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Battle of Midway commemoration June 6 ... A Battle of Midway memorial commemoration is scheduled for 10 a.m. June 6 in the Blue Angel Atrium at the National Naval Aviation Museum. Rear Adm. Michael S. White, commander, Naval Education and Training Center (NETC), will be guest speaker. Dress is service dress white for E-6 and below, summer whites for E-7 and above, blue dress “D” for Marines and business casual for civilians. For more information, contact Lt. John Cunningham at 452-3249 (john.c.cunningham1@navy.mil) or AWRC Steven Ballard at 452-3949 (steven.ballard@navy.mil).

Vol. 80, No. 22

VISIT GOSPORT ONLINE: www.gosportpensacola.com

June 3, 2016

Navy Medicine: Updated Zika virus infection guidance From U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery Public Affairs

Navy Medicine released updated Zika Virus Infection guidance in NavAdmin 121/16, May 26, communicating current information, travel precautions and risk reduction measures to Navy and Marine Corps personnel. “The updated NavAdmin includes the latest Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommendations for the prevention of sexual transmission of Zika virus; it also highlights recommendations for couples who are considering conception,” said Cmdr. Alan Lam, deputy associate director, U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery (BuMed) public health, emergency preparedness and response. The updated NavAdmin also directs installation commanders to implement the secretary of defense guidance to control Zika virus-transmitting mosquitoes at Navy installations and in housing areas. Installation commanding officers will en-

sure public health emergency officers and installation vector control staff coordinate their efforts with state and local counterparts. BuMed has instructed Navy Medicine providers to follow clinical guidelines issued by the CDC. In addition, Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center issued an updated information sheet and trifold pamphlet on their public website for Navy and Marine Corps personnel. “Navy Medicine implements the latest CDC guidelines and supports installation vector surveillance and control efforts; however, each member of the Navy and Marine Corps family must also do their part to ensure they are protected from the Zika virus,” said Lam. Zika is a viral infection primarily spread by a bite from an infected mosquito. The virus is also spread by a mother to her fetus during pregnancy, through blood transfusion, and by a man infected See Zika on page 2

‘For their tomorrow, we gave our today’ ... (Above) On Memorial Day, America recalls the cost of freedom at Barrancas National Cemetery (BNC). Photo by Mike O’Connor. (Right) HM1Jennifer Bradley, a corpsman with Naval Hospital Pensacola, and her son Jacob, 2, place an American flag on a grave site at BNC May 28. Several Sailors from NHP spent the morning placing flags throughout the cemetery, which dates to the end of the Civil War. Photo by MC1 James Stenberg

Take charge in June, Men’s Health Month Story, photo by Jason Bortz Naval Hospital Pensacola Public Affairs Officer

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the top five leading causes of death among men are heart disease, cancer, unintentional injury, chronic lower respiratory disease and stroke. Heart disease is number one, causing 25 percent of male deaths in the U.S. June is Men’s Health Month, a time to encourage early detection and treatment of disease. “Many of the health issues men face are preventable and treatable,” said Cmdr. John Callahan, director of medical services, Naval Hospital Pensacola (NHP). “Patients are en-

ease, obesity and depression. A person’s sleep needs change with age, but seven to nine hours a night is ideal for adults. Toss the tobacco. Tobacco use remains the single largest preventable cause of death and disease in the U. S. – killing more than 480,000 Americans each year. It’s never too late to quit. Quitting produces immediate and longterm benefits; it lowers the risk of heart disease, cancer, lung disease, and other illnesses. Avoid secondLt. Cmdr. Ken Shaw, 44, Naval Hospital Pensacola (NHP) hand smoke, which can assistant director of administration, exercises with Ken also cause heart disease, Laube, 57, NHP Medical Home Port business manager, lung cancer and stroke. at NHP during their lunch break. Be active. More than couraged to speak with charge of one’s health. one-third of U.S. adults are their physician about any Get good sleep. Insuffi- obese. Adults should get at health care concerns they cient sleep can be associ- least two and a half hours are having and to ask ques- ated with a number of of moderate-intensity aertions.” conditions such as dia- obic activity each week Here are tips to take betes, cardiovascular dis- and muscle-strengthening

activities at least two days a week. Work all major muscle groups including legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders and arms. Eat healthy. Eat a variety of fruits and vegetables every day. They contain many vitamins and minerals that protect against diseases. Choose healthy snacks and limit food and drinks that are high in calo-

ries, sugar, salt, fat and alcohol. Manage stress. Physical or emotional tension is often a sign of stress. Sometimes stress can be good, helping develop skills needed to manage potentially threatening situations, but stress can also be harmful and lead to See Health on page 2

Gosport’s 2016 hurricane tracker inside Hurricane season began June 1 and runs through Nov. 30. In 2004, four major hurricanes struck the state of Florida. In 2005, Hurricane Katrina devastated the Gulf Coast region. The lesson to learn is not “if” a hurricane will strike, but “when.” Having a plan and preparing for a hurricane are the keys to survival before, during and after the storm. Develop your own hurricane plan. The time to plan is before a hurricane strikes. See pages 4-5 for Gosport’s hurricane tracking map, local emergency phone numbers and information.

Asian American Pacific Islander Heritage Month marked at NAS Pensacola ... NAS Pensacola’s Diversity Committee presented a cultural celebration May 31 at the Chiefs Club onboard the base. The guest speaker was Cmdr. Christopher D. Eng (right), commanding officer Center for Information Dominance Unit at NASP Corry Station. Performers included the BCI and Philippines Islander Dancers (left) from Fort Walton Beach and Teruko Van Bargen of the Japan-American Society of Northwest Florida. Photos by Janet Thomas

Published by Ballinger Publishing, a private firm in no way connected with the Department of the Navy. Opinions contained herein are not official expressions of the Department of the Navy nor do the advertisements constitute Department of the Navy, NAS Pensacola or Ballinger Publishing’s endorsement of products or services advertised.


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GOSPORT

Navy Voting Assistance Program makes voting easy By Lt. Kristin Hope Special contributor to Navy Installations Command Public Affairs

With all the 2016 election buzz, who you are voting for has probably crossed your mind and with that, you have probably wondered how to vote. Are you going to be deployed? Will you be at sea? Or maybe you and your family are stationed in a state that is different from where you are registered to vote? All of these are challenges Navy voters face, but a team of 2,000 voting assistance officers are here to help. It has been an exciting primary voting season so far. The voting assistance officers have attended workshops across the world to learn about how to better assist voters and common voting mistakes. Some of the most common mistakes we see are voters not signing their forms or not entering the correct addresses in the correct lines. While filling out voting forms, the block titled

LN1 David Forrest reviews a voter registration form for IT1 Richard Skees aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). Photo by MCSN Sabrina Fine

“My Voting Residence Address” should always be the address of where you are registered to vote. It doesn’t matter if you no longer live there as long as you lived there when you first registered. The block titled “where to send my voting materials” is just that. Keep in mind where you are now versus where you will be this summer when ballots are sent out. If you are going on deployment in the very near future, you

Navy celebrates 2016 LGBT Pride Month From Chief of Naval Personnel Public Affairs

WASHINGTON (NNS) – The Navy joins the nation in recognizing Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Pride Month during the month of June. Established by Presidential Proclamation in 2000, LGBT Pride Month is held annually and recognizes the importance of diversity within our society as well as the many achievements of LGBT individuals. This year's theme is celebration, and calls Americans to eliminate prejudice and celebrate our diversity. “Americans have always worked to fulfill that exceptional promise made at our founding,” said Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus. “We have continually broken down artificial barriers to equal opportunity ... Our military forces have followed that same history and made themselves stronger and better and more effective because of it.” This June, the Navy recognizes LGBT service members and civilians for their dedicated service to the United States. “Diversity is a source of strength for the Navy, and is (a) key component to maintaining our highest state of readiness,” said a Navy spokesperson. “Diversity encompasses more than race and gender – we seek to include diversity of thought, background, language, culture and skills as well. Our force comes from a diverse populous, and we are simply better at what we do when we are more diverse. We want individuals to serve who are right for the job regardless of race, gender, sexual orientation, and creed. Our goal is to ensure that the mission is carried out by the best-qualified and the most capable service members.” For service members, repeal of Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell in 2011 allowed gay, lesbian and bisexuals to serve openly in the United States armed forces. Currently, the Department of Defense is reviewing its transgender policy for the armed forces. For more information about LGBT Pride Month, visit: http://www.deomi.org/contribute/SpecialObservance/Pride.cfm/. For more information, visit http://www.navy.mil/, http://www.facebook.com/usnavy/, or http://www.twitter.com/usnavy/. For more news from Chief of Naval Personnel, visit http://www.navy.mil/local/cnp.

Vol. 80, No. 22

should put your deployed address. We all know mail while deployed can take time, especially at sea. You don’t want your ballot sent home, then forwarded to you by your family. It may not give you enough time to get it, fill it out and mail it back to your election official in time for them to count it. However, even if that is the case, you are in luck. If you are registered and haven’t received a ballot by August, it is in your best interest

Also, there is one installation voting assistance officer at every Navy installation covered by Commander, Naval Installations Command (CNIC) and each has an office to provide in-person assistance to all local Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting Act members and their families. Visit https://www. fvap. gov/info/contact/iva-offices or http://www. cnic.navy. mil/navy voting to find your local installation voting assistance officer. Onboard NASP, go to the NASP Voting Assistance Office (Bldg. 1500, Room 229). As the world changes, so does Federal Voting Assistance Program and Navy Voting Assistance Program. All installation voting assistance officers and unit voting assistance officers are now able to log all required training and reports online at the Federal Voting Assistance Program portal and voters can received daily Navy Voting news from either https:// www. facebook. com/ NavyVoting/ or https:// twitter. com/NavyVoting.

