Days of Scholarship and Engagement

Page 1

Celebrating scholarship as students and faculty across disciplines share their research and creative works.

Monday, April 15

12:30 p.m. - 1p.m.

Willis N. Hackney Library

Library Commons

Schedule of Events

The Honors Lecture

“Not Death but Eternal Life”

Speaker — Dr. Murali Ranganathan

All Day

Willis N. Hackney Library Art Gallery

Student Travel

“Bulldogs Abroad: A Digital Display of Student Travels”

Students in HIS 003 share a website showing their recent travel experiences. The display is open throughout the day in Hackney Library Art Gallery.

7 p.m. - 8 p.m.

Culinary Center

Opening Dinner

Beats & Eats

Hosts — Mr. Michael Brantley and Members of the English Club

Pick up a plate in the Culinary Center and join us for an historic Beatnik experience as our English Club students share some of their works.

Dress like a Beatnik and support our contributors with encouraging snaps.

Tuesday, April 16

9 a.m. - 9:50 a.m.

Hardy Alumni Hall

Trustee Room

Schedule of Events

The Plenary Session

Welcome — Dr. Kevin N. Pennington

Introduction of the Speaker — Mr. Michael Brantley

Sharing the Light: Walking in Scholarship

Keynote Speaker — Ms. Shannon Baker, Class of 2021

Shannon Baker graduated from Wilson Early College in 2019 and subsequently completed her bachelor’s degree in mass communications with a concentration in journalism at Barton College in 2021. She was employed as a radio personality for 98.5, “The Big Dawg,” in Rocky Mount for the following year and a half. In late 2022, she became a digital reporter for WNCT Channel 9. She has been the lead singer for the band, “Shannon Baker and Sometime Soon” for approximately eight years. Her passions in music rest around country and bluegrass. The band now travels up and down the East Coast, playing at festivals and venues. In the summer of 2021, they made their debut in Nashville, Tenn., at the world famous Station Inn. We are pleased to welcome her back to Barton as she shares how scholarship shows up in her daily life.

Schedule of Events

Tuesday, April 16

10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. *

Willis N. Hackney Library Library Commons

* Students will be available to speak about their research during these hours. Posters will be available for viewing until 5 p.m. on April 16th.

The Poster Session

Shining Bright: Exploring Barton Student Research

• Deciding for Invasion: How Allied Leaders Chose to Invade Europe Through the D-Day Landings in Normandy, France

Braedon Barnes, Javontae Jones, and Graham Walston (Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Katie Deale)

• Key Military Strategies and Tactics of the Korean War: How did these influence the conduct, outcome, and military doctrine?

Caleb Bullock, Alexander Neeld, and Zeno Rodartz (Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Katie Deale)

• Possible Factors That May Increase One’s Procrastination on a Task

Carlos Chavez, Mea Urquijo, and Samantha Serio

(Faculty Mentor: Dr. Sheri Browning)

• The Events of 9/11 and the United States’ Response Amber DeWalt

(Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Katie Deale)

• How Do Mental Workload and Time Pressure Influence Stress?

Cooper Edwards, Brianna Huffman, and Ariana Rodriguez

(Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Sheri Browning)

• Extracting Casein from Milk: What Does This Say About the Presence of Proteins and How Similar or Different Results and Nutritional Facts Can Be?

Sanbena Emeto

(Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Farzad Mohaddes)

continued

Schedule of Events

Tuesday, April 16

10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. *

Willis N. Hackney Library Library Commons

* Students will be available to speak about their research during these hours.

Posters will be available for viewing until 5 p.m. on April 16th.

The Poster Session continued

• What Effect Does Music Have On Attention?

Jessica Farmer, Jessica Pigford, and Skyler Unruh (Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Sheri Browning)

• How Does Being a Student-Athlete Impact Academic Achievement?

Anna Fretwell (Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Stacey Robinson)

• How Can Inquiry-Based Learning Be Used Within the Secondary Education Classroom?

Brittany Glover (Faculty Sponsors: Dr. Jackie Ennis and Dr. Stacey Robinson)

• Does Competitiveness Influence Performance Outcomes?

Benjamin Griswold, Jakevion Kornegay, and Isabella Pita (Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Sheri Browning)

• Does Note-taking Affect Students’ Academic Performance?

Aniya Hackstall, Emily Krohn, and Rebecca Stroud (Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Sheri Browning)

• How Does the Halo Effect Influence Perceptions of an Individual Who Drives a Certain Type of Car?

Chelsea Hernandez-Cortez and Taivyon Mizelle (Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Sheri Browning)

• Emotional Triggering Through Media and Favorite Television Series

Ta’Jion Jeanty

(Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Tamara Avant)

continued

Schedule of Events

Tuesday, April 16

10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. *

Willis N. Hackney Library Library Commons

* Students will be available to speak about their research during these hours.

Posters will be available for viewing until 5 p.m. on April 16th.

The Poster Session continued

• Does Low Income Affect Students in the School System?

Sherry Keys

(Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Morghan Bosch)

• Brand Identity and Profitability in Performing Arts: A Marketing Plan for Jordan Peartree

Xavier McCreary

(Faculty Sponsor: Ms. Susan Fecho)

• Does Manipulating the Paper Color Affect How a Student Performs on a Test?

Macey Meredith, Cindy Pena, and Bailey Storicks

(Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Sheri Browning)

• North Carolina Gerrymandering: Past and Present Issues in State and Local Government

Erik Ramirez-Ovando

(Faculty Sponsor: Dr. John Bublic)

• The Exchange of Ideas Between the United States and Nazi Germany’s Development of Persecution

Madeline Hoffman, Caroline Leegins, Monica Shaver, Carmen Sullivan, and Yulisa Weaver

(Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Katie Deale)

continued

Schedule of Events

Tuesday, April 16

11 am. - 12:30 p.m.

Barton Art Galleries

Case Art Building

* Students will be available to speak about their work during these hours.

Gallery Crawl

Student work will be on display and the art collection of the late Dr. Michael Fukuchi will be available for viewing.

11 am. - 1 p.m.

Center Campus

1 p.m. - 4 p.m.

Various Locations

Campus Wide Lunch & Concert

Performance by Shannon Baker and Sometime Soon 11 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

This performance is made possible through a generous gift by the Reverend Ms. Blythe Taylor, Assistant Provost for Integrative Learning.

