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POSTGRADUATE DEGREES TAUGHT & RESEARCH

www.bangor.ac.uk/law

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Bangor Law School


Contents Bangor Law School Introduction to Bangor Student Law Society Career Pathways Law School Staff International Students Visitors to the Law School Teaching & Studying Programme Structures LLM International Commercial & Business Law LLM International Intellectual Property Law LLM International Law LLM International Law (European Law) LLM International Law (Global Trade Law) LLM International Law (International Criminal Law & International Human Rights Law LLM Law (General) LLM Law & Banking LLM Law & Criminology/MA Criminology & Law Institute for Competition & Procurement Studies (ICPS) Masters Degrees in Public Procurement Law & Strategy LLM Public Procurement Law & Strategy Executive LLM Public Procurement Law & Strategy MBA Banking & Law MBA Law & Management MA Banking & Law The Bridging Degree (for candidates holding approved university Diplomas) LLM Modules Management & Banking Modules Criminology Modules Procurement Law & Strategy Modules Part II Research Degrees Accommodation Entry & Application Financial Information

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3 4 5 6 8 – 10 12 13 14 15 16 16 17 17 18 18 19 19 20 22 23 24 24 25 25 26 27 29 – 35 36 – 40 42 44 - 45 46 – 47 48 49 50 51


Bangor Law School Welcome to Bangor Law School. This prospectus provides an excellent overview of some of the many exciting and important activities that we are engaged in at the Law School. Law students will find a warm and welcoming home at Bangor, a dynamic, ambitious and competitive environment equipping students for the international workplace of the future. We are an International Law School, set in a beautiful, environmentally pristine location, with energetic staff recruited from the world’s top law schools, and exciting programmes designed for the internationally mobile ambitious law student. Over the past year, my colleagues have continued to work hard in taking teaching and research at the Law School to new heights. Two of our team, Criminal Law Lecturer Ann McLaren and Aled Griffiths, Social Law Lecturer and Deputy Head of School, were appointed University Teaching Fellows for their outstanding contribution to undergraduate teaching. Law Librarian Mrs Mairwen Owen has also been recognised by our students for her exceptional support to them.

We continue to be impressed by the innovation underway in international legal education, and that is why we have internationalised all of our programmes well ahead of most other UK Law Schools. It is becoming very clear to us that highly motivated students right around the world are increasingly looking for quality experience in their international legal education, and we can certainly meet that need. Our programmes will be of interest to both the International student seeking a high quality graduate law masters experience in a prestigious UK University, and to the UK student seeking an international graduate education experience. We automatically consider all international students for a £2,000 Scholarship (subject to you meeting our academic eligibility criteria). More information on page 51.

Bangor Law School has actively supported students as they have reached out to participate successfully in conferences, seminars, mooting competitions, winning major scholarships, and as they have broadened their horizons with international work placements and research fellowships.

I hope that you enjoy reading this prospectus. Bangor continues to attract the best and the brightest. Fulfil your potential, come and join us! Professor Dermot Cahill Head of School

Bangor University is now placed among the world’s top 275 Universities (Times Higher Education World University rankings 2011/2012)

Bangor has been rated the BEST University in Wales for its teaching (Sunday Times University Guide 2012 Ranking)

Top 15 University in the UK for Teaching Excellence (Sunday Times 2012 Ranking)

Bangor Law School is now placed amongst the top 50 UK Law Schools (The Guardian League Tables 2013)

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Introduction to Bangor Established in 1884, Bangor University has a long tradition of excellence in teaching and research. Students from all parts of the UK and many countries worldwide choose to study at Bangor every year, creating a multicultural student population of over 10,000 students. We find that our specialist programmes, the natural beauty and safety of the area and the lower cost of living make Bangor a popular choice amongst students. Bangor is a student-oriented and student-friendly city. Its compact nature means that student facilities, university buildings, accommodation and the city centre are all within easy walking distance. As it is easy to move around the city, our students find it is easier to settle down and to meet up in the evening with new friends. Students and their families are naturally concerned about safety, and they can have peace of mind knowing that Bangor is regarded as one of the safest places to be a student, with the North Wales crime rate being one of the lowest in the UK.

TRAVEL TIME TO BANGOR Manchester - 2hrs Dublin - 3hrs London - 3hrs 15mins Cardiff - 4hrs Liverpool - 2hrs Birmingham - 2hrs 50mins

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Participants of the annual McLaren Moot Court competition at Caernarfon Criminal Justice Centre. Mooting is a key event in the Students’ Law Society calendar.

Student Law Society BANGOR STUDENTS’ LAW SOCIETY The aim of the Bangor Students’ Law Society is to help Law students academically and socially. It is an important objective to fill in the gaps between what is learnt in lectures, and what is needed to succeed in a highly competitive industry. The Society is actively involved in organising a wide variety of activities and events for Law students, facilitating a more social and productive atmosphere in which to study law. The activities and events are designed to widen the scope of learning and socialising whilst at Bangor.

NEWS FROM 2012... LAW SOCIETY VISITS LONDON Members of the Bangor Students’ Law Society marked the end of the academic year with an educational trip to London. As part of the expedition, students took in the House of Commons, the Royal Courts of Justice and the Supreme Court, having the opportunity to sit in on a Committee Meeting at the House of Commons before being given a talk by Elfyn Llwyd MP. At the Supreme Court, the group witnessed a copyright infringement case involving the ‘Stormtroopers’ suits from the Star Wars franchise.

Activities include: Law related residential trips, Mooting Sessions, Book Sales, Special Guest Speakers, Student Skills Workshops, Study Groups, Social Nights, Law Christmas Ball, Innocence Project, Pro bono activities and End of Year Meal/Party. For further details visit the Bangor Students’ Law Society website: www.undeb.bangor.ac.uk/law Or check out www.facebook.com/law.bangor

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Career Pathways Route to Legal Practice

Employability

The LLM qualification can lead to careers, or promotion of an existing career, within law firms, the civil service, public service, public administration, health service, industry, finance and banking. An LLM can also be a useful qualification for those wishing to progress to doctoral studies and to embark on an academic career.

The academic experience offered by Bangor Law School is enriched by a programme of activities designed to encourage students to accelerate their personal development and to cultivate the skills required in an increasingly competitive job market.

Although an LLM qualification is very useful for those wishing to practice law, it is not a ‘qualifying degree’ that will secure entry onto the Law Society Legal Practice Course or the Bar Council Bar Professional Training Course. Overseas graduates who wish to secure the right to practice in England and Wales are advised to consider entry onto the Law school’s twoyear accelerated graduate entry LLB degree which enjoys a Qualifying Law Degree (QLD) status for professional practice purposes. On securing a qualifying law degree, students must subsequently undertake further courses and training to become either a practising Solicitor or Barrister in England and Wales. Candidates interested in a qualifying law degree should contact the Admissions Tutor, Aled Griffiths: a.w.griffiths@bangor.ac.uk

These include: The Innocence Project ‰ Careers Talks ‰ Work Placements and Internships ‰ Street Law ‰ The Bangor Employability Award scheme ‰

www.bangor.ac.uk/law/development

Professional Exemptions Graduates of the LLM degrees will be entitled to the Chartered Insurance Institute exemptions as follows: ‰ Financial Services Framework 30 non-unit specific credits at Advanced Diploma Level, as well as 25 non-unit specific credits at Diploma level. ‰ Insurance Framework 30 non-unit specific credits at Advances Diploma level and the Diploma unit P05 (Insurance Law).

The MBA and MA qualifications can lead to careers in the Finance and Banking sectors as banking lawyers, banking executives or managers of modern enterprises. These are also valuable qualifications for securing training contracts in the highly competitive professional job market, both in the UK and overseas.

Careers and Employability Service In today’s highly competitive employment market, it is important to take advantage of the academic, recreational and work-related activities available to you as a student. Whether or not you know what career path you want to follow, the Careers and Employability Service supports students and recent graduates in making appropriate choices about their futures by providing high-quality information, workshops, individual advice and guidance as well as offering work-based opportunities. T: +44 (0) 1248 382071 E: careersopps@bangor.ac.uk www.bangor.ac.uk/careers 06 04

Nigel Giffin QC, Kings Bench Walk Chambers, London, speaking at Bangor Law Schools' Public Procurement Law Conference in 2012


NEWS FROM 2012... CONFUCIUS INSTITUTE

Graduate Destinations Bangor Law Graduates have found employment or further study opportunities in recent times in the following organisations: ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰

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College of Law (Solicitor Training) University of Arizona Whitehall Federal Capital Development Administration in Nigeria Oxford Institute of Legal Practice (Legal Practice Course) College of Law Chester University of the West of England, Bristol (Bar Professional Training Course) Old People’s Commission Wales Marsden & Rawthorn Edward Hughes Solicitors RAF Citizens Advice Bureau Cordner Lewis Solicitors Tudur Owen Roberts Glynne & Co Howell Davies & Co Lincolns Inn (Bar) Middle Temple (Bar) HM Revenue and Customs, Treasury Solicitor New York Bar Bank of Shanghai United Nations Reserve Bank of Malawi Her Majesty’s Courts Service Cabinet Office, London Wilson Browne Solicitors Stephensons Solicitors LLP Gwynedd & Anglesey County Councils

Bangor University has established a Law-focussed Confucius Institute in collaboration with China University of Political Science & Law, Beijing Confucius Institutes provide people all over the world with the opportunity to learn about Chinese language and culture. The establishment of the Confucius Institute at Bangor University will provide a suitable base from which to help foster understanding of Chinese culture among the people of the region. Bangor Law School already has extensive links with several of China’s top law school and regularly attracts top students and law professors from China. "We now want to take things a step further,” explains Professor Dermot Cahill, Head of Bangor Law School. "The Chinese come here learning about us, now it is time for us to learn more about them. This is wonderful news for the North Wales region and Bangor University.”

Professor John G. Hughes, Vice Chancellor of Bangor University, with Ms Xu Lin, DirectorGeneral of Hanban (Confucius Institute Headquarters), and Professor Zhang Guilin, Vice President of China University of Political Science & Law

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Law School Staff Staff and their Research Interests Below are the details of staff at Bangor Law School, including their areas of expertise and research interests. These are the areas in which the School offers research supervision. We welcome research proposals relevant to these areas of expertise.

PROF. DERMOT CAHILL

PROF. SUZANNAH LINTON

HEAD OF SCHOOL, SOLICITOR

CHAIR OF INTERNATIONAL LAW, SOLICITOR

Graduate of the College of Europe, Bruges, the National University of Ireland, and the Law Society. Research Interests: European Union Internal Market Law in Goods and Services, Competition Law, Corporate Finance Law, Public Procurement Law Recent Publications: European Law (Co-Author, 5th ed., Oxford University Press, 2011); The Irish Journal of European Law – Editor; The Ebb and Flow of EU Internal Market Law: Public Procurement, State Aids and Public Sector Competition Law (2010) European Business Law Review 1051; The Modernisation of EU Competition Law Enforcement (Editor, Cambridge University Press, 2004); Corporate Finance Law (Sweet & Maxwell, 2000)

ALED GRIFFITHS DEPUTY HEAD OF SCHOOL Graduate of Bangor University and Aberystwyth University. Research Interests: Community Care Law, and Employment Law Recent Publications: Gofal 2 - Community Care Law and Practice (2008), Care Council Wales

PROF. JOHN ALDER Formerly the Head of Newcastle University Law School and of Keele Law School. Research Interests: Environmental Law, Public Law, Equity Recent Publications: Constitutional and Administrative Law Palgrave (7th ed. 2009) 474pp. ‘Environmental Ethics and Proportionality: Hunting for a Balance’, with Ilona Cheyne, (2007) 3 Environmental Law Review

ANN MCLAREN Graduate of University of Westminster and University of Reading. Research Interests: Tort Law, Criminal Law, Evidence 08

Graduate of University of Bristol, University of Essex and the Law Society. Research Interests: International Criminal Law, International Criminal Procedure, International Law of Armed Conflict, International Human Rights Law, International Dispute Resolution. Recent Publications: “Post Conflict Justice in Asia”, in M. Cherif Bassiouni (Ed.), The Pursuit of International Criminal Justice: A World Study on Conflicts, Victimisation and Post-Conflict Justice, (Brussels: Intersentia NV, 2010), Vol. 2, Part III (pp.515-753); “Completing The Circle: Accountability for the Crimes of the 1971 Bangladesh War of Liberation”, Criminal Law Forum, Vol. 21(2) June 2010, pp.191-311; “ASEAN States, their reservations to human rights treaties and the proposed ASEAN Commission on Women and Children”, Human Rights Quarterly, Vol. 30(2), May 2008, pp. 436493; “Unravelling The First Three Trials at Indonesia’s Ad Hoc Court for Human Rights Violations in East Timor”, Leiden Journal of International Law, Volume 17(2), 2004, pp.303-361

SARAH NASON Graduate of Cambridge University. Research Interests: Public International Law and Human Rights, Jurisprudence, Legal and Political Theory, Administrative Law / Judicial Review Recent Publications: “Multiculturalism, Human Rights and Proportionality” (2008) Kings Law Journal vol. 19 issue 2

OSIAN REES Graduate of Aberystwyth University. Research Interests: Family Law, Devolution in Wales, Succession Law Recent Publications: “Devolution and the Development of Family Law in Wales” (2008) 20 Child and Family Law Quarterly 45


ZHEN JING

MARK HYLAND

Graduate of Central University of Finance and Economics of China, University of Wales Swansea, and Queen Mary College, University of London.