Zika from page 1

with Zika to his partner during sex. Typical symptoms include fever, conjunctivitis, muscle pain, rash, headache, and joint pain. Zika virus infection during pregnancy can cause microcephaly and other birth defects. Currently, Zika outbreaks are occurring in numerous Pacific Islands, the Caribbean and throughout Central America and South America. Navy and Marine Corps personnel are at risk when travelling to areas experiencing active Zika virus transmission. Infection risk is reduced by taking measures to avoid mosquito bites. No vaccine or drug is currently available to prevent Zika virus infection, and there is currently no specific antiviral treatment for the disease. The best way to prevent infection is to avoid mosquito bites while in areas of active transmission and avoid unprotected sex with a man who may have been exposed to Zika. Mosquitoes that spread Zika virus bite mostly during the daytime, but bites should be avoided day and night. The CDC recommends pregnant women postpone travel to any area with active Zika virus transmission. Pregnant women who do travel to one of these areas should talk to their Navy Medicine health care provider before traveling and strictly follow steps to avoid mosquito bites. The CDC also recommends that, for the duration of pregnancy, pregnant women avoid unprotected sex with any man who lives in or travels to an area of active Zika virus transmission. The following steps are recommended for those traveling to an area with ongoing Zika virus transmission: • Choose a hotel or lodging with air conditioning or with screens on windows and doors. • Sleep under a mosquito bed net if you are outside or in a room that is not well-screened. • Cover exposed skin by wearing long-sleeved shirts Health from page 1

feeling overwhelmed or out of control. Manage stress with self-care and social support. Avoid drugs and alcohol, stay active, stay socially connected and find support. Stay on top of your game. Patients should see their Medical Home Port Team or physician for regular checkups. Checkups can

June 3, 2016

Naval Air Station, Pensacola, Fla.: A Bicentennial Defense Community Commanding Officer — Capt. Christopher T. Martin Public Affairs Officer — Patrick J. Nichols The Gosport nameplate pays homage to the 100th anniversary of naval aviation in 2011: the Centennial of Naval Aviation, or CONA. The image on the left side of the nameplate depicts Eugene Ely taking off in a Curtiss pusher bi-plane from the USS Pennsylvania Jan. 18, 1911. While Ely had taken off from the USS Birmingham two months earlier after his plane had been loaded on the ship, the USS Pennsylvania event was the first time a plane landed on and then took off from a U.S. warship.

to fill out a Federal Write-In Absentee Ballot and send that in so that it arrives in time. This will act as your official ballot and allow you to cast your vote just as if you had received your ballot on time. If you would like to register to vote or fill out your absentee ballot online, the Federal Voting Assistance Program has got you covered with www.fvap.gov. The Federal Voting Assistance Program is the Department of Defense program tasked with ensuring that all American citizens who fall under the Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting Act are able to exercise their right to vote. They assist states in complying with federal laws and act as the go between for the DoD and Congress to ensure that voting impediments are identified ahead of time. If you want to fill out a form in person or have a question, every Navy unit with 25 members or more is required to have at least one unit voting assistance officer to offer assistance.

The image on the right side is the Navy’s most modern fighter aircraft, the F-18 Super Hornet. Established in 1921 as the Air Station News, the name Gosport was adopted in 1936. A gosport was a voice tube used by flight instructors in the early days of naval aviation to give instructions and directions to their students. The name “Gosport” was derived from Gosport, England (originally God’s Port), where the voice tube was invented. Gosport is an authorized newspaper published every Friday by Ballinger Publishing,

and long pants. • Use EPA-registered insect repellents containing DEET, picaridin, or IR3535. These are safe for pregnant women when used as directed. • Use permethrin-treated clothing and equipment. • Avoid unprotected sex with potentially exposed men. • Use condoms the right way, every time you have sex. Navy Medicine is a global health care network of 63,000 personnel that provide health care support to the U.S. Navy, Marine Corps, their families and veterans in high operational tempo environments, at expeditionary medical facilities, medical treatment facilities, hospitals, clinics, hospital ships and research units around the world. For more information, visit http://www.navy.mil/, http://www.facebook.com/usnavy/, or http://www. twitter.com/usnavy/. For more news from Navy Medicine, visit http://www.navy.mil/local/mednews.

help diagnose issues early, before they become a problem, and sometimes before symptoms appear. Ask the doctor what screenings are needed and when. Track personal numbers such as blood pressure, blood sugar, cholesterol and body mass index. And get vaccinated; immunizations help maintain health, regardless of age. Medical Home Port Teams at

314 N. Spring St.- Suite A, Pensacola, Fl. 32501, in the interest of military and civilian personnel and their families aboard the Naval Air Station Pensacola, Saufley Field and Corry Station. Editorial and news material is compiled by the Public Affairs Office, 150 Hase Road, Ste.-A, NAS Pensacola, FL 32508-1051. All news releases and related materials should be mailed to that address, e-mailed to scott.hallford@navy.mil. National news sources are American Forces Press Service (AFPS), Navy News Service (NNS), Air Force News Service (AFNS), News USA and North American Precis Syndicate (NAPS). Opinions expressed herein do not necessarily represent those of the Department of Defense, United States Navy, officials of the Naval Air Station Pensacola, or Ballinger Publishing. All advertising, including classified ads, is arranged through Ballinger Publishing. Minimum weekly circulation is 25,000. Everything advertised in this publication must be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to rank, rate, race, creed, color, national origin or sex of the purchaser, user or patron. A confirmed rejection of this policy of equal opportunities by an advertiser will result in the refusal of future advertising from that source.

NHP and the branch health clinic are ready to meet patients’ urgent, preventive and routine health care needs. To make an appointment, call 505-7171 or schedule online by going to TRICAREonline.com. For 24/7 clinical advice and urgent care referrals, call the NHP Nurse Advice Line at 800-TRICARE (800-874-2273).

For classified ads, call: (850) 433-1166, ext. 29 For commercial advertising: Becky Hildebrand (850) 433-1166, ext. 31 Becky@ballingerpublishing.com Visit Us On The Web At: Ballinger Publishing.Com Mail To: Gosport, NAS Pensacola, 150 Hase Road, Ste.-A, Pensacola, FL 32508-1051

Gosport Editor

Scott Hallford 452-4466 scott.hallford@navy.mil Gosport Associate Editor

Mike O’Connor 452-2165 michael.f.o’connor.ctr@navy.mil Gosport Staff Writer

Janet Thomas 452-4419 janet.thomas.ctr@navy.mil


June 3, 2016

GOSPORT

COMMENTARY

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NHP psychologist sees value in unique identity By Lt. Courtney Pollman-Turner Clinical psychologist, Naval Hospital Pensacola

I

followed a winding and enlightening road to become a clinical psychologist in the Navy. In 2003, I received a commission as a naval officer through the Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps program at George Washington University and reported a few months later bright-eyed, bushy-tailed and a little bewildered to my first command. I was assigned to the USS Ross (DDG 71) as a surface warfare officer (SWO). The days I spent aboard this ship earning my SWO pin were some of the most challenging I have ever experienced. I left the active-duty component some years later and eventually pursued an advanced degree in psychology so that I could continue to serve in a capacity that more closely suited my strengths and my passions. In 2015, I accepted a commission in the Medical Service Corps and bid farewell to my days as a SWO. Friends often tell me that my job as clinical psychologist sounds hard. I am faced daily with the struggles and stressors of other service members, veterans and their families.

How to submit a commentary

Lt. Courtney Pollman-Turner was recently featured by Navy Medicine as part of the “I am Navy Medicine” series. She discusses her transition from being a surface warfare officer to her current position as a clinical psychologist. Photo by Naval Hospital Pensacola Public Affairs Officer Jason Bortz

I tell my friends, “I love my job,” and because of this, I just cannot think of my job as hard. What I do find challenging is sustaining myself and nourishing myself both physically and emotionally so that I can continue to be at my best with my patients. The practice of self-care is often something that does not come naturally to those of us in the military.

We devote so much of ourselves to the care and protection of others that sometimes we forget to take care of ourselves. This is something that I see my patients and co-workers struggle with as well. During my time as a SWO, I learned something about Sailors that took me years to realize – that each had a unique identity within the

working environment and outside of the Navy. They were boyfriends, brothers, fathers, friends, wives, mothers, sisters and daughters. They liked gun shows, mountain biking or cross-stitching; they were all very different people coming together for a common cause. Now, as a clinical psychologist, I understand that I am more than just a naval officer and I believe that this is the key to self-care, which is something I try and share with my patients. We would do well to remember that the Navy’s strength stems from its diversity, which is comprised of all of us as individuals. I now see how much more effective I could have been as a SWO if had I better cared for and respected the unique aspects of my identity, and I work daily to encourage others to give themselves the same respect. Just think how incredible the world would be if we all left work on time so that we could get in that evening workout or be home in time to share dinner with the family. I believe that the Navy is strong as a force because of the diversity we seek to promote, and we will only grow stronger if we respect that same diversity within ourselves. I’m Lt. Courtney Pollman-Turner. I am Navy Medicine, and I am also so much more, as are you. For more on Navy Medicine, go to http://navymedicine.navylive. dodlive.mil/.

Commentaries are the opinion of the writer and should not be interpreted as official government, Navy or command policy statements. Reader submissions are welcome but should not exceed 800 words. Submissions must be bylined and include a daytime phone number or e-mail contact for the writer. All submissions are subject to editing to comply with policy and standards. Send commentary submissions to Janet.Thomas.ctr@navy.mil.