The Presentation Sessions

Session One (1 p.m. - 1:50 p.m. )

Nixon Nursing - Room 135

Mrs. Angie Walston, Moderator

• Sickle Cell Anemia and Malaria Resistance: Are There Pharmacological Applications?

Tucker “Chase” Eaton

(Faculty Sponsor: Ms. Nicole Sciortino)

• Communication Barriers in Pediatric Medicine

Kandyce Condrey

(Faculty Sponsor: Ms. Nicole Sciortino)

• The Effects of Animal Interactions on Stress: Does Animal Interaction Impact Stress Positively?

Ashlee Ebeling-Lynd

(Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Tamara Avant)

continued

Schedule of Events

Tuesday, April 16

1 p.m. - 4 p.m. Various Locations

The Presentation Sessions

Session One (1 p.m. - 1:50 p.m. )

Nixon Nursing - Room 140

Dr. Katie Deale, Moderator

• Brand Identity and Profitability in Performance Careers: A Marketing Plan for Jordan Peartree

Xavier McCreary

(Faculty Sponsor: Ms. Susan Fecho)

• Career Paths for Aspiring Actors: Options in Stage and Screen

Alyssa Krasovich

(Faculty Sponsor: Ms. Sherry Lee Allen)

• North Carolina Secession: A Feeling of Betrayal

Caroline Leegins

(Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Katie Deale)

Nixon Nursing - Room 141

Dr. Tamara Avant, Moderator

• Emotional Triggering Through Media and Favorite Television Series

Ta’Jion Jeanty

(Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Tamara Avant)

• Mental Health and Trauma Coping:

Examining Stigmas

Asia Reddick-Baker

(Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Tamara Avant)

• Effects of Music Therapy on Nutritional Intake: A Study of Memory Care Unit Residents

Jayden Smith

(Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Tamara Avant)

continued

Schedule of Events

Tuesday, April 16

1 p.m. - 4 p.m.

Various Locations

The Presentation Sessions

Session One (1 p.m. - 1:50 p.m. )

Moye Science 111

Dr. Farzad Mohaddes, Moderator

• Dental Disparities in Hispanic/Latino Communities in the United States: Raising Awareness of Oral Health and Its Long-term Effects

Karla Trejo-Lopez

(Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Luis Carlos Ayarza)

• How Do Sound Frequencies Affect Swimming Patterns of Fish?

Mayuko Torii

(Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Tamara Avant)

• Extracting Caffeine from Commercial Drinks Using Conventional Chemistry: What Are the Effects of Varying Organic Solvents?

Sydney Hopkins

(Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Farzad Mohaddes)

Session Two (2 p.m. - 2:50 p.m. )

Nixon Nursing, Room 135

Dr. Charles Ottinger, Moderator

• Body Mass Index and Its Relationship with Cultural Variables

Marko Krtinic

(Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Charles Lanier)

• Examining Barton College Cross Country Athletes: How do VO2 Max, Vital Capacity, and Heart Rate Relate to Each Other?

Nathan Metcalf

(Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Gerard Lange)

continued

Schedule of Events

Tuesday, April 16

1 p.m. - 4 p.m.

Various Locations

The Presentation Sessions

Session Two (2 p.m. - 2:50 p.m. )

Nixon Nursing, Room 135

• Balance and Strength: Assessing Older Adults in Wilson

Chloe Butts

(Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Lauren Biscardi)

Nixon Nursing, Room 140

Dr. Lydia Walker, Moderator

• An Exegetical Analysis of II Samuel 5: 6-9 and its Portrayal in the Morgan Bible

Lauren Abeling-Judge

(Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Lydia Walker)

• Examining the Relationships Between Religiosity, Self-esteem, and Sense of Self

Katie Hansen

(Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Tamara Avant)

• “Dirty War” and its Comparisons to the Holocaust

Caroline Leegins

(Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Luis Carlos Ayarza)

continued

Schedule of Events

Tuesday, April 16

1 p.m. - 4 p.m.

Various Locations

The Presentation Sessions

Session Two (2 p.m. - 2:50 p.m. )

Nixon Nursing, Room 141

Dr. Tamara Avant, Moderator

• The Influence of Media and Trauma Culture on the Perception of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Veterans

Catherine Wood

(Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Tamara Avant)

• The Impact of Social Media on Health Promotion

Logan Roberson

(Faculty Sponsor: Ms. Melissa Goines)

• Same Sex Friendships: Differences in Males and Females

Paige White

(Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Tamara Avant)

Moye Science 111

Dr. Yvette Richardson, Moderator

• Empowering Social Work Practice that Inspires Action and Leads to Change: A Panel on Experience and Theories in the Practicum

Sherica Cox, Azier Grier, Latisha Humphrey, Hannah Hux, Jessica Medlin, Jessica Pigford, Haleigh Ward, and Alexis Williams

(Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Yvette Richardson)

Note: This session will take the entire 50 minutes.

continued

Schedule of Events

Tuesday, April 16

1 p.m. - 4 p.m.

Various Locations

The Presentation Sessions

Session Three (3 p.m. - 3:50 p.m. )

Nixon Nursing, Room 135

Ms. Roberta Draughn, Moderator

• North Carolina Gerrymandering: Past and Present Issues in State and Local Government

Erik Ramirez-Ovando

(Faculty Sponsor: Dr. John Bublic)

• Effects of Restorative Justice Programs vs.Traditional Suspension Methods on the School to Prison Pipeline: How Does Discipline Effect Recidivism?

Cara Davis

(Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Tamara Avant)

• Prostitution and Human Trafficking: The Unique Challenges and Strategic Efforts of Law Enforcement

Madison Greene

(Faculty Sponsor: Dr. David Abeling-Judge)

Nixon Nursing 140

Mrs. Jacqueline Fischer, Moderator

• Motivation, Emotion, and Music: Examining Motivation Levels and Influences in Athletes

Jaquan Lynch

(Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Tamara Avant)

• How Seasonal Changes Affect the Mood States of College Students

Marissa Barber

(Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Tamara Avant)

• Strength Training Sessions Improved Mood in College Students

Faculty Presentation — Lauren Biscardi

continued

Schedule of Events

Tuesday, April 16

1 p.m. - 4 p.m.