Graduate of University College Dublin and Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium.

Research Interests: International Trade Law, Insurance Law and Maritime Law Recent Publications: “A Potential Trap for the Insured: The Application of the ‘Basis of the Contract’ Clauses in China’s Insurance Market” (2008) Insurance Law Journal, Vol 19, No 2,160-180, ISSN: 1030-23; Subrogation in Marine Insurance Laws and Practice in China [2009] Journal of International Maritime Law, Issue 3, ISSN: 1478-8586, (forthcoming)

Research Interests: Intellectual Property Law, the Conflict of Laws, Copyright Law, digital copyright issues. Recent Publications: “Copyright Law”, Technology and IP Law (Law Society of Ireland/Bloomsbury Professional), published August 2008; “Judicial Pragmatism Prevails in Sharman Ruling”, Computer and Telecommunications Law Review, Volume 12, Issue 4, 2006 (pp 98-108); “The Ever Expanding Nature of Copyright Liability Down Under”, Communications Law, Volume 10, Issue 5, 2005 (pp 157-163)  

ˆ JONES DEWI LLYR

ALISON MAWHINNEY

Graduate of Cardiff University.

Graduate of Trinity College Dublin, University of Essex and Queen’s University Belfast

Research Interests: Constitutional Law, Law & Devolved Government, The Welsh Language in the Legal System Recent Publications: “Devolution”, in L. Webley and H. Samuels, Complete Public Law Text, Cases and Materials, Oxford University Press, 2009; “The Welsh Language and the judicial system – realities, difficulties and opportunities”, Communications Law, 13(2), 2008, 47-55; Bilingual Dictionary of Legal Terms (Bangor University, 2008)

AMA EYO Graduate of the University of Lagos, Nigeria, and the University of Nottingham. Research Interests: Public Procurement Law and Policy, international and national regulation of contemporary procurement techniques and processes, regulatory procurement reforms in Africa. Recent Publications: “Electronic auctions in the EC Procurement Directives – a Perspective from UK Law and Practice” in Arrowsmith (ed), Reform of the UNCITRAL Model Law on Procurement: Procurement Regulation for the 21st Century (West, 2009, Chapter 12)

GWILYM OWEN Graduate of Oxford University. Research Interests: Contract Law, the impact of the latest European Remedies Directive on procurement in Wales

Research Interests: freedom of religion in schools, religious discrimination in employment, the human rights obligations of non-state service providers. Recent Publications: “Freedom of religion in the Irish primary school system: a failure to protect human rights?” 3 Legal Studies 379 (2007); “The Rights of Foreigners in the United Kingdom”, 19 European Review of Public Law 355 (2007)

PEDRO TELLES Graduate of the University of Nottingham. Research Interests: Public Procurement Law and Policy, the day to day application of public procurement rules Recent Publications: “The competitive dialogue in Portugal”, Public Procurement Law Review, (1) 2010

WEI SHI Graduate of Renmin University China, and Cambridge University. Research Interests: Intellectual Property Law, WTO Law, International Commercial Arbitration Recent Publications: Shi, W, Intellectual Property in the Global Trading System: EU-China Perspective, Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p324 (2008); Shi, W, “Incurable or Remediable? Clues to Undoing the Gordian Knot Tied by Intellectual Property Enforcement in China,” 30(2) University of Pennsylvania Journal of International Law 541-584 (2008)

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Law School Staff EVELYNE SCHMID Graduate of The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University, USA, and The Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland. Research Interests: International & European Law; Law & Armed Conflict; Business & Human Rights. Recent Publications: Schmid E. (2011) 'War Crimes Related to Violations of Economic, Social and Cultural Rights' 71 Heidelberg Journal of International Law 523; Schmid E. (2011) 'Thickening the Rule of Law After Conflict: the Constitutional Entrenchment of Economic and Social Rights in South Africa’ in Importing International Law in Post-Conflict States: The Role of Domestic Courts. A Nollkaemper, C Ryngaert and E Kristjansdottir, Antwerp: Intersentia

YVONNE MCDERMOTT Graduate of Leiden University and National University of Ireland, Galway; Ph.D. Candidate, Irish Centre for Human Rights Research Interests: International Criminal Law, Criminal Procedure, Refugee Law. Recent Publications: McDermott, Y. and Keane, D. (eds), The Challenge of Human Rights: Past, Present and Future (Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, 2012); McDermott, Y., 'Case commentary: Prosecutor v. Krajisnik, "Decision on Momcilo Krajisnik's motion to reschedule status conference and permit Alan Dershowitz appear"' in A. Klip and G. Sluiter (eds.) Annotated Leading Cases of International Criminal Tribunals: Vol XXXV (Antwerp: Intersentia, 2011); McDermott, Y. 'Yong Vui Kong v. Public Prosecutor and the Mandatory Death Penalty for Drug Offences in Singapore: A Dead End for Constitutional Challenge?' (2010) 1 International Yearbook of Human Rights and Drug Policy 35-53.

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HONORARY PROFESSOR PROF. THOMAS WATKIN Professor Watkin’s principal interests are in the history of law in England, Wales and Europe, including the history of Roman law. He has published several books and numerous articles on these subjects in leading journals both in Britain and overseas. His work on English legal history has won recognition in his election to the Council of the Selden Society, the principal society dedicated to advancing knowledge of the history of English law. His work on continental legal systems, and in particular Italian law, led to his election to the Academy of Private Lawyers of Milan and Pavia. In the year 2000, together with other academics, judges and practising lawyers, he founded the Welsh Legal History Society, and he has edited the first three volumes of essays published by the Society, of which he is also secretary and treasurer. He is also a member of Scotland’s Stair Society, the Irish Legal History Society and the American Society of Legal History. As a teacher, Professor Watkin has been particularly associated with the development of degrees in law with languages, contributing to the European Legal Systems module on the LLB. His most recent work has focussed on the history of law in Wales, and his book The Legal History of Wales, the first comprehensive history of law in Wales from the Roman invasion to devolution, was published by the University of Wales Press in March 2007. In April 2007, Professor Watkin returned to Cardiff to become First Welsh Legislative Counsel, the legal officer principally responsible for drafting the legislative programme of the Welsh Assembly Government under the new powers conferred upon the National Assembly of Wales by the Government of Wales Act 2006.


Bangor University has risen substantially in the Times Higher Education World University rankings, and is now placed amongst the world’s top 275 universities.

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International Students Students from countries worldwide choose to study at Bangor every year, and make up 12% of the student population. The lower cost of living and safety of Bangor makes it a popular choice for both students and their families. We welcome applications from students from all over the world, and at present students from Vietnam, Canada, India, China, Libya, Iraq, Nigeria, Ghana, the UAE and a number of other countries worldwide are studying at the School. We firmly believe that international students bring an added dimension to the classroom, promoting the comparative study between legal systems and business and political practices worldwide.

Support We are highly aware of the challenges that face international students in moving away from home to study. The University’s dedicated International Student Welfare Office offers support to students prior to arrival and throughout their time in Bangor.

English Language Courses International students are generally required to provide evidence of English language proficiency. We normally require IELTS 6.0 or equivalent. If you have not yet achieved the level required by the University, you can undertake English Language and Study Skills courses at the University’s English Language Centre for Overseas Students (ELCOS) before starting your academic programme. To reach IELTS 6.0 level (with no individual score lower than 5.5) by September, you may undertake the following courses, according to your current score: CURRENT SCORE COURSE IELTS 4.0 42 weeks from September IELTS 4.5 30 weeks from September IELTS 5.0 20 weeks January - June IELTS 5.0 20 weeks April - September IELTS 5.5 12 weeks from June IELTS 5.5 8 weeks from July (reading and writing at 5.5) IELTS 6.0 4 weeks from August (but 1 score lower than 5.5)

£10,750 £8,250 £5,750 £6,000 £3,000 £2,100 £1,050

www.bangor.ac.uk/international/support

Scholarships for International Students In addition to the School scholarships, the University’s International Education Centre also offers a range of additional scholarships and bursaries to International Students. Please note that students are not eligible to receive both an International Scholarship and a School Scholarship. For further information please visit: www.bangor.ac.uk/international/future/scholarship

At the end of the course, you are not required to undertake a further external English test. Our highly experienced and qualified staff will conduct a test and provide an official report for the University. You can also receive English language support throughout the year in courses specially organised for international students. Further details of English language courses can be obtained from: ELCOS (English Language Centre for Overseas Students) Tel: +44 (0)1248 382252 Email: elcos@bangor.ac.uk www.elcos.bangor.ac.uk

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Visitors to the Law School VISITING SPEAKERS & RESEARCH FELLOWS

LAW SOCIETY PRESIDENT VSITS THE LAW SCHOOL

Demonstrating our commitment to teaching of the highest quality, the School arranges a programme of distinguished guest lectures and seminars. Experts in their fields visit Bangor to deliver lectures to both staff and students.

Recent contributors have included: Sir Igor Judge Lord Chief Justice of England & Wales Carwyn Jones First Minister for Wales Lord Alex Carlile Mr Justice Hickinbottom High Court Professor Eugene Basanta Southern Illinois University, USA Ms Judith Lesar Senior Manager, Deloitte & Touch, London Professor Robert Reiner London School of Economics Martijn Quinn Deputy Chef du Cabinet, European Commission Environment Directorate, Brussels Dr Qi George Zhou School of Law, the University of Sheffield Judge Anthony Seys Llewellyn Designated Civil Judge for Wales

Mr John Wotton, President of the Law Society of England & Wales, with a group of students during his recent visit to the Law School.

Bangor Law School was delighted to welcome Mr. John Wotton, the President of the Law Society of England and Wales. During his visit Mr. Wooton spent time with students currently engaged in the Innocence Project, Street Law, the Student Law Society, and the Employability Project before delivering his lecture, ‘The Young Lawyer of the Near Future.’ This lecture outlined the challenges, opportunities and rewards that a legal career can bring, in addition to the increasingly international nature of work being undertaken by the legal profession. The key personal qualities being sought by the profession were highlighted throughout the lecture. Having a sense of humour will undoubtedly enable newly qualified lawyers to cope with the unexpected and retain a sense of perspective when working in a pressurised environment advised the president. The evolving structure of the legal profession presents many opportunities which should be seized with both hands. Following the lecture Mr. Woton answered several questions and gave advice to students, particularly with regard to securing a training contract. Being able to evidence a range of skills, the ability to work in a team and demonstrating an intelligent interest in a firm are all factors to be mindful of during the application process. The message from the President of the Law Society to the students of the Law School was clear: this is an exciting time to become a lawyer.

Professor Cahill pictured with Lord Igor Judge, Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales, at the Opening of the Legal Wales Conference at Caernarfon Criminal Justice Centre.

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Teaching & Studying Law is an exciting subject to study and highly relevant in today’s rapidly changing society. Our courses address contemporary issues relevant to business and political environments worldwide and are tailored to equip students with the knowledge and skills required for operating successfully in an increasingly global marketplace. Graduates of many of the world's leading universities, our staff have substantial experience at professional and academic level. This expertise is reflected in the teaching, through which students develop a thorough understanding of contemporary legal systems and issues with a worldwide perspective.

Teaching Methods Teaching will mostly be seminar based, promoting group and individual interaction and ensuring that every individual student is encouraged to contribute to discussions and presentations. Typical LLM seminar sizes range from 10 to 15 students. Seminar-based teaching enables lecturers and students to discuss issues and investigate topics in greater depth, develop critical thinking and solution-based learning skills, whilst also allowing the course teachers to closely monitor each individual’s progress. Emphasis will be placed on the use of virtual learning through the mechanism of the Blackboard computer assisted learning system.