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June 3, 2016

GOSPORT GOSPORT

Ready, set –

HURRICANE NAS Pensacola Emergency Management Office 452-4481 Quarterdeck 452-4785 For on-base emergency: 911 for fire and ambulance; 911 for NASP Police; non-emergency 452-8387

NFAAS: Navy Family Accountability and Assessment System https://navyfamily.navy.mil/cas/login

American Red Cross Northwest Florida 432-7601 http://www.redcross.org/fl/pensacola

Fleet Weather Center Norfolk http://www.usno.navy.mil/NOOC/fwc-n

Escambia County Sheriff’s Office 436-9630 http://www.escambiaso.com

Ready Navy http://www.Ready.Navy.mil

NAS Whiting Field 911 for Emergency Center Emergency Management (850) 623-7324

Air Force Be Ready http://www.beready.af.mil/

NASP Corry Station Quarterdeck 452-6618

Ready Army http://www.acsim.army.mil/readyarmy/

NETPDTC Saufley Field Main gate 452-1628

Federal Emergency Management Agency www.fema.gov (800) 621-FEMA (3362)

Florida Division of Emergency Management (850) 413-9969 http://www.floridadisaster.org National Hurricane Center www.nhc.noaa.gov National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration www.noaa.gov

Be Ready Escambia: Escambia County Public Safety 471-6400 http://www.myescambia.com/beready Santa Rosa County Emergency Management (850) 983-5360 www.santarosa.fl.gov/emergency/

HURRICANE CATEGORIES TROPICAL STORM: Minor winds — 39-73 mph Category 1: Minimal winds — 74-95 mph Category 2: Moderate winds — 96-110 mph Category 3: Extensive winds — 111-130 mph Category 4: Extreme winds — 130-156 mph Category 5: Catastrophic winds — 156-plus mph NAS Pensacola

Santa Rosa County Sheriff’s Office 983-1100 http://www.santarosasheriff.org Emerald Coast Utilities Authority 476-0480 http://www.ecua.fl.gov Pensacola Energy (natural gas) 435-1800 http://www.pensacolaenergy.com/ 474-5300 to report gas leak/emergency Gulf Power (outages and service interruptions) 800-487-6937 http://www.gulfpower.com

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The time for hurricane preparedness is now: #ItOnlyTakesOne #HurricaneStrong From http://www.nws.noaa.gov/com

It only takes one storm to change your life and community, as it did in 2004 for NAS Pensacola, with Hurricane Ivan’s strike on the Gulf Coast. “NOAA pointed out the forecast uncertainty today,” NASP Emergency Manager Burt Fenters said May 27. “This year could be problematic. Early storm development (such as Tropical Storm Bonnie) makes you wonder how this season will go.” Tropical cyclones are among nature’s most powerful and destructive phenomena. If you live in an area prone to tropical cyclones, you need to be prepared. Even areas well away from the coastline can be threatened by dangerous flooding, destructive winds and tornadoes from these storms. The National Hurricane Center issues watches, warnings, forecasts, and analyses of hazardous tropical weather. Hurricane hazards: The primary hazards from hurricanes are storm surge flooding, inland flooding from heavy rains, destructive winds, tornadoes, and high surf and rip currents. While hurricanes pose the greatest threat to life and property, tropical storms and depressions can also be devastating. Flooding from heavy rains can cause extensive damage and loss of life. For example, Tropical Storm Allison produced more than 40 inches of rain in the Houston area in 2001, causing about $5 billion in damage and taking the lives of 41 people. Storm surge has the potential to cause the largest loss of life in hurricanes. Since 1963,

storm surge has caused nearly half of the deaths in the United States in tropical cyclones. Water, not wind, has accounted for nearly 90 percent of all tropical cyclone deaths in the U.S. during that time. Storm surge is dangerous because a mere six inches of fast-moving flood water can knock over an adult. It takes only two feet of rushing water to carry away most vehicles – including large pickup trucks and SUVs. Tornadoes are also common with landfalling tropical systems. In recorded history, almost every tropical storm and hurricane that has come onshore in the U.S. has produced a tornado. These tornadoes most often occur in thunderstorms embedded in the storm’s rainbands, well away from the center of the hurricane. Strong winds of a tropical cyclone can also cause dangerous waves that pose a significant hazard to mariners and coastal residents and visitors. When the waves break along the coast, they can produce deadly rip currents – even at large distances from the storm. In 2008, despite the fact that Hurricane Bertha was more than a 1,000 miles offshore, the storm resulted in rip currents that killed three people along the New Jersey coast and required 1,500 lifeguard rescues in Ocean City, Md., during a one week period. The time to prepare is now: What should you do to prepare for a hurricane? Get a plan. The most important step is to identify your hurricane risk. Do you live in an evacuation zone? If so, you need to plan on where you and your family would ride out the storm if you are told to evacuate.

Most people only need to evacuate a few miles from the coast to avoid the dangers of storm surge. Find a friend or relative that lives outside the storm surge evacuation zone and have a plan to ride out the storm with them. You should also establish a family communications plan in case you are not together when you need to evacuate. Once a person understands their risk for hurricane impacts, an appropriate disaster safety plan should be developed to help ensure an individual’s and a family’s safety. A disaster safety plan is a comprehensive plan that identifies all of the steps a family needs to take before, during and after a disaster to ensure maximum personal safety and property protection. For a step-by-step guide on creating a family disaster plan see Florida’s “Get a Plan” guide. Citizens should also visit their State Emergency Management Agency websites for family disaster plan templates that may be more suited to a local area. Coastal residents should go to their local emergency managers for evacuation zone information. This information is typically available online. A county-by-county list of evacuation zone resources is available at: http://flash.org/ hurricane-season/ evacuation-zones/ Evacuation_Zone_Identification_Survey.pdf. Vital resources to help you prepare include: Hurricanes.gov, which provides critical hurricane advisories and marine forecasts. Weather.gov for the latest forecasts for your part of the country. And Ready.gov for additional preparedness information.

Storm names for 2016 Alex Bonn ie Co lin Da nielle E arl Fio na Gas ton He rmin e Ian J ulia Karl L is a Matthew Nicole Otto Pa ula Richard S har y To bias Virginie Wa lter

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June 3, 2016

GOSPORT GOSPORT

Ready, set –

HURRICANE NAS Pensacola Emergency Management Office 452-4481 Quarterdeck 452-4785 For on-base emergency: 911 for fire and ambulance; 911 for NASP Police; non-emergency 452-8387

NFAAS: Navy Family Accountability and Assessment System https://navyfamily.navy.mil/cas/login

American Red Cross Northwest Florida 432-7601 http://www.redcross.org/fl/pensacola

Fleet Weather Center Norfolk http://www.usno.navy.mil/NOOC/fwc-n

Escambia County Sheriff’s Office 436-9630 http://www.escambiaso.com

Ready Navy http://www.Ready.Navy.mil

NAS Whiting Field 911 for Emergency Center Emergency Management (850) 623-7324

Air Force Be Ready http://www.beready.af.mil/

NASP Corry Station Quarterdeck 452-6618

Ready Army http://www.acsim.army.mil/readyarmy/

NETPDTC Saufley Field Main gate 452-1628

Federal Emergency Management Agency www.fema.gov (800) 621-FEMA (3362)

Florida Division of Emergency Management (850) 413-9969 http://www.floridadisaster.org National Hurricane Center www.nhc.noaa.gov National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration www.noaa.gov

Be Ready Escambia: Escambia County Public Safety 471-6400 http://www.myescambia.com/beready Santa Rosa County Emergency Management (850) 983-5360 www.santarosa.fl.gov/emergency/

HURRICANE CATEGORIES TROPICAL STORM: Minor winds — 39-73 mph Category 1: Minimal winds — 74-95 mph Category 2: Moderate winds — 96-110 mph Category 3: Extensive winds — 111-130 mph Category 4: Extreme winds — 130-156 mph Category 5: Catastrophic winds — 156-plus mph NAS Pensacola

Santa Rosa County Sheriff’s Office 983-1100 http://www.santarosasheriff.org Emerald Coast Utilities Authority 476-0480 http://www.ecua.fl.gov Pensacola Energy (natural gas) 435-1800 http://www.pensacolaenergy.com/ 474-5300 to report gas leak/emergency Gulf Power (outages and service interruptions) 800-487-6937 http://www.gulfpower.com

June 3, 2016

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The time for hurricane preparedness is now: #ItOnlyTakesOne #HurricaneStrong From http://www.nws.noaa.gov/com

It only takes one storm to change your life and community, as it did in 2004 for NAS Pensacola, with Hurricane Ivan’s strike on the Gulf Coast. “NOAA pointed out the forecast uncertainty today,” NASP Emergency Manager Burt Fenters said May 27. “This year could be problematic. Early storm development (such as Tropical Storm Bonnie) makes you wonder how this season will go.” Tropical cyclones are among nature’s most powerful and destructive phenomena. If you live in an area prone to tropical cyclones, you need to be prepared. Even areas well away from the coastline can be threatened by dangerous flooding, destructive winds and tornadoes from these storms. The National Hurricane Center issues watches, warnings, forecasts, and analyses of hazardous tropical weather. Hurricane hazards: The primary hazards from hurricanes are storm surge flooding, inland flooding from heavy rains, destructive winds, tornadoes, and high surf and rip currents. While hurricanes pose the greatest threat to life and property, tropical storms and depressions can also be devastating. Flooding from heavy rains can cause extensive damage and loss of life. For example, Tropical Storm Allison produced more than 40 inches of rain in the Houston area in 2001, causing about $5 billion in damage and taking the lives of 41 people. Storm surge has the potential to cause the largest loss of life in hurricanes. Since 1963,

storm surge has caused nearly half of the deaths in the United States in tropical cyclones. Water, not wind, has accounted for nearly 90 percent of all tropical cyclone deaths in the U.S. during that time. Storm surge is dangerous because a mere six inches of fast-moving flood water can knock over an adult. It takes only two feet of rushing water to carry away most vehicles – including large pickup trucks and SUVs. Tornadoes are also common with landfalling tropical systems. In recorded history, almost every tropical storm and hurricane that has come onshore in the U.S. has produced a tornado. These tornadoes most often occur in thunderstorms embedded in the storm’s rainbands, well away from the center of the hurricane. Strong winds of a tropical cyclone can also cause dangerous waves that pose a significant hazard to mariners and coastal residents and visitors. When the waves break along the coast, they can produce deadly rip currents – even at large distances from the storm. In 2008, despite the fact that Hurricane Bertha was more than a 1,000 miles offshore, the storm resulted in rip currents that killed three people along the New Jersey coast and required 1,500 lifeguard rescues in Ocean City, Md., during a one week period. The time to prepare is now: What should you do to prepare for a hurricane? Get a plan. The most important step is to identify your hurricane risk. Do you live in an evacuation zone? If so, you need to plan on where you and your family would ride out the storm if you are told to evacuate.