Various Locations

The Presentation Sessions

Session Three (3 p.m. - 3:50 p.m. )

Nixon Nursing, Room 141

Mr. George Venturella, Moderator

• Homework’s Effect on Elementary School Students in the Classroom Environment

Helaina Bossolono, Hayley Grunberg, and Savannah Penny

(Faculty Sponsors: Dr. Barbara Mize and Dr. Stacey Robinson)

• A Look at First Year Programs in Higher Education and How to Better Them

Katie Cossette

(Faculty Sponsor: Ms. Ashley Gardner)

• Running an Obstacle Course: Exploring Student Success in First-Year Composition

Faculty Presentation — Mr. Shawn McCauley

Moye Science 111

Dr. Gerard Lange, Moderator

• Mental Health and the Student Athlete: A Panel Discussion on Choices

Cooper Edwards, Kris Fails, Gianna Ferigne, Bryson Jenkins, Kloe Martin, Nathan Metcalf, Brigitte Sander, and Monica Shaver

(Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Gerard Lange)

Note: This session will take the entire 50 minutes.

continued

Schedule of Events

Tuesday, April 16

4:15 p.m. - 5 p.m.

Willis N. Hackney Library Library Commons

Edible Book Reception

• Remarks from Days of Scholarship and Engagement Committee

The Reverend Ms. Blythe Taylor

— Best Poster Award

— Best Presentation Award

— Raffle Award presented by Mr. Xavier McCreary and Ms. Brigitte Sander

• Edible Book Award

Ms. Naija Speight

Wednesday, April 17

Blood Drive

Sponsored by Healthcare+HOSA Cohort

10:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Hardy Alumni Hall

Health & Wellness Fair

Sponsored by the Community Wellness Committee

11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

Center Campus

6:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.

Mary Irwin Belk Hall Room 106

Master Level Student Research Presentations

Students will be presenting their graduate capstone projects for the Master of Kinesiology program. Throughout the one-year program, students propose, carry out, and present a research project on a topic of their choice. Students will be presenting the findings of their projects in a poster presentation format.

(Faculty Sponsors: Dr. Lauren Biscardi and Dr. Charlie Ottinger)

continued

Kinesiology Student Capstone Projects

• Demands of Resistance Training vs. High Intensity Interval Training in College Football Players

Nicholas Butler

• Balance and Strength: Assessing Older Adults in Wilson

Chloe Butts

• Effects Physical Activity Have on Anxiety and Depression

Kiley Darden

• Force Output of a Front Row vs. Back Row Volleyball Player

Allison Gambill

• Position-Specific Workloads in Division II Football Players

Quayon Gilbert

• The Short-Term Testing Effects of Periodization on the Lower Body in Trained Adults

Kevin Hall

• Examining Supplement Use and Behaviors Among Recreational Weightlifters

Katelyn Lawrence

• The Impact of Knee Injuries on Range of Motion and Force Production

Patrick “Finn” Long

• Blood Flow Change in Hamstrings After Manual Therapies: Cupping and Scraping

Tomomi Nishihara

• Are Movement Screenings OneSize-Fits-All? An Evaluation of Generic and Specific Movement Screenings for Baseball and Softball Athletes

Shelby Shepherd

• Comparing Landing Biomechanics Between High and Low Impact Sport Athletes

Marcus Thomas

• The Effects of an Individualized 4-Week Corrective Exercise Program on eSports Students

Franklin “Jay” Wheeler

• Differences in Resulting Power Output from Static and Dynamic Stretching Protocols

Ashley Williford

• Effects of Unilateral versus Bilateral Resistance Training on Strength and Power

Bryan Wilson

Schedule of Events continued

Thursday, April 18

7 p.m.

Kennedy Family Theatre

Friday, April 19

11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Spring Choir Concert

Life, Love, and Light

Undergraduate Students Performing School of Arts and Humanities

(Faculty Sponsor: Ms. Sherry Lee Allen)

Kennedy Family Theatre Online Presentation

7:30 p.m.

Radiant Futures: Perspectives on Success in Physical Therapy Graduate School

Access this presentation:

Video call link:

https://meet.google.com/hmj-uyqut-kdy

Or dial:

(US) + 1 336-904-9291 PIN: 638 175 279#

For more phone numbers:

https://tel.meet/hmj-uyqt-kdy?pin=1436047940330

Or use this QR code:

The Spoken Word and Student Produced Works

Students in the theatre program express their research and scholarship experiences through a performative lens of scholarship.

(Faculty Sponsor: Ms. Sherry Lee Allen)

Days of Scholarship and Engagement 2024 Planning Committee

Dr. Lauren Biscardi

Dr. Sheri Browning

Mrs. Kathy Daughety

Dr. Liz Parham

Dr. Gerard Lange

Ms. Katherine Lindfors

Mr. Thomas Maze

Ms. Nicole Sciortino

The Reverend Ms. Blythe Taylor

Dr. Lydia Walker

Mrs. Brenda Whaley

The Days of Scholarship and Engagement Committee wishes to thank the faculty and students involved in the work of this week as well as the many campus partners who worked together to make this week happen.

Special thanks to Mrs. Kathy Daughety for her in-kind gifts to the event.

Student Marketing Team

Mr. Xavier McCreary

Ms. Brigitte Sander

Recording Team

Ms. Silvia Fernandez-Trabedelo

Ms. Eulalia Pascual Biosca

Mr. Colton Riat

Mr. Caleb Walls

Mr. Colton Wilson

Dr. Miguel Elizade

Session Hosts

First Year Students of the Whitehurst Honors Program

Thanks to the Campus Partners who assisted in supporting this effort:

All Faculty Sponsors

All Presentation Moderators

Ms. Sherry Lee Allen

AVI Fresh Catering

Mrs. Harriet Barnes

Mr. Michael Brantley

Mr. Robert Cagna

Mrs. Irene Cannon

Community Wellness Committee

Mrs. Kathy Daughety

Ms. Tyshika Dickens

Dr. Dave Dommer

The Hackney Library Staff

Mrs. Debbie Larkin

Ms. Katherine Lindfors

Mrs. Susan Mathewson

Mrs. Amanda Metts

Dr. Kevin Pennington

Dr. Sharon Shepard

Mrs. Cindy Temple

Mr. Keith Tew

Note: Various titles throughout the week’s presentations have been designed using artificial intelligence software.

