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EVERY WIN IS A JOURNEY

A tree’s rings are a map of its life. As they accumulate with each passing year, varying in thickness and colour and forming according to experience, the pattern of rings becomes individual to every tree. They are a unique imprint of a lifetime’s journey. This year’s EE British Academy Film Awards cover design draws influence from the natural world to relate to the journeys in our lives, the paths to success which are unique and filled with both challenges and achievements. It is a reminder that every win is a journey.

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45 SHADES FULL COV ERAGE

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CONTENTS

WELCOMES

8 HRH The Duke of Cambridge, KG, President of the Academy 9 Amanda Berry obe , Chief Executive of the Academy / Dame Pippa Harris dbe , Chair of the Academy 11 Marc Allera, CEO of EE THE NOMINATIONS

15 The Nominations in Full 42 Juries & Chapters 44 Shortlists BEST FILM FEATURES

47 1917 Words by Ian Haydn Smith 51 The Irishman Words by Ella Kemp 55 Joker Words by Rob Carnevale 59 Once Upon a Time... in Hollywood Words by Kate Stables 63 Parasite Words by Tim Robey

SPECIAL AWARDS

66 The Fellowship

With a credits list that boasts such huge worldwide hits as E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, Gremlins, The Goonies, The Color Purple, The Sixth Sense, Jurassic Park, Seabiscuit, Lincoln and, most recently, steering the ship of the Star Wars saga, there are few people who have demonstrated such a keen eye for creative, critical and financial achievement as inspirational producer Kathleen Kennedy. Words by Clarisse Loughrey 76  Outstanding British

Contribution to Cinema As one of the leading actors in performance-capture, Andy Serkis has been integral to the development of this remarkable digital technology, which allows filmmakers to bring to life amazing characters that would otherwise have been almost impossible to accurately recreate onscreen. In 2017, he began adding directorial duties to his extensive acting and producing repertoire. Words by Neil Smith

FEATURES

82 The Journey

Words by Toby Weidmann

88 BFI NETWORK x

BAFTA Crew Words by Toby Weidmann 90 For The Love of Film

Competition Words by Toby Weidmann 97 The Art of Performance:

A Photographic Essay Portraits by Matt Holyoak 115 In Memoriam 123 125 127 129 130

Officers of the Academy Partners of the Academy Film Awards Partners  Film Awards Gift Providers Acknowledgements & Credits

7


HRH WELCOME

HRH THE DUKE OF CAMBRIDGE, KG PRESIDENT OF THE ACADEMY


WELCOME TO THE EE BRITISH ACA DEMY FIL M AWA RDS WELCOM E TO TH E EE BRITISH Academy Film Awards, a celebration of the very best work of the past year. Our congratulations to all the incredible films and individuals nominated this evening.

BAFTA has been recognising and rewarding new talent through our Awards since the 1950s, and as this year’s nominations and shortlists demonstrate, there are many extraordinary new voices out there, telling original, wide-ranging and exciting stories.  AMANDA BERRY

OBE

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OF THE ACADEMY

However, this year, we are acutely aware of the lack of diversity in some of the key categories and we have promised a full and thorough review of the entire awards process that will commence immediately. It is our firm ambition to see a more inclusive industry, one which accurately reflects the society in which we live. And until the time that it does, we will redouble our efforts in nurturing and advocating new and emerging talent through our Awards and year-round activities, allowing their unique voices to be heard. Initiatives such as Breakthrough, scholarships, mentoring schemes and Elevate – now in its third year, supporting actors from underrepresented groups – are starting to break down the barriers to a truly diverse industry. 

DA ME PIPPA H A RRIS DBE CHAIR OF THE ACADEMY

Sustainability is another vital concern of our times and BAFTA is embracing and implementing multiple positive changes to reduce our impact across our Awards and our goal is for them to be carbon neutral. Just a few examples include sourcing a fully recyclable red carpet; branding produced from reclaimed or recyclable materials; and we are serving sustainably sourced produce. Where we are not able to make sustainable choices, we are offsetting them by planting trees in Scotland. We ask you to do the same. We would like to take this opportunity to say thank you to Amanda Nevill as she steps down as chief executive of the BFI. She and the BFI have been a truly great partner to BAFTA. Finally, we must mention BAFTA 195. The total redevelopment of our London HQ is well and truly underway. Once completed, its capacity will be doubled, enabling us to dramatically increase the year-round work we do to support the next generation of talent. We thank all those who have supported the fundraising campaign to date. Please enjoy tonight and congratulations once again to all of this year’s nominees.