Most people only need to evacuate a few miles from the coast to avoid the dangers of storm surge. Find a friend or relative that lives outside the storm surge evacuation zone and have a plan to ride out the storm with them. You should also establish a family communications plan in case you are not together when you need to evacuate. Once a person understands their risk for hurricane impacts, an appropriate disaster safety plan should be developed to help ensure an individual’s and a family’s safety. A disaster safety plan is a comprehensive plan that identifies all of the steps a family needs to take before, during and after a disaster to ensure maximum personal safety and property protection. For a step-by-step guide on creating a family disaster plan see Florida’s “Get a Plan” guide. Citizens should also visit their State Emergency Management Agency websites for family disaster plan templates that may be more suited to a local area. Coastal residents should go to their local emergency managers for evacuation zone information. This information is typically available online. A county-by-county list of evacuation zone resources is available at: http://flash.org/ hurricane-season/ evacuation-zones/ Evacuation_Zone_Identification_Survey.pdf. Vital resources to help you prepare include: Hurricanes.gov, which provides critical hurricane advisories and marine forecasts. Weather.gov for the latest forecasts for your part of the country. And Ready.gov for additional preparedness information.

Storm names for 2016 Alex Bonn ie Co lin Da nielle E arl Fio na Gas ton He rmin e Ian J ulia Karl L is a Matthew Nicole Otto Pa ula Richard S har y To bias Virginie Wa lter

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June 3, 2016

GOSPORT

Gold Star widow recognized at HT-8 Story, photo by Jay Cope NAS Whiting Field Public Affairs Officer

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46-year-old honor was finally bestowed May 18 to the widow of a Vietnam War helicopter pilot by members of the squadron with which he served. The Seawolves Association, a group of Vietnam-era helicopter pilots, presented the Gold Star to Carolyn Suhr, wife of the late Lt. j.g. Alfred Suhr, in the Helicopter Training Squadron Eight (HT-8) wardroom to honor the sacrifices of her and her family following his death in Vietnam. The Gold Star tradition originated during World War I when homes, businesses and schools hung white banners bordered in red with a blue star for each active service member and a gold star for each service member who passed away during the conflict. The tradition has continued through World War II, Korea and on through today, and has been formalized with the military presenting gold stars to the family members to pay tribute to their sacrifice and honor the fallen heroes. Bud Barnes, the Seawolves president, worked with the Commander Navy Region Southeast Gold Star Coordinator Rufus Bundrige to arrange for the presentation materials and coordinated the event to coincide with Carolyn’s trip to Pensacola to visit her daughters. He also asked for volunteers from the squadron to make the trip in honor of their shipmate’s memory. Former Navy Seawolf aviators Bill Barnes, Dick Catone, Richard Barr, John Mann, C. M. “Pete” Peterson and Mike Louy attended in addition to Barnes. After more than 45 years, Carolyn just appreciated that Suhr’s service was not forgotten. “It was thrilling that so many people cared enough to come out,” she said. “He loved flying and if he had to go, at least he

died doing what he loved. I miss him still, and I am so very thankful that people remember him.” The Seawolves, Helicopter Attack (Light) Squadron Three, is the most decorated squadron in naval aviation history, accumulating more than 120,000 sorties in support of the Vietnam War “Brown Water” Navy. The all-volunteer gunship squadron primarily provided close air support to riverine craft patroling the rivers of the Mekong Delta including Navy Special Warfare operations. The unit was also regularly called on to perform medical evacuations. The achievements came at a heavy cost though, with 44 members’ ultimate sacrifice memorialized on a bronze plaque at Patriot’s Point in Charleston, S.C. By the decommissioning of the unit in 1972, HAL-3 had earned Presidential Unit Citations for (Extraordinary Heroism), six Navy Unit Citations, two detachments received the Meritorious Unit Citations, the Vietnam Cross of Gallantry (MUC) Palm, the Vietnam Civil Action (Honor) with Palm, and several of the detachments received the Vietnam Presidential Unit Citation. Only a few of the members had met Suhr. Bud Barnes, though, arrived in theater with him but the two officers were sent to different detachments. Catone served in a collocated detachment at the time of the fatal mortar attack. However, all the attending Seawolves were familiar with the events surrounding Suhr’s loss. “I knew Al Suhr as we arrived in the squadron at Vung Tau the

Gold Star widow Carolyn Suhr, left, receives a flag in honor of her husband, Lt.j.g. Al Suhr, from members of the Seawolves Association. Suhr was killed in 1969, piloting a helicopter in combat in Vietnam.

same week in March 1969. We rode the same helicopter from Vung Tau to Dong Tam, where Al deplaned for Det-6. The only difference between a lot of us was two minutes or two inches,” Bud stated, emphasizing the dividing line between living and dying during the war. Suhr had only been with the squadron for two weeks when the Dong Tam Base, south of Saigon, where he was stationed, was attacked March 26, 1969. He had scrambled to his helicopter when the ammunition depot was struck with a mortar round. According to news reports, the attack blew up more than 500 tons of ammunition, and the resulting explosion damaged the aircraft and sent it crashing into the ground. A native of Mexico, Mo., and a graduate of the University of Missouri on a NROTC scholarship, Suhr was in naval cadet training in Pensacola when he first met Carolyn around Easter in 1966. They sang in the church choir together and were married Dec. 31, 1966 – just

three days after he earned his wings as a helicopter pilot. Carolyn gave birth to their twin daughters, Christine and Kimberly, less than a year before Suhr headed to Vietnam. Both daughters attended the ceremony as did one grandson, Robert, and one son-in-law, Freddy Powell. The event provided an opportunity for the family to meet other men like Suhr and to gain an understanding of the helicopter community. “It was very enlightening to hear so many different people talking about Al and the type of work that they all did (in Vietnam),” Carolyn said. “I felt like they (Kimberly and Christine) needed to speak to the people that knew him. I wanted them to know what his life was like, and I think they were very wowed.” HT-8 was selected as the site for the ceremony as all the Seawolves went through a portion of their helicopter training with the unit – although it was then located at Ellyson Field in Pensacola. Surrounded by squadron

members from HT-8, the family was welcomed by Capt. Mark Murray, Commodore, Training Air Wing Five, who discussed the importance of young, future pilots to understand the legacy they carry forward. “They (pilots) never know when they will be tested, but they will be. They have to rely on the training they learn here,” he stated. “It is therefore, important to remember our heritage and the people who came before. We can’t forget where we came from, so thank you for helping us to know one of our own.” As he prepared to present a flag, flown above the original UH-1B Seawolf Gunship atop the Pensacola Vietnam Memorial, and the pins on behalf of his squadron mates to Carolyn, retired Navy captain and former Training Air Wing Five commodore Dick Catone spoke about Suhr. “He was a hero. He was a patriot,” Catone stated. “That is the legacy he left behind. We just can’t thank you enough for sharing Al with us.”

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Over 20,000 American boys and girls lost their fathers in Vietnam.

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Each of these sons and daughters has a unique story to tell. They are bonded together in tragedy but also joined together in patriotism, honor and respect for the fathers they loved and lost. Their stories serve as powerful testimonies about the true cost of war.

Presented by

Naval Aviation Memorial Giant Screen Theater NAS Pensacola Please enter NAS Pensacola through the West Gate via Blue Angel Parkway.

Broadcast Premiere: 7pm Fathers Day wsre.org/fathers


June 3, 2016

PARTYLINE

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GOSPORT

June 6 expo to focus on technology The annual NAS Pensacola Tech Expo is scheduled for 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. June 6 at the Mustin Beach Club. The expo offers an opportunity for the organizations and units structured under the Naval Education Training Command and other tenant units to see the latest in emerging technologies, network with industry experts and share ideas and future goals. Exhibitors will include: Adobe, Dataminr, Krueger International (KI), LANDESK, LogRhythm, M2 Technology, MySQL, Netlocity, New Horizons Computer Learning Centers, Optiv (Fishnet+Accuvant), PacStar, Plug-In Storage Systems, TVAR Solutions and World Wide Technology, Inc. Admission is free and the expo is open to all personnel. For more information, go to www.federal events.com.

Military transition seminar offered

“Marketing Yourself for a Second Career,” a seminar for military members considering transitioning from service in the near future, is scheduled for 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. today, June 3, at the Naval Air Station Pensacola Fleet and Family Support Center, Bldg. 741. Spouses are welcome to attend. Retired Army Col. Terri Coles will be the speaker. Seminar topics include understanding you competition for jobs, developing a transition strategy, civilian employers’ perceptions of military service, resumes and LinkedIn development, networking and penetrating the hidden job market, preparing for and conducting a successful interview and negotiating a salary and benefit package. For more information, call Lara Sabanosh at 4524369.