Faculty Presentation Abstracts

Strength Training Sessions Improve Mood in Student-Athletes

Dr. Lauren Biscardi

The rising concerns of student-athlete well-being highlights a need for better understanding of the moodboosting effect of exercise sessions in athletic populations. This study examined the effect of a typical sport-specific strength training session on acute mood responses in male and female student-athletes. Female studentathletes display lower mood states relative to males, however, a 45-minute moderate-high intensity full-body strength training session can acutely improve mood in both male and female student-athletes.

Running an Obstacle Course: Exploring Student Success in First-Year Composition

Dr. Shawn McCauley

Performance in First-Year Composition (FYC) courses serves as a significant predictor of whether students will complete their undergraduate studies, as those who are unsuccessful in FYC are unlikely to be retained and eventually graduate. Given this fact, improving success rates in FYC courses should be an institutional priority for colleges and universities. The question is not whether institutions of higher education should tackle this important problem; it is how. Vincent Tinto’s foundational research on retention may offer a useful framework for understanding and addressing common obstacles to success in FYC.

Undergraduate Student Presentations

An Exegetical Analysis of II Samuel 5:6-9 and its Portrayal in the Morgan Bible

Lauren Abeling-Judge

The Morgan Picture Bible, also known as The Crusader Bible, is a medieval gothic manuscript that depicts the biblical scenes of Exodus, Joshua, Judges, Ruth, and Samuel. The Lower Right portion of Folio 38v details David’s captures of Jerusalem as detailed in II Samuel 5:6-9. The Morgan Bible’s depiction of this scene is striking in contrast to the information conveyed by the text. In both the text and the Morgan Bible’s portrayal little description has been given to the conquest of Jerusalem or the violence employed. In the course of a mere four verses, a curious phrase occurs three times: the blind and the lame. Various interpretations aimed at understanding their meaning have shaped how biblical scripture has been viewed. The purpose of this presentation will consist of an exegetical analysis of the

specific text discussing its various interpretations and their connection to the iconography depicted in the Morgan Bible.

The purpose of this research project is to understand the history of stage and film acting as it applies to young actors entering the field. This project contains a historical overview of the evolution of theatre in relation to its purpose, style, and practice. Then, this research was used to model a career path a young actor may choose to follow, along with a portfolio needed for young actors in the working world. This project not only shows the path the researcher will choose to follow, but also can help aspiring actors in the year to come.

How Seasonal Changes Affect the Mood States of College Students

Marissa Barber

Every year seasonal changes will occur. However, these seasonal changes can cause a shift in perceived mood states, like the winter blues. Mood changes are often some of the most common symptoms that individuals notice when the weather begins to change. Some of the most drastic mood changes occur during the more extreme summer and winter seasons. Baek et.al, (2015), Chotai et.al, (2004), Guzman et.al, (2007), and Tonetti et.al, (2012), all investigated summer and winter patterns of mood seasonality, with findings that suggest that environmental influences that accompany summer and winter seasonal changes can affect perceived mood seasonality. Participants of this study will include Barton College students and through the usage of the Profile of Mood States and selected questions from the Seasonal Profile of Mood States, seasonal changes and their effect on mood states will be examined, to understand this yearly phenomenon better. The hypothesis of this study suggests that winter seasonal changes will have a greater impact on mood states than summer seasonal changes. A second hypothesis states that seasonal changes will have an increased impact on females. This study aims to provide more information on how and why seasonal changes affect mood states.

Homework’s Effect on Elementary School Students and the Classroom Environment

Helaina Bossolono, Hayley Grunberg, and Savannah Penny

Our question that guided this research was: Does homework support students’ understanding of content in the classroom? When conducting a literature review it was found that homework has both negative and positive effects on students within the classroom. The reviews discuss how much the effects vary due to different circumstances such as parental involvement, amount given, and correlation to content being taught. When

Abstracts for Presentations

Abstracts for Presentations

conducting further research, we hosted a survey in which one local elementary school had access. All educators within the elementary school answered ten questions that collected qualitative data on their personal opinions about homework and information about how they give homework. Based on our findings, we conclude that the majority of educators provide students with homework and this homework affects students both positively and negatively. Students have the ability to use homework as a way to show growth when homework correlates to the content being taught and the workload is attainable to show a positive effect. When homework affects students negatively, it can be due to the lack of a positive support system at home, technology accessibility, and socioeconomic factors. We plan to take this information gained from research into account as future educators and implement it into our careers and further establish the benefits or cons of assigning homework to students.

Communication Barriers in Pediatric Medicine

Kandyce Condrey

My research topic was discussing the communication barrier in pediatric medicine compared to adult medicine. I was able to research this topic by holding interviews with a variety of different pediatric healthcare providers, including a RN, MD/PA, and a dentist. I asked them a series of questions regarding how they are able to effectively communicate with children to provide the best quality of care, what factors may get in the way of this, and what tactics they use to break down this barrier. The results were fairly similar across the board, explaining that building trust with your young patient is the most important in having a successful interaction with the patient. This fits into the basic scholarship category because it aims to expand the knowledge on communicating with children effectively to provide the best quality of care.

A Look at First Year Programs in Higher Education and How to Better Them

Katie Cossette

In this research project, I intend to take information provided by first year students on their experiences in the first year seminar course and analyze ways to better retention and the transition to college for incoming freshmen. The question I will be researching is “How can we better the transition to college in efforts to retain students for the remainder of their undergraduate career?” The literature suggests that environmental and emotional factors greatly impact first year students, most commonly their first year having independence. These factors play a significant role in their success as a student their first semester of college. I will be researching how

it can be better understood and adapted to meet the needs of students within the first year transition period. I will be using information from the 2023-2024 freshman class taken from a survey following their completion of the first year seminar course required by Barton College. The expected result of this research is to take suggestions and possible solutions to better retention and the program and apply it to the course. This work can be continued to be researched and adapted over the years for students as the needs of students evolve.

Effects of Restorative Justice Programs vs. Traditional Suspension Methods on the School to Prison Pipeline: How Does Discipline Affect Recidivism?