FOLLOW US #    E E B A F T A S  / B A F T A  @ B A F T A  B A F T A BA F TA .ORG

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CELEBRATING 15 YEARS OF THE EE RISING STAR AWARD Proudly supporting the future of film


WELCOME FROM OUR SPONSOR WELCOM E TO TH E EE BRITISH Academy Film Awards, a celebration of another beautiful year in the neighbourhood of British and global filmmaking.

MARK ALLERA CEO, EE

The past 12 months have produced some of the most varied and interesting contenders I’ve seen since our partnership with BAFTA began more than 20 years ago, with 2020 marking 15 years sponsoring these particular Awards respectively. From the story of a beloved children’s presenter that celebrates the virtue of patience and the honest expression of feelings, to the divisive reimagining of a classic comic villain via the adventures of a boy whose make-believe friend happens to be Hitler. This year, perhaps more than any other, has demonstrated the unlimited bounds of creativity and imagination. With new technologies like 5G, it’s easier than ever to enjoy that creativity and stream movies on whatever device you want – the next best thing to seeing them on the big screen – with a faster, more reliable connection that means you can enjoy immersive experiences even in the busiest places. We’re proud to have brought a bit of immersive cinematic magic to the red carpet this evening, with another world-first from our team: a 5G-powered augmented reality dress. Inspired by special effects in film, the dress uses real-time AR, mixing the physical and digital world to create new possibilities – morphing into multiple looks and turning styling into storytelling. It’s a fantastic example of what’s possible in the future of fashion. Talking of potential, all of us at EE are proud to present the EE Rising Star Award, not least because it’s the only BAFTA award voted for by the public. Thanks to the sparkling line-up of industry experts who made up our jury, including chair Andrew Orr, Lucy Bevan, Helen Bownass, Lena de Casparis, Nina Gold, Uzma Hasan, Larushka Ivan-Zadeh, Marc Samuelson, Georgina Lowe, Edith Bowman, Tom Macklin, Anna Smith, Vanessa Kirby, Laura Weir, Gemma Whelan and Cynthia Erivo – one of the extraordinary actresses nominated for last year’s award. This year, our jury has given us a shortlist surely destined for critical and box office success. The very best of luck to Awkwafina, Jack Lowden, Kaitlyn Dever, Kelvin Harrison Jr and Micheal Ward. That shortlist alone will provide plenty to inspire us all this evening. Enjoy it!

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N E W

T A L E N T

BAFTA Rocliffe New Writing Showcase: YA and ChildrenÕs Media

S U P P O R T

BAFTA is a registered charity no 216726 and Friends of BAFTA USA is a tax-exempt public charity under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code (“IRC”).


At BAFTA, we believe that talent is everywhere but opportunity is not. Our ambitious plans to redevelop our iconic headquarters at 195 Piccadilly will double its capacity and enable us to dramatically increase the year -round work we do to find and support the next generation of filmmakers. You can play a pivotal role in supporting the creative future of film, games and television by making a donation today. To find out more, visit bafta.org/about/fundraising or contact Lucy Plaskett on +44 20 7292 5854.


WARNER BROS. PICTURES THANKS THE

BRITISH ACADEMY OF FILM AND TELEVISION ARTS AND PROUDLY CONGRATULATES OUR NOMINEES AT THE

EE BRITISH ACADEMY FILM AWARDS IN 2020

BEST FILM

TODD PHILLIPS, p.g.a. BRADLEY COOPER, p.g.a. EMMA TILLINGER KOSKOFF, p.g.a.

DIRECTOR TODD PHILLIPS

ADAPTED SCREENPLAY TODD PHILLIPS & SCOTT SILVER

LEADING ACTOR JOAQUIN PHOENIX

ORIGINAL SCORE HILDUR GUÐNADÓTTIR

CASTING

SHAYNA MARKOWITZ

CINEMATOGRAPHY LAWRENCE SHER ASC

EDITING JEFF GROTH

PRODUCTION DESIGN MARK FRIEDBERG KRIS MORAN

MAKE UP & HAIR NICKI LEDERMANN KAY GEORGIOU

SOUND

ALAN ROBERT MURRAY TOD MAITLAND TOM OZANICH DEAN ZUPANCIC

W W W . W B A WA R D S . C O M


THE NOMINATIONS 17 Adapted Screenplay

Animated Film

27 Editing

Film Not in the English Language

19 Best Film

British Short Animation

Leading Actress

37 Sound

Special Visual Effects 31 Make Up & Hair

Original Score 23 Cinematography

Costume Design

a British Writer, Director or Producer Production Design

29 Leading Actor

21 British Short Film

Casting

35 Outstanding Debut by

39 Supporting Actor

Supporting Actress 33 Original Screenplay

Outstanding British Film

41 EE Rising Star Award

25 Director

Documentary

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HOLLYWOOD We're proud to be your airline.

