increased powerfeed lift height allow larger materials into the grinding chamber – increasing productivity and efficiency. This heavy-duty grinder is now available with a more aggressive powerfeed and either a 630- or 755hp diesel engine to grind a variety of raw materials.

TOMRA REVERSE VENDING FOR OUTDOOR COLLECTION

UNISORT PREVO 5.0 LATEST UPGRADE FOR NIR OPTICAL SORTING UniSort is Steinert’s NIR optical technology that uses hyperspectral imaging cameras for high-speed plastics sorting. Through its latest software upgrade, combined with the fifth evolutionary stage of UniSort PR, UniSort PREVO 5.0 now includes improvements that increase productivity and application flexibility and make maintenance significantly easier. UniSort 5.0 now uses new artificially Intelligent Object Identifier technology developed to provide a more stable sorting process, while also improving results. This solution can be integrated without any additional sensorics and is downward compatible with UniSort machines dating back to 2018, with a combination of near-infrared (NIR) and colour cameras. Other key UniSort PREVO 5.0 upgrades include dynamic calibration, revamped light boxes, automatic white balance and a new optimized valve manifold to guarantee a consistently precise separation of the waste flow. The UniSort PR is available in working widths of 1,000 mm to 2,800 mm.

20 Recycling Product News March 2020

TOMRA of North America has extended its standalone line of durable reverse vending machines (RVMs) with the introduction of the rugged TOMRA S1 concept. Designed for outdoor use in or under a sheltered area, the S1 can withstand the elements, including substantial variations in temperature. S1 uses TOMRA Flow Technology to recognize can, plastic and glass beverage containers instantly and without rotation, increasing return speed considerably and providing customers with a fast, reliable and efficient recycling experience. Units are also equipped with topof-the-line fraud prevention technology to help protect deposit refunds. The S1 concept is currently being piloted outside three supermarkets in New York City.


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SPOTLIGHT CARBONATOR DESIGNED FOR ECO-FRIENDLY ORGANIC MATERIALS REDUCTION The 6050 carbonator is the first product offering from Tigercat’s new material processing equipment lineup. Unique, cost-effective and eco-friendly, the mobile 6050 carbonator is engineered to reduce wood debris volume on-site through an environmentally friendly carbon sequestration process, with no material pre-processing required. Logs, limbs, brush, stumps, yard waste, pallets, clean lumber and other clean wood-based debris can be reduced by 90–95 percent, with high throughput, according to Tigercat. The remaining carbon-based output – often referred to as biochar – sequesters the captured carbon. Because there is no resulting organic decay, along with the associated release of greenhouse gasses, Tigercat says this carbonization process represents the lowest carbon footprint of any competing material reduction method. “It is a single-step sequestration process done on site,” explained Anders Ragnarsson Tigercat’s VP, material

processing products. “A cost-effective and environmentally friendly solution that reduces debris transportation and disposal costs.”

MAGUIRE GRAVIMETRIC BLENDERS EXPAND CAPACITY FOR POST-CONSUMER RESIN

APPLICATION-SPECIFIC SEALS TO EXTEND CONVEYOR IDLER LIFE

Superior Industries, Inc., says it has revolutionized the conveyor idler market with the introduction of applicationspecific idler seals designed for use in wet, dusty and other more extreme conditions. The introduction was one of a dozen made by Superior in early March at CONEXPO-CON/ AGG 2020. “These next-generation SpinGuard Idler Seals will offer greater protection in applications known to expose bearings to fugitive material prematurely,” said Paul Schmidgall, chief engineer of Superior’s conveyor components division. “We tested dozens of seal iterations over more than five years and we think we have some pretty robust options.” Look for more new equipment and technology news from CONEXPO-CON/AGG 2020 in our upcoming spring issues of RPN and online at www.recyclingproductnews.com

22 Recycling Product News March 2020

These new 1200 Series Blenders from Maguire Products are designed to address the growing need to use more regrind and postconsumer resin, along with virgin polymer, in plastics manufacturing. These blenders are designed for larger-throughput applications, precisely dispensing up to 12 materials of widely diverse types, and can be configured to dose up to six major ingredients, including virgin polymer, regrind and post-consumer resin (PCR). The new Maguire Weigh Scale Blender (WSB) 1200 Series has a throughput range of 900 to 2,040 kg/hour and is suitable for extrusion, high-volume injection, blow molding and central blending applications. “WSB-1200 Series blenders enable processors working in a somewhat smaller throughput range to meet growing demand for products that incorporate regrind and PCR along with virgin resin,” said Frank Kavanagh, Maguire Products.


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24 Recycling Product News March 2020

RUNNING ST


STRONG MORE THAN A CENTURY ON KINGSTON, ONTARIO’S KIMCO STEEL RELIES ON UNPARALLELED SERVICE AND CUTTING-EDGE EQUIPMENT TO STAY COMPETITIVE IN THE EVER-EVOLVING WORLD OF SCRAP RECYCLING BY KEITH BARKER, EDITOR

K

Cody Rosen and father Gregg Rosen with their new LH 40 material handler, at the yard in Kingston, ON.

imco Steel Sales Ltd., operating on a 65-acre site in Kingston, Ontario, is one of Canada’s most innovative and modern steel service centres, scrap metal and recycling facilities. The origins of the company date back to 1911, when Hyman Rosen, a 16-yearold immigrant, began collecting used rags and bottles with a horse and buggy. Rosen opened his first shop in 1918 under the name of H. Rosen, and later moved to a larger lot and rebranded to Kingston Scrap Iron & Metal Co. By 1950, Hyman Rosen was joined by his son Irving and they soon after added a baling press to compress end-of-life automobiles. In the 1960s, Kimco expanded into new steel sales and began its refuse collection operation serving industrial, commercial and C&D customers. Kimco moved to its present location on John Counter Blvd. in Kingston in 1975 and then further expanded with a new steel service centre, ferrous and non-ferrous metal division, recycling centre and container services. In 1977, Kimco Steel Sales Ltd. was named the

Most Outstanding Recycling Operation in Canada by the Canadian Association of Recycling Industries. Gregg Rosen, Kimco’s current president, joined his father Irving in the family business in 1979 and, like his father before him, took on the role of modernizing the company. By the early 2000s, for example, they had installed their on-site auto shredder which is still running strong today. Currently, the Kimco Steel Sales recycling division processes up to 400 tons per month of non-ferrous and about 2,000 ELV automobiles, as well as approximately 150,000 tons of ferrous yearly. As both a scrap recycler and a new steel distribution centre, Kimco sells its processed scrap to steel mills and then buys finished product back from mills for distribution. “Having integrated these separate but related businesses, we can better respond to market fluctuations,” explains Rosen. “Last year was a great new steel distribution year. The year before was an amazing scrap year. Our size and approach allows us to take advantage of these kinds of swings.” March 2020 www.recyclingproductnews.com

25


COVER STORY

Another relatively small Kimco division provides containerized refuse, construction and demolition pickup service within an approximate 50-mile radius of their yard in Kingston. They run a fleet of 60 trucks and 200 trailers, with about 650 containers in the field (as of the start of 2020). Rosen admits that while business is good, the past few years have been challenging ones for the scrap metal industry. “There has been a great deal of consolidation in our industry, and a lot of our large industrial customers have moved out of Ontario,” he says. “With the reduction in plants in our region, and our distance (approximately 275 km) from the Greater Toronto Area (GTA), we have had to be extremely creative in finding ways to grow our business.” He adds that in the past they could handle a wide range of materials, from garbage and scrap metal, to cardboard, plastic and e-waste. “We could do it all,” he says. “Now we’ve got tons of competition from large players like Triple M, American Iron & Metal and CMI, so we’ve had to be extremely

26 Recycling Product News March 2020

strategic in finding areas in which we can continue to be profitable and ‘outservice’ the big guys.” For Kimco, long-term success as a relatively smaller player in the scrap recycling industry (with about 230 employees at their one location) is about providing a level of service that others do not. “We want to be the best we can be and we pride ourselves on giving value to our customers who we treat like partners,” explains Rosen. “If a customer values that kind of reliability, dependability and service, then they are going to do business with us. If they are just looking for the lowest price, well then I’m maybe not going to win out.”

A LONG-TIME SUPPLIER PARTNERSHIP

Rosen has worked with Liebherr as a key equipment supplier since they bought their first machine in 1990. He says they used to run cable cranes before the introduction of the hydraulic excavator in the late 1970s, and even back then, when hydraulic excavators were first introduced, the Rosen family considered Liebherr to be the “RollsRoyce” of this category of equipment.

Kimco’s auto shredder in place by the early 2000s is still running strong today, producing up to 10,000 tons of shred every month. “At first, we felt like we could not afford a Liebherr hydraulic excavator for our business,” explains Rosen. “We ended up buying a competitor’s piece of equipment as our first machine of that size. My father and I considered it a really big deal back then and we thought the lower-priced machine was a better value for us.” In the end, he says that first machine did not work out to be a great investment for Kimco. “We got what we paid for and realized we needed a better option,” Rosen recalls with a grin. In the early 2000s, around the time their auto shredder was installed, they brought in their first Liebherr hydraulic excavator. “Ever since then, I’ve owned nothing but yellow Liebherr cranes,” he says. “Today we have 14 of them and it’s the only brand you will see in our yard.” Rosen continues, “We need to be costeffective everywhere, so our Liebherr


dependability is a very big thing. “The most expensive thing for me is a breakdown. Whether it’s a truck, crane or a shredder. When something so critical to our business goes down, I need it fixed quickly and efficiently. “Liebherr never lets me down when it comes to this.” Rosen says they have built an amazing relationship with Liebherr Canada, including their current point of contact, Rick Koen, whom he has known for several decades. “They treat me as well as they treat anybody else and I’m only a small guy,” he says. “I only buy two to three pieces of equipment per year but Rick and the rest of the team are always there for me. And they always stand behind their products. Liebherr has helped Kimco grow, and I truly believe they’re a big part of our success. “We’re in Kingston, Ontario, and they’re located in Burlington and Montreal, but they still look after us. I can’t ask for more than that.” Rosen continues, “Everything’s going

Kimco Steel Sales recycling division processes about 2,000 ELV automobiles per month and approximately 150,000 tons of ferrous yearly. to break at some point. Especially when you work your equipment as hard as we do. “The bottom line is, can your supplier provide the required service? Can they look after you? “Liebherr certainly does,” he says. “After all the changes in our business and in our industry over the last 30 years, they’re still my go-to people.”