The school-to-prison pipeline is referred to as the current practices of schools using the zero-tolerance policy which pushes children out of the classroom and into criminal involvement. This study investigates different restorative justice programs to identify the most effective way to decrease re-occurrence of recidivism, problematic behaviors that lead to arrests or any delinquency. This study will include participants in participating middle and high schools in order to conclude if the outcomes of restorative justice programs result in less recidivism compared to the traditional methods. Using existing data from the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data to compare restorative justice practice and the traditional methods, I hypothesize that students that participate in the restorative justice programs will show less recidivism after completing the program and that traditional methods will show more recidivism.

Sickle Cell Anemia and Malaria Resistance: Are There Pharmacological Applications?

Tucker Chase Eaton

Having the ability to reflect upon previously completed, scholarly information to form a new understanding of a topic is crucial for scholarship and intellectual development. Cross examining literature regarding sickle cell trait and malaria resistance in hopes of solidifying a new understanding more than adequately exemplifies scholarship. The research question used to guide analysis and comparison is as follows: “To what extent does the advantageous relationship of sickle cell trait and malaria resistance pose a basis for pharmaceutical applications?” It is hoped that meta-analyzed literature will bring to light solidified or theorized medical techniques utilizing similar physiological pathways as detailed in the research. Information will be gathered to satisfy all necessary information regarding the individual topics, the

Abstracts for Presentations

correlation between the two, and the possible future application with the discovered information. If current and future research/results deem viable for future application, additional testing and correlational analyses will take place in the post-baccalaureate setting.

Effects of Animal Interactions on Stress: Does Animal Interaction Impact Stress Positively

This is an applied research study because of its potential to be used in a therapeutic setting. I aim to focus on how interacting with an animal can have positive effects, benefits and reduction in stress levels. This could be far more accessible and less intimidating than other potential treatment options which creates people finding more healthy ways of coping. Pet-ownership has a beneficial effect on mental health generally and specifically with depression (Chakma, et al., 2021). There is correlation between having an emotional support animal and improvements in an individual’s mental, emotional, and physical health (Anderson, 2023). Another study examined the effect of petting an animal on the reduction of anxiety and focused on the underlying mechanisms involved in the effect. They conducted an experiment that had results showing that petting an animal reduced state-anxiety but not petting a stuffed animal (Shiloh, et al., 2003). These findings indicate that there is no need to differentiate between registered emotional support animals and house pets in regards to their effect on stress levels. They also provide an abundance of reinforcement to the idea of animals having an overall positive impact on humans. Participants can be any individual, the only exclusionary criteria for participants in this study will be anyone with allergies or fear of animals. Both of these negate the purpose of the study as these can cause increased stress out of fear of allergic reaction or past experiences. This study will be a Between-subjects Experimental design. The independent variable will be the stress-reduction activities of which there will be two ‘levels’, a coloring activity versus the other which is the canine interaction. The dependent variable is the positive and negative affect the two groups experience. The expected results are that the affected scores of the K-9 group will show a greater stress reduction than the coloring activity group.

Prostitution and Human Trafficking: The Unique Challenges and Strategic Efforts of Law Enforcement

The purpose of this independent study is to understand the relationship between prostitution and human

trafficking. The research will give a better perspective of the unique challenges that law enforcement faces when engaging with prostitution and human trafficking as well as their strategic efforts. Three human trafficking organizations were identified to be subjects in this study. These organizations were the Raleigh Dream Center, the Mission Haven, and the NC Coalition Against Trafficking. The agency directors were each contacted for a qualitative interview. Interview questions were about the relationship between human trafficking and prostitution, current legislation, and future recommendations. The qualitative interview was used in order to answer the research question about the connection between prostitution and human trafficking (Appendix A).

Contact was made and a qualitative interview was set up with their Human Exploitation and Trafficking (HEAT) unit. The HEAT unit has intensely investigated human trafficking cases giving them expertise and deep insight on the research question. The original interview questions intended for the first three organizations were used as a guide for the interview.

Examining the Relationships Between Religiosity, Self-esteem, and Sense of Self

Katie Hansen

This research study aims to explore the relationship between spirituality, self-esteem, and the meaning of life. Through a review of existing literature and a quantitative analysis, this study will deepen our understanding of the complex relationships that shape spirituality, self-esteem, and the significance we attach to our lives. This study is designed to assess the hypothesis that individuals with high levels of religiosity and spirituality have higher self-esteem and have a more positive view on the meaning of life. This study consists of three scales; The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), The Spiritual Well Being Scale (SWBS), and the Meaning of Life Questionnaire (MLQ). A demographics questionnaire is also included to assess religiosity and gather information on the participants.

Extracting Caffeine from Commercial Drinks Using Conventional Chemistry: What Are the Effects of Varying Organic Solvents?

Sydney Hopkins

Caffeine extraction is not a particularly novel concept, however, the use of it is still quite significant in the scientific community. Extraction itself usually involves common solvents to isolate the desired compound. With this, information about other chemicals and how they work in extraction add to already known information about the conventional methodology for extraction. The method for extracting caffeine using conventional chemistry requires

Abstracts for Presentations

skills using laboratory techniques and advanced knowledge of organic chemicals. By learning how to use these techniques, they can be applied to more practical aspects of daily life, like finding the content of a chemical in food/ drinks. This project covered the basis of exactly how much caffeine is contained in commercial drinks and whether the concentrations indicated on their nutrition labels are correct.

Emotional Triggering Through Media and Favorite Television Series

Ta’Jion Jeanty

This study is an interdisciplinary culmination of the communications and psychology fields. Academically, “Emotional Triggering” finds a way to breathe new life into the sedentary activity known as television.This research examines people’s emotions through their relationship with media specifically, through their relationship with their favorite television series. According to renowned psychologist Paul Ekman, there are six basic emotions: happiness, sadness, anger, fear, surprise, and disgust. While emotions can be triggered through anything and anyone, one important facet is through the media. Media attachment can be traced through a relationship with television. In this study, participants were asked about their emotions and emotional relationship with the media using the Discrete Emotions Questionnaire (Harmon‐Jones et al., 2016). Once the surveys have been completed, the data will be analyzed to determine which emotions are elicited when viewing television and how these emotions may affect daily life.