The Law Library and Facilities In order to support our students throughout the course of their studies, both the Law School and the University provide a range of learning resources supported by experienced staff. Our extensive Law Library has benefited from substantial investment and is overseen by a dedicated Law Librarian who provides specialist support and advice to students. It includes printed and electronic resources that reflect current teaching and research within the Law School. The collection includes Reference, Statutes, Law Reports, Journals, Books and pamphlets, Official Publications, Newspapers, European Documentation Centre and Online databases. www.bangor.ac.uk/law/facilities Library and archive services include an extensive collection of books and journals; databases; videos and CDs; micro material; a manuscript collection; and a web-based catalogue to access e-books, e-journals, past exam papers, subject guides and other learning resources. www.bangor.ac.uk/library IT support includes media, reprographics facilities and services, unlimited internet access, email account, 24-hour computer laboratories, wi-fi technology, IT training and the Blackboard virtual learning environment. www.bangor.ac.uk/itservices

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Programme Structures Each programme consists of 2 parts and will take 12 months to complete full-time. A part-time option is also available and individuals interested in this option should contact the Director of Postgraduate Studies to discuss the matter further. PART 1 Semester 1 September – January 60 credits

PART 1 Semester 2 January – June 60 credits

PART 2 Semester 3 June – September 60 credits

1 YEAR

LLM Degrees

Part 1: Taught modules consisting of modules to the value of 120 credits studied in the period September June. Part 1 is taught during the two semesters which make up the academic year. Teaching during semester 1 normally runs from late September to December, with assessment by the way of essays at the end of semester 1. Teaching during semester 2 normally runs from late January to early May, with assessment by the way of essays at the end of semester 2. In all LLM programmes students (unless exempted) will have to study a 20 credit Legal Research Methods module in order to acquire the necessary research skills to take full advantage of the programme. Part 2 will consist of EITHER participating in a structured Advanced Taught Programme of Summer Study OR completing a supervised dissertation of approximately 20,000 words in length, contributing 60 credits. The dissertation will focus on a legal topic reflecting students' specialised topics and module selection. Part 2 is completed during the summer months (June to September) and students are expected to submit their dissertation or Advanced Taught Programme of Summer Study project work by the end of September in the calendar year following initial registration on the LLM degree programme.

Internship Programme MBA and MA students are able to apply for internships with a number of leading banking organisations, including a number of well-known international banks. Through these placements, students are offered the opportunity to experience the world of practical banking at first hand. Internships are normally undertaken at the end of the academic course at Bangor. Internship placements are limited and must be applied for on a competitive basis. Details of the application process are supplied to students during the course of their studies at Bangor.

MBA & MA Degrees

Part 1: Taught modules consisting of modules to the value of 120 credits studied in the period September June. Part 1 is taught during the two semesters which make up the academic year. Teaching during semester 1 normally runs from late September to December, with examinations in January. Teaching during semester 2 normally runs from late January to early May, with examinations in May and June. Continuous assessment is an integral part of all our taught modules. The weightings attached to coursework and other forms of continuous assessment vary from module to module, from a minimum of 25% to a maximum of 50%. Each MBA and MA module is valued at 15 credits, therefore students normally undertake 60 credits in each semester, followed by the dissertation. Part 2 will consist of EITHER participating in a structured Advanced Taught Programme of Summer Study OR a completing a supervised dissertation of between 12,00020,000 words, contributing 60 credits. The dissertation provides the opportunity to critically review, and possibly (but not necessarily) produce an original contribution to the literature in any part of the taught syllabus. Part 2 is completed during the summer months, from June to September. Students are expected to submit their dissertation or Advanced Taught Programme of Summer Study project work by the end of September in the calendar year following initial registration for the MBA or MA degree programme. Please refer to pages 46 - 47 for details of the Advanced Taught Programme of Summer Study. Students interested in the LLM / Executive LLM in Public Procurement Law & Strategy programmes should note that Part 2 of these programmes will consist of the Applied Procurement Research Projects (APRP). Please refer to page 30 of this brochure for more information.

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Masters Degrees ‰

LLM in International Commercial & Business Law

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An exciting, commercially-relevant programme that provides an in-depth curriculum and thorough training in the law, policy and legal regulation that governs some key areas of commerce and industry worldwide. This course is particularly relevant for students who anticipate careers in business and industry, or intend to specialise in legal practice in the commercial area, and wish to develop expertise and hands-on ability to address and manage business development within a legal framework, whether in the UK or internationally. Part 1 - Taught Modules Compulsory Modules

Credits

International Banking & Capital Markets Law 20 Legal Research Methods 20

Exemptions from this module may be granted if a student has achieved the learning outcomes in another way, e.g. already having done an LLM or LLB with a research or dissertation element. Requests for exemption should be made to the Director of Postgraduate Studies. Optional Modules (choose 4)

Credits

Competition Law International Insurance Law Intellectual Property Law International Commercial Arbitration International Sales Law Global Trade Law Comparative Corporate Governance International Taxation Law Employment Law International Environmental Law EU Internal Market Law International Maritime Law

20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20

Description of Modules are on pages 29-35. Part 2 will consist of Dissertation on a topic related to International Commercial and Business Law.

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LLM in International Intellectual Property Law

This programme will enable students to develop their expertise in Intellectual Property Law. The course will include comparative studies of various national jurisdictions, providing national and international perspectives on Intellectual Property Law and International Trade Law. Students will develop a deep knowledge and understanding of Intellectual Property theory, and also the rationale for Intellectual Property Rights protection. Through studies of various jurisdictions, students will develop an understanding of why Intellectual Property protection varies in different parts of the world. Through studies of case law from different jurisdictions, students will develop an understanding of how the social context can impact on International Intellectual Property Law issues. Comparative Law assessment skills will be developed to a high level as students will be studying both national and international law regimes. Part 1 - Taught Modules Compulsory Modules

Credits

Legal Research Methods Intellectual Property Law Data Protection Law

20 20 20

Optional Modules (choose 3)

Credits

EU Internal Markets Law Global Trade Law Comparative Corporate Governance International Commercial Arbitration International Environment Law International Sales Law

20 20 20 20 20 20

Description of Modules are on pages 29-35. Part 2 will consist of Dissertation on any topic related to International Intellectual Property Law.


Mr Justice Hickinbottom of the High Court of England & Wales, marking the opening of the refurbished Law School building, Athrolys. Mr J. Hickinbottom delivered a Distinguished Lecture on Modern Challenges in Personal Injury Litigation.

LLM in International Law

This programme is designed to equip students with a general yet comprehensive education in a range of International Law areas. The course will enable students to master the basic principles of the discipline, explore advanced level theories, and to understand the many traditional and contemporary challenges in International Law. They will have a wide range of International Law options to choose from, and may therefore acquire broad knowledge. Through carefully designed course work and varied teaching approaches, students will acquire the intellectual open-ness, technical expertise and critical thinking abilities that are necessary for effectiveness in a globalising world. The programme will equip students to respond effectively to the wide range of intellectual and professional challenges facing contemporary International Lawyers. The LLM in International Law will equip them to deal with both case work and policy making. Part 1 - Taught Modules Compulsory Modules

Credits

Legal Research Methods Public International Law

20 20

Optional Modules (choose 4)

Credits

International Criminal Law 20 International Human Rights Law 20 Children’s Rights and the Law 20 European Human Rights Law 20 EU Internal Markets Law 20 Competition Law 20 Global Trade Law 20 Comparative Corporate Governance 20 International Banking and Capital Markets Law 20 International Commercial Arbitration 20 International Refugee Law 20 International Environmental Law 20 Intellectual Property Law 20 International Law of Armed Conflict 20 Legacies of War and Repression 20 Description of Modules are on pages 29-35 Part 2 will consist of Dissertation on any topic related to International Law.

LLM in International Law (European Law)

This programme will focus on developing expertise within European Law, on top of a broad understanding of International Law. Students will develop the skills and knowledge required to operate as European legal specialists. In addition to the foundational courses in Legal Research Methods and Public International Law, students will be required to study EU Internal Markets Law, Competition Law, and write a dissertation on a topic within European law. The remaining courses can be chosen from a range of relevant options. Through carefully designed course work and varied teaching approaches, students will acquire the intellectual open-ness, technical expertise and critical thinking abilities that are necessary for effectiveness in a globalising world. The programme will equip students to respond effectively to the wide range of intellectual and professional challenges facing those working on European legal issues. The LLM in International Law (specialising in European Law) will equip them to deal with both case work and policy making. Part 1 - Taught Modules Compulsory Modules

Credits

Legal Research Methods Public International Law EU Internal Markets Law Competition Law

20 20 20 20

Optional Modules (choose 2)

Credits

European Human Rights Law Global Trade Law International Commercial Arbitration International Environmental Law Intellectual Property Law

20 20 20 20 20

Description of Modules are on pages 29-35. Part 2 will consist of Dissertation on any topic related to European Law.

Bangor Law School

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Masters Degrees ‰

LLM in International Law (Global Trade Law)

This programme is designed to help students become experts in Global Trade Law. The programme will focus on key aspects of International Law and Global Trade Law and the development of skills and knowledge required to operate as International Lawyers in an increasingly globalised world. Global Trade Law and Public International Law will be compulsory courses, and a range of carefully designed optional modules will allow students to focus more on their areas of interest. Throughout the course, basic principles and advanced level theories will be studied and the many traditional and contemporary challenges in International Law and Global Trade Law will be explored. The course will combine a balanced approach to law, theory, politics and practice. Part 1 - Taught Modules Compulsory Modules

Credits

Legal Research Methods Global Trade Law Public International Law

20 20 20

Optional Modules (choose 3)

Credits

EU Internal Markets Law Competition Law International Commercial Arbitration International Environmental Law Intellectual Property Law Comparative Corporate Governance International Banking and Capital Markets Law

20 20 20 20 20 20 20

Description of Modules are on pages 29-35. Part 2 will consist of Dissertation on any topic related to Global Trade Law.

LLM in International Law (International Criminal Law & International Human Rights Law)

This programme is designed to help students become experts in the areas of International Law that directly concern the human person - International Criminal Law & International Human Rights Law - whilst mastering the discipline of International Law of which they are part. In addition to the foundational courses in Legal Research Methods and Public International Law, students will be required to study International Criminal Law, International Human Rights Law and write a dissertation on a topic within the International Criminal Law or International Human Rights Law areas. The remaining courses can be chosen from a range of relevant options. Through carefully designed course work and varied teaching approaches, students will acquire intellectual open-ness, technical expertise and critical thinking abilities. The programme will enable students to respond effectively to the wide range of intellectual and professional challenges facing those working on legal issues concerning the human person in International Law. Part 1 - Taught Modules Compulsory Modules

Credits

Legal Research Methods Public International Law International Criminal Law International Human Rights Law

20 20 20 20

Optional Modules (choose 2)

Credits

European Human Rights Law Children’s Rights and the Law International Law of Armed Conflict International Refugee Law International Environmental Law Legacies of War and Repression

20 20 20 20 20 20

Description of Modules are on pages 29-35. Part 2 will consist of Dissertation on any topic related to International Criminal Law or International Human Rights Law.

Professor Suzannah Linton, Chair in International Law, teaches International Criminal Law on the LLM programmes. Prior to joining the faculty at Bangor, Prof. Linton worked at the University of Hong Kong and at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia. 18


Philippe Ruttley, Partner at Clyde & Co, London, and the Hon. Mr Justice John Cooke of the High Court Dublin and formerly of the European Court of First Instance, attending the Law School’s India Competition Conference in 2011.

LLM in Law (General)

LLM in Law & Banking

For the non-specialist student, the Law School offers this general LLM which permits the students to pick and mix modules from the various specialist schemes. The general LLM consists of a compulsory module in Legal Research Methods plus taught modules, selected from the module lists on pages 29-40. The dissertation could be on any legal topic subject to approval of the Law School.

This programme is designed to equip students with a general yet comprehensive education in a range of areas within Banking Law. The course will enable students to master the basic principles of the discipline (viewed from an international perspective) and to explore in more depth themes including:

Part 1 - Taught Modules Compulsory Modules

Credits

Legal Research Methods

20

Exemptions from this module may be granted if a student has achieved the learning outcomes in another way, e.g. already having done an LLM or LLB with a research or dissertation element. Applications should be made to the Director of Postgraduate Studies. Optional Modules Any five modules offered by the Law School up to the value of 100 credits may be undertaken subject to approval and timetabling. Up to 20 credits may be taken from the list of modules offered by Bangor Business School, Bangor School of Social Sciences and the Welsh Institute of Social and Cultural Affairs, subject to the approval of both Schools and timetabling. Description of Modules are on pages 29-40 Part 2 will consist of Dissertation on any legal topic, subject to the approval of the Law School.