FRESH PLANT

In February, Kimco brought two new Liebherr material handlers into their yard – an LH 40 and an LH 50, which have since been operating ten hours per day on average. “We rotate our equipment

March 2020 www.recyclingproductnews.com

27


COVER STORY

LH 40 (M INDUSTRY LITRONIC) Reach 16 m Operating Weight* 36,400 – 38,700 kg Engine Output 155 kW / 211 PS System Performance 237 kW Emission Stage Stage V / Tier 4 Final IIIA Multi-tine Grab Capacity 0.40 – 1.10 m³

LH 50 (M INDUSTRY LITRONIC) Reach 18 m Operating Weight* 40,000 – 43,500 kg Engine Output 155 kW / 211 PS System Performance 269 kW Emission Stage Stage V / Tier 4 Final IIIA Multi-tine Grab Capacity 0.40 – 1.10 m³ *Without attachment

28 Recycling Product News March 2020

after so many hours,” explains Rosen. “We decided to replace some of our older Liebherr 934s with a 40 and a 50 model. Our LH 40 will sit in a smaller area, it doesn’t need to do as much work. Our LH 50s and LH 60s are our true workhorses.” According to Rosen, there’s genuine excitement when they get new equipment, for multiple reasons, including increased efficiency and improved operating costs. And it’s a morale booster for everyone in the scrapyard. “Our operators are very appreciative when we get a new crane in the yard,” he explains. “They’ve got all the latest technology and operator comforts. If you’re an operator and you get the opportunity to work in a shiny new crane, it really makes you proud of the work you are doing. We don’t have multiple operators for our cranes. So if ‘John’ gets the new crane, it’s John’s crane, and he treats it as if it’s his own. This raises morale and productivity.” He says they also use some excavators that have different shears on them, but their Liebherrs are rubber-tired material handlers (also called hydraulic cranes) with grapples and magnets.

Kimco’s new Liebherr LH 50 is a true workhorse, used primarily at the shredder behind a larger LH 60 to maximize feeding. “Our yard is paved and clean, so they get around relatively quickly. They’re beasts! Our Liebherr cranes don’t stop all day long.” Kimco’s new LH 40 is a compact material handling crane on rubber tires designed specifically to be quick around a scrapyard, to go wherever it is needed. Rosen says it is used in multiple applications, for loading stainless or aluminum, or sorting loads of copper or wire, or it may be needed to pile material at the shredder. Their other new Liebherr, one of several LH 50s in the yard, along with their larger LH 60 model, while mobile, are used as more stationary machines, working in a set spot. “We use our larger models primarily in one location on site at the shredder to maximize feeding, because of their long reach, capability and high capacities,” says Rosen. “The LH 60 is closest to the shredder, with the LH 50s be-


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COVER STORY hind it, feeding sorted material forward. Everything needs to be pre-sorted by the LH 40 and smaller machines to make sure there are no unshreddables. It is all fed to the LH 60 which all day long is loading the conveyor to the shredder.” According to Rosen, their aim is to produce between 8,000 and 10,000 tons of shred every month. “That’s an average, but everything is still market-driven,” he says. “Some months we do more than others, depending on the market and various factors.” Rosen adds that it is very important to provide a consistent supply to the mills. “The mills can rely on us because they know what they are going to get month to month. There is no sense sending 15,000 tons tomorrow, and then next month turning around and sending only 5,000 tons.

IF YOU’RE AN OPERATOR AND YOU GET THE OPPORTUNITY TO WORK IN A SHINY NEW CRANE, IT REALLY MAKES YOU PROUD OF THE WORK YOU ARE DOING.

GREGG ROSEN “I like to be somewhat consistent, and I like to keep some scrap on hand to play the market a bit. If I can keep some scrap behind to wait for a drought, it’s good. If it looks like there may be a pick up in the market, it’s great to have lots of material on hand. If the market goes down, I’ll start saving scrap again.”

30 Recycling Product News March 2020

AN EYE TO THE FUTURE

According to Rosen, as the third generation to lead the family company, he is very proud to have had the opportunity to expand Kimco into the multifaceted, modern company it is today. “Our capabilities now include innovative materials handling, efficient transportation systems, environmental management and of course the refinement of scrap metal processing,” he says, adding that his grandfather’s philosophy is still alive and well to this day: “Focus on the needs of your customers and the future

will take care of itself.” “It’s a long time to be surviving in this business,” concludes Rosen. “There’s been hundreds of companies that we’ve known, that have gone by the wayside over the years. “And now I am so fortunate to welcome the fourth generation to the family business, as my son Cody joined the company a few years ago. “I can already see how he’s taking us into the future the way I did when I came on board, and the way my dad did when he went to work with his father.” RPN


Model 4 The new model 4 E-Z log Baler is just what mid size scrap yards have been asking for! Priced right for any yard — small, mid size, or large! Like the Model 3, the NEW Model 4 has no set up time and a very low cost to operate. The one man operations are all handled from the newly designed cab. With the 400º rotation crane and a reach of 27’ adding the continuous rotation grapple, it makes loading the larger chamber a breeze. Taking your loose scrap to a highly sought after shreddable log.

— Cycles in under 2 minutes! — Produces up to 70 tons per day. — Fully portable in the closed position. — New seat design for more operator comfort.


SCRAP RECYCLING USED OIL RECYCLING

BUILDING THE MODEL FOR USED OIL RECOVERY IN B.C. BCUOMA PROGRAM IS TRANSFORMING THE WAY WE COLLECT AND RESPONSIBLY MANAGE USED OIL, ANTIFREEZE AND FILTERS BY KEITH BARKER, EDITOR

D

avid Lawes (pictured above) has spent just over six years with the B.C. Used Oil Management Association (BCUOMA.) Prior to that, he was with the B.C. provincial government in the Ministry of Environment where he oversaw recycling programs and led the award-winning B.C. government team behind many of the recycling programs in place around the province today. “The product stewardship policy approach that we have in British Columbia is considered world-class,” says Lawes. “It’s a results-based regulatory approach where government has put industry in charge of managing the products they

32 Recycling Product News March 2020

make and sell, and then set high standards and reporting requirements. The government really doesn’t get involved in the day-to-day operations of recycling businesses, instead it leaves that up to the business people that are running the take-back programs. “I’m a British Columbian, so I’m pretty proud of what we’ve done here.” He says the model used in B.C. for managing used automotive and industrial oil and other fluids including antifreeze has been noticed across the country and in the U.S., but from a government perspective, the results-based model in BC can be hard to replicate in other jurisdictions. “It takes a lot of trust in the quid pro quo equilibrium and braveness on behalf of government.

Government needs to provide industry with the flexibility it needs to design and efficiently deliver these programs. Government then needs to keep laser focused on having the right metrics and regulatory provisions in place to make sure targets are being met, and the public interest is being served, but stay out of the operations.”

HOW THE B.C. USED OIL RECYCLING MODEL WORKS

The BC Used Oil Management Association (BCUOMA) started in 2003, the same year the provincial government regulated that producers be put in charge of used automotive and industrial oil and fluids recycling. (“Producers” are the first sellers of products such as


automotive oil and antifreeze, as well as oil filters, etc.) BCUOMA’s program enables the province-wide collection and recycling of lubricating oil, oil filters, oil containers, antifreeze and antifreeze containers. Since 2003, the used oil program has been expanded into all parts of the province. BCUOMA membership is currently at about 250 members, with first sellers of oil or antifreeze in British Columbia as its membership base. BCUOMA has a fee schedule for that membership, based on the volume they put into the market, or the weight they put into the market. The BCUOMA board consists of member nominated industry representatives from companies including Petro-Canada, Chevron, Canadian Tire and Mr. Lube. “We are an open market, or freemarket program,” explains Lawes. “We don’t contract out collection companies to go around to all the different lube shops, or Canadian Tires, or the municipal yards. We provide an incentive to all registered companies to collect used oil and other fluids and these com-

panies make their own contracts with the generators. “Companies in British Columbia that are registered with us must demonstrate they’re doing the right thing, environmentally, with their products and meeting all the environmental regulations. We measure and monitor the amount of material collected, and then we provide a zone-based incentive. “The further they are away from the major centres, the more we pay them,” he continues. “We want to make sure oil and antifreeze is collected through the entire province. They bring it into a recycling facility, where it is processed and eventually re-marketed. Our incentive is really just to make sure that material moves from all parts of the province, and that enough companies involved in the business are staying viable and competitive.” He adds that British Columbia is fortunate with respect to end market availability for recovered oil, as one of Canada’s largest re-refineries of oil, is located in North Vancouver.