Career Paths for Aspiring Actors: Options in Stage and Screen

Alyssa Krasovich

The purpose of this research project is to understand the history of stage and film acting as it applies to young actors entering the field. This project contains a historical overview of the evolution of theatre in relation to its purpose, style, and practice. Then, this research was used to model a career path a young actor may choose to follow, along with a portfolio needed for young actors in the working world. This project not only shows the path the researcher will choose to follow, but also can help aspiring actors in the year to come.

Body Mass Index and Its Relationship with Cultural Variables

Marko Krtinic

This study integrates knowledge from nutrition, nursing and health importance, but also culture data as well, so it is a complex but interesting topic. The main research

question of my paper posed the query: “Is there a significant relationship between culture and body mass index (BMI)? “ I have used multiple articles and websites for literature review, mostly to define BMI and Hofstede’s cultural variables. Methodology used were correlations and regressions. First, I did a correlation test to see if there are any correlations and then I did single variable regression between cultural variables and BMI. After that, I have done multivariate regression to try to find the best model that explains BMI using cultural variables. I did not expect any results at first because BMI is not usually connected to BMI but findings were interesting. In the future, further research of this topic might help in nutrition and health advice because people will include the fact that culture affects body mass index, and therefore affects health as well.

North Carolina Secession: A Feeling of Betrayal

Caroline Leegins

This will be a research of the state of North Carolina and its final decision to secede from the Union during the United States Civil War. In this study, it will focus on North Carolina’s political standing in the years leading up to the Civil War. By looking at the surrounding states, the geographical structure, the social structure, and the political ties of the state I will explain my understanding of their decision to secede.

“Dirty War” and its Comparisons to the Holocaust

Caroline Leegins

This will be a research of the relationship between Nazis Germany’s Holocaust and Argentina’s Dirty War. In this study, it will take a wider view of Germany’s eugenics movement by looking at their practices of violence and repression. Then it will examine how the ideas of Nazis Germany traveled to Argentina and developed into their version of a violent repression movement. It will also be a comparison and contrasting of Nazi Germany’s motivations and the motivations behind the military dictatorship in Argentina.

Brand Identity and Profitability in Performance Careers: A Marketing Plan for Jordan Peartree

Xavier McCreary

The proposal aims to define and expand the brand of Jordan Peartree, a multi-talented Musical Theatre major, by leveraging his various artistic skills and personality traits. The research question revolves around determining the best strategy to showcase his talents and expand his social media presence while aligning with his career

Abstracts for Presentations

aspirations. The project will involve reviewing existing literature on personal branding, social media marketing for artists, and career development in the performing arts industry. This will provide insights into effective branding strategies and social media practices for artists and performers. The methodology will include conducting interviews and discussions with Jordan Peartree to understand his career aspirations, artistic preferences, and personal values. Market research and analysis will be conducted to identify trends and audience preferences in the performing arts and fashion industries. The expected results include a clearly defined brand identity for Jordan Peartree that resonates with his personality, artistic talents, and career goals. This will include a logo design, color scheme, and social media presence that reflects his whimsical, mysterious yet homey persona. The application of this branding strategy will aim to enhance Jordan’s visibility, attract opportunities in the performing arts and fashion industries, and support his aspirations for graduate school and a career in stage acting. The findings and recommendations from this can be utilized beyond the Day of Scholarship to help with branding or establishing a personal brand for any students that must sell themselves contractually. Additionally, Jordan Peartree can use this research himself and add to it as well with insights from social media, further extending the reach and impact of the project.

Motivation, Emotion, and Music: Examining Motivation Levels and Influences in Athletes

Jaquan Lynch

The purpose of this research is to determine whether there is a specific type of music that motivates athletes more than other types of music. A deep and diverse relationship exists between music, emotion, and motivation. Human emotions are profoundly affected by music, and it can serve as a strong motivator in many facets of life. Listeners might experience a wide range of emotions when listening to music. Emotions can be evoked by several musical components like tempo, melody, harmony, and lyrics. Ribeiro et al. (2019) discuss the role of music in evoking emotions, primarily happiness, sadness, and fear. It delves into how music induces emotional responses, involving physiological changes in the body and brain activations. The study explores how specific musical features, such as tempo, rhythm, and mode (major or minor), influence emotional responses. The operational definition for motivation is defined here as “the process whereby goaldirected behavior is energized and sustained” (Berhenke et al 2011). This study focuses on understanding young children’s motivation by observing their emotions and behaviors during challenging tasks. Elvers and Steffens

(2017) hint at the relationship between music and motivation for athletes. Elvers and Steffens’s (2017) study explores the impact of music on sports and exercise, focusing on “musical self-enhancement.” They hypothesized that listening to motivational music would enhance self-evaluative cognition, improve performance in a ball game, and evoke greater risk-taking behavior. I comprised both a happy and sad mood induction playlist to be played over a speaker during the experiment. Participants will be asked to fill out the questionnaire while the music induction is being played to persuade their emotions thus testing their motivations based on their current mood. In the end, people’s emotional reactions to music are quite subjective, and depending on their preferences and experiences, people may interpret and relate to songs in different ways. Two main predictions are being made in this study. The first is that studentathletes who are exposed to the music used to induce positive emotion will be more motivated than studentathletes who are exposed to the music used to induce negative emotion. The second is that male student-athletes will be more motivated than female student-athletes regardless of the music induction group. This hypothesis suggests that men are more motivated than women despite their emotions.

Examining Barton College Cross Country Athletes: How do VO2 Max, Vital Capacity, and Heart Rate Reserve Relate to Each Other?

Nathan Metcalf

My research question was looking to see how a few different variables related to one another in aerobically trained cross-country athletes. After submitting for Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval and designing the experimentation, I recruited athletes from the Barton College Cross-Country team. The focus of the study was determining the relationship between VO2 max, vital capacity and heart rate reserve in these athletes. Prior research had shown there would more than likely be a positive correlation between VO2 max and heart rate reserve. However, there was not as much literature describing what relationship may exist between VO2 max and vital capacity. At the conclusion of the experimentation process there was a clear positive correlation between VO2 max and heart rate reserve. However, there was no distinguishable connection between VO2 max and vital capacity. After looking back through the raw data, it was clear that there was an unforeseen clear positive correlation between each subject’s body weight and vital capacity.