Antarctic explorers scheduled to meet

Members of the Gulf Coast Group Chapter of the Old Antarctic Explorers Association (OAEA) will meet at noon tomorrow, June 4, at Rico Mexican restaurant, 830 North Navy Blvd. The guest speaker will be Burt Outlaw. With the assisted by OAEA member Grady Lea, he will discuss how to begin your family genealogy search and local genealogy library resources. All members, family, or interested parties who have been to Antarctica or who may have an interest in Antarctica are welcome. For more information, call 456-3556.

Historic Pensacola holding open house

The University of West Florida Historic Trust will present Historic Pensacola’s 26th annual open house from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. tomorrow, June 4. All venues and events are free and open to the public. Activities will include the opening of the Appleyard Storytelling Cottage, an exhibit featuring Pensacola storyteller John Appleyard, at 10 a.m. at the McMillan House, 213 East Zaragoza St. Guided tours of Old Christ Church, the Dorr House, the Lavalle House and the Lear/Rocheblave House will be offered every 30 minutes. Living history demonstrations interpreting life in Colonial Pensacola will be held throughout the day. The Hilton-Green Resource Room on the second floor of Voices of Pensacola, 117 East Government St., will also be open. Children activities will be offered at the Pensacola Children’s Museum. For more information, go to historicpensacola.org.

Jacksonian Guard ceremony planned

The inaugural Jacksonian Guard Colors Ceremony will be conducted tomorrow, June 4, in Plaza Ferdinand. A student only re-enactment group has been assembled to perform the ceremony in Plaza Ferdinand at 6 p.m. each Saturday through Sept. 3. The ceremony will features soldiers, fifers and drummers performing in period 1821 uniforms and the lowering of a replica 23-star flag. For more information, call 466-5220.

Relationship training program available The NAS Pensacola chaplain’s office is offering the Prevention and Relationship Enhancement Program (PREP) 8.0 training designed to teach couples communication skills and ground rules for handling conflict; it also promotes intimacy. Training sessions are scheduled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 10 and Aug. 5 at the J.B. McKamey Center, Bldg. 634, NAS Pensacola. The sessions are open to any active duty member and spouse or fiancée. Civilian DoD employees and retired military are also welcome. For more information, call 452-2093, or e-mail CREDO facilitator Tony Bradford at tony.bradford.ctr@navy.mil.

Florida A&M alumni plan banquet

The Pensacola Chapter of the Florida A&M University National Alumni Association is presenting a scholarship fundraising banquet at noon tomorrow, June 4, at St. John Divine Missionary Baptist Church, 620 East Jordan St. Tickets are available for

Partyline submissions

Fiesta parades include floats, boats The annual Fiesta of Five Flags continues this week. The 10-day festival commemorates the founding of Pensacola in 1559 by Spanish explorer Don Tristan de Luna and the five different governments — Spanish, French, British, Confederate and American — that have ruled the city. Floats will line up in downtown Pensacola at 7 p.m. today, June 3, for the Pen Air Grand Fiesta Parade. The Fiesta Boat Parade will set sail from the Pensacola Yacht Club at 1 p.m. tomorrow, June 4, for the trip to Pensacola Beach for a reenactment of the De Luna landing. The Fiesta event wraps up every year with a private, formal gala — the DeLuna Coronation Ball. For more information Fiesta events, go to www.fiestaoffiveflags.org. $35 and can be obtained by contacting Reginald Todd, by phone at 458-3480 or by e-mail at rltodd84@yahoo.com.

Case lot sale being held at commissary For those who want to stock up on deals, a case lot sale is scheduled from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. June 3, 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 4 and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. June 5 at the Pensacola Commissary, 5800 West Highway 98. Demonstrations and games are also planned. For more information, call 452-6880.

Artist to present digital workshop

The Pensacola Museum of Art will present a digital illustration workshop with artist Shelly Henseler from noon to 4 p.m. June 4. The workshop will enable attendees to take something that they have created on paper and transfer it to the computer to continue to enhance their design digitally. Workshop agenda includes transferring hand-drawn graphics onto a digital platform, beginner Adobe Photoshop tools and skills, photo-editing computer basics and an in-class project. The workshop is open to adults of all skill levels with an interest in design. Cost is $5 for museum members and $10 for nonmembers. Participants need to bring a laptop computer. Additional materials will be provided by museum. You can register and pre-pay online at www.pensacolamuseum.org. For more information about the museum, call 432-6247.

NEX announces bra fitting event

Proper fit is important with bras. The semi-annual bra fitting event is scheduled for 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. June 15 at the Navy Exchange Mall, 5600 Highway 98 West. Participants will receive a free gift with purchase. Walk-ins are welcome. For more information, call 453-5311 or go to www.mynavyexchange.com.

2016) as a full time student. Applications must be submitted no later than June 15, and can be downloaded at www.pmoaa.org. For more information or to request assistance in applying, contact retired Navy Cmdr. Vann Milheim by phone at 969-9715 or by e-mail at vann.milheim@att.net.

Navy Cup sailing races coming up

The Navy Yacht Club’s Navy Cup Competition is scheduled for June 11-12 on the waters of Bayou Grande and in Pensacola Bay. On-shore race activities will be held at the Navy Yacht Club facility at the Bayou Grande Marina on Naval Air Station Pensacola (NASP). Individual performance handicap racing formula (PHRF) sailboats will be competing June 11 and small one-design sailboats will be sailing June 12. Early registration check-in will be from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. June 10 with the skipper’s meeting at 6 p.m. Race day registration will 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. June 11 with the first race starting at noon. Entry forms can be completed online at www.navy pnsyc.org/racing.htm. Race day registration will be from 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. June 12 with a skipper’s briefing at 11 a.m. For more information, contact John Matthews, Navy Yacht Club commodore, by phone at 492-4802, 5161580 (e-mail: johnmatthews@cox.net). For race information, contact Barry Pokorney (barry.pokorney@gmail) or Jim Parsons (jimparsons@bellsouth.net) or go to www.navypnsyc.org.

Jazz musicians gather monthly to jam The Jazz Society of Pensacola presents a Jazz Jam at 6:30 p.m. the first Monday of each month at La Brisa Cafe in Gulf Breeze. The next gathering is scheduled for June 6. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. Performers include the house band, Joe Occhipinti on saxophone; Fred Domulot on drums, Steve Gilmore on bass and Burt Kimberl on keyboard. Admission for others is $10 for members and guests, $12 for non-members, $5 for students with ID and free for peforming musicians or military in uniform. For more information, call 433-8382 or go to jazz pensacola.com.

Reunion announced for USS Lexington

The annual reunion for the USS Lexington (CV 16) is scheduled for Sept 12-15 in Pigeon Forge, Tenn. All past ship’s company, air wings, Marines and their families are welcome. For more information, go to usslexington cv16.com or contact Bob Dimonte by e-mail at bobdimo@cox.net or by phone at 492-3483.

Free trolley service running at beach The Escambia County Area Transit (ECAT) system’s Beach Trolley service is free and will run through Labor Day weekend. Two trolleys allow riders to travel to 35 stops along the beach between Fort Pickens and the Portofino Resort. The free trolleys will run every 15 minutes from 4 p.m. to midnight Monday through Thursday and 11 a.m. to midnight Friday through Sunday . For more information, go to www.goecat.com or call 595-3228.

Dates announced for basketball camp Firecracker 5K scheduled for July 2

The 37th Chip Boes Championship Basketball Camp will feature three sessions at Malcolm Yonge Community Center, 925 East Jackson St. Sessions are scheduled for 9 a.m. to noon June 6-10, June 2024 and July 18-22. Cost is $85 per session. Multiple session and multiple camper discounts are available. For more information or to register, contact Chip Boes at 968-9299 or by e-mail at chipboes@gmail.com.

Humane Society planning Doggie Bowl Individuals, teams and sponsors are invited to participate in the Pensacola Humane Society’s annual Doggie Bowl scheduled for 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. June 26 at Cordova Lanes. Teams of four to six people are $20 per person with shoe rental and door prize tickets included. Corporate sponsorships are available. For more information or entry forms, go to www.pensacolahumane.org or call 466-3945.

PMOAA has scholarships available

The Pensacola Chapter of the Military Officers Association of America will be awarding scholarship grants to children, stepchildren, spouses or grandchildren of active-duty or retired military personnel (both officer and enlisted). To be eligible, applicants must be a resident, dependent of a resident or grandchild of a resident of Escambia or Santa Rosa counties in Florida or Baldwin County in Alabama, and must have completed a minimum of one year at a college/university, with at least a 3.2 grade point average (GPA) if an undergraduate or 3.5 GPA if a graduate student, for the two preceding semesters (fall of 2015 and spring of

The annual Ronald McDonald House Charities of Northwest Florida Firecracker 5K run, walk and wheelchair race is scheduled to start at 7:30 a.m. July 2 at Seville Quarter. At the conclusion of the 5K, children are invited to participate in the free “Rock Our Socks” fun run. Registration for the 5K is $27 until June 29 and late registration is $32. Packet pick-up will be noon to 6 p.m. June 30 at the Ronald McDonald House and noon to 6 p.m. July 1 at Apple Annie’s inside Seville Quarter. Late packet pick-up and registration will be from 6 a.m. to 7:25 a.m. July 2 at Seville Quarter. Only participants registered for the 5K by midnight on June 16 are guaranteed a T-shirt in their size. You can register online until midnight June 29. For more information, go to www.rmhcnwfl.org or call 477-2273.