“On average, 75 percent of the oil that’s collected in British Columbia gets turned back into new lubricating oil, and is reused again and again,” he says, adding that all the antifreeze collected also gets turned back into new antifreeze products. “Lots of times, antifreeze is going right back into use, it’s being distilled and it goes right back into the car.” He says used oil filters also contain steel, for which there is established markets and that most of the plastics recovered from their programs go to Merlin Plastics located in Delta, B.C., outside of Vancouver. “Most of our recovered plastics go to Merlin Plastics, one of the best plastic recycling facilities in the Pacific North West of North America,” he says. “Our recovered plastics are cleaned and turned into new pellets, and sold back to the plastics industry.” Our filter and container recovery rates on average, typically near 85 percent, are quite high compared to other jurisdictions in North America. “On average, 75 percent of the oil

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USED OIL RECYCLING

Modified sea containers are ideal for providing the infrastructure and signage needed to serve more remote communities with used oil collection for recycling. that’s collected in British Columbia gets turned back into new lubricating oil, and is reused again and again,” he says, adding that all the antifreeze collected also gets turned back into new antifreeze products. “Lots of times, antifreeze is going right back into use, it’s being distilled and it goes right back into the car. Or sometimes it’s used for the antifreeze component of windshield washer fluid.” He says used oil filters also contain steel, for which there is usually a good market and that plastics recovered from their programs go to Merlin Plastics located in Delta, B.C., outside of Vancouver. “Our recovered plastics all go Merlin Plastics, one of the best plastic recycling facilities in North America,” he says. “They are well known. We really monitor our plastics closely. Plastics is a hot topic these days, and so it’s really important that we recover all of our containers and get them processed. Our recovered plastics are cleaned and turned into new pellets, and sold back to the plastics industry.”

34 Recycling Product News March 2020

THE MODIFIED SEA CONTAINER SOLUTION FOR USED OIL COLLECTION

Outside of commercially and industrially generated oil, lubrication fluids, antifreeze and containers collected, there is a need for the collection of DIYgenerated oil, antifreeze, other fluids and containers, coming from the public and residential sources. To provide consumers with convenient options to recycle their oil BCUOMA works with recycling depots, auto repair shops, quick lube stations, local government and others to provide a network of nearly 300 locations across BC. For the last three years the BCUOMA program has been implementing a program that brings used oil collection infrastructure to public return sites, often in the more remote locations in the province through community partnerships. These partnerships often result in the delivery of a modified sea-container, fully equipped for the collection of used oil, antifreeze and filters. This “turnkey” infrastructure can be placed in an

optimal location in a community and can be easily moved if needed. With the sea container program, Lawes says their data indicates they are collecting about two million litres of oil and about a half a million litres of antifreeze every year from public drop offs. “It sounds like a huge number, but the total amount of oil and antifreeze we manage is 50 million litres per year through our commercial program,” he explains. “However with the sea containers, we are talking about two million litres that is really hard to get, and it can cause the most damage to the environment. This is why we’re investing so much into this area.” The genesis of the sea container program he says was a few years ago when the BCUOMA started looking closely at their collection network, consulting with all stakeholders, and needing to make sure it was serving consumers in all regions in British Columbia, including do-it-yourselfers (DIY). “We found that we had a whole bunch of facilities around the province, but many were small without the proper infrastructure, where the potential for spillage and contamination was high. We developed our new program so that we have less facilities, but better facilities.” He says during their preliminary research to see how hazardous waste was managed by companies they found a few good examples, including at BC Hydro, where they were using steel sea containers modified with a spill tray. “We took this to the next level,” says Lawes. “We partnered with an engineering company and a sea container manufacturer in Richmond, B.C., and really tweaked the design to suit used oil and antifreeze recycling. We then worked on signage, to make it easy for DIYers and regular people [outside of a commercial and industrial environment] to understand how to properly recycle used oil and antifreeze.” We really have a strong team working on this program. Will Burrows, who previously worked for the Coast Waste Management Association is leading the sea-container program and teaming up with our Director of Communications, Kelly Duran, who previously worked for the Canucks and the BC auto industry.


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USED OIL RECYCLING We also have Get Smart, a boutique IT firm, managing the administration of the program. Lawes says that as CEO my role is easy as I just have to hire great people and empower and support them to do great things. He says their modified sea containers are fully contained, with proper spill containment and venting, so that the area and neighbours will be less concerned with having hazardous material collection infrastructure in their community. Units are also built for quick, easy setup in any location. “When a local government or a retailer says they would like a 20-foot or a 10-foot, or six-foot seacontainer for used oil recycling delivered to their site, we’ve got a pathway, we can get it delivered and put it out there really quickly. It doesn’t require months or a year of construction like many projects.” Lawes says their program is growing fast, with about 60 different installations of modified sea-container used oil collection facilities currently set up in B.C., and we are hoping to add about 20 more in 2020.

Inside a modified sea container – BC Used Oil Recycling Centre.

WORKING WITH FIRST NATIONS PARTNERS

In 2018, the Indigenous Zero Waste Technical Advisory Group (IZWTAG) was created. This indigenous led non-profit society are dedicated to environmentally-responsible waste management. IZWTAG provides technical support, resources, training services and to all First Nation communities. In their efforts to be stewards of the land and the environment, IZWTAG is an organization that develops skilled and accomplished operators, helps with practical advice on installing, operating and maintaining waste management systems and advancing zero waste education and best practices for First Nation communities. The chair is Calvin Jameson Public Works Superintendent at Lil’wat Nation in Mount Currie. “IZWTAG work with all of the First Nations communities in B.C. and it was a natural fit for BCUOMA to become the first industry stewardship association to sign up as a partner. We’re partnering to do remote community clean-ups. We just did one in the summer of last year working with the Hesquiaht First Nation at Hot Springs Cove.” On this project, he says they used a barge to get the appropriate equipment and infrastructure into Hot Springs Cove, a small community north of Tofino on the West Coast of Vancouver Island where they use a generator to provide all the electricity for their remote community. “They were diligent in changing the oil, but they had a whole bunch of it and that volume was piling up, and they had no options for it. We worked with them to get it taken care of.” By the end of this project, BCUOMA removed 3,500 litres of used oil, 160 used oil filters and 150 x 20 litre empty oil pails

36 Recycling Product News March 2020

BCUOMA working with Hesquihat First Nation on their remote site cleanup. and lids. They also provided long-term infrastructure as well as on-site training to the Hesquiaht First Nation to ensure future used oil materials are safely stored and free of contamination. “For me, this is a really exciting area, and I’m happy that this First Nations group have stepped up and created this new association to make it really easy to work on projects together.” In a previous role I spent 3 years working for a US Indian Tribe, the Makah Tribe, working on environmental and natural resource projects, where I lived in the community and developed an appreciation for the culture and needs of a remote Pacific Coast native community. According to Lawes, as the very first Associate Member of IZWTAG, BCUOMA is going to do its part to support all of the group’s efforts. “We look forward to working with IZWTAG to support their success, which will we believe will in turn help us ensure that used oil and other BCUOMA program products are safely collected from First Nation communities and responsibly recycled.” RPN


COMMODITY FOCUS: FERROUS

FERROUS SCRAP MARKET

LOOKING FOR A REBOUND IN 2020

H

BY JOE PICKARD

eading into 2020, ferrous scrap recyclers in North America had ample reason to be optimistic. Following a very difficult 2019 that saw benchmark prices for No. 1 Heavy Melt fall from more than US$300 per gross ton in January 2019 to nearly $180 per ton at the start of the fourth quarter, market sentiment improved significantly in the first quarter of 2020. The trade outlook improved considerably with the passage of the United States–Mexico–Canada Agreement (USMCA) and phase one of the U.S.–China trade deal early in the year, along with China’s expected reclassification of certain scrap metal grades from waste to raw materials. U.S. monetary policy was more accommodative late in 2019 and became even more so in early 2020 with the half point rate cut announced in mid-February 2020 (followed by a commensurate Canadian rate cut), which

38 Recycling Product News March 2020

could help revive North American business investment levels. Additionally, the economic fundamentals in North America remain mostly solid with continued healthy U.S. nonfarm job gains in February (+273,000), low unemployment rates, and signs of improved factory orders and construction spending. The World Steel Association reports crude steel production the United States increased 2.5 percent year-on-year in January 2020 to more than 7.7 million metric tons, helping to offset the struggling steel production trends in Canada and Mexico.

TRADE FLOWS IN FOCUS

U.S. ferrous scrap exports, excluding stainless steel and alloy steel, grew by a modest 1.2 percent in 2019 to nearly 15.9 million metric tons as improved shipments to Turkey, Malaysia, Saudi Arabia,


COMMODITY FOCUS: FERROUS 100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 2018

86.6 87.9

20.2 18.6

2019

U.S.

Mexico

13.4 12.8

Canada

Steel production in North America, 2018 vs. 2019. Million metric tons. Source: World Steel Association. Vietnam, Bangladesh and others more than offset weaker business with Egypt, China and Mexico. Turkey not only retained its place as the largest export destination for U.S. ferrous scrap, but also posted the largest net volume gain (+524,000 mt to more than 3.9 million tons) last year. Improved Turkish buys early in 2020 helped to underpin domestic ferrous scrap prices, although obsolete scrap tags were only seen as holding steady late in the first quarter. On the import side of the equation, the American Iron and Steel Institute

reports the “U.S. imported a total of 3,135,000 net tons of steel in January 2020, including 1,633,000 net tons of finished steel (down 9.9 percent and 33.4 percent, respectively, vs. January 2019).” According to AISI, the largest volume of U.S. finished steel imports came from South Korea, Brazil, Japan and Turkey. Meanwhile, Argus Media reports that “The US International Trade Commission decided against placing dumping duties on fabricated steel imports from Canada, China and Mexico in a rare trade case win for importers.”