Abstracts for Presentations

North Carolina Gerrymandering: Past and Present Issues in State and Local Government

Erik Ramirez-Ovando

Gerrymandering can affect a citizen’s life in how much aid certain counties and townships can receive (for example: Public Assistance Programs, Social Work Programs, Child Support Enforcements, etc.), the political structure of the state government, the state and local budgets and much more. My research question is: How does partisan gerrymandering influence the state and local governments in North Carolina? My project will connect with the creation and history of gerrymandering and how gerrymandering has evolved over time to give more power to a certain party over the other. The scholarly and peer reviewed works that I have been able to read have all expressed an interest in shedding more light on the situation by examining past and current challenges to make gerrymandering fair and incline for all constraints in congressional districts. My methodology will consist of using past SCOTUS cases, current civil lawsuits against the installed maps by North Carolina Republicans, and other relative issues to gerrymandering. After my research is complete, my goal is to educate the audience on how partisan gerrymandering can affect citizens and what can a typical citizen do to make a difference to make our government fair and just. My work would influence our community members by seeing that these issues can be resolved with just the cast of one vote, because “your’’ vote can make a difference, and that these issues can help elect the lawmakers and leaders that we need for our democracy. Bringing awareness to issues in North Carolina will hopefully raise awareness for other important issues across our state.

Mental Health and Trauma Coping: Examining Stigmas

Asia Reddick-Baker

This study explores the widespread and frequently neglected problem of Black people’s underrepresentation in mental health and trauma coping strategies. There are various causes for the stigma associated with mental health, including systemic injustices, historical influences, cultural stigmas, and the absence of easily accessible and culturally sensitive mental health resources. This research navigates through the family dynamic in black households and how that shapes the stigmas and perceptions African Americans have on mental health, and ultimately contributes to the underutilization of mental health services. The research initiative provides insight into the insufficient representation of mental health issues in the Black community. This will help build culturally appropriate treatments and support networks, which will promote a

more equitable and inclusive approach to trauma coping and mental health. These findings include quantitative surveys with individuals that encompass the African Diaspora, by scrutinizing the intersectionality of mental health, race, and ethnicity. The work presented ultimately promotes a thorough comprehension of mental health that takes into account various cultural viewpoints, promising that everyone’s needs are satisfied regardless of their race or ethnicity.

The Impact of Social Media on Health Promotion

Logan Roberson

My defined research question is “What is the impact social media can have on health promotion?” Through literature, social media is something that is very new, so the literature is very current as social media has not been around for a very long time. Finding new marketing ways to show health promotion is incredibly important as things are constantly evolving. The method that will be shown through this study is creating health related Instagram posts on Vitality Nutrition’s Instagram and seeing the interactions received, while also looking at sales based on the drink that is promoted. This will take place each day for five days, while also having a new health issue promoted for each of the days. With this application, there should be increasing sales on the promoted drink as many people struggle with health issues each day, but do not know how to go about fixing it. This work will be shown beyond the Day of Scholarship by possibly adapting the marketing strategies used within Vitality itself. Vitality is a nutrition club that sells many different health drinks that can be customized based on your health goals and wishes.

Effects of Music Therapy on Nutrional Intake: A Study of Memory Care Unit Residents

Jayden Smith

The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of instrumental versus lyric music on the nutritional intake of residents in a memory care unit of an assisted living facility. Proper nutritional intake is often overlooked, especially for those with late-stage dementia and Alzheimer’s because of their decreased ability to communicate basic needs. Specific interventions have been implemented to help those with malnutrition; however, the impact of music therapy on food intake has not been heavily researched. Lack of knowledge and behavioral measures covering all cognitive populations provides evidence that a multitude of research hypotheses can be studied today. Overall, being able to understand the benefits of music therapy on activities of daily living, such as eating, can provide assisted living facilities an

opportunity to address the growing concern of malnutrition for their residents. To discover the capability music has for those in the memory care unit, eight subjects from a memory care unit at an assisted living facility took part in a five-day study. This within-group study design had all subjects participate in the treatment options. One day of no music therapy was conducted before two days of instrumental music therapy and lyric music therapy. The weight of the food on the plate was measured before and after mealtimes administered at 4:00 p.m. Data collected was then recorded in a chart with each participant having a corresponding subject number to help remain anonymous. Music type, age, gender, diagnosis, the food served, the pre-weight of the food (g), and the post-weight of the food (g), were all collected for each day. I hypothesized that residents in the memory care unit of an assisted living facility will eat more food if music therapy is used during mealtime. By playing music in the background residents will feel more comfortable, making them feel more inclined to eat their food.

How Do Sound Frequencies Affect Swimming Patterns of Fish?

Mayuko Torii

Previous research has explained how fish hearing works through sensory cells to differentiate the different volume and frequencies of auditory stimuli. Knowledge of how fish hear has prompted research on responses to sounds and vibrations. The present study seeks to better understand what types of sounds provoke certain behavioral responses through acoustic vibrations from the bass in music. These responses include swimming activity, tightness of schooling, and amount of schools formed. The study will consist of two treatments: a low bass treatment and a high bass treatment. The fish will be exposed to each treatment with observation periods before and after exposure to observe the behavioral effects of the treatments. The study is expected to find that heavy bass music evokes negative responses and low bass music induces positive responses. Negative responses consist of less swimming and a large, tighter school, and positive responses are more swimming and less schooling. These behaviors will be a reflection of how safe the fish feel when being exposed to either treatment. Results from this research will help further understanding of how human interaction can influence animal behavior, and how we as humans can minimize the negative impacts.

Dental Disparities in Hispanic/Latino Communities in the United States: Raising Awareness of Oral Health and Its Long Term Effects

Karla Trejo-Lopez

This research project discusses and aims to expand knowledge regarding the influence of socioeconomic status, cultural perceptions, and access to dental care on oral health outcomes. Furthermore, this research aims to provide valuable insights into addressing these disparities and advancing the understanding of dental health equity. The research question is: What are the primary factors contributing to dental disparities among Hispanic/Latino communities in the United States, and how do socioeconomic factors, cultural perceptions, and access to dental care influence oral health outcomes within this demographic? This research considers numerous scholarly articles and literature reviews regarding dental disparities in these communities.