Stage workshop auditions announced Pensacola State College has announced auditions for the 2016 Summer High School Onstage Workshop (SHOW) production of the classic Gershwin musical comedy “Crazy for You.” SHOW is open to area high school students who will be in grades 9-12 in the next year, as well as recent graduates. Auditions begin at 8 a.m. June 6-7 at the Ashmore Fine Arts Auditorium, Bldg. 8. Auditions include singing and dancing. Students should bring sheet music or accompanying music and wear comfortable clothing and shoes – no sandals, flip-flops, heels, etc. Auditions are for casting roles but everyone who joins SHOW will participate. There is no tuition cost. Students may receive college credit hours. “Crazy for You” will be on stage July 22-24 and July 29-31 at the Ashmore Fine Arts Auditorium. For more information, call Theater Director Rodney Whatley at 484-1807.

You can submit information for possible publication in Partyline by sending an e-mail to Janet.Thomas.ctr@navy.mil. Submissions must include the organization’s name and details about events including times, dates, locations and any costs involved. Contact information also is required. All submissions are subject to editing to comply with established standards. Items should be submitted at least one week in advance. The deadline is noon Friday for the next week’s publication.


June 3, 2016

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SECTION

LIFE

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June 3, 2016

CNATT Marine recognized by Marine Corps Aviation Associaton; See page B2 Spotlight

GOSPORT

Japan’s sword shattered at

By Mike O’Connor Gosport Associate Editor

Veterans, cryptographers and historians will take time this week to recall World War II’s Battle of Midway, considered to be the turning point in the battle for the Pacific. Midway. A catastrophic defeat for Japan, and a desperately needed victory for America, the Battle of Midway destroyed the illusion of Japanese invincibility and set the stage for Japan’s inevitable defeat. More than a halfway point, it was the turning point for World War II in the Pacific. A string of quick victories had led to overconfidence in the Japanese admiralty, a condition they later termed “victory disease.” Its forces had run up success after success in the Pacific after the Dec. 7 attack on United States forces at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. The British battleship Prince of Wales and cruiser Repulse had been sunk on Dec. 10. Guam and Wake Island were seized, the Philippines invaded. Hong Kong and Singapore, too, fell into Japanese hands. By June 1942, Japan was in uncontested possession of the whole of Southeast Asia. Japanese Naval General Staff strategic planner Fleet Adm. Isoroku Yamamoto had sought to strike a decisive blow that would knock America out

of the Pacific once and for all. By attacking Midway Island, an atoll actually consisting of two islands, Sand and Eastern Island – and also in the Aleutian Islands off Alaska – he hoped to draw the American carrier forces into a trap. If Japanese fleet forces succeeded in destroying the U.S. Navy’s carrier forces, which were untouched by the attack at Pearl Harbor, Yamamoto reasoned Japan would have a free hand in the Pacific for years. Yamamoto was a wellknown gambler, but in his bid to take Midway he could not have known the deck was stacked against him. American cryptologic efforts, under the direction of Cmdr. Joseph Rochefort at Pearl Harbor’s Station Hypo, had made significant progress against the Japanese naval code then in use, called JN-25. The Navy’s radio intelligence organization was able to decipher an increasing percentage of enemy radio traffic and was beginning to offer clues to America’s military planners about Japan’s intentions.

In the months leading up to the Midway battle, the Station Hypo team was putting together a puzzle based on the information they knew. A large-scale Japanese naval offensive was in the making against a target they called “AF” but the focus of the attack was unclear. The staff of Adm. Chester Nimitz, commander of the U.S. fleet in the Pacific, needed to be sure. Rochefort’s team, along with Capt. Edwin Layton, Nimitz’s fleet intelligence officer, had a clue that “AF” might be Midway, so a ruse was developed. The radio operator at Midway was instructed to broadcast in the clear a message that the installation’s fresh water distillation plant had broken down and that fresh water was needed at once. Soon after, monitored Japanese radio traffic passed along a message, “AF is short of water.” With the enemy intentions in hand, Nimitz drew up his own plan of attack. Three American aircraft carriers, USS Enterprise (CV 6), USS Yorktown (CV 5) and USS Hornet (CV 8) faced four large

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A Dauntless SBD dive bomber lands onboard USS Yorktown (CV 5) after attacking Japanese carrier Kaga, June 4, 1942. Note battle damage to tail. Naval History and Heritage Command photo

Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) carriers – Akagi, Kaga, Hiryu and Soryu at Midway. Accompanying the IJN carriers were no less than seven Japanese battleships; the Americans had none at Midway. And supporting the powerful IJN fleet were about 150 supporting ships of various kinds; the United States had about 50. The date of the intended offensive was known – June 3. Though American naval forces were far less numerous than the opposing force, Nimitz was able to position his strength to his best advantage. Patrols made contact and on June 4, in the space of a few history-changing minutes, three Japanese carriers were hit and left ablaze by American dive bombers.

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Later that day the fourth Japanese carrier was located, hit and later sunk. Though Yorktown was lost – bombed, then torpedoed and sunk by a Japanese submarine – the damage to the Japanese fleet was thorough. Four of the six Japanese carriers which had attacked Pearl Harbor were lost, along with a cruiser, 256 aircraft and 3,057 personnel. American losses in addition to Yorktown were one destroyer, 145 aircraft and 307 personnel. The battle was won due to a combination of factors in which courage, skill, fortune and timing all played a part, but the value of the naval intelligence which indicated Japanese intentions is undeniable. The victory was a

needed shot in the arm to an anxious America at war. Before the Battle of Midway, Japanese military power in the Pacific did nothing but advance. After Midway, they did nothing but retreat. In the words of author and historian Walter Lord, the Americans at Midway “had no right to win. Yet they did, and in doing so they changed the course of the war. More than that, they entered the name ‘Midway’ into that small list that inspires men by example – like Marathon, the Armada, the Marne. Even against the greatest of odds, there’s something in the human spirit – a magic blend of skill, faith and valor – that can lift men from certain defeat to incredible victory.”

Jokes & Groaners Points to ponder I planted some bird seed. A bird came up. Now I don’t know what to feed it. I had amnesia once ... or twice. I can’t remember. All I ask is a chance to prove that money can’t make me happy. What’s a “free” gift? Aren’t all gifts free? They told me I was gullible ... and I believed them. Teach a child to be polite and courteous in the home and, when he grows up, he’ll never be able to merge his car onto the freeway. Experience is the thing you have left when everything else is gone. My weight is perfect for my height ... which varies. I used to be indecisive. Now I’m not sure. How can there be self-help “groups?” Is it me, or do buffalo wings taste just like chicken?


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SPOTLIGHT

June 3, 2016

CNATT Marine recognized by Marine Corps Aviation Association From Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Public Affairs

A

Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training (CNATT) Marine was recognized by the Marine Corps Aviation Association (MCAA) during an awards ceremony May 20 in New Bern, N.C. CNATT Technical Support Directorate F35 Integrated Product Team Lead, Marine Corps Staff Sgt. Scott Colagrossi II received the Michael A. Hough Acquisition Award. Marine Corps Commandant Gen. Robert Neller presented the award at the annual MCAA awards banquet. An Escalon, Calif., native, Colagrossi said receiving the award showcases the teamwork he feels underscores the sense of community aviation maintainers employ. “The Marines and Sailors at CNATT are always working together to improve our methods of ensuring we’re deliv-

ering the right training at the right time to the right Sailors and Marines,” he said. “The CNATT family excels at training, and awards such as this are the result of a team effort, and I couldn’t be prouder of my command.” Although a fixed wing aircraft mechanic (6217 Military Occupation Specialty), Colagrossi currently serves as an integral part of CNATT’s F-35 Joint Strike Fighter program. He played a key factor in the acquisition of a $40 million contract for the F-35 school house trainers at Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATT) Detachment

Veranda

Marine Staff Sgt. Scott Colagrossi, left, is the recipient of the Marine Corps Aviation Association’s Michael A. Hough Acquisition Award. Photo from http://www.flymcaa.org

Eglin aboard Eglin Air Force Base. also Colagrossi played a pivotal role in the acquisition of four F135 engines, an effort which significantly enhanced the training throughput of F-35 power plant mechanics. The Michael A. Hough Acquisition Award was established in honor of Lt. Gen.

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Mike Hough, who served as the Deputy Commandant for Aviation and as the director of the Joint Strike Fighter Program. The award is presented by the MCAA to recognize excellence and superior achievement by a Marine assigned to the acquisition field. The MCAA is a nonprofit organization that

recognizes professional excellence in Marine aviation through 29 aviation awards educating the public on Marine Corps aviation history and heritage. CNATT Detachment Eglin develops, delivers and supports aviation technical training necessary to sustain the fifth generation F-35 Joint Strike Fighters and is a

part of CNATT. CNATT is the technical training agent for the Naval Aviation Enterprise (NAE), an organization designed to advance and sustain naval aviation warfighting capabilities at an affordable cost, and is the largest training center under the Naval Education and Training Command.