ISRI COMMENDS CANADA’S RATIFICATION OF USMCA AGREEMENT

The Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries (ISRI) has commended Canada on the achievement of royal assent of the U.S.–Mexico–Canada Agreement (USMCA) from Governor General Julie Payette, following a decisive victory in the Canadian Senate during the second week of March. This follows ratification by Mexico in 2019 and by the United States in January and makes the agreement officially final. “The USMCA is a win for the North American recycling industry,” says ISRI President Robin Wiener. “The market and policy certainty that comes with the agreement will support the 130,000 U.S. jobs that depend on strong regional trade for scrap commodities and the industries that depend on these critical materials. We look forward to a swift implementation process in order to gain immediately from the agreement.” Key components of the agreement include: maintained tariff-free access in Mexico (U.S. and Canada are already tariff-free); improved and accelerated customs clearances; indirect recognition of ISRI Specifications as industry standards; and increased demand for scrap through enhanced auto rules of origin requirements.

40 Recycling Product News March 2020

CORONAVIRUS AND OTHER CONCERNS CLOUD THE OUTLOOK

Heading into 2020, a number of North American steel manufacturers had announced major capacity expansion plans, with accompanying gains expected in ferrous scrap consumption. But concerns about end-market demand and recent coronavirus worries may be having a dampening effect on investment plans, despite the recent Fed rate cuts. For example, Fastmarkets AMM reports “Executives at BlueScope warned that the escalating spread of the novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) could delay the $700-million expansion of its electricarc furnace (EAF) operations in Ohio, due to supply chain disruptions. The potential interruption would not be “significant,” Mark Vassella, chief executive officer of the Australian steel producer, said during the company’s half-year earnings call on Monday, February 24.” In addition, Argus reports “Liberty Steel confirmed it has put its new EAF install on hold at its Georgetown, South Carolina, wire rod mill while it revaluates. The existing melt shop was idled in September 2019. Liberty has been supplying the mill with billet from its Illinois mill (ex-Keystone). Also for the record, it closed on its acquisition of bankrupt bar mill Bayou Steel on January 31.”

FERROUS MARKET FORECAST

Looking forward, the World Steel Association projects Chinese steel demand will only grow 1.0 percent in


Steel Mill Product Ingots and Billets and Slabs Sheets & Strip Galv Hot Dipped Sheets Hot Rolled Sheets Cold Rolled Oil Country Goods Bars – Reinforcing Plates in Coils Wire Rods Line Pipe Sheets & Strip All Other Metalic Bars – Hot Rolled Mechanical Tubing Wire Drawn Standard Pipe Tin Plate Structural Shapes Heavy Structural Pipe & Tubing All Other TOTAL SUBTOTAL Finished Imports

Jan. 2020 Prelim. 1,500,092 247,029 173,623 142,146 126,307 106,623 85,476 73,024 71,848 70,564 65,418 64,400 60,562 59,925 41,962 40,764 33,007 172,271 3,135,043 1,633,092

Dec. 2019 Final 226,942 158,013 164,991 142,136 116,210 45,613 96,801 43,902 69,540 31,256 66,794 45,027 45,544 53,065 45,222 20,557 33,811 180,134 1,585,558 1,356,594

% var Jan. vs. Dec.

YTD 2020 (1 mo.)

YTD 2019 (1 mo.)

% var 2020 vs 2019

561.0% 56.3% 5.2% 0.0% 8.7% 133.8% -11.7% 66.3% 3.3% 125.8% -2.1% 43.0% 33.0% 12.9% -7.2% 98.3% -2.4% -4.4% 97.7% 20.4%

1,500,092 247,029 173,623 142,146 126,307 106,623 85,476 73,024 71,848 70,564 65,418 64,400 60,562 59,925 41,962 40,764 33,007 172,271 3,135,043 1,633,092

1,027,278 271,718 205,860 174,650 333,495 128,278 124,855 134,779 327,542 79,924 90,929 61,798 67,275 70,294 64,541 60,426 41,537 214,953 3,480,132 2,451,290

46.0% -9.1% -15.7% -18.6% -62.1% -16.9% -31.5% -45.8% -78.1% -11.7% -28.1% 4.2% -10.0% -14.8% -35.0% -32.5% -20.5% -19.9% -9.9% -33.4%

U.S. steel imports. 2020 while steel demand in the rest of the world will increase 2.5 percent, driven by 4.1 percent growth in emerging and developing economies excluding China. As a result, global steel demand is forecast to grow 1.7 percent to 1,805.7 million metric tons in 2020, down from the 3.9 percent growth rate in 2019. But as with other commodities, any improvement in global trade relations could have outsized implications for the global steel and ferrous scrap markets. According to the U.S. Trade Representative’s press release earlier this year, China has agreed to import at least $120 billion of U.S.manufactured goods in 2020, including iron and steel products. Improved trade deals with between trading partners including the U.S., China, Canada and Mexico will play an important role for the North American iron and steel industries, along with ferrous scrap availability, pricing, and steel capacity expansion plans. Joe Pickard is the chief economist and director of Commodities at the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries (ISRI) located in Washington, D.C.

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41


E-WASTE RECYCLING

A QU ELEC

Tony Perrotta founded Greentec in 1995, starting with recycling Product News March 2020 ink42 andRecycling toner cartridges.


QUARTER CENTURY IN ECTRONICS RECOVERY NO SIGNS OF SLOWING DOWN FOR ONTARIO’S GREENTEC AFTER 25 YEARS MANAGING IT ASSETS AND PROCESSING E-WASTE BY KEITH BARKER, EDITOR

B

ased in Cambridge, Ontario, Greentec is a specialist in IT equipment recovery, confidential data destruction and e-waste recycling, serving businesses in Ontario and across Canada. In 2020 the company is celebrating its 25th year in business. In 1995, Tony Perrotta started by collecting and recycling ink and toner cartridges. He led the organization over the next decade through several expansion phases, and key certifications, including ISO 14001 and OSHA. In 2005, Greentec expanded recycling services to cellphones and electronics, and in 2010 the company grew into a new 83,000-squarefoot facility, completed OHSAS 18001 certification and started both its ITAD (IT Asset Disposition) business and high-volume e-waste processing. By 2017, Greentec also had R2 (Responsible Recycling Practices) and NAID (National Association for Information Destruction) industry certifications in place. Today, Greentec offers a range of services including secure pick up and removal of IT assets and waste, certified data destruction, electronics refurbishing and recycling as well as sustainability reporting for corporate clients. On average, the company manages between 12,000 and 16,000 tons per year of material, including both recovered assets (re-usable IT assets and equipment) and scrap e-waste. In 2019, Perrotta says they repurposed over 114,000 IT devices, while between 2010 and 2019, they recycled about 60,000 tons of end-of-life electronics waste.

“We’re growing at about 30 percent year-overyear,” Perrotta says.”Our growth is coming mostly from our IT asset disposition and e-scrap recovery. “Our speciality is managing data containing devices. For example, we manage equipment for entire data centres, when a company is going through server refreshes or storage and network refreshes, as well as data for endpoint devices such as desktops, laptops, computers, tablets and mobile phones.” The processes they use, along with the employees and logistics they have in place, all have to comply with strict NAID standards for data destruction. These standards provide specific instructions on how to destroy various data types, with a main element of the certification focused on the people that have access to sensitive materials and information in the secure IT disposal environment. Background checks on all employees are required and facilities need to be secure with safeguards in place. Plus, all trucks and materials collected need to be closely tracked. For Greentec, end-of-life IT assets are “repurposed” via sale or donation, if they are not damaged or otherwise unusable. “If a company goes through a refresh and they have working assets they need to dispose of, we use specialized equipment that allows us to perform data erasure and functional testing of devices on a large scale,” explains Perrotta. “We can collect and perform a wipe on 450 hard drives simultaneously. After we’ve done the wiping of an asset, we have to be able to test it to make sure that there is no information left on the device. It can then be safely and securely resold or donated for reuse.” March 2020 www.recyclingproductnews.com

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E-WASTE RECYCLING

Greentec’s BLUBOX integrated lamp and flat panel display recycling system can process two streams simultaneously.

IF YOU LOOK AT ALL THE NEW PHONES AND TABLETS AND OTHER TECH DEVICES, IT IS NOT EASY TO PULL THE BATTERIES OUT. DESIGN FOR RECYCLING WOULD DEFINITELY BE A GOOD THING FOR US.

TONY PERROTTA, GREENTEC

44 Recycling Product News March 2020

PRECIOUS METALS RECOVERY

At Greentec, for end-of-life e-waste that will be dismantled and separated for value and recycling, the process is very different than for IT assets that will be reused. “We have a dedicated line that handles just servers, desktop computers and end-of-life devices,” explains Perrotta. “We break them down, we take out the hazardous materials and batteries. There are often batteries embedded in computer boards, and we harvest all components and parts. Depending on the device, there could still be good memory or a reusable hard drive. If this is the case, the hard drive would go into our secure area. It would go through data erasure, it would be wiped clean, and then it can be reused.” “We work with a lot of partners across the country,” Perrotta continues. “We get end-of-life high-grade commodities. We pick up truckloads of a mixture we call e-scrap commodities: mobile phones, tablets, laptops, computers, servers, networking switches, circuit boards, etc. “We can offer recovery value on these items because we are able to extract value from them in our end-of-life processing.”

The main value in this stream is with the recovery of gold, silver, palladium and copper. According to Perrotta, precious metals recovery really drives their end-oflife e-waste recycling business. “It’s a big economic driver for us,” he says. “With our partners across the country, we don’t do low-grade material, because it just doesn’t make sense for them to ship something that has no real value. For end-of-life low-grade material (like older rear projection TVs and other electronics and appliances including vacuums) most will find more of a local solution to process it or they do it themselves.” At the top end of the value scale, Perrotta says the demand for rare earth material has gone through the roof. “New technology, energy-efficient devices, new electric cars, windmills, all of these manufacturing sectors use a lot of rare earth metal.” He says there is a big opportunity for the e-waste industry to meet this demand. The main type Greentec recovers is rare earth magnet. “We are recovering rare earth metals from some of the systems we put in place.