Whether you’re based in LA, London or anywhere in-between, we’re proud to be the airline of the film & entertainment industry. The Official Airline to the EE British Academy Film Awards.

American Airlines, Flagship and the Flight Symbol logo are marks of American Airlines, Inc. oneworld is a mark of the oneworld Alliance, LLC. © 2019 American Airlines, Inc. All rights reserved.


A DA PTED SCREENPL AY

THE IRISHMAN STEVEN ZAILLIAN

JOJO RABBIT TA IK A WA ITITI

LITTLE WOMEN GRETA GERWIG

THE TWO POPES ANTHONY MCCARTEN

JOKER TODD PHILLIPS, S COT T S I LV ER

ANIM ATED FILM

FROZEN 2 CHRIS BUCK, JENNIFER LEE, PETER DEL VECHO

KLAUS S ER G I O PA B LOS, JINKO GOTOH

A SHAUN THE SHEEP MOVIE: FAR M AGEDDON WILL BECHER, RICHARD PHELAN, PAU L K E WLE Y

TOY STORY 4 J O S H C O O L E Y, MARK NIELSEN

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NETFLIX PROUDLY CONGRATULATES OUR

EE BRITISH ACADEMY FILM AWARDS NOMINEES DOCUMENTARY STEVEN BOGNAR, JULIA REICHERT

DOCUMENTARY KARIM AMER, JEHANE NOUJAIM

ANIMATED FILM SERGIO PABLOS, JINKO GOTOH

ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY NOAH BAUMBACH LEADING ACTRESS SCARLETT JOHANSSON

BEST FILM ROBERT DE NIRO, JANE ROSENTHAL, MARTIN SCORSESE, EMMA TILLINGER KOSKOFF DIRECTOR MARTIN SCORSESE

LEADING ACTOR ADAM DRIVER SUPPORTING ACTRESS LAURA DERN CASTING DOUGLAS AIBEL, FRANCINE MAISLER

ADAPTED SCREENPLAY STEVEN ZAILLIAN SUPPORTING ACTOR AL PACINO JOE PESCI CINEMATOGRAPHY RODRIGO PRIETO EDITING THELMA SCHOONMAKER PRODUCTION DESIGN BOB SHAW, REGINA GRAVES COSTUME DESIGN CHRISTOPHER PETERSON, SANDY POWELL SPECIAL VISUAL EFFECTS LEANDRO ESTEBECORENA, STEPHANE GRABLI, PABLO HELMAN, IVAN BUSQUETS

OUTSTANDING BRITISH FILM FERNANDO MEIRELLES, JONATHAN EIRICH, DAN LIN, TRACEY SEAWARD, ANTHONY MCCARTEN ADAPTED SCREENPLAY ANTHONY MCCARTEN LEADING ACTOR JONATHAN PRYCE SUPPORTING ACTOR ANTHONY HOPKINS CASTING NINA GOLD

AND SALUTES THE NOMINEES FOR THIS YEAR’S EE RISING STAR AWARD AWKWAFINA KAITLYN DEVER

KELVIN HARRISON JR. JACK LOWDEN

MICHEAL WARD


BEST FILM

1917 PI PPA HA RRIS, CALLUM MCDOUGALL, SA M MENDES, JAYNE-A NN TENGGREN

THE IRISHMAN RO BERT D E N I RO, JANE ROSENTHAL, M ARTIN SCORSESE, E M M A TI LLI N G ER KOSKO FF

ONCE UPON A TIME... I N H O L LY WO O D DAVID HEYM AN, SHANNON MCINTOSH, QUENTIN TA R A NTINO

PAR ASITE BO N G J O O N H O, KWAK SIN AE

JOKER BRADLEY COOPER, TODD PHILLIPS, E M M A TI LLI N G ER KOSKO FF

B R I T I S H S H O R T A N I M A T I O NÂ

GR ANDAD WAS A ROMANTIC M A RYA M M O H A J ER

IN HER BOOTS KATHRIN STEINBACHER

THE MAGIC BOAT NA A MAN AZHARI, LILIA LAUREL

19


Casting Society of America would like to extend our deep and heartfelt appreciation to BAFTA for the creation of the Best Casting Award categories in film and television. Our community is forever grateful for your support and recognition of the integral and long-standing contributions of the both the Casting Director, and the craft of casting, within our industry.