‰ ‰

The role and powers of regulatory bodies and central banks (principally, the UK, EU and US) Analysis of the UK and EU banking systems, to include the notion of ‘passporting’ of credit institution and investment firm activities within the EU The main banking reforms brought about by the credit crunch The Eurozone sovereign debt crisis

Students will have a wide range of modules to choose from, and may therefore acquire broad as opposed to specialised knowledge. Part 1 - Taught Modules Compulsory Modules

Credits

Legal Research Methods 15 International Banking and Capital Markets Law 15 Optional Modules (choose 6)

Credits

Competition Law Bank Financial Management International Insurance Law International Commercial Arbitration Financial Institutions Strategic Management Banking and Development Global Trade Law International Banking Comparative Corp. Governance International Taxation Law Corporate Risk Management Employment Law Islamic Banking Islamic Finance EU Internal Market Law Investment Strategy & Portfolio Management Marketing Financial Services

15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15

Description of Modules are on pages 29-40. Part 2 will consist of Dissertation on any topic related to Law & Banking Bangor Law School

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Masters Degrees ‰

LLM Law & Criminology / MA Criminology & Law

Offered by the School of Social Sciences in co-operation with the Law School, the LLM Law and Criminology / MA Criminology and Law will provide students with postgraduate level knowledge and skills in the interdisciplinary area of criminology and law. It builds on criminological and legal skills and knowledge so as to provide specialist training in criminological, criminal justice and legal research. The programme enables students to develop an international perspective on crime, justice and law through national and cross-national approaches and case studies of other societies, and/or ‘cutting edge’ issues in contemporary criminology and law. Students will also acquire a wide range of transferable skills.

Part 1 - Taught Modules Compulsory Modules

Credits

International Case Studies in Criminology and Criminal Justice Key Issues in Crime and Justice Legal Research Methods Forensic Linguistics in Court International Criminal Law

20 40 20 20 20

Description of Modules are on page 42. Part 2 will consist of a Dissertation. Students undertaking the LLM programme will be required to submit a Law-based dissertation, whilst those on the MA degree will complete a Criminology-based dissertation.

Half of the compulsory modules will be delivered by the Law School with the other half delivered by the School of Social Sciences, giving a total of 60 credits for Law and 60 for Criminology.

NEWS FROM 2012... PRESTIGIOUS HONOUR FOR BANGOR LAW SCHOOL Bangor Law School has twice hosted the final of the prestigious European Moot Court Competition, where teams from some of the world’s leading Universities battled it out to gain their place in the world final held at the European Court of Justice at Luxembourg. The Moot Court Competition is based on a topic within European Law and involves twelve teams, each consisting of four law students, who appeare ‘in court’ before a panel of judges.

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Iwan Emlyn Jones & Joshua Simpson during the Moot Court Competition. Bangor Law School

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Institute for Competition & Procurement Studies (ICPS) Bangor Law School is home to the Institute for Competition & Procurement Studies (ICPS), a major research centre for Public Procurement Law and Policy research. Led by Professor Dermot Cahill, the Institute specialises in evidence-based research into the behavioural responses of public institutions and their suppliers to public procurement policies, laws and practices. The Institute’s staff hail from several different countries, including England, Wales, Ireland, Nigeria, Portugal, and Spain. With various disciplinary backgrounds, the Institute’s staff work in numerous fields including Competition Law, Public Procurement Law, European Union Law, Sustainable Procurement, Competitive Dialogue Competency Frameworks, Economic Analysis, Judicial Review and Contract Design.

The team co-wrote the highly influential ‘Barriers to Procurement Opportunity Report’ in 2009, which has led the Welsh Government to redesign the pre-qualification questionnaire process. The Barriers Report has been welcomed by purchasers and suppliers, and is enabling public purchasers to adopt new business-friendly practices to PreQualification design in Wales and beyond. Currently, the Institute is leading a major £4 million European Union funded international project, "Winning in Tendering", which examines the EU Remedies Directive. Further information about the ICPS can be found on the Law School’s website: www.bangor.ac.uk/law/ICPS

NEWS FROM 2012... PROCUREMENT LAW CONFERENCES AT BANGOR Bangor Law School’s Institute for Competition and Procurement Studies held four conferences during the Institute’s first Annual Procurement Week in March 2012. Conferences covered themes such as Innovation, Cutting Edge Procurement, Supply Chain Strategies, as well as the keynote conference on the theme of Public Procurement Law – International and Regional Perspectives. The conference was addressed by leading international practitioners, including: ‰ Nigel Giffin QC, one of the leading UK procurement barristers, 11 King’s Bench Walk Chambers, London ‰ Andrew Denny, Partner and Head of Public Litigation, Allen & Overy, London ‰ Nicolas Pourbaix, Hogan Lovells, Brussels ‰ Patrick McGovern, Partner Arthur Cox, Belfast & Dublin ‰ Ann-Marie Curran, Partner, A & L Goodbody, Belfast & Dublin ‰ Dr Sanchez Graells, ICADE University, Madrid ‰ Jennifer Skilbeck, Barrister, Monckton Chambers, London ‰ Dr Sanjeeta Khorana, Aberystwyth University 22

This International Public Procurement Law Day Conference provided a unique forum for leading legal practitioners and academics to share ideas and discuss different approaches to procurement law-related issues, looking at matters from international and regional perspectives, where the latest developments in EU Law, Global Procurement Law, and Judicial Review were considered.

Andrew Denny, Partner and Head of Public Litigation, Allen & Overy, London


Masters Degrees in Public Procurement Law Building on its extensive and diverse experience in relation to UK and European Public Procurement Law, the Law School offers two new exciting and innovative Masters programmes to candidates: ‰ ‰

LLM in Public Procurement Law and Strategy (1 year, full time) Executive LLM in Public Procurement Law and Strategy (2 years, part time)

The delivery team will be complemented by experts from public sector organisations, central and local government, policy makers, leading law firms, and SME organisations. Both programmes are enriched by regular expert guest lecturers and a dedicated Procurement Week which will feature presentations, workshops and seminars by leading procurement professionals. Leading legal advisers will give masterclasses on procurement law and strategy, and how to deal with the challenges and opportunities presented by the interaction between National and European Public Procurement Law. The main aim of these specialist programmes it to: ‰

equip participants to effectively operate in the space where public procurement law interfaces with the strategic procurement objectives of public and private sector organisations;

BANGOR LAW SCHOOL HOSTS MAJOR INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE Bangor Law School hosted a major Competition Law conference in July 2011 that saw guest speakers from across the globe descend on North Wales.

provide a flexible programme enabling participants to develop national, European and international perspectives on public procurement law issues and practice, which will open up whole new areas of opportunities for them; enhance participants with specialist knowledge and legal skills in the area of national (UK and Ireland), European and International Public Procurement (World Trade Organisation, World Bank and UNCITRAL).

For both programmes, Part 1 will require students to undertake study of modules to the value of 120 credits. This will be through a combination of Compulsory and Optional modules, as detailed on the next page. Part 2 of both programmes will be assessed by means of Applied Procurement Research Projects (APRP) for both programmes. Candidates on the one year full-time programme undertake their project during the period of June to September, while those on the two year programme will undertake their project in the final year of study. Please refer to page 44 for more information about the APRP.

LLM student Roisin Ni Thuama, from Ireland, attended the Conference: “this was a fantastic opportunity to meet practitioners from all over the world whose expertise in this area is unrivalled. The whole experience was engaging, informative and stimulating”.

The International Conference on the Evolution and Future of Indian Competition Law and Policy, hosted by Bangor Law School’s Institute for Competition and Procurement Studies (ICPS), welcomed to Bangor guests including Kaushal Kumar Sharma, Arshad Khan, Prof. Shanti Chakravarty, Lisa Rabbe, Dr R. Shyam Khemani, Dr Vincent Power and the Hon. Mr Justice John Cooke (all pictured, left to right).

Bangor Law School

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LLM/Executive LLM in Public Procurement Law & Strategy ‰

LLM in Public Procurement Law & Strategy (1 year, full time programme)

Executive LLM in Public Procurement Law & Strategy (2 years, part time programme)

The 1 year programme is designed for applicants who can commit to full-time study over a period of one academic year. It is designed for those interested in developing a specialisation in Public Procurement Law in order to enable them to develop a career in procurement law, policy, advice, practice or research that requires specialist procurement knowledge and a wide range of legal, strategic and analytical skills

Teaching on the Executive programme is by block release to enable busy professionals to participate on the programme, whilst minimising the amount of time spent away from the workplace. The programme is designed for those working as procurement practitioners, policy makers, public servants, legal advisers and in similar positions.

Compulsory Modules

Compulsory Modules

Public Procurement Research and Writing Skills National & EU Public Procurement Law Applied Procurement Research Projects – Work placement and research projects on any topic within the programme

Public Procurement Research and Writing Skills National & EU Public Procurement Law Contract Design & Management Sustainable and Social Procurement Innovation in Public Procurement Risk Management in Public Procurement Applied Procurement Research Projects

Optional Modules (choose 5) Contract Design & Management Sustainable and Social Procurement Strategic Procurement & Leadership European Union Internal Market Law Litigation Strategy & the Remedies Regulations Innovation in Public Procurement International Procurement Regimes Risk Management in Public Procurement Procurement Relationships & Ethics Description of modules are on pages 44 - 45 Career Prospects The LLM programme will open up exciting opportunities for graduates including career opportunities with public and private sector organisations, law firms, research centres and international organisations such as the United Nations, the World Bank, the World Trade Organisation (WTO) and the EU. Participants may also find employment opportunities with Social and Environmental Rights Groups, many of whom view procurement as a way of advancing social and environmental agendas.

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Optional Modules (choose 1) Strategic Procurement & Leadership International Procurement Regimes Description of modules are on pages 44 - 45 Career Prospects The Executive LLM programme is specifically designed for participants already working in public procurement. It will develop their expertise in procurement law and strategy issues in order to enhance their career development prospects, upgrade their procurement skills, and significantly develop participants’ procurement competencies and knowledge.


Combined Masters with Bangor Business School ‰

MBA in Banking & Law

MBA in Law & Management

The MBA in Banking and Law will help develop knowledgeable and capable banking executives and banking lawyers who will move quickly into key positions in the financial sector. The degree focuses on the financial and strategic management of banks and other financial institutions as well as the increasingly complex legal and regulatory structures within which banks and their executives have to operate. The legal issues will cover a wide range of topics at UK, EU and international level with which a modern banker needs to be familiar.

The MBA in Law and Management emphasises both professional and vocational development as well as an awareness of key legal and regulatory issues that play a central role in the successful management of modern enterprises of all types and sizes. You will develop an understanding of higher-level managerial skills and concepts, and their application in practical situations, as well as the opportunity to examine the law and regulation that affects business in a wide range of key areas.

Part 1 – Taught Modules Compulsory Modules

Part 1 – Taught Modules Compulsory Modules

Credits

Credits

Organisations and People Management Research Bank Financial Management International Banking Financial Institutions Strategic Management International Banking & Capital Markets Law

15 15 15 15 15 15

Organisations and People Management Research Comparative Corporate Governance Finance for Managers

15 15 15 15

Optional Modules (choose 3) *

Credits

Optional Modules (choose 2)

Credits

Competition Law International Insurance Law Intellectual Property Law International Commercial Arbitration Global Trade Law Comparative Corp. Governance International Taxation Law Employment Law International Environmental Law EU Internal Market Law International Sales Law

15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15

Strategic Management Marketing Financial Services Marketing Strategy New Venture Creation European Business Knowledge Management Strategic Management Contemporary Issues in Management

15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15

Description of modules are on pages 29-40. Part 2 will consist of either participating in a structured Advanced Taught Programme of Summer Study or a dissertation which will focus on a topic in Banking, Law or a combination of both.

* Your Optional Modules must include Strategic Management or Marketing Financial Services or both.