We have a line that focuses specifically on hard drive disassembly. “Hard drives contain high concentrations of rare earth metal and is where we recover a lot of it,” continues Perrotta. “We’re taking them apart and pulling out the rare earth magnet. We also find rare earth metal in other appliances, in mobile phone speakers, tablets and laptops, but the higher concentrations are in the hard drives.”

BLUBOX TECHNOLOGY TAKING ON MERCURY-CONTAINING DEVICES

One of Greentec’s newer lines deals specifically with the processing of endof-life fluorescent lamps and LCD flat panel and laptop screens. Many of the screens of this type being retired today use what’s called CCFL backlight. It’s a cold cathode compact fluorescent, containing hazardous materials including mercury vapour. In 2018, Greentec brought a new machine online at their Cambridge facility to deal with mercury-containing end-of-life materials. Their fully automated BLUBOX recycling system, built by Swiss company BLUBOX Trading, was developed specifically to recycle flat panel displays and lamps containing mercury and is one of only six installed in the world, according to Perrotta. The BLUBOX system (shown opposite page) separates out hazardous particles from mercury-containing devices and extracts valuable output fractions for further processing. The entire system is packed into a 40-foot HC container, the inside of which is constantly under negative pressure and therefore meets highest safety standards for containment of hazardous materials. According to the BLUBOX website (at blubox.ch) these machines are capable of recycling up to 1,000 kg/h of flat panel displays and 500 kg/h of lamps simultaneously. “The unique thing about our new piece of equipment is the speed at which you can safely process mercury-containing items. We can feed lamps in on one side, while on the opposite end, we can feed it LCD monitors and laptops – basically anything that has a screen. “Our BLUBOX looks like a big metal blue box,” he continues. “It’s self-

Precious metals and rare earth magnet recovery is a key driver for e-waste recycling.

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March 2020 www.recyclingproductnews.com

45


MRF TECHRECYCLING E-WASTE TALK

Tony Perrotta (top left) and his team at Greentec HQ in Cambridge, Ontario. contained and uses negative pressure and a series of active carbon filtration systems to extract mercury vapours from mercury-containing products.” Basically, he explains, lamps or screens are put in, they’re crushed and the mercury vapour is contained. The glass, plastics and metals get separated out, while mercury is collected through an active carbon filtration system. The mercury-containing filters then go to a specialized mercury disposal facility.

ASSESSING RISK: BATTERIES TO E-CIGARETTES

Beyond mercury vapour, one of the biggest hazards faced at any e-waste recycling plant is from battery explosions, which can cause injury and fire. “It’s a big risk for us,” says Perrotta. “It’s why we have to manually dismantle a lot of material. We have to manually pull out batteries and lithium-ion batteries. If not, they are hazards that can cause fire.” He says manufacturers need to make it easier to pull batteries out. “If you look at all the new phones and tablets and other tech devices, it is not easy to pull the batteries out. Design for recycling would definitely be a good thing for us.” He says items such as toner cartridges getting into shredders can also cause fires. “You don’t want to put anything into a

46 Recycling Product News March 2020

shredder with mercury, anything with backlighting, compact fluorescents or any little lamps within devices, because they release mercury vapours. Some items also have beryllium [another toxic chemical element] and other toxic chemicals in them. We’ve got to be very careful.” For this reason, health and safety is priority number one for Greentec, before anything else they do. “We conduct risk assessments on any new products we process. We’re currently going through a risk assessment for the processing of e-cigarettes.” E-cigarettes are another challenging, relatively new e-waste stream, he says. Perrotta’s team has to look out for biohazard risks specifically and as with all materials they process, they need to consider environmental risks and health risks to employees. “We also look at whether there are any security risks,” he says. “What would happen if any new material we’re processing goes missing? We look at all aspects, and then from our risk assessments, we develop action plans. We make sure we use the proper personal protective gear, have the proper security and that we have safe processing. “With e-cigarettes, there’s so many different models,” he adds. “There has to be several hundred different types. And there are those that contain not only nicotine, but now THC. It’s a complicated waste stream.”

THE CHANGING REGULATORY LANDSCAPE IN ONTARIO

In Ontario currently, there are a lot of changes happening in the waste management and recycling industry. New legislation and policies have recently been put in place by the Ontario Ministry of Environment which are moving the province toward the next phase of extended-producer-responsibilitybased (EPR) solutions for various waste streams, including tires, e-waste, batteries and blue box materials. This change in Ontario is dissolving established end-of-life recovery programs there which have each been run by one central industry-funded organization. The change is being overseen and managed by the Resource Productivity Recycling Authority (RPRA). According to Perrotta, the RPRA is similar to a clearing house for recyclables. “Everybody needs to report their numbers to the RPRA, and they are in charge of enforcing compliance requirements for the various programs. They’re an enforcement body. “We’re going through a transition phase currently in Ontario,” he continues. “We’ve seen large regulatory changes and we’ve had a new conservative government recently elected. Our previous program for e-waste is unwinding in Ontario, as of December 31, 2020.” He notes that extended producer


responsibility programs come and go. “I have to say it was a good thing when they first came out, but these industryfunded organizations have been run like monopolies. That’s why the government got rid of them. They were no good for the economy, no good for business and they’re no good for innovation.” He says because the former system set prices for processing various materials, businesses and recyclers couldn’t maneuver. “Everything needed approval. It was not market-driven. Prices for processing were just decided without consulting the industry, and they were not really in tune with the way the industry operates.” Perrotta agrees that it often happens in the recycling industry that regulations are made without consulting the recyclers who know the reality of the business. He hopes this will not be the case this time and that things will change as the old system is dissolved and the new system takes hold.

In 2019, Greentec repurposed over 114,000 IT devices, while between 2010 and 2019, it recycled about 60,000 tons of end-of-life electronics waste. “I think it’s going to make recycling more market-driven. It opens it up to competition. Now it’s not one industry-funded organization that runs the entire program.” He says there could be 20 stakeholders involved, depending on the sector.

The ideal scenario he says is that there is a more competitive marketplace for IT assets and e-waste recovered materials. “A more innovative marketplace is what we want. Whether that’s going to happen right away, from the get-go, that remains to be seen.” RPN

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47


PLASTICS RECYCLING

THE PLASTICS INDUSTRY IS CHANGING BECAUSE IT HAS TO IN EUROPE, THE SHIFT FROM LARGE-SCALE MECHANICAL MODELS FOR EOL PLASTIC TO SMALLER-SCALE, LOCALIZED CHEMICAL RECYCLING IS WELL UNDER WAY

W

hile plastic, in its myriad forms is ingrained in every aspect of our life, “plastiphobia” has entered the vernacular as a condition, and regulators around the world are cracking down hard on an industry that already faces a number of complex challenges.

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48 Recycling Product News March 2020

But plastiphobia shouldn’t be a thing at all. Plastic should not be demonized, rather it should be treated like the crux of modern living that it actually is. The problem is not with plastic per se, but with the recycling of plastic and its inappropriate usage. The plastics industry has become acutely self-aware, and some might even say introspective. Directive targets must be met, new processes researched, developed and launched, consumer education delivered and consumer expectations met. Looming over all of this is the spectre of sustainability and the demonization of plastics. Speaking at Circularity for Polymers: The ICIS Recycling Conference in Berlin, in 2019, Paul Hodges, Chairman of International E-Chem, said there’s an awful lot of work to do in a very limited time. “It’s very clear there's a paradigm shift going on in the industry. Companies are waking up to the fact that waste plastics are a really big issue – one that’s not going to go away. Single use plastics are going to be in the firing line for the next few years – and business models simply must change,” he said. Hodges emphasized that at the core of the shift required is the fact that people don’t know how to recycle plastics, but they do understand why

we need to: “We haven't got the technology available. We haven’t got the collection processes set up. We need to move away from throwing rubbish away at waste sites and focus instead on developing resource centres based on a distributed network of local chemical recycling plants.” He says the move to smaller, local chemical recycling plants – which are more efficient and effective at separating out the different types of plastic to help better achieve the dream of a circular economy – is certainly on the horizon, yet still only a nascent industry. Richard Daley is managing director of ReNew ELP, a company at the cutting edge of chemical recycling. ReNew ELP are in the final stages of development on the first of four chemical recycling processing lines, with each line processing 20,000 tonnes a year. Their Cat-HTR technology utilizes what Daley describes as “a unique hydrothermal upgrading process, using supercritical water to break down plastics into reusable, valuable chemicals and oils.” ICIS senior editor, recycling, Mark Victory commented, “Chemical recovery is better in theory – but there are issues with cost and yield. In theory, it’s good, but there are still the same challenges of collection – and it will be five to ten years – an optimis-


deliver what you need to do,” he said. ICIS’s senior analyst of plastics recycling, Helen McGeough explained, “Plastic packaging is more complex than ever before, modern packaging has moved beyond just functionality to a marketing tool. But we need to strip it back to a simpler level and encourage recycling concepts at the design stage. “The EU has set the bar high with the Single Use Plastic Directive, requiring higher collection rates, even with 2018 recovery rates for PET bottles in Europe at 63 percent, and 55 percent in the U.K. The European country PET collection rates range varies across member states reflecting the differences in systems, consumer participation and government ability to prioritize investment in waste management. This lack of standardisation in everything from waste infrastructure to final R-PET product specification continues to present as many challenges as opportuni-

E RID

THE NEW INDUSTRY BUSINESS MODEL IS SMALL SCALE AND LOCAL, WHEREAS FOR THE LAST 30 TO 40 YEARS, ALL WE’VE TALKED ABOUT IS MASSIVE AND GLOBAL. THIS IS A COMPLETE GAME CHANGER.