Same Sex Friendships: Differences in Males and Females

Paige White

The purpose of this study is to examine same-sex friendships and the differences between male/male and female/female friendships. I will specifically be looking at the differences in intimacy, physical touch, longevity, and if societal factors including homophobia affects them. This is important because quality friendships are vital aspects of a person’s well-being and societal influences of these friendships should be known. A survey will be sent via email, this will include a 2-part questionnaire. The first part will be the homophobia scale and the second part the participants will be asked to think about their closest same-sex friendship and answer questions on their relationship. Past literature has reviewed homophobia or other social norms and how it affects friendship and also physical touch in friendships in general. Past literature has also reviewed the gender differences in friendships and longevity of friendships. I hope to expand this research while also focusing on the societal factor of homophobia and societal norms that are put on specifically male/male friendships and how that affects all aspects of their friendships. Some expected results from this study is that those who have more homophobic ideas and tendencies will be less physically intimate with their same sex closest friend, especially in males. I also expect to see general differences between male/male and female/female friendships in intimacy, physical touch, longevity. I also expect to see differences in gay versus straight people’s friendships in all the same aspects as well.

Abstracts for Presentations

The Influence of Media and Trauma Culture on the Perception of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Veterans

Post-traumatic stress disorder, known as PTSD, is a common mental illness that veterans and current service members can struggle with. Much past research has focused on defining PTSD, the causes of PTSD, and the influence it can have on those who surround the veteran. However, little time has been put into understanding how the modern-day media and the concept of trauma culture has influenced the perception of PTSD in service members.The present study aims to remedy this gap in the research by exploring the influence of the media and trauma culture on the perception of PostTraumatic Stress Disorder in veterans. A fifteen question, true or false, survey was used that measures the knowledge level of the participants in regard to the misconceptions surrounding PTSD in veterans. Due to the various pathways that the survey contains, the participants report their military involvement (or lack thereof) as well as media consumption in order to explore the impact these factors have on the perception of PTSD as a result of being involved with the military. Based on past research literature and the procedures that have been described, four hypotheses have been developed.The first hypothesis is an increase of media consumption regarding mental health leads to a decrease in the participants questionnaire score.The second hypothesis is that an increase in belief in trauma culture leads to a decrease in the participants questionnaire score.The third hypothesis is veterans will have a higher questionnaire score than non-service members.The fourth hypothesis is that family members of veterans with a high closeness score will have a higher questionnaire score than non-related participants. For each of these, the questionnaire score is an average of the fifteen question section regarding misconceptions surrounding PTSD in veterans.

Panel Discussion Abstracts

Empowering Social Work Practice that Inspires Action and Leads to Change: A Panel on Experience andTheories in the Practicum

Senior Social Work Students

Sherica Cox, Aziah Grier, Latisha Humphrey, Hannah Hux, Jessica Medlin, Jessica Parish, Haleigh Ward, and Alexis Williams

Social Work senior students who are in their field placement will be the panel experts to discuss their learning, experience, application of social work theory, skills and knowledge gained in the Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) program through a structured conversation that is moderated. Students will emphasize how they are

using scholarship from their academic program in the “real world” and examples of how they have or have not felt prepared. The format will be conducted through a question-and-answer forum. Questions will come from the moderator, and time will be allowed for audience questions as well. Each student will introduce themselves and briefly discuss the scope of work that is done by the agency. The moderator will provide a brief description of the field placement philosophy and objectives.

I’ll Do Mental Health Tomorrow: Hidden Cost of Being a Collegiate Student-Athlete

Whitehurst Honors Students

Cooper Edwards, Kris Fails, Gianna Ferigne, Bryson Jenkins, Kloe Martin, Nathan Metcalf, Brigitte Sander, and Monica Shaver

Student-athlete or athlete-student; the people who find themselves torn between these two identities find each an integral part of what makes them who they are, but seldom do they have enough time for either. The resulting split can result in students not making decisions in the best interest of their own mental health. Classes and trainings are folded together into an awkward mix that often finds students getting up before dawn, filling every daily moment with required activities, then squeezing in homework time into the early morning hours. However, there are also moments of enrichment woven between the two states of being that provide student-athletes with opportunities they might not otherwise have; such as leadership development activities, exposure to other parts of the country, and unique experiences like traveling by train. This panel discussion with high-achieving studentathletes who are members of the Whitehurst Family Honors Program addresses the complexities of their lives in a reflective inquiry that seeks to enrich the understanding of what it takes to be at the top of one’s game both on the field and in the classroom. At the center of the discussion is a question that probes the nuanced relationship between being both a student and an athlete, and how when torn between the two, mental health often pays the price. What, then, are the sacrifices to mental health that must be taken to achieve both academic and athletic success? Underpinning this presentation are reports compiled by the National Institutes of Health and the Southern Association of Independent Schools that demonstrate high levels of anxiety, depression, and other mental health concerns amongst collegiate student-athletes. Through the discussion the participants hope to encourage further conversations about positive ways to embrace both parts of their college experience, not simply being a student-athlete or an athlete-student, but a person passing through the doorway to the future versions of themselves.

Abstracts for Presentations

Abstracts for Presentations

Master Level Student Research Presentation Abstract

Balance and Strength: Assessing Older Adults in Wilson

Chloe Butts

This project is an original research investigation conducted by a graduate student in partial fulfillment of the Master of Science in Kinesiology program. The purpose of this study is to determine whether a Matter of Balance training program improves physical function and reduces fear of falling in older adults.This study used an experimental approach to evaluate an 8-week Matter of Balance training program on physical and psychological variables related to fall risk in older adults. Nine community-dwelling participants above the age of 60 participated in this study. Participants were tested before and after the Matter of Balance intervention using the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), grip strength, and the Fear of Falling Avoidance Behavior Questionnaire. The SPPB includes a 4-meter walk, 5 chair stand test, and timed balance

test. No significant difference was found from pre-test to post-test for the Short Physical Performance Battery, 4-meter walk, gripstrength, or the Fear of Falling Questionnaire (p > .05). The average time to complete five chair stands before the Matter of Balance Intervention (M = 14.88 ± 4.69) was greater than the average time following the intervention (M = 13.84 ± 2.93). While statistical tests were run at the time of submission to the Day of Scholarship, data collection is not yet complete. The initial intervention was held at the Foundation YMCA. We will continue to conduct research in the Wilson Community at other community centers, with the hope of obtaining a sample size that can draw more generalizable conclusions.

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