Optional Modules (choose 2) Competition Law International Insurance Law Intellectual Property Law International Banking & Capital Markets Law International Commercial Arbitration Global Trade Law International Taxation Law Employment Law International Environmental Law

15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15

Description of modules are on pages 29-40. Part 2 will consist of either participating in a structured Advanced Taught Programme of Summer Study or a dissertation which will focus on a topic in Management, Law or a combination of both. Bangor Law School

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Combined Masters with Bangor Business School ‰

MA in Banking & Law

The MA in Banking and Law is an interdisciplinary programme that will enable the student to study key legal and regulatory developments affecting the financial sector. This includes the regulation of financial services, security instruments, corporate finance, arbitration and other issues affecting modern banks at UK, EU and international level. As well as the general principles of International Banking Law, you will also study modules from a wide range of law and business. The programme will equip candidates with higher level knowledge in both the Banking and Law areas, as global Banking practice today is heavily influenced by the Law. Part 1 – Taught modules Compulsory Modules

Credits

Bank Financial Management Research Methods International Banking & capital Markets Law Financial Institutions Strategic Management International Banking

15 15 15 15 15

Optional Modules (choose 3)

Credits

Financial Crises & Bank Regulation Financial Intermediation EU Internal Market Law Competition Law International Insurance Law Intellectual Property Law International Commercial Arbitration Global Trade Law Comparative Corporate Governance International Taxation Law Employment Law International Environmental Law

15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15

“The MBA in Banking and Law immediately appealed to me when I was researching postgraduate course online – it seemed the perfect course for me. It was an added bonus to find that the cost of living in Wales is lower than in many other parts of the UK. The course deals with the traditional academic aspects of banking as well as contemporary practical issues, and takes a close look at the legal aspects of financial markets. Throughout, the lecturers have made the topic interesting and have been helpful, approachable and responsive. The non-academic staff have also been very accommodating. After graduating, my plan is to return to Barbados and to find work there. I feel I will be returning with improved confidence and a better grounding in aspects of my organisation’s work. I will miss the friendly people and student-orientated lifestyle of Bangor when I leave – it has been a great place to study.”

* Your Optional Modules must include EITHER Financial Crises & Bank Regulation or Financial Intermediation.

Description of Modules are on pages 29-40. Part 2 will consist of either participating in a structured Advanced Taught Programme of Summer Study or a dissertation which will focus on a topic in Banking, Law or a combination of both. Elson Gaskin from Barbados MBA Banking and Law 26


2012 Graduates & Bangor Law School Staff

The Bridging Degree In order to gain entry onto a Masters degree, a bachelor degree from a recognised institution is required. This one year programme is specially designed for international candidates who do not possess such an LLB bachelor degree, but have a recognised University Diploma (e.g. the Dazhuan from China) and similar qualifications from other countries worldwide which are of a level equivalent to having passed the second year of a three-year UK bachelor degree. On successful completion of this programme with a lower second class degree classification or above students will be awarded a Bangor University LLB degree and may progress onto the full range of Masters degrees offered at the Law School.

Modules

Credits

Commercial Law EU Law OR Private International Law Intellectual Property Law OR Company Law Near Native English 1 Near Native English 2 Dissertation / Project

20 20 20 20 20 20

For further details about the course and modules, please visit: www.bangor.ac.uk/law/postgraduate/bridging

Students undertake a full-time programme of study equivalent to the final year of bachelor study combining Law and English. Modules to the value of 120 credits should be selected:

Bangor Law School

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NEWS FROM 2012... ‘INSPIRATIONAL’ LAW LECTURER SELECTED TO CARRY THE OLYMPIC TORCH A lecturer from Bangor University Law School was selected to carry the Olympic Flame after being nominated for the honour by her students. Law lecturer Sarah Nason was nominated in the ‘Inspiring Others through Education’ category and carried the Flame through Conwy – 15 miles from Bangor – on Tuesday, 29th May 2012. Sarah’s nomination was in recognition of her teaching, with students putting her forward for being “an inspirational academic and teacher” and “an exceptional role model.”

“To be nominated to take part in the Olympic Torch relay was a great honour in itself, but it meant all the more coming from the students”, said Sarah. “It is most rewarding to know that the students take as much from their experience at Bangor Law School as we staff do. I’ve witnessed the School go from strength to strength during my time here and I look forward to seeing what’s to come next.”

Sarah Nason is a graduate of Cambridge University. Sarah’s recent research work centres on the Regionalisation of the new Administrative Court in the UK, focusing on access to justice and judicial review issues.

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LLM Modules Law & Devolution in Wales This module will examine the legal provisions relating to the devolved legislative, administrative and judicial administrations in Wales, the United Kingdom and in other European regions and nations, with particular reference to the Welsh Assembly Government and the National Assembly for Wales. It will assess: ‰

‰

‰

The reasons for devolution in several European countries and the manner in which it has been achieved The benefits and problems to which it has given rise, together with attempted or postulated solutions to those problems Whether there is, or can be, a universal model for devolution in Europe.

The Legal Regulation of Health & Social Care in England and Wales The legal distinction between health care and social care is unclear, with no clear separation between the responsibilities of social service authorities to provide care services on the one hand and to provide health services on the other. Clients and patients are required to negotiate services resulting in controversial consequences, and the necessity for judicial intervention and review. The statute law and case law in this area is complex and growing rapidly, and the purpose of this module is to provide a critical overview in the hope that the understanding provided will contribute in due course to judicious decision making and the enhancement of service provision. Issues such as access to free residential and nursing care for the elderly and allocation of resources in the National Health Service will be considered.

Bangor Law School

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LLM Modules Comparative Corporate Governance

Employment Law

In the light of world-wide scandals and subsequent government and public loss of confidence in the financial markets, the reform of corporate governance is recognised to be of central importance to effective business management and development.

Modern Employment Law is complex and imposes major compliance costs on employers if broken. This course will focus on the main issues of employment law:

This module will appeal to all those engaged in corporate management and particularly to those managers or lawyers contemplating new business ventures The initial focus will be on the law of the UK, and a comparative approach will be adopted and encouraged and consideration will be given to materials from the US, Commonwealth Countries, other European Union Member States, East Asia and China The broad intention is to provide a road map for international corporate governance and to promote examples of good practice based on appropriate international case studies

‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰

European Union Internal Market Law The European Union is now one of the most powerful trading blocs in the world. This module examines the main body of legal principles which underpin the creation of the EU Internal Market. This will demonstrate the key role played by the European Commission in ensuring that the Common Market came to fruition, and the role of the European Court of Justice jurisprudence in ensuring that EU Member States respected their obligations under the EC Treaty. The course will concentrate on the following areas: ‰

‰ ‰

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Customs Duties - the extent to which EU law prevents Member Sates levying charges on goods when they cross from one Member State to another Internal Taxation - the limits to which a Member State can use National Taxation regimes to discriminate against imports from other Member States Goods - how the Jurisprudence of the European Court of Justice has forced Member States to abolish quantitative restrictions on the movement of goods between Member States Services - how EU law has impacted on the provision of services between Member States Establishment - how EU law has facilitated the establishment of companies to establish secondary bases of operations in other Member States without discrimination

The difference between employees and independent contractors The contract of employment Core employee rights Minimum wage legislation Trade union representation and rights – including the regulation of industrial action The closed shop Freedom of movement of workers within the EU The operation of the employment tribunal system and the rules relating to unfair dismissal and proscribed forms of discrimination against employees on grounds of sex, sexual orientation, age, disability and racial origin etc The regulation of employee safety - the main principles of health and safety legislation and the rules in criminal prosecutions for corporate manslaughter

Competition Law The module will consider the theory of competition as well as comparative competition law regimes: ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰

UK competition law in relation to monopolies, mergers, restrictive practices and price-fixing cartels EU competition law in particular Articles 101 & 102 EU Treaty Restrictive practices Vertical and horizontal restraints and abuse of a dominant position Competition litigation and enforcement The inter-relationship of competition and intellectual property law EU Merger Control Regulation EU State Aids regulation


“From the start I felt welcomed at the School, helped in part by the fact that the staff were friendly, supportive and accessible whenever you needed guidance. Further to this, the wide range of expertise and specialities of the staff made for a very interesting learning environment. All this is complemented by the activities of the vibrant Law Society, who arrange a busy calendar of events, both social and academic. My personal highlight of my time on the course was winning the Sir Samuel Evans Prize for attaining the highest marks of any final year Law student in the whole of Wales.” Carys Aaron, LLM student

International Maritime Law

International Banking Law

The Maritime Law module is concerned with rules relating to carriage of goods by sea, maritime casualties and their aftermath. The law considered in this module is characterised by its diversity – national legislation, international conventions and case law – all contributing to a fascinating mosaic in which the focus of law is a developing blend of international commercial and environmental concerns. This module will:

This module will provide students with a sound understanding of the law and practice of modern international banking. It will:

‰ ‰

‰ ‰ ‰

Discuss the laws relating to carriage of goods by sea Discuss and compare common law and relevant international conventions (such as Hague-Visby Rules, Hamburg Rules and Rotterdam Convention) regarding the carriage of goods by sea Examine the documents of bill of lading and charter-parties Consider maritime law relating to safety regulations in navigation and liability Examine the law relating to wrecks, focusing particularly on the rights of owners, salvors and insurers

‰ ‰

Intellectual Property Law The course will consist of seminars on the fundamentals of intellectual property law: the definition and scope of copyright; and the authorship, ownership, duration and qualification for copyright protection. The course will also consider: ‰

‰ ‰ ‰ ‰

‰ ‰

The rights of copyright owners and actions for infringement of copyright and the defences to an infringement action The civil, criminal and administrative remedies available to a copyright owner for breach of copyright The non-economic rights of authors or ‘moral rights’ The protection of performers rights, including both economic and moral rights The exploitation of copyright works, including both the individual and collective licensing of such works and the assignment of such works The work of the Copyright Tribunal – its jurisdiction and decisions The interaction between the quasi-monopoly rights conferred by copyright law and the operation of UK and EU competition law The control and regulation of unconscionable music contracts in the entertainment industry

Examine the legal framework of international banking and related legal issues and consider current trends in international and UK banking Undertake a detailed analysis of the regulation and prudential supervision of banks in the UK and EU, with emphasis on capital adequacy and assessment of banking risks, and the use of prudential techniques in risk management Examine international banking facilities with particular reference to syndicated loans, security interests and lender liability Consider the main features of international capital markets, focusing on international bond issues Discuss the international banking industry in the wider context considering important contemporary issues such as money laundering and issues of environmental and social responsibility and the ramifications of the so-called ‘credit crunch’ crisis in 2007-08

International Commercial Arbitration Law This module is divided into three parts: ‰

The theoretical and institutional structure of arbitration - an historical overview and a comparative analysis of arbitration and litigation An examination of the legal framework within which arbitral disputes are resolved – specific aspects of international commercial arbitration such as the 1958 New York Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Arbitral Awards, the extent and timing of judicial review of awards, grounds for refusing recognition or enforcement of awards, and interim measures of protection A review of the principles and practices of international commercial arbitration - recent developments in international commercial arbitration, the emergence of converging arbitral rules an overview of the arbitral institutions in China, Hong Kong and Japan

Bangor Law School

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LLM Modules International Refugee Law

International Insurance Law

This module will provide a critical and thorough understanding of the international legal regime for the protection of refugees. It will take students through the origins and core elements of the international legal framework for the protection of refugees, its effectiveness and the challenges it faces. Topics include:

Insurance plays a very important role in the world of commerce and is one of the methods used to manage risk. The module will:

‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰

The issues surrounding exclusion and cessation of refugee status The core principles of international refugee protection (like non-refoulement) The complementary protection offered by human rights law. The Common European Asylum System The operation of UK refugee law

International Environmental Law Environmental problems transcend national boundaries and require concerted international action. Yet in the main, enforceable legal regulation can be delivered only through national legal systems which may diverge in terms of concepts values, methods and priorities. Such international norms that have developed are often regarded as vague, evasive and sometimes contradictory. Moreover, environmental concerns raised by states or businesses are sometimes regarded as a cloak for other objectives such as competitive advantage. There are also wider ethical concerns centring upon whether environmental policies should be concerned only with human welfare. This module will provide an introduction to the main internationally recognised environmental principles and concepts. This will be followed by selective studies of particular areas of concern. These are intended to exemplify the way in which the international principles are converted (or not) into European and national law. Main topics include: ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰

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The nature of international environmental norms Environmental Values and Ethics Sustainable development The precautionary principle The polluter pays principle Environmental rights Environmental liability Nature conservation and biodiversity Integrated pollution prevention and control A special topic to be chosen and researched by the student and presented to the group e.g GMOs

Consider insurance contracts which are governed by the rules of general law of contract and explore the nature and scope of the contract of insurance, evaluate its salient features, consider the general principles of insurance, and examine the relationships between the parties to the contract Examine the statutes (MIA 1906) and common law of insurance, and considers in detail the key elements of insurance: the fundamental principles of insurable interest, utmost good faith (disclosure and representations), subrogation, assignment and contribution and the principles of indemnity (for non-life insurance) Examine the formation of insurance contracts; the terms of contract; construction and causation; claims under policy; different types of insurance (property, life, liability and motor insurance etc), and insurance intermediaries Consider the recent development of the case law and reform on Insurance Law

International Sales Law International Sales Law is concerned with the law of sale of goods of a cross-border kind. The main focus of the course is to examine the legal relationship between parties who sell and buy goods from each other. The course will include: ‰ ‰