PAUL HODGES

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tic estimate – before we see large scale chemical recovery.” Victory identifies another hurdle, in that collection is simply not big enough. He says local authorities in Europe – where most responsibility for household waste collection lies – have been underfunded since the global economic downturn more than a decade ago, and investment in infrastructure has not kept pace with the growing complexity of packaging as a result. That domestic issue is further exacerbated by China’s decision to stop taking waste plastics from the rest of the world. “Investment in waste collection hasn’t kept pace with the increasing complexity of packaging,” explained Victory. “And since China stopped accepting waste, there’s more contamination in our domestic recycling. Wastage rates have increased because China used to take the lower quality waste material – which they could use in industries such as textile – but is now being incorporated into domestic bales. “The scale of demand and size of the undersupply is also meaning material is having to be produced at maximum capacity and stretched further, which also has an impact on contamination levels,” he continued. “In recycled polyethylene terephthalate, for example, we’ve seen wastage rates increase from 25 percent in 2009 to 30–35 percent currently.” Hodges added that what the industry urgently needs is project teams to work out how to produce more sustainable product and better recycling collection and processing facilities. “We’ve got 18 months to work this out,” he warned, “Because if we don't do it, brand owners are going to say ‘look we’ve made a commitment to the consumers to have done this by 2025. You’re not moving. So we’re going to have to do something else.’ We have six years to work this out – and we don’t know what to do.” Hodges feels the brand owners which have committed to the 2025 deadline need reassurance from the plastics industry. “We need to reach out to brand owners and say we have got the technology sorted out, the business model sorted out and the finance sorted out, so trust us, we will now deliver so you can

F

March 2020 www.recyclingproductnews.com

49


PLASTICS RECYCLING ties for one of the most developed recycled markets in the plastic industry.” According to Mark Victory, the sector needs heavy investment to catch up across the entire chain. “There’s no point in everyone wanting to recycle if the infrastructure isn’t there,” he said. “We are relying on people to understand and embrace recycling systems – which is hard to predict. There’s a strong education element to it. For most people, plastic is simply plastic – they are unaware of the different types and what to do with it.” Hodges concurred on the need for investment, emphatically suggesting the industry needs to provide funding.

CANADIAN PLASTICS INNOVATION CHALLENGE WINNERS INCLUDE AXIPOLYMER, GREENMANTRA AND MGO

I

“The amounts the industry is committing to this sea change is next to nothing – 25 million here, 10 million there ­– we’re talking about a hundred billion [dollar] industry here,” said Hodges. “You can’t start with pocket money!” Hodges sees the biggest industry challenge – and perhaps opportunity – as the shift from massive mechanical recycling plants to smaller, local chemical recycling plants. “The new industry business model is small scale and local, whereas for the last 30 to 40 years, all we’ve talked about is massive and global,” said Hodges. “This is a complete game changer.” Will Rankin is a freelance journalist and editor specialising in business, finance and technology.

50 Recycling Product News March 2020

n February, at GLOBE Forum 2020 in Vancouver, Jonathan Wilkinson, Canadian Minister of Environment and Climate Change (ECCC), announced three winners of the Plastics Innovation Challenge, sponsored by ECCC. Axipolymer Inc., based in Montreal, will create a recyclable multi-layer film that can be used for food packaging; GreenMantra Technologies from Brantford, will transform polystyrene insulation waste into new insulation; and MgO Systems from Calgary will use PVC waste from construction to produce new insulating materials. These Canadian small- and mediumsized businesses will all receive $1 million each to develop prototypes of their new technologies designed to address plastic waste from food packaging and construction. Minister Wilkinson also announced in February the launch of six new Plastics Challenges and three Clean Technology Challenges, through the Innovative Solutions Canada program. Innovative Solutions Canada has launched 14 plastics challenges to date, committing nearly $19M to support Canadian innovators and small and medium businesses in the sector. The nine new Innovation Challenges call on Canadian companies to develop solutions to find sustainable alternatives to plastics and waste challenges in textiles, ewaste and end-of-life vehicle sectors. Other

new challenges are looking to award the optimum solutions for addressing microplastics in marine environments, recycling plastic into ceiling tiles, developing waste conversion techniques, and for developing energy-producing window coverings from recycled plastic. The Challenges will be led by Environment and Climate Change Canada, the National Research Council of Canada, Shared Services Canada and Global Affairs Canada. “The Government of Canada has committed nearly $19 million to fund Canadian innovators through the Canadian Plastics Innovation Challenge initiative, which results in real, Canadian-made solutions,” said Wilkinson. “As Shared Services Canada continues to upgrade our antiquated IT infrastructure, we will need new ways to recycle and repurpose the associated waste from this transition,” commented Joyce Murray, Canada’s Minister of Digital Government. “The Innovative Solutions Canada challenge will promote innovation to reduce the environmental impact of end-of-life e-waste and support our greening government strategy.” According to an ECCC news release, “By improving how we manage plastic waste and investing in innovative solutions, we can reduce 1.8 million tonnes of carbon pollution, generate billions of dollars in revenue, and create approximately 42,000 jobs.”


BASF PILOT PROJECT IN B.C. COMBINES BLOCKCHAIN, DIGITAL BADGE AND LOOP COUNT TO REVITALIZE THE VALUE OF PLASTICS

B

ASF, the Germany-based chemical company (and second largest chemical producer in the world) has launched a pilot project called reciChain in British Columbia designed to better manage plastic waste. BASF says the project will introduce a more sustainable alternative to linear economic models, reducing plastic waste, maximizing its value and enhancing resource efficiency. According to a report produced by Deloitte for Environment and Climate Change Canada, the country disposed of nearly 3.3 million tons of plastic waste in 2016. Of these plastics, less than 11 percent were recycled, meaning the rest were landfilled or lost to the environment. If the present trend continues, the report estimates that Canadians will dispose of $11.1 billion worth of plastic materials each year by 2030. “There is a clear global challenge around the economics of recycling plastic,” said Marcelo Lu, president, BASF Canada. “Much of the collection and sorting activities are challenged by manual processes and material contamination. Additionally, traceability is a concern as new commitments start to emerge from brand owners and retailers. “With reciChain, our goal is to revitalize the value of plastics and significantly improve circularity in the supply chain.” The BASF platform combines the power of blockchain with a digital badge and loop count technology that enables the secured sharing of data among market participants, while improving the sorting, tracing and monitoring of plastics throughout the value chain. The result is a more competitive circular supply chain rather than a linear one, extending the life cycle of plastics. “A successful implementation of reciChain will result in a collaborative digital consortium that will bring together plastic manufacturers, suppliers, government entities, retailers, waste collectors and recyclers aimed at keeping the life of plastic molecules circular,” said Anthony DiPrinzio, head of BASF blockchain lab. “Leveraging blockchain technology, we can work together to ensure our products deliver

back to the value chain and contribute to a circular economy.” For the pilot project in British Columbia, BASF is working with Deloitte as a strategic advisor. The team is currently validating the pilot’s value in the local supply chain with

the goal of expanding it to a nation-wide solution in order to position Canada as a leading country in the recycling and recovery of plastics. To learn more about reciChain, visit www. basf.ca/reciChain.

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March 2020 www.recyclingproductnews.com

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ISRI 2020 SHOW PREVIEW

ISRI 2020

T

he Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries (ISRI) annual Convention & Exposition is the world’s largest

annual scrap recycling industry event. The event focuses primarily on the recycling of ferrous and nonferrous metals, plastics, paper and fibre, tires and

DOOSAN MATERIAL HANDLERS AND WHEEL LOADERS Doosan Infracore North America, LLC, will display its DX210WMH-5 material handler, along with a DL2805 wheel loader, at the 2020 Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries Convention and Exposition. According to Doosan, the new DX210WHM-5 material handler is designed to provide scrap and recycling professionals with improved fuel efficiency, versatility and productivity. DX210WMH-5 material handlers excel in a variety of scrap-handling applications, at scrapyards, recycling facilities, solid waste centres and transfer stations. The DX210WMH-5 includes four selectable power modes that allow customization for different jobsite requirements and features a lifting work mode which provides increased pump torque, low engine rpm and an automatic power boost to improve operator precision when lifting and placing materials.

e-waste. Our show preview highlights some of the latest equipment and technology that companies will be exhibiting at this year’s event. At press time Recycling Product News was advised that ISRI 2020, originally scheduled for the end of April in Las Vegas, will be postponed. Further information will be provided when available.

52 Recycling Product News March 2020

BRAVO 6280 SHREDDER FROM 3TEK GLOBAL ​

3TEK Global has introduced the compact mobile Bravo 6280 scrap shredder. Part of 3TEK’s lineup of mobile and stationary hammer mills and downstream sorting systems, this latest model was designed in partnership with Blanchard Machinery, Granutech-Saturn Systems and Riverside Engineering from the ground up as a true mobile hammer mill that can process up to 3,000 tons per month. The new machine will be a focus for the company at ISRI 2020. “The Bravo 6280 was designed to serve the scrap marketplace,” said Bill Padula, VP of sales and marketing for 3TEK Global. “This is a true mill that delivers very clean, dense, furnace-ready scrap at a price point for both purchase and production that makes sense for small and large operators alike.” According to 3TEK, the Bravo 6280 is an ideal option for smaller scrap operations or those that want to make the move beyond being just a collection site, or which may be seeking to expand existing scrap milling operations. And with O&O costs less than $28/ ton, the new Bravo 6280 will raise both the user’s capability and profits. Driven by an 1,125-hp CAT32 diesel engine, the Bravo 6280 can comfortably produce 15–20 output tons per hour in ferrous output capacity (13.7 m tons/hour) with 240-pound hammers on a 315,000-pound single chassis that is 80 inches wide and equipped with a 19-foot feed chute. Its operating cost is less than $25 USD per ton, providing a combination of capacity and efficiency that provides top margin and return on investment.