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Photo © David Schrichte


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Film honors children who lost dads in Vietnam Story, photo from WSRE

Some 20,000 American boys and girls lost their fathers during the Vietnam War. In a new documentary film produced by WSRE, several of these Gold Star children, now adult men and women, share their stories which serve as powerful testimonies about the true cost of war. WSRE will premiere “They Were Our Fathers” with a special Father’s Day broadcast at 7 p.m. June 19. The Gold Star designation is given to family members who have lost loved ones in United States military service during wartime. Every five years on

Father’s Day, members of Sons and Daughters in Touch – a group formed in 1990 to locate, unite and support Gold Star children who lost their fathers serving in the Vietnam War – gather at the nation’s capital to honor their parents, reflect on their common grief and support one another. Under the direction of executive producer Jill Hubbs, a WSRE production crew traveled to Washington, D.C., last June to document the gathering and record personal accounts. The film is narrated in first person by Hubbs, whose father was reported as missing in action during his second

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tour of duty in Vietnam on March 17, 1968. U.S. Navy Cmdr. Donald Richard Hubbs was commanding officer of the VS-23 Black Cats and was stationed aboard the USS Yorktown (CVS 10) in the Gulf of Tonkin when his S-2E Tracker reconnaissance aircraft disappeared off the North Vietnam coast. “Each of these sons and daughters has a unique story to tell. We are bonded together by tragedy, but also joined together in patriotism, honor and respect for the fathers we loved and lost,” Hubbs said. For more information about Cmdr. Donald Richard Hubbs says goodbye to his daughter, Jill “They Were Our Fathers,” go Hubbs, and his wife, Bereth. He was reported missing in action in 1968. Jill Hubbs is executive producer of a WSRE documentary film. to wsre.org/fathers.


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June 3, 2016

Morale, Welfare and Recreation

A crowd gathers in front of the stage at the Community Maritime Park Hunter Amphitheater for a Blues Angel Music Blues on the Bay summer concert.

Story, photo from the City of Pensacola Parks and Recreation Department

Summer events scheduled at the Vince J. Whibbs Sr. Community Maritime Park include a series of movies and concerts. The Hill-Kelly Drive-In Movie series returns June 3. You can bring blankets, chairs and spread out on the lawn or your tailgate to watch the movie underneath the stars. All movies are family friendly and suitable for all ages. All shows begin at 8:15 p.m. and parking will begin at 6 p.m. Concessions are available from food trucks, but picnic baskets are welcome. No pets, or glass containers are allowed. The City of Pensacola Parks and Recreation Department,

Community Maritime Park Associates, and Blues Angel Music are presenting the 2016 Blues Angel Music Blues on the Bay summer concert series. Concerts are held on select Sunday evenings at the Community Maritime Park Hunter Amphitheater when the Blue Wahoos are away. The series has become a popular event for local residents and visitors to spend the final hours of their weekend enjoying music with family and friends. Concerts begin at 6 p.m. and admission is free. Here is a list of the performances schedule for the rest of the season: • June 5, Still Standing: A Tribute to Elton John. • June 26, Robert Wayne. • July 17, Crowned Jewelz.

• Aug. 7, Boukou Groove. • Aug. 21, Reunion Band. • Sept. 4, Not Quite Fab: A Tribute to the Beatles. Blues Angel Music plans to give away numerous prizes to attendees at each performance and there will be a grand prize raffle at the end of the series to raise funds for music education through the Blues Angel Music Foundation. The winner of the raffle will be announced Sept. 4 at the final concert. Pack your coolers and bring your lawn chairs or blankets. Concerts are family friendly and concessions are available. Pets and glass containers are prohibited at the concerts. For more information about events at the Community Maritime Park, call 436-5670 or go to www.PensacolaCommunityMaritimePark.com.

At the movies

TheNASPMorale,WelfareandRecreation (MWR)departmenthasanumberofupcomingeventsandactivities.Formoreinformation, call452-3806,ext.3100,orgototheMWR websiteatwww.navymwrpensacola.com. • Swimming lessons: Pool and beaches are open for the summer and registration is open for swimming lessons. Several classes are available throughout the summer at Mustin and Corry Station pools. Class registration is filled on a • Youth Sports pro first come, first camp: Regisfootball serve basis. For is open for a free tration more information, contact the MWR pro football camp with Aquatics Depart- kicker Graham Gano ment at 452-9429. scheduled for July 19• Movies by the 20 at NASP Barrancas Bay: Starting June Ball Field. You can find 4 with “Return of registration forms under the Jedi,” the Blue Youth Sports on MWR Angel Recreation webpage (www.navy Park will present mwrpensacola.com/). movies at dark, on You should return the first and third the registration forms Saturday of each to NASP or Corry Stamonth through Au- tion youth centers, or completed gust. In case of e-mail registration forms to rain movies will be y.center@mchsi.com. cancelled. For information, go to https://www.facebook.com/mwrpensacola. • Youth Racquet Round-Up: June 8 at A.C. Read Tennis Courts at NASP (9 a.m. check in, 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. instruction). For military, retiree and DoD dependents ages 4 to 12. Participants should bring a water bottle marked with their name and a properly sized racquet. Some racquets will be available. Participants should wear tennis shoes with proper soles, a hat and sunscreen. For more information, contact, Taysha Blessington at tblessington@pensacolasports.org. • Summer Day Camps: Weekly camps, continue through Aug. 9. From 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. at NASP Youth Center; from 5 a.m. to 7 p.m. at NASP Corry Station School Age Care. For ages 5 (kindergarten) to 12. Preregister at www.militarychildcare.com. For information, call 452-2417 or 453-6310. • Navy Youth Sports Track Team: Registration open through June 3 at NASP Youth Center, Bldg. 3690. Training season is June 6 to July 29. Team events will be held at NASP Corry Station track. Open to dependents ages 7-18 (high school) of active-duty or retired military, DoD employees, contractors and reservists. For information, call 4523810 or 452-2417. • Navy Youth Sports Tennis Lessons: Registration open through June 3 at NASP Youth Center, Bldg. 3690. Training season is June 14 to Aug. 4. Lesson will be at A.C. Read Tennis Courts at NASP. Open to dependents ages 5-18 (high school) of activeduty or retired military, DoD employees, contractors and reservists. For information, call 452-3810 or 452-2417.

FRIDAY

“Captain America: Civil War” (3D), PG-13, 5 p.m.; “Keanu,” R, 8 p.m.; “Ratchet and Clank” (2D), PG, 5:30 p.m.; “Captain America: Civil War” (2D), PG-13, 7:30 p.m.

SATURDAY

“The Jungle Book” (3D), PG, 12:30 p.m.; “Captain America: Civil War” (3D), PG-13, 3 p.m.; “Ratchet and Clank” (3D), PG, 6 p.m.; “Criminal,” R, 8 p.m.; “Ratchet and Clank” (2D), PG, noon; “The Jungle Book” (2D), PG, 2 p.m.; “Captain America: Civil War” (2D), PG-13, 4:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.

SUNDAY

“Captain America: Civil War” (3D), PG-13, noon; “Ratchet and Clank” (3D), PG, 3 p.m.; “Mother’s Day,” PG-13, 5 p.m.; “Keanu,” R, 7:30 p.m.; “Ratchet and Clank” (2D), PG, 1 p.m.; “Captain America: Civil War” (3D), PG-13, 3:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m.

MONDAY,

“Ratchet and Clank” (3D), PG, 5 p.m.; Captain America: Civil War” (3D), PG-13, 7 p.m.; “Mother’s Day,” PG-13, 5:10 p.m.; “Criminal,” R, 7:30 p.m.

Liberty activities

TUESDAY

“Ratchet and Clank” (2D), PG, 5 p.m.; “Captain America: Civil War” (2D), PG-13, 7 p.m.; “The Huntsman: Winter War,” PG-13, 5:10 p.m.; “Keanu,” R, 7:30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY

Free admission to all movies: “Kung Fu Panda 3,” PG, 1 p.m. and 4 p.m.; “Elvis and Nixon,” R, 7 p.m.; “The Jungle Book” (2D), PG, noon and 3 p.m.; “Criminal,” R, 6 p.m.

THURSDAY

“Ratchet and Clank” (3D), PG, 5 p.m.; “Captain America: Civil War” (3D), PG-13, 7 p.m.; “Mother’s Day,” PG-13, 5:10 p.m.; “The Huntsman: Winter War,” PG-13, 7:30 p.m.

Liberty program events target young, unaccompanied active-duty military. New hours are 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. Friday, 11 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. Saturday and 11 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Sunday. Regular events are scheduled at the main Liberty Center in the Portside Entertainment Complex. You must sign up in advance for off-base trips. For more information, call 452-2372 or go to http://naspensacolamwr.com/singsail/liberty.htm.

COST Regular: $3 adults, $1.50 children ages 6-11, free for 5 and younger 3D shows: $5 adults, $3 children ages 6-11, free for 5 and younger

Details: 452-3522 or www.naspensacola-mwr.com

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June 3, 2016

COMMAND LINES

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GOSPORT SAPR

If you are a victim of sexual assault, it is not your fault. Help for victims of sexual assault in the DoD community is a call, click or text away: The SafeHelpline provides live, one-on-one crisis support and information by trained staff. Call: (877) 995-5247; click: www.SafeHelpline.org; or text: 55-247, CONUS; (202) 470-5546, OCONUS (may be extra charges for OCONUS). The Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) Program provides prevention, intervention and a 24/7/365 response to non-intimate partner adult victims of sexual assault. Active-duty and adult family member sexual assault victims have a choice of reporting options, unrestricted and restricted. Unrestricted reporting allows victim to have an advocate, seek medical care, counseling, legal services, safety interventions and/or transfer, etc. To access an unrestricted report, the victim may report to his/her chain-ofcommand, security/law enforcement, NCIS, SAPR VA, SARC, or others. NCIS shall be notified by the CO and/or the VA/SARC in unrestricted cases to begin investigation. Investigation results are provided to the offender’s CO for appropriate action/disposition. Restricted reporting allows a victim to have a confidential report, which does not trigger command or law enforcement notification and the victim may have a SAPR VA and seek medical care and/or counseling. To access restricted reporting, the victim may disclose his/her sexual assault only to the SARC, a current SAPR VA, a health care professional and/or a chaplain. To contact the NASP 24/7 Victim Advocate, call 449-9231/2. For the Civilian Victim Advocate, call 293-4561. To contact the duty SARC, call the SARC cell at 554-5606.