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A brief introduction to the international sales law An examination of the Sale of Goods Act 1979 and its relevance to international sale contracts, in particular implied terms and the passing of risk and property UN & UNIDROIT International Sales Law Conventions An examination of the various sales contracts under Incoterms and case law, i.e. CIF, FOB with particular focuses on flexibility of FOB contracts and the importance of documents in CIF contracts under common law Agents who play an important role in international sale of goods, an outline of the roles of agents and their impact on international sale are also considered


Legal Research Methods

Global Trade Law

(Compulsory for all LLM students except where granted an exemption)

The module will study in depth aspects of the regulation of international trade through the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and the World Trade Organisation. It will consider:

This module addresses the development of the necessary legal skills and research methods to enable the study of legal systems and specific legal issues at Masters level. It includes: ‰

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The process of doing legal research both nationally and in the context of EC law, ECHR jurisprudence and international law Legal sources, statutory interpretation, hierarchies of authority, law as social history and critical legal theory Developing comparative legal study techniques to enable students to benefit from studying a specific legal issue in a selection of jurisdictions and legal cultures The distinctions between common law and civil law systems. Guidance on the practical aspects of doing legal research, for example how to access legal texts and case-studies, and how to construct legal perspectives on national and international issues

International Taxation Law International Income Taxation involves the study of the basic principles of income taxation of international transactions involving taxpayers of several European countries (including the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, France, Germany, Ireland), the United States, Australia, Canada and Japan. The course of study includes: ‰

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The jurisdictional nexus used by the various countries to impose income taxation on international transactions The determination of the tax base in the various countries examined for the imposition of the income tax Comparative analysis of the various source rules used by the various countries studied The methods used by several countries examined to provide relief from double taxation of international transactions An overview of the transfer-pricing rules used in the various countries

The institutional framework of the treaty scheme, the removal of tariff barriers to trade, international control of dumping and subsidies, intellectual property rights under the TRIPs Agreement, environmental, health and labour conflicts, protection of human rights, services and dispute resolution Whether ‘regionalism’ goes against the philosophy of free trade, whether trade should be free or fair (or are both possible) and whether the substantive GATT rules and dispute settlement mechanisms are in practice fair to poor countries. Coming from a variety of jurisdictions students will be expected to offer comparative insights to the group

Data Protection & Privacy Law This module will critically examine the law of data protection and privacy at two distinct levels – domestic (UK) and EU – covering some of the following topics: ‰

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Data subject, data controller, data processor, personal data and data processing. data protection principles, data security, data breaches and hacking Criteria for making data processing legitimate The processing of sensitive personal data and the rights of the data subject The Information Commissioner, the European Data Protection Supervisor and the Article 29 Working Party US data protection vs EU data protection Legislation: the 1998 Data Protection Act, the Privacy and Electronic Communications Regulations 2003, Directive 95/46/EC (Data Protection Directive) and Directive 2002/58/EC (E-Privacy Directive)

I chose to study at Bangor because of the location - the university has such a beautiful campus and everything is really close by. The Law school is located in an ideal place with nice views of the Menai Straits on one side and the Snowdonia mountains on the other. There is a close-knit community of law students across all years, and getting to know your teachers, classmates is easy. Studying at Bangor Law School has given me a lot of unique opportunities, enriched my knowledge and helped me develop in a way that no other School possibly could. Not only have I made great friends along the way, but I have had the opportunity to learn from everyone in the School (the teachers especially) and I’ve enjoyed every class. The lecturers’ passion for their subjects is contagious. I would definitely recommend this programme to any student wanting a challenging and rewarding Masters and career. Bsher Altaher, from Libya, LLM in International Law

Bangor Law School

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LLM Modules Children’s Rights & the Law

International Criminal Law

The purpose of this module is to:

This module will provide students with a balanced and thorough understanding of the fundamentals of International Criminal Law. It will take students through the evolution of modern International Criminal Law, the underlying policy and philosophical underpinnings, substantive international criminal law and substantive international criminal procedure. International Criminal Law will also engage in close examination of the leading international courts and tribunals and their work, without neglecting key decisions from domestic courts. Students will:

‰ ‰

Critically examine the effectiveness of international and domestic legal provisions for protecting children’s rights Analyse the theoretical perspectives on children’s rights and the international instruments relevant to children’s rights including the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, the European Convention on Human Rights and the African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child Analyse implementation mechanisms at national and international levels Consider the extent to which the law takes children’s rights into account in relation to substantive matters, such as health, education, religion, criminal justice and family proceedings

European Human Rights Law The purpose of this module is to provide students with a detailed and critically informed knowledge of the principal legal institutions and instruments for the protection of human rights in Europe. The module will concentrate on the critical analysis of the human rights instruments drafted by the Council of Europe, with particular emphasis on the European Convention on Human Rights and its protocols. However, attention will also be paid to the activities of other intergovernmental organisations concerned with the protection of human rights in Europe, including the Organisation for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) and the EU. The aims of the module include: ‰ ‰

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To provide a critical understanding of the European human rights regime To provide an in-depth study of the principles and case-law of the European Convention on Human Rights To give students an understanding of the manner in which cases are brought to and dealt with by the European Court of Human Rights To encourage students to develop their research techniques and essay-writing skills

Look at the relevant laws and leading cases ranging from the judgements of the International Military Tribunals at Nuremberg and Tokyo to the explosion of jurisprudence that began with the ad hoc tribunals in the 1990s Develop a thorough understanding of the elements of Aggression, War Crimes, Crimes against Humanity and Genocide Analyse the International Law of Armed Conflict, which is essential for a complete understanding of the concept of War Crimes Explore the fundamental principles underpinning International Criminal Law, such as the rights to fair trial and due process, and other essential concepts of justice such as the principles of legality and double-jeopardy Study the different forms of criminal responsibility as well as defences to crimes, jurisdiction and immunities that may prevent prosecution

International Human Rights Law The objective of this module is to provide students with a broad yet thorough understanding of International Human Rights Law, covering various aspects of history, theory, politics, law and practice. By studying this course students will: ‰

Understand how International Human Rights Law has evolved and is applied in international and regional systems of human rights promotion and protection


Develop a sophisticated understanding of the challenges that this area of the law has faced and will continue to face Formulate, investigate and refine suggestions for the development and/or reform of existing international standards and mechanisms Critique areas of legal controversy and competing interpretations of the law

International Law of Armed Conflict The course will provide an introduction to the law relating to when it is permissible to use force, the law governing the conduct of hostilities, and the law governing protection of the human person in armed conflict (known as Geneva law, or International Humanitarian Law). The module will: ‰

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Provide an overview of the law on resort to force, including the prohibition of use of force and the exceptions to this prohibition Introduce the fundamental principles, such as humanity in war, which underpin legal regulation of conduct in armed conflict. Examine the scope and application of the laws of armed conflict Examine the protection of combatants, civilians and cultural property as well as means and methods of combat in both international and non-international armed conflicts Explore current challenges, such as displaced persons and collective security operations Look at the implementation and enforcement of the laws of armed conflict, including criminal repression of breaches and State responsibility

Legacies of War & Repression The objective of this module is to enable students to understand many of the complex issues that emerge in the challenging situations surrounding armed conflict, repression or serious situations of human rights violations. It will: ‰

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Examine the ways that nations around the world have dealt with, and are dealing with, legacies of gross violations of human rights, armed conflict or repression Introduce students to challenging subject matter and difficult ethical, moral and legal questions that go beyond the everyday Consider the areas of study commonly called ‘postconflict justice’, ‘conflict resolution’ and ‘peace studies’ Enable students to engage in informed analysis of how these matters have been dealt with in many countries around the world, and offer principled, creative, workable and effective strategies for handling the challenges of nation-building or re-building

Public International Law Students on this module will learn about the fundamental values, principles and rules of Public International Law. This will be a balanced course, with the essential elements of history, theory, law and practice being presented. Specific topics include: ‰ ‰ ‰

The structure, formation and sources of Public International Law and how it differs from domestic law Treaties, custom, general principles, decisions of courts of law and international institutions The interaction of international and domestic law, and the interplay between international relations, domestic politics and law The Use of Force, State Responsibility or Jurisdiction and Immunities. Bangor Law School

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Management & Banking Modules Bank Financial Management

Strategic Management

This module provides a grounding in the nature, strategic context and managerial functions of financial management in banks, and other financial services firms. Three key themes are: identification and management of the trade-off between risk and return; improvement of a bank’s value using market models; and external market-based tests of bank performance. Specific topics include:

This module analyses strategic decision-making within business. You will develop a critical understanding of the strategic processes of business management, the interconnections with the functional domains of marketing, human resource management and corporate finance, and the management of knowledge systems. Specific topics include:

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External and internal drivers that shape bank financial management Financial and performance analysis Asset and liability management Lending and securitisation Risk and capital adequacy Capital allocation and VAR (Value-At-Risk) modelling Current issues in bank financial management

Contemporary Issues in Management This module develops several theories and concepts introduced in the ‘Organisations and People’ module, critiquing key issues arising from contemporary research in organisational behaviour (OB) and management. It provides a detailed and critical analysis of management, further developing the conceptual, strategic and practical skills necessary for managers in complex, global organisational contexts. ‰

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Critical management studies, and ethical dilemmas in management and organisation Changing organisation structures and the implications for management Managing across cultures Contemporary approaches to leadership Managing complexity and change Managing for sustainability

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Financial Crises & Bank Regulation This module examines why banks and financial markets are inherently vulnerable to crises, and analyses the role of policy makers and institutions. The roles of monetary policy, bank supervision and regulation, corporate governance and ratings agencies in mitigating or exacerbating crises are considered. ‰

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Concepts of strategic management applicable to business Prescriptive and emergent strategies Strategy implementation through capacity building and resource allocation Managing, monitoring and reviewing strategic change Organisational designs for strategic advantage Human resources strategy, marketing and corporate financial strategy Organisational learning and knowledge management

Asymmetric information in financial markets: adverse selection, moral hazard, credit rationing and liquidity crises Coordination failures: bank runs, contagion and bubbles A history of bubbles and banking crises: US in the 1930s, Japan and Scandinavia in the early-1990s; Europe and the USA in 2007-09 Executive compensation, corporate governance, the culture of banking, and excessive risk taking Securitization and the 2007-08 subprime mortgage crisis The role of government and the central bank; bank regulation, Basel II and the ratings agencies


Financial Institutions Strategic Management

International Banking

This module examines the main theoretical and practical issues concerning banking business. You will develop a critical awareness of the theory of the banking firm, the motives for international banking, and regulatory and structural issues impacting on bank behaviour. Specific topics include:

This module examines the origins of international banking, the activities of international banks, the markets in which they participate, and the sources of risk. You will investigate the determinants of efficiency of international banks, and evaluate the implications of banks’ strategic decision-making. Specific topics include:

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Financial intermediation, the financial system and bank behaviour Domestic and international banking Unique characteristics of financial intermediaries Bank regulation and supervision Retail and wholesale banking, and off-balance sheet banking business Bank industrial structure: market structure, competition, efficiency Technology, innovation and growth Electronic payments and internet banking

New Venture Creation This module examines the advantages and disadvantages of the various routes to business start-up, including new venture creation, or establishing a business based on your own expertise, experience and ideas; buying an established business; purchasing a franchise; and succession through a family firm, an increasingly common way of becoming involved in entrepreneurial activity. Specific topics include: ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰

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Starting a new business Entrepreneurship, innovation, creativity Ideas, opportunities, market research, finance Franchising: origins and growth, advantages and disadvantages, legal issues Buying an established business Succeeding in a family business

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International banking: market development and definitions Integration of market structure and bank efficiency Evaluation of country risk The international debt crisis and policy responses Market failure and international bank regulation International financial centres, Euromarkets and offshore banking Case-study: the internationalisation of the Brazilian banking system

Management Research This module analyses the philosophical basis for research in the management sciences, and examines a number of key methodological issues and approaches. Research designs for both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies are developed, including interviews, case studies, focus groups, surveys and experiments. Specific topics include: ‰

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Research methodologies and philosophy: positivism and interpretivism Qualitative research methods and the search for meaning Selecting a research strategy and design Data gathering, documentary records, triangulation and mixed methods Content analysis, conversation analysis, discourse analysis, grounded theory Quantitative research design and methodologies Univariate and multivariate analysis, factor, cluster and discriminant analysis Bangor Law School

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Management & Banking Modules Marketing Strategy

Research Methods

This module critically evaluates the contributions of various schools of thought in marketing, and examines the relevant analytical models and management practices, with emphasis on the strategic importance of marketing to all organisations. Specific topics include:

This module equips students with knowledge of intermediate and advanced research methods, which they will encounter in other modules and in their dissertations. The module also provides a basis in research methodology for those who may eventually wish to pursue research degrees. Specific topics include:

Marketing and its domestic and international environment Understanding markets: market segmentation and targeting customers Marketing strategy, planning, forecasting and performance evaluation Market research and understanding the behaviour of customers Design and implementation of effective marketing strategies Product, place, price, promotion, people, process and physical evidence Social and ethical aspects of marketing

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Knowledge Management This module examines the processes whereby organisations and individuals develop and utilise their knowledge bases. Knowledge is a key asset and source of competitive advantage in the new economy. Successful knowledge management hinges on people, culture and technology. As such, it has professional and academic links with organisational behaviour and organisational learning. Specific topics include: ‰

Bangor Business School - No.1 in the UK for research in Accounting, Banking and Finance.