GENSCO DYNASET HMG HYDRAULIC-DRIVEN MAGNET POWER AND CONTROL Toronto-based recycling equipment specialist Gensco will highlight its DYNASET HMG and HMG PRO hydraulic-driven magnet power and control system (models from 3kW to 30kW) for use with hydraulic excavators along with a range of equipment for recycling applications. HMG systems are sold as a complete package, including the generating and electronic control system, custom priority or load sense oil flow valve system and wire harness kit, with on/off switch, push button activation and magnet indication sensor. According to Gensco, the new HMG PRO option offers the most sophisticated solid-state control system on the market. These reliable, weatherproof generators can be supplied with everything needed to install on any make and model of hydraulic carrier. There is no need to add an expensive dedicated pump and auxiliary drive, and Gensco can customize any installation with custom valve packages, allowing operators to use multiple hydraulic functions with the magnet generator on. All generators are also supplied with 110V AC sockets, suitable to charge phones and operate computers, lights and small work tools like a

TRIPLE COVERAGE DUST CONTROL FROM BUFFALO TURBINE

drill or grinder. At ISRI 2020, Gensco will also be focused on its complete selection of round and rectangular 24V and 230V DC CANMAG Scrap Handling and Steel Mill Magnets, hydraulic H-MAG Magnets for scrapyards and demolition sites, and Heavy Severe Duty magnets for mill use, slab turning, billet/bloom and hot structural handling.

MAGNET GRAPPLE

Buffalo Turbine recently introduced the Trident dust control solution. This system uses three separate turbines all powered by the same Kohler 74-hp diesel engine, capable of three times the coverage area compared to single turbine dust controllers. Different from other dust control units on the market, this unit is self-contained, meaning no generator is required, lower maintenance costs and less space required for setup. According to Buffalo Turbine, each of the three turbines on the new Trident model uses their Gyratory Atomizing Nozzle technology, which does not clog like conventional nozzle tips. The Trident is available with one, two or three oscillation kits to match desired coverage in a wide range of applications from scrap metal and C&D recycling to composting and solid waste.

CALL TODAY 705-487-5020 www.batemanmanufacturing.com March 2020 www.recyclingproductnews.com

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ISRI 2020 SHOW PREVIEW BUNTING STAINLESS STEEL SEPARATION CONVEYORS

“T

he trade outlook improved considerably with the coming passage of

the United States–Mexico–Canada Agreement (USMCA) and phase one of the U.S.–China trade deal early in the year, along with China’s expected reclassification of certain scrap metal grades from waste to raw materials.”

This year at ISRI 2020, Bunting will be showcasing a strong lineup of products, including the patented SSSC (Stainless Steel Separation Conveyor). This piece of equipment utilizes its patented magnetic circuit design of high-intensity neodymium magnets to maximize the recovery and removal of stainless steel in applications such as wire chopping streams, auto shredding and general recycling. The intense power of the SSSC enables recovery of up to 94 percent of large fraction stainless steel, and up to 98 percent of small- and mid-fraction 300 series stainless steel from ASR zurik lines. By achieving the maximum removal of ferrous dust and stainless steel from wire fraction, Bunting says its SSSC provides users with the purest zurik and the greatest scrap metal recovery profitability. According to Bunting, no other product available on the modern recycling market allows for the high stainless steel recovery levels that the SSSC delivers. Every feature on the SSSC has been designed to maximize separation efficiency while streamlining operations. The SSSC is equipped with 8- and 12-inch-diameter patented high intensity neo magnetic circuit head pulleys that are capable of holding all sizes of 300 series stainless steel, as well as VFD controllers operating between 30 and 120 fpm to deliver effective separation. General capacities run about 1,000 pounds/hr/ft width on small fraction, 1,500 pounds/ hr/ft on mid-fraction, and 2,000 pounds/hr/ft on large fraction. Custom design options are available.

— Joe Pickard, ISRI chief economist and director of Commodities

OVERBUILT CAR CRUSHERS AND BALER LOGGERS OverBuilt’s latest models of recycling equipment include the Model 10 Car Crusher and the Model 20 Baler Logger (shown right). Both of these models will be a focus for the company on the show floor at ISRI 2020. OverBuilt’s Model 20 Baler Logger is designed with crane reach at 26.5 feet and a 5,000-pound lifting capability at 25 feet, providing smooth operator loading and unloading of material. The unit’s standard clam grapple is ideal for cars as well as loose scrap, and an orange peel grapple is available. According to OverBuilt, with baling at 4,600 psi and logging at 3,200 psi, these machines provide the highest pressures in the industry. Plus, all functions can be changed with the touch of a button in the unit’s heated, airconditioned and roomy cab. OverBuilt Model 10 Car Crushers feature a large opening, at 10 feet, long crushing bed, at 20 feet 3 inches, along with a patented high-speed oil bypass system that cuts cycle time in half. The unit also features a 400-gallon fuel cell and fluid recovery system and state of the art remote control. Additional 22- and 24-foot models are available.

54 Recycling Product News March 2020


LABOUNTY’S LATEST MOBILE SHEARS EMPLOY TELEMATICS

LINK-BELT SCRAP GRAPPLES LBX Company has introduced Link-Belt LSG Series Scrap Grapples and LCG Series Contractor Handling Grapples, designed for scrap handling, C&D sorting and bulk material handling. The new LSG Scrap Grapple is a low-maintenance, high-capacity orange peel model designed for highvolume scrapyard processing. Available in four models, LSG key features include: reverse-mounted cylinders that protect rods from damage; multiple tine and spade styles for all types of scrap material; fully boxed construction for strength and durability; an overall footprint that easily fits inside trailers; and a heavy-duty guarding system that completely protects cylinders and internal components yet is easily removed for maintenance. These scrap grapples use identical hardened steel bearings with dust seals at all pivot points that protect against external debris, and largebore hydraulic cylinders for maximum clamping force. Units also provide high-torque, continuous 360-degree rotation and feature abrasion-resistant steel tips that are easily replaced with a simple perimeter weld.

LaBounty’s expanded line of mobile scrap shears, the MSD Legend Series, are available in four new models: the MSD4000R, MSD4500R, MSD2000 and MSD1500R. These new Legend Series shears include InSite telematics, which provides real-time data to optimize shear performance and productivity. An industry first, according to Labounty, InSite is an advanced telematics platform that provides actionable information about the shears’ condition and activity, such as job tracking, jobsite mapping and remote diagnostics. With the InSite app, available for iOS and Android, Legend Series shear users have access to valuable information that helps optimize performance. Additional MSD Legend mobile shear features include: full 360-degree rotation; enhanced, durable lower jaw; long-lasting index blades with four-way indexable cutting; full-protection for the indexable piercing tip; and wear bar protectors for maintaining heavy wear surfaces.

SCRAP RECYCLING PRODUCTS MOBILE AND STATIONARY SHEAR BLADES • Piercing Tips • Hardware

• Custom Blades • Shear Blades

• Shim Kits • Wear Plates

CALL US 877-937-2756 TODAY! ASKOINC.COM March 2020 www.recyclingproductnews.com

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HEALTH & SAFETY

SWANA 2019 SOLID WASTE FATALITY DATA SHOWS INDUSTRY LOSS OF 53

A

t least 53 solid waste industry workers died on the job in 2019 in the United States and Canada, according to the Solid Waste Association of North America (SWANA). The most common cause of death was being struck by one’s own waste vehicle, followed by single-vehicle accidents involving only a waste vehicle. Over 40 percent of worker fatalities were a result of one of these two causes. Solid waste and recycling collection continues to have the highest occurrence of fatalities, representing about 68 percent of worker deaths. Fatalities at landfills increased slightly from 8 in 2018 to 11 in 2019, and fatalities at MRFs increased from three to four. “The number of solid waste-related fatalities continued at unusually high levels in 2019,” commented David Biderman, SWANA’s Executive Director and CEO. “Although there was a small decline from 2018, and that slight improvement has continued into 2020, we

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WORKER 2018

U.S. and Canada solid waste fatalities. remain concerned about the solid waste industry’s overall safety performance. We urge all employers and employees to take advantage of the growing number and variety of SWANA safety resources,” he added. SWANA collects data on solidwaste-related fatalities from a wide

As an aid to helping scrap recycling facilities develop strategies for reducing the risks of fire, the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries (ISRI) has released a new electronic publication, Creating a Fire Prevention and Management Plan. The book was developed by fire science, insurance and scrap recycling industry professionals. It is meant to be used as a guidance document to help business owners, operators and EHS professionals better understand and mitigate potential risks before they become bigger problems. “The Creating a Fire Prevention and Management Plan is a terrific resource for any scrap processing operation seeking guidance on preparing a plan,” said Scott Wiggins, vice president of environment, health and safety for ISRI. “This guidance document provides information on how to prepare a fire prevention plan, fight incipient stage fires, and to be prepared in the event of a crisis management scenario. Even if your facility has an existing plan, this is a valuable tool to help you review your operations and make any necessary improvements.” Creating a Fire Prevention and Management Plan serves as a living document, and ISRI plans to review and update it at least once every year. While the document does provide a detailed, and scalable overview of developing a plan, each site is different. Plans should be prepared according to the type and size of the facility and, depending on the size, not all suggestions may be appropriate. The document is available for free to those in the recycling industry.