Fleet and Family Support Center

Worship schedule NAS Pensacola Protestant • Worship service, 10:15 a.m. Sunday, Naval Aviation Memorial Chapel, Bldg. 1982. • Chapel choir, 12:30 p.m. Sunday, All Faiths Chapel. • Contemporary service, 6 p.m. Sunday, All Faiths Chapel. • Training Air Wing Six Bible Study, 11:15 a.m. Tuesday, Griffith Hall student lounge. • Bible study, 6:30 p.m. Tuesday and 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, J.B. McKamey Center. Roman Catholic • Sunday Mass, 8:30 a.m. Sunday, Naval Aviation Memorial Chapel, Bldg. 1982. • Daily Mass, 11:30 a.m. Monday, Wednesday and Friday in the Our Lady of Loreto Chapel. • Confessions: 30 minutes before services. Latter Day Saints • Service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday, All Faiths Chapel. • Meeting: 6 p.m. Monday and 6 p.m. Thursday, J.B. McKamey Center. For information, call 452-2341. NASP Corry Station Protestant • Adult Bible study, 9 a.m. Sunday, fellowship hall vice conference room. • Chapel choir, 9 a.m. Sunday, choir room vice sanctuary. • Worship service, 10 a.m. Sunday. • Fellowship, 11:30 a.m. Sunday.

To Advertise in the Gosport Contact Becky Hildebrand at 850.433.1166 ext 31

• Contemporary worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, followed by fellowship at 7:30 p.m. • Bible study and dinner, 5:30 p.m. Thursday, fellowship hall. Latter Day Saints • Service, 7 p.m. Wednesday. Roman Catholic • Mass, noon Sunday and 11:30 a.m. Tuesday and Thursday. For information, call 452-6376. NAS Whiting Field Chapel Roman Catholic • Mass, 11 a.m. Friday. Protestant • Bible study, 11:30 a.m. Tuesday. • Weekly chapel service, 11:30 a.m. Thursday. For information, call 623-7212. More services Jewish • B’nai Israel Synagogue, 1829 North Ninth Ave., services 7 p.m. Friday and 9:30 a.m. Saturday. For information, call 433-7311. • Temple Beth El, 800 North Palafox St., services 7 p.m. Friday (6 p.m. first Friday of each month). For information, call 438-3321 or go to http://templebethelof pensacola.org. Seventh-day Adventist • Seventh-day Adventist Church, 1080 North Blue Angel Parkway, Bible studies at 9:30 a.m. and services at 11 a.m. Saturday. For information, call 4533442.

The NASP Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC), 151 Ellyson Ave., Bldg. 625, is offering the following: • Emergency Preparedness: 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. today, June 3, and June 24. Each type of disaster requires different measures to keep you, your family and your pets safe. The best thing you can do is to be prepared. For information or to register for the workshop, call 452-5609. • Healing the Angry Brain: Sessions begin at 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. June 7 and continue for six weeks. Program presented by Mario Campa, clinical counselor, and Susan Rivazfar, family advocacy program case manager. Pre-registration preferred; call 452-5990. • U.S. Department of Veteran’s Affairs e-benefits workshop: 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. June 15. A resource guide to all online veteran’s benefits. Open to all military veterans and military family members.

To register or for more information, call 452-5609. • Couples Communication Workshop: 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. June 15 and June 22. Two-session workshop will teach skills to increase chance of your relationship being successful. Registration required. For more information, call 452-5609. • Parenting 6- to 12-yearolds: 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. June 6, June 13, June 20 and June 27 (six sessions). For more information or to register, call 452-5990 or 452-5609. • Sun and Splash Playgroup: 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. June 23, Lighthouse Terrace. For more information, call 452-5609. • AmVets ... Understanding Your VA Benefits: 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. June 30. The veterans service organization, AMVETS (or American Veterans), sponsors numerous programs that offer help to veterans and their families. To register or for more information, call 452-5609.

Community Outreach If you are interested in participating in some volunteer activities, contact the NASP Community Outreach office. The Community Outreach office also keeps track of volun-

teer hours. You need to report any hours of volunteer work to receive due recognition. For more information, call 452-2532 or e-mail nasp_ comm_outreach@Navy.mil.


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Ads placed by the Military are free To place an ad go online at www.gosportpensacola.com or call 433-1166 ext.29

MARKETPLACE Publication date every Friday except Christmas and New Years Deadline to place an ad is noon Monday, the week of the publication. Place your ad online at www.gosportpensacola. com Place your ad by phone at 850-433-1166 ext. 29 Mon - Fri 8:30am to 5:00pm

motor • merchandise • employment • real estate • and more! Articles for Sale

Articles for Sale

Auto

Real Estate

GE gas stove, microwave dishwasher, side by side fridge, white. $500. 850-492Pilot’s helmet. Jet 9811. pilot with oxygen mask. Many rare Naval Aviation prints, patches included framed on helmet. $200. Vietnam. Enterprise on Yankee 454-9486. Stadium 34x44. Man cave items. USS DeHaven esEnough authentic corting USS Cormarine pilot gear al Sea @Tonkin to make perfect Gulf 39x31. Artmannequin for ist R.G. Smith photos: man cave. $300 see for all. 497-1167. p e n s a c o l a . c r a i g s l i s t . o rg / Craftsman lawn- art/5542437987. mower, 22”, html. large rear wheels in back and bag- Hot tub seats 850-455ger. $110. 944- five. 2966. 5763

Samsung UN60JS7000 SUHD Smart TV. Purchased new in November 2015. Includes a 3 year warranty. Asking $775. Please call 251-424-7302.

2014 Ford Escape. Excellent condition, new warranty. Call Patty or George 850-712-0987, or 334-782-9572.

FSBO: brick home 1700 sqft. Split bedroom. Fireplace. All new floors, all new kitchen. On 1 acre land. Cantonment. Call anytime: Mike @850-491-6567, Tess @850-5294899.

Garage Sales

Articles for Sale

Estate sale: 1934 Larspur circle Pensacola, FL. 32534. June 2-4. 8am – 6pm. Everything goes. 850-776-9522.

on 1911 Colt frame. Shoots like magic. $350. 417-1694.

Yard sale: June 4. 7-10 am. 5401 Lillian Hwy. “I Love Lucy” Memorabilia. Bedding, jewelry, dishes, toys, books, shoes and more. Estate sale: 6/11 and 6/12. 8 am to 5 pm. 7832 Montego Drive, 32526. All must go. Announcements Announcements

Total Gym. Like new, comes with many accessories. $125. 850-7765158. White Kohler Deerfield sink. Double sink, drop in. Porcelain over cast iron. Like new, no scratches or dents, comes in replacement packaging. $225 OBO. 850-776-5158.

6 cuft. wheelbar- Men’s clothes, Auto Auto row, $35. 944- size 3X. 850-455‘90 Corvette. 2966. 5763 Good condiNavy officer’s Small boat and tion, 117k, masword. Beauti- large bird cage. roon, Glasstop, Bra, Cold AC, fully etched. 850-455-2966. 6spd, Kenwood Brass fittings with 24-carat Cobia aluminum CD, Avg NADA gold plating. stand. 75.75” x $12,600. Asking Scabbard, cloth 93.5”. $500. 850- $9500. 453-4769. bag, leather carry 221-4399. Articles for for Sale Sale case, sword belt. 2004 Nissan AltiArticles $250. 850-492- 18 ft. Lung alu- ma. 50,000 miles. minum boat. Extra clean. AskPistol. Colt. 6968. $1600. 850-221- ing $6250. 850Semi-automatic. 261-0305. 4399. 22 cal. New. Built I have 2 Cemetery Plots 4-sale @ Memory Park Cemetery in Milton Fl. I will trade something of equal value or cash. Please call phone 850-6264710 For more information.

ALL CLASSIFIED ADS PLACED BY MILITARY ARE

FREE

2003 Buick LeSabre, 85K miles. Very good condition, white with gray interior. $3,400. Call 850- Home for sale: Brick 4BR/2BA 501-0433. split plan home. Motorcycles Located at 6204 Motorcycles Chickadee Pass, 2007 883 Harley 32503. $216,000 Zillow. Sportster. Dia- on mond ice. Under + 1 ( 8 1 3 ) 5 6 3 4K miles. No 6131. scratches. Harley windshield, Har- Lots Lots ley saddlebags, plus other extras. 2 side x side $4,000. 850-375- really nice approved lots. Gulf 3514. access canal included. Boating/ ForReal SaleEstate Fishing. ID Newly renovated MLS 2200sf 4BR/3BA C7222850. Call home. Hardwood 860-567-4604. floors!aWasher/ dryer included. got something to Close to military sell? bases, quiet neigh- call 850.433.1166 borhood.a$1200/ ext. 29 month. Available for more info June 1. Kevin or Savannah 850-2911653, norrisk73@ yahoo.com.

Real Estate

TOO MUCH STUFF? HERE’S THE BEST AND CHEAPEST WAY TO CLEAR OUT THE GARAGE. LIST YOUR STUFF IN A GOSPORT CLASSIFIED. RATES ARE $9 FOR THE FIRST TEN WORDS AND FIFTY CENTS FOR EACH ADDITIONAL WORD. OVER 25,000 PEOPLE SEE THE GOSPORT EVERY WEEK. GO ONLINE TO GOSPORTPENSACOLA.COM OR CALL 433-1166 EXT. 29 TO PLACE YOUR AD TODAY!


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Gosport - June 03, 2016  

Weekly newspaper for Naval Air Station Pensacola