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Introduction to research methodology Techniques for describing and summarising data Elements of data modelling Principles of statistical inference Regression analysis Time-series analysis Survey methodology

The nature of knowledge, and its relationship to data and information Knowledge management processes in organisations, and their relationship to research, innovation and creativity Knowledge management tools for building and searching knowledge repositories, virtual communication and group working Communities of practice, and the dynamics of virtual team working Knowledge assets, auditing and valuing knowledge competences and intellectual property


Finance for Managers This module is designed for those who aim to achieve a basic understanding of financial management and control and who require an understanding of finance in order to manage an organisation effectively. Financial planning and control are central themes, as well as the appraisal techniques of investment projects. Specific topics include: ‰

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Principles underlying the preparation of accounting information Recording business transactions Preparation and analysis of financial statements Preparation of budgets, financial planning and control Costing methods, uses and interpretation of cost data Investment appraisal techniques

Organisations & People This module examines key issues arising from contemporary research in organisational behaviour (OB) and human resource management (HRM). It provides an integrated analysis of management, organisations and people, developing the conceptual, strategic and practical skills necessary for managers in complex, global organisational contexts. ‰ ‰

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NEWS FROM 2012... FROM BANGOR TO BRUSSELS: JOINT LAW AND BUSINESS SCHOOL TRIPS TO EUROPE

The nature of organisations Organisation structures: strategy, design and function, job design Organisation cultures: values, ethics, norms of behaviour Theories and models of management: classical and contemporary Individual differences: perception, learning, motivation, equality and diversity Groups and teams in the organisation Managing relationships: power, conflict, communication, engagement Managers as leaders, people developers, coaches Managing job satisfaction and performance

Students from Bangor Business & Law Schools joined together for a study trip to the institutions of the European Union and the Council of Europe, sponsored by Ms. Jill Evans MEP. Led by Brian Jones of the Business School and Evelyne Schmid from Law School, the trip was intended to provide students with a better understanding of the roles of the various institutions of the European Union and how they interact with key institutions and domestic law in the UK. In Brussels, they visited the Council of Ministers, the European Commission, the EU Committee of the Regions and the Economic and Social Committee before moving on to Luxembourg, to visit the European Court of Justice. From there, they visited the European Parliament in Strasbourg, the European Court of Human Rights and the Palace of Europe, followed by a memorable final night in Paris. Law and Business students from Bangor University returned to Brussels for a visit during the Easter vaction to visit some of the most important institutions in Europe. Students from both Schools joined up for the two-day trip to Brussels, during which they visited the European Commission, the Committee of the Regions, the Economic and Social Committee, the European Parliament and the Council of Ministers.

Bangor Law School

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Management & Banking Modules Financial Intermediation

European Business

The purpose of this module is to provide a theoretical foundation for the theory of financial intermediation, and examine core empirical papers in the banking literature. Specific topics include:

The purpose of this module is to consider the complexities and challenges of doing business in Europe and the singular characteristics of an economic, political and social space which contains 27 countries and almost 500 million people, which generates around 30% of the world’s GDP and which is subject to a unique system of supra-national governance. Specific topics include:

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Banks as delegated monitors and information producers (theory and evidence) Banks as liquidity producers The industrial organisation approach to banking Relationship lending Bank risk management Monetary policy and banks Banks and economic growth Market segmentation and branching Crises Regulation

Marketing Financial Services This module introduces and critically assesses approaches to and tools of modern financial services marketing. The lectures focus on the key methods of financial services marketing in the acquisition of customers and sale and distribution of financial services. The module progresses considering consumer behaviour, the changing customer demands, consumer heuristics and biases and ways in which financial services marketing has succeeded and failed. Course content includes: ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰

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What is a financial service? Understanding the customer and financial literacy Marketing planning tools Market segmentation and product positioning Methods of customer acquisition Choice in financial services New financial services development Financial services pricing Price differentiation and discrimination Regulated sales of financial services Customer relationship management strategies

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The structure, institutions and purpose of the EU The internal market and the Euro Competition, industry and aid policy A European workforce Nice and the implications of enlargement Business strategy in the Single European Market Marketing in the Single European Market Managing in a multi-cultural Europe Globalisation, Kyoto and Europe

NEWS FROM 2012... DESIGNATED CIVIL JUDGE FOR WALES VISITS LAW SCHOOL The Law School was recently honoured by the visit of Judge Anthony Seys Llewellyn, Designated Civil Judge for Wales, who visited the Law School as part of its Distinguished Visiting Judges programme, to conduct a seminar with both graduate and undergraduate students on the Role of the Judge in the Modern Era. He is pictured (right) with Head of School, Professor Dermot Cahill.


“One of the cheapest places to be a student” according to The Independent’s A-Z of Universities and Higher Education Colleges

Bangor Law School

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Criminology Modules Key Issues in Crime & Justice

Forensic Linguistics in Court

This module is organised into four main sections which offer a thorough grounding in the following key issues:

This module focuses on established principles and theories of Linguistics as they apply to discourse which occurs in the court room, the use of forensic linguistics as an expertise, and the analysis of the different types of language found in the court room. The aim is to make law and criminology students aware of what is happening at the linguistic level. Specific topics include:

Comparative Criminology: considers the position of the victim within national and international criminal justice systems and key crime prevention techniques to address wrongdoing Comparative Victimology: considers some general issues relating to ordinary victims of crime and provides a critical study of victims of war, state violence and genocide Comparative Criminal Justice: offers a critical reflection of international aspects of criminal justice agencies, as well as differences and commonalties of policing and court systems across different jurisdictions and how these can be researched Comparative Perspectives: explores new and emerging criminological perspectives at national and international level, with a focus on international crime

International Case Studies This module aims to provide an internationally comparative perspective on key areas of criminological concern. These include questions of crime and deviance, criminological theory and the operation of systems of criminal justice. Each of these fundamental concerns differs across diverse regions, and the module will take as its case study one or more nations from across the globe. In particular, the module will focus on: ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰

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International criminological perspectives The value of the case study approach within comparative criminology The case study nation(s) in regional and global context The case study nation(s) and criminological theory The case study nation(s) and crime and deviance The case study nation(s) and criminal justice systems

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The language of examination and cross-examination The language of judge-lawyer communications The language of judicial summaries The language of voir dire The language of expert witnesses The language of opening and closing speeches to the jury

International Criminal Law This module will provide students with a balanced and thorough understanding of the fundamentals of International Criminal Law. It will take students through the evolution of modern International Criminal Law, the underlying policy and philosophical underpinnings, substantive international criminal law and substantive international criminal procedure. International Criminal Law will also engage in close examination of the leading international courts and tribunals and their work, without neglecting key decisions from domestic courts. Students will: ‰

Look at the relevant laws and leading cases ranging from the judgements of the International Military Tribunals at Nuremberg and Tokyo to the explosion of jurisprudence that began with the ad hoc tribunals in the 1990s Develop a thorough understanding of the elements of Aggression, War Crimes, Crimes against Humanity and Genocide Analyse the International Law of Armed Conflict, which is essential for a complete understanding of the concept of War Crimes Explore the fundamental principles underpinning International Criminal Law, such as the rights to fair trial and due process, and other essential concepts of justice such as the principles of legality and double-jeopardy


Bangor Law School

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Procurement Law & Strategy Modules Risk Management in Public Procurement

Applied Procurement Research Projects (APRP)

This module will help participants undertake proper risk analysis prior to tender specification and to manage procurement risks. Participants will be equipped with the relevant knowledge, skills, and risk management measures for dealing with changes in government policies and budgets. There will also be focus on the examination of risk related approaches to pre-qualification questionnaires (PQQ) design in the public sector, as a useful strategy to minimising risks and promoting best practice procurement. The module will also address fraud, bribery and corrupt activities in procurement.

The Applied Procurement Research Projects (APRP) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken on successful completion of Part 1.

International Procurement Regimes This module will enable participants to develop sound knowledge of procurement law and relevant legal issues from an international perspective. Specifically participants will explore the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL) Model Law on Procurement of Goods, Construction and Services; the World Trade Organisation (WTO) Agreement on Government Procurement and the procurement rules of selected international financial institutions.

Procurement Relationships & Ethics This module will provide participants with requisite competencies to develop, manage and maintain appropriate and successful supplier relationships to ensure efficient procurement outcomes. Participants will investigate analytical tools and various relationship models in organisations and different tiers of the supply network.

Candidates on the one year full time programme will undertake their project during the period of June to September, while candidates on the two-year programme will undertake the project in the final year of their programme. The research project comprises a two week work placement in a procurement function and the submission by candidates of either: ‰ ‰ ‰

The APRP will be used to familiarise candidates with a broad range of current themes in Public Procurement Law and Strategy. Areas where candidates may undertake applied research projects include: ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰

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One essay with a maximum length of between 18,000 and 20,000 words OR Two essays not exceeding 10,000-words per essay OR Four essays not exceeding 5,000-words per essay.

Strategic Procurement & Leadership

This module focuses on developing participants’ procurement management and leadership skills to enable them identify, evaluate and manage the strategic procurement functions more effectively. Participants will explore the strategic procurement challenges faced by managers and leaders within the procurement environment, and will examine in detail opportunities

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National and European Procurement Law Litigation Strategies Relationship between European Internal Market Law and Public Procurement Law International Procurement Regimes Sustainable Procurement Public Procurement and Innovation Procurement Relations Procurement Ethics Risk Management in Public Procurement Contract Design and Management.

Other topics proposed by candidates may be acceptable subject to ratification by the Course Leader.


Participants of Renmin University China. Summer Law School programme at Bangor Law School 2012.

Procurement Law & Strategy Modules National & EU Public Procurement Law

Procurement Litigation

This module is designed to expose participants to an understanding of national and supranational regimes for public procurement in Ireland, United Kingdom and other EU Member States. It focuses on enabling participants to gain in-depth understanding of the main procurement principles and legal rules, including their implications for procurers and suppliers. Participants will be skilled in developing and applying insights and techniques of analysis to national and European public procurement law issues and will explore the application of the rules to practical issues and scenarios faced by public procurers and suppliers.

This module will develop participants’ functional in-depth understanding of the procurement litigation process and provide them with specific comparative knowledge on the procurement remedies regimes in the EU, UK and Ireland, including how to prepare and handle litigation and how to mitigate organisational risks associated with litigation. Drawing on inputs from external legal practitioners, participants will acquire practical legal knowledge of the challenges which purchasers and suppliers encounter during procurement litigation.

Contract Design & Management

Participants will examine EU procurement procedures which support the procurement of innovation. Participants will focus on the competitive dialogue procedure, design contests, outcome-based approaches to procurement and negotiations in procurement. Practical examples will be used as case studies in the module.

This module will develop participants’ contract drafting, design and management skills, support them in exploring different forms of contract, and enable them to appreciate the significance of different contract clauses. A number of model contract clauses used in public sector contracts will be examined. Participants will be taught appropriate mechanisms for dealing with and managing specific issues that arise during contract drafting and management stages including intellectual property issues, TUPE, and how to deal with changes to the contract scope and duration.

Sustainable and Social Procurement This module is expected to enhance participants’ understanding of sustainable procurement issues, including the legal context for introducing social agendas in public procurement. Participants will receive support on techniques for integrating sustainable and social considerations into procurement practice, in ways that comply with the EC procurement framework.

Innovation in Public Procurement

Public Procurement Research and Writing Skills This module will provide participants with the fundamentals of public procurement research and the writing process. Participants on the LLM in Procurement Law and Strategy programmes will be provided with specialist training, knowledge of key research techniques and analytical skills necessary for independent work in public procurement research at postgraduate level. Participants knowledge and experience of research methodology will be broadened to include the comprehensive skills necessary for undertaking doctrinal, socio-legal, empirical, comparative and interdisciplinary public procurement research.