2019 SOLID WASTE ASSOCIATION OF NORTH AMERICA

A FIRE PREVENTION & MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR RECYCLING FACILITIES

56 Recycling Product News March 2020

MEMBER OF PUBLIC

number of industry and media sources in order to produce an annual picture of the state of safety. In addition to the workers killed on the job in 2019, at least 80 members of the public were killed in an incident involving the industry. Almost all of these were the result of a collision with a solid waste collection vehicle. Two-thirds of the victims were a driver or passenger at the time, and about 16 percent were pedestrians. Incidents involving motorcyclists represented 9 percent and bicyclists 7.5 percent of fatalities in 2019. Forty-four of all fatalities recorded by SWANA in 2019 occurred in the United States and nine were in Canada. This represents an increase from 2018 when four fatalities were recorded in Canada and 2017 when there were six. January was the deadliest month in 2019, with 22 total fatalities. “Employers must look inward for causes and corrective actions,” recommended Suzanne Sturgeon, SWANA Safety Committee Chair and Health & Safety Program Manager for SCS Field Services. “Changing the culture of workers is essential to this effort. Training frequently in small and digestible doses is paramount to make this shift,” Sturgeon added. For more information on SWANA’s safety program, visit swana.org/safety.


Winds of Change in Halifax, Nova Scotia!

Join us in Halifax!

CARI’s 79th Annual Convention - “Winds of Change” June 11 - 13, 2020 Contact: Donna Turner Phone: 613-728-6946 ext 2 Email: donna@cari-acir.org


RECYCLING INDUSTRY MILESTONE

MACHINEX CELEBRATES 50 YEARS IN 2020

METHODS HAVE EVOLVED IN THE FIELD OF RECYCLING, MARKETS CONTINUE TO FLUCTUATE AND WE HAVE TO ADAPT IN ORDER TO REMAIN COMPETITIVE.

PIERRE PARÉ, CEO OF MACHINEX GROUP

58 Recycling Product News March 2020

I

n 2020 Plessisville, Quebec-based Machinex is celebrating its 50th anniversary in manufacturing. “Half a century in business is a great source of pride, but also a major accomplishment when we think of all we had to navigate through to be here,” commented Pierre Paré, CEO of Machinex Group. “Only 10 years ago, we were barely 200 employees and today we are nearly 500.”

A HISTORY IN RECYCLING

Founded in 1970 in Plessisville, the company initially offered machining services, parts and equipment manufacturing for industrial and agricultural clientele. In 1980, Machinex began to offer engineering services, project studies, equipment manufacturing and installation, still within the industrial and agricultural sectors. In 1985 Machinex officially entered the recycling industry by delivering a sorting facility in Victoriaville, Quebec. Another important turning point

for Machinex came in 1989 when the company decided to devote its activities entirely to the recycling industry. Machinex was subsequently awarded the contract for design and construction of the first material recovery facility (MRF) for curbside recycling in Canada, for Laidlaw in Ontario. After experiencing significant growth in Canada and in order to better serve customers in Ontario, Machinex opened a sales and service office in Toronto in 1995. This division was registered Machinex Recycling Services Inc., and now includes a satellite office near Vancouver. In the early 1990s, Machinex won its first contracts in the United States which led to the creation in 1996 of the Machinex Technologies Inc. division, with the opening of an office in Chicago. The sales office in the United States is now relocated to High Point, North Carolina. The European division of Machinex, currently called MRS Europe Ltd., was


Left: Machinex’ original factory in Plessisville, Quebec, when the company specialized in machining, parts and equipment for industrial and agricultural customers. Right: Machinex Group CEO Pierre Paré, at the Plessisville main factory in 2020. Right middle: In 2019, RPN was invited to visit Machinex’ SamurAI robotic sorters at the Sani-Eco MRF in Granby, Quebec. Right bottom: Machinex’ planned Technology Hub. created in 2009 after Machinex was awarded a first major contract in England. A service office near Manchester was opened in 2012 to better serve European clientele. These various companies are now gathered under Machinex Group, owned by Pierre Paré, the single shareholder since 2016. Paré joined the company in 1983 as a sales engineer and became a co-shareholder in 1989. According to Machinex, over the years they have always adapted to market changes, and focused on the development of equipment and systems that allow customers to improve the performance of their recycling operations through advanced automated sorting and techniques. Today the company continues to pursue its primary vocation to deliver high-performance turnkey material recovery facilities. Machinex-built equipment and systems for recycling is wide ranging, including disc screens, trommels, balers, glass cleaning equipment, ballistic separators, optical and robotic sorting technology, as well as specialized equipment such as plastic perforators and eddy current separators. To fuel its vision for the future and the development of its latest technologies, the company is currently completing the construction of a new Technology Hub which will welcome its research and development department along with the manufacturing line of high-tech equipment such as optical sorters and sorting robots. “Methods have evolved in the field of recycling, markets continue to fluctuate, and we have to adapt in order to remain competitive,” said Paré. “Machinex has greatly contributed to the development of the recycling industry and sorting technologies over time. “We can affirm that we are an international reference in the environment and waste management industry for our expertise in high-performance sorting solutions. This happened due to the hard work of a great team.” RPN March 2020 www.recyclingproductnews.com

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60 Recycling Product News March 2020


ADVERTISER INDEX 3Tek Global..................................................................... 23

Kensal Carbide............................................................... 39

American Baler............................................................... 51

LeFort America............................................................... 29

ASKO Inc........................................................................ 55

Liebherr.......................................................................... 64

Bateman Manufacturing................................................. 53

LBX Co............................................................................. 4

Buffalo Turbine............................................................... 49

Mack Trucks..................................................................... 6

Bunting Magnetics......................................................... 21

OverBuilt Inc..................................................................... 9

Cal-Waste Recovery Systems........................................ 48

Paradigm Software......................................................... 61

Canadian Association of Recycling Industries (CARI)............................................................................. 57

PMR Inc.......................................................................... 35

CP Group........................................................................ 45

Rotochopper Inc............................................................... 3

Eco Green....................................................................... 37

Sennebogen LLC............................................................ 11

ELV Select...................................................................... 33

Shred-Tech....................................................................... 5

Gensco Equipment......................................................... 27

STADLER America.......................................................... 15

Harris Equipment............................................................ 17

Stellar Industries Inc....................................................... 19

Herbold USA.................................................................. 47

Van Dyk Recycling Solutions............................................ 2

Industrial Netting............................................................ 41

WasteExpo 2020............................................................ 63

R.M. Johnson Co........................................................... 31

recyclinG PRODUCT news

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March 2020 www.recyclingproductnews.com

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LAST WORD

IMPROVE RECYCLING TO HELP THE PLANET LEGISLATORS NEED TO BE MORE PROACTIVE AND CREATE REAL INCENTIVES FOR CHANGE

A

BY TONY MARTINS

GOVERNMENTS SHOULD BE DOING MUCH MORE TO PRIORITIZE THE RECYCLING INDUSTRY’S CURRENT AND POTENTIAL ENVIRONMENTAL BENEFITS.

TONY MARTINS, CARI

s the effects of climate change increase at an alarming rate and we collectively seek concrete actions in response, governments should be doing much more to prioritize the recycling industry’s current and potential environmental benefits. In recent years we have seen a global legislative emphasis on the managing of end-of-life electronics and plastics, but these policies have been chiefly reactive. To best achieve global sustainability and circular economy goals, governments everywhere must invest in recycling innovation before new products and materials begin to reach the end of their lives, and they must motivate manufacturers to incorporate recyclability into the design of their products. This can be accomplished by rewarding manufacturers for using secondary materials and for designing products for recyclability, by setting effective recycled-content targets for producers and manufacturers, and by providing economic incentives for the creation of new recycling technologies and the construction of infrastructure to manage new or difficult-to-recycle materials. In concert with the industry, lawmakers in the U.S. have shown significant willingness to stimulate new understanding in the recycling sector. Draft legislation introduced to Congress in November 2019 would provide up to $500 million in matching grants to state and local governments to support recycling. The Realizing the Economic Opportunities and Values of Expanding Recycling (RECOVER) Act was introduced on America Recycles Day (November 15). It would provide funds to support recycling infrastructure, programs and education. While Canada’s Federal Government has established strong climate change and plastic waste priorities, we must show a greater range of leadership to bring about the required innovations to meet our stated sustainability goals. Speaking at the UN Climate Change Conference in Madrid in December, Canada’s environment minister Jonathan Wilkinson listed a wide range of emission-reduction initiatives that the government has spurred. These included “introducing a price on carbon, phasing out coal, making historic investments in renewables, building public-transit projects across the country and

62 Recycling Product News March 2020

doubling our protection of nature.” Not once did Wilkinson mention the current and future impact of recycling. He did, however, make reference to the need for innovation. “I am optimistic about technology’s potential to make deep cuts to carbon emissions, carve new paths to prosperity and create jobs,” said Wilkinson. “Canada is ready to be among the leaders in this global economic shift.” If this is true, Canada should lead by example and stimulate direct innovation in the recycling industry. First, by creating procurement programs that prioritize highly recyclable products made with a high percentage of recycled material. Second, by providing fiscal incentives for manufacturers and recyclers to innovate for even greater environmental benefit. Importantly, these innovations must go well beyond a reduction in consumer plastic. New products and technologies are entering the scrap stream every day. As consumer products continue to evolve, the recycling of these products represents new opportunities to reduce waste and carbon emissions. Hybrid vehicle batteries are a prime example of a product that is increasingly reaching the end of its life but cannot yet be easily recycled. Safely and efficiently handling new products like these requires developing the necessary infrastructure. Without an established end market for the materials, there is currently little incentive to make the investment in recycling. CARI supports the Government of Canada’s announced intentions to sustainably “carve new paths to prosperity” through enhancing circularity and durability of goods – but intentions and language refinement can only carry so much weight. As an industry, we need innovation in areas that reach beyond how we are currently operating, and recyclers deserve greater recognition for the role they play in creating a greener planet. That’s why real incentives should be put in place as soon as possible to reward and expand upon the concrete environmental benefits that come from recycling today, for a better tomorrow.

Tony Martins is the communications coordinator at the Canadian Association of Recycling Industries (CARI).


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Recycling Product News March 2020, Volume 28, Number 2