Bangor Law School

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Part 2 After successfully completing the taught component (Part 1, worth 120 credits), students proceed to Part 2, which is worth 60 credits. The Part 2 stage of the LLM programmes is usually completed by way of Dissertation (see below) EXCEPT in the case of the LLM and Executive LLM in Public Procurement Law and Strategy, where students must complete the Applied Procurement Research Projects (APRP). Please refer to page 44 for further details on the APRP. On most of the MA and MBA programmes described in this brochure, you will complete Part 2 either by writing a supervised dissertation, or by participating in a structured Advanced Taught Programme of Summer Study. On the right hand column of this page is the syllabus for the MA and MBA Advanced Taught Programme of Summer Study.

The Dissertation The dissertation is normally about 20,000 words in length for LLM degrees and 12,000-20,000 words in length for MA/MBA. As part of the LLM, students will study the ‘Legal Research Methods’ module in Part 1. This will enable students to start preparing for the dissertation well in advance. After Part 1 has been completed and examined, students will have a fully developed plan for researching and writing the dissertation.

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Students will receive full support of lecturing staff throughout the process, from the planning stage through to the final stages of writing up the final version. Every student is allocated a supervisor who will oversee and provide advice and guidance on research design, methodology, results, drafting and final dissertation submission. The Dissertation will focus on a topic, reflecting students’ specialised topics and module selection. Students who undertake one of our specialist LLM programmes will undertake dissertations within the relevant area. Students doing the general LLM will be able to pursue a dissertation on any approved legal topic provided the School can provide appropriate supervision. Students undertaking the MA or MBAs will undertake a dissertation in either Law, Criminology, Banking or Management or a combination of two elements. The dissertation will enable students to research a topic in depth which will improve their legal research skills and enable them to study a topic of particular interest or concern to them, perhaps in connection with future employment prospects.


Right: Bangor University’s historic library

Advanced Taught Programme of Summer Study: The Applied Business Projects (ABP)

Available for MBA Banking and Law, MBA Law and Management, MA Banking and Law. The Advanced Business Projects (ABP) requires students to choose four of the following projects that are taught in late May and June. Business Planning: This project leads on from New Venture Creation (which is a pre-requisite) and focuses upon developing a Business Plan for an innovative organisation of the students’ own choosing conducting a full analysis of the potential economic, strategic and marketing issues. e-Business and Value Chain: The value chain: primary and secondary activities; Individual and organisational e-purchasers; Digital communities and digital government; New business models and opportunities in the new economy; e-marketing. Human Resource Management: develops theories and concepts introduced in Organisations and People and focuses on issues arising from contemporary research in human resource management (HRM). It provides an integrated analysis of people management, developing the conceptual, strategic and practical skills necessary for managers in complex, global organisational contexts. International Business: analyses the conditions in the international environment that drive trade between nations and the issues facing companies and governments. The project provides insights into the behaviour of consumers, workers and managers in multinational enterprises (MNEs), small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) as well as the public/governmental sector. Investment and Private Banking: Asset structure and business mix in investment banking; Regulation of investment banking; Asset and risk management services in private banking; Offshore and onshore private banking. Assessment is by means of Management reports due in September.

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Research Degrees PhD, MPhil & LLM by Research The Law School provides expert PhD and MPhil supervision in a range of legal areas. For a PhD degree, candidates are expected to present the results of research in a thesis which represents a significant original contribution to knowledge in the subject area studied, and to undergo a viva voce examination. For an MPhil degree, candidates are expected to successfully complete an approved programme of supervised research, and to present the results in a thesis. As an alternative to a one-year taught LLM, students can do a one-year LLM by Research on a specific research topic and submit a 30,000 word dissertation on that topic. All research students are allocated to a supervisor with a research interest in your chosen topic of study. Your supervisor will provide advice and guidance on your choice of topic; the literature in your field and how to access it; your choice of research methods; thesis structure, content and presentation; critical appraisal of drafts of your thesis; and, in the case of PhD students, advice on preparation for your viva voce examination. Prospective applicants are encouraged to consult the Law School website for an indication of research areas where the School can supervise candidates.

Please refer to pages 8-10 for details of Bangor Law School staff, their areas of expertise and research interests, and the areas in which the School offers research supervision.

Integrated PhD programme In exceptional cases where there is a strong research topic but the candidate has failed to attain the necessary 6.5 or equivalent in the IELTS English test, the student may be admitted on an MPhil / PhD programme subject to doing approved English language courses, alongside the MPhil / PhD study for a period of one year. This will enable the student to reach the appropriate standard of English required to successfully undertake a research degree. The fee for this integrated programme will be the normal Law PhD fee plus an additional sum to cover the additional language tuition and support. The additional sum will be specified on the Law School website.

International Student Scholarships Bangor University's International Education Centre offers a range of scholarships to International Students towards Postgraduate Research. For further information please visit: www.bangor.ac.uk/international

I choose Bangor Law School because the Head of School (Professor Dermot Cahill) is a leading expert in Corporate Finance Law, which is my particular field of interest. Amongst the best aspects of my course was the opportunity to attend a Competition Law conference held at the School. I had the chance to meet practitioners from all over the world whose expertise in this area is unrivalled. The whole experience was engaging, informative and stimulating. It’s difficult to single out one highlight of the course as there are so many! But as a student undertaking legal research, I must say that the fact that the Law School has its own dedicated Law Librarian was a huge positive. Roisin Ni Thuama, from Ireland, PhD in Corporate Law

The Law School and the Business School, for all their taught postgraduate schemes, reserve the right to amend the programmes and/or the lists of modules by addition or deletion of modules or not to offer a programme/module in a given academic year. Details of any changes will be posted on the Law School website. 48


Accommodation

The University offers a range of accommodation in student Halls of Residence, but many postgraduate students choose to live in private housing or privatelymanaged accommodation in the city centre. Wherever you choose to live, you will find yourself within easy walking distance of your lectures and many local amenities.

Private Accommodation

University-Managed Halls of Residence

Rooms in privately owned student halls of residence are also available in Bangor city centre, 10 minutes walk from the University. Accommodation includes single study bedrooms with en-suite facilities, with shared kitchen/lounge facilities.

These halls offer a range of single study bedrooms with shared or en-suite facilities, in catered or self-catered halls. The rent for the university-managed accommodation is between £3,800 (approx £75 per week) and £5,000 (approx £100 per week) for a 51 week period. Rent covers water and electricity. Please remember that you cannot make an application for a room in a hall until you have firmly accepted a place (which may be conditional) to study at Bangor University. If you are an International student, please make an application for halls as soon as you accept a place to study at the University. Please do not wait until you have been granted a visa – there may be no rooms available by then. www.bangor.ac.uk/accommodation

The University’s Student Housing Office carries details of private rented accommodation available in Bangor and the surrounding area. www.bangor.ac.uk/studentservices/studenthousing

Privately Owned Halls of Residence

www.luxurystudentaccommodation.com

The accommodation at Bangor University has been placed in the top 10 for the What Uni? Student Choice Awards in Accommodation 2011.

Bangor Law School

51 49


Entry & Application ACADEMIC

ENGLISH

LLM Degrees: Entry to the LLM degrees usually

International applicants are normally required to provide evidence of English language proficiency.

requires a minimum second class single or joint honours bachelor degree in Law or a related subject such as Business, Economics, Accountancy, Politics, Criminology or Sociology from an approved University.

MBA: Entry to the MBA degrees requires a minimum second class degree in a related discipline such as law, banking, management etc. Whilst relevant professional work experience is not essential, it is considered to be an advantage.

‰ ‰

IELTS 6.5 (with no individual score lower than 6.0) TOEFL Internet-based (IBT): 90 with no score lower than 20

For the MBA, MA and Bridging Degree, the minimum English Language requirements will be: IELTS 6.0 (with no individual score lower than 5.5) TOEFL Internet-based (IBT): 80 with no individual score lower than 16

MA: Entry to the MA degrees requires a minimum second

class degree in a related discipline such as law, banking etc.

APPLICANTS WITH OTHER QUALIFICATIONS

Applicants whose English test scores are below the required level may undertake English Language courses at Bangor prior to starting the academic course. Further details at: www.bangor.ac.uk/law/postgraduate/entry

Applications will be considered on a case by case basis for students with degrees in other subjects (for example, Science or Arts & Humanities) or a degree at a level less than the normally required standard. Alternatively, possession of a suitable professional qualification or relevant practical experience may be accepted. In general, all applicants are judged on their individual merits. Age, work experience and other factors are also taken into consideration. Please contact law.pg@bangor.ac.uk if you need further information. International students have chosen to study at Bangor University for many years and so we are familiar with overseas education systems and are experienced in making offers of entry based on qualifications awarded worldwide. If in any doubt as to whether your qualification is one recognised by Bangor University, please e-mail the International Education Centre at international@bangor.ac.uk

50

For the LLM and research degrees the minimum English language requirements will normally be:

For details of the English Language and Research degree package, please refer to page 48.

APPLICATION PROCEDURE To apply, complete the online application form at: www.bangor.ac.uk/courses/postgrad/apply The taught postgraduate degree programmes start in late September. Applications can be submitted at any time during the preceding twelve months, but it is best to apply early. Applications for the PhD, MPhil and LLM by Research degrees can be submitted at any time during the calendar year and should enclose a short summary (about 1,500 – 2,000 words) outlining your intended research proposal.


Financial Information Tuition Fees

LLM Law & Criminology LLM/ Executive LLM Public Procurement Law & Strategy

Up-to-date tuition fees are published on the following webpage: www.bangor.ac.uk/ar/main/fees

As a guide, however, 2012/13 fees are as follows:

MBA & MA Gold & Silver Scholarships £5,000 & £2,000

LLM LLM (Research) MBA MA PhD MPhil Bridging Degree

UK/EU International £3,900 £11,300 £3,900 £11,300 £10,000 £13,800 £6,300 £12,800 £3, 828 £11,300 £3,828 £11,300 £3,375 £9,600

LLM in Public Procurement Law & Strategy (1 year) £4,998 £5,997 Executive LLM in Public Procurement Law & Strategy (2 years p/t) £4,497p.a. £5,997p.a. It is expected there will be a small increase in 2013/14.

Cost of Living The cost of living in Bangor is lower than in many other university cities, making Bangor an affordable choice for postgraduate study. It is estimated that students need around £7,200 per year to cover all requirements including accommodation, food, books and clothes. Of course, some students spend more, whilst others live comfortably on a smaller budget. Bangor is ranked amongst the top 4 most economical and affordable places to study in the UK, according to a cost-of-living survey published in The Independent University Guide.

LLM Master of Laws Scholarships Each successful international applicant will automatically be considered for a £2,000 scholarship when the application for entry is being considered. Confirmation of the award will be provided in the offer letter. You must be applying for one of the following programmes to be eligible for the Scholarship: ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰

LLM Law (General) LLM International Commercial & Business Law LLM International Intellectual Property Law LLM International Law LLM International Law (European Law) LLM International Law (Global Trade Law) LLM International Law (International Criminal Law & International Human Rights Law) LLM Law & Banking

Gold Scholarships valued at £5,000 and Silver Scholarships valued at £2,000 are available for the study of the following MA or MBA joint masters degrees delivered jointly by Bangor Law School and Bangor Business School: ‰ ‰ ‰

MBA Law & Management MBA Banking & Law MA Banking & Law

For further details on how to apply for a Gold or Silver Scholarship go to: www.bangor.ac.uk/law/postgraduate/scholarships or email: law.pg@bangor.ac.uk

Loyalty Award The Law School is pleased to announce a Loyalty Award for Bangor graduates who choose to continue with Masters degree study at Bangor Law School. A 10% reduction on tuition fees will be awarded to Bangor graduates who enrol in 2013/14.

Postgraduate Access Bursary Students may be eligible for the Postgraduate Access Bursary. For further information contact the Money Support Unit: Tel: +44 (0) 1248 383566 / 383637 Email: moneysupport@bangor.ac.uk

Scholarships for International Students In addition to the School scholarships above, the University’s International Education Centre also offers a range of additional scholarships and bursaries to International students. Please note that students are not eligible to receive both an International Scholarship and a School Scholarship. For further information please visit: www.bangor.ac.uk/international Bangor Law School

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Postgraduate Admissions Administrator Bangor Law School Bangor University Gwynedd LL57 2DG UK T: +44 (0)1248 383023 E: law.pg@bangor.ac.uk www.bangor.ac.uk/law/postgrad To apply go to: www.bangor.ac.uk/courses/postgrad/apply

Law Postgraduate eProspectus 2013-14  
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