Congratulations to all of tonight’s nominees! JOKER - Shayna Markowitz, CSA MARRIAGE STORY - Douglas Aibel, CSA & Francine Maisler, CSA ONCE UPON A TIME...IN HOLLYWOOD - Victoria Thomas, CSA THE PERSONAL HISTORY OF DAVID COPPERFIELD - Sarah Crowe THE TWO POPES - Nina Gold, CSA


BRITISH SHORT FILM

AZAAR MYRIA M RAJA, NATHANAEL BARING

GOLDFISH HECTOR DOCKRILL, HARRI KA MALANATHAN, BENEDICT TURNBULL, LAURA DOCKRILL

L E A R N I N G TO S K AT E BOA R D I N A WA R ZO N E ( I F YO U ’R E A GIRL) CAROL DYSINGER, ELENA ANDREICHEVA

THE TRAP L E N A H E A D E Y, A NTHONY FITZGER A LD

KAMALI S A S H A R A I N B O W, ROSALIND CROAD

CASTING

JOKER SHAYNA M A RKOWITZ

MARRIAGE STORY DOUGLAS AIBEL, FRANCINE MAISLER

THE PERSONAL HISTORY OF DAVI D COPPERFI ELD SARAH CROWE

THE TWO POPES NINA GOLD

ONCE UPON A TIME... I N H O L LY WO O D VICTORIA THOM AS

21


ATELIERSWAROVSKI.COM

DESIGNED BY PENÉLOPE CRUZ, M ADE WITH SWAROVSKI CRE ATED DIAMONDS AVAIL ABLE NOW IN LUXURY JE WELLERY, FIRST FLOOR, HARRODS


CINEM ATOGR A PHY

1917 ROGER DEAKINS

THE IRISHMAN RODRIGO PRIETO

LE M ANS ‘66 PH ED O N PA PA M I CHA EL

THE LIGHTHOUSE JARIN BLASCHKE

JOKER LAWRENCE SHER

COSTUME DESIGN

THE IRISHMAN CHRISTOPHER PETERSON, SANDY POWELL

JOJO RABBIT M AYES C RU BEO

LITTLE WOMEN JACQUELINE DURRAN

ONCE UPON A TIME... I N H O L LY WO O D ARIANNE PHILLIPS

JUDY JANY TEMIME

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SONY PICTURES RELEASING (UK) THANKS THE BRITISH ACADEMY OF FILM AND TELEVISION ARTS AND PROUDLY CONGRATULATES OUR EE BRITISH ACADEMY FILM AWARDS NOMINEES

DAVID HEYMAN, SHANNON M c INTOSH, QUENTIN TARANTINO BEST FILM QUENTIN TARANTINO DIRECTOR QUENTIN TARANTINO ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY LEONARDO Di CAPRIO LEADING ACTOR BRAD PITT SUPPORTING ACTOR

GRETA GERWIG ADAPTED SCREENPLAY SAOIRSE RONAN LEADING ACTRESS FLORENCE PUGH SUPPORTING ACTRESS ALEXANDRE DESPLAT ORIGINAL SCORE JACQUELINE DURRAN COSTUME DESIGN

MARGOT ROBBIE SUPPORTING ACTRESS VICTORIA THOMAS CASTING FRED RASKIN EDITING BARBARA LING, NANCY HAIGH PRODUCTION DESIGN ARIANNE PHILLIPS COSTUME DESIGN

TOM HANKS SUPPORTING ACTOR IN ADDITION, SONY PICTURES HAS LIMITED RIGHTS TO PAIN & GLORY, WHICH RECEIVED THE FOLLOWING BAFTA NOMINATION:

PEDRO ALMODÓVAR, AGUSTÍN ALMODÓVAR FILM NOT IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE

www.sonypictures.co.uk

© 2020 Sony Pictures Entertainment Inc. All Rights Reserved.


DIRECTOR

1917 SA M MENDES

THE IRISHMAN MARTIN SCORSESE

ONCE UPON A TIME... I N H O L LY WO O D QUENTIN TA R A NTINO

PAR ASITE BONG JOON HO

JOKER TODD PHILLIPS

DOCUMENTA RY

A MERICAN FACTORY STEVEN BOGNAR, JULIA REICHERT

A P O L L O 11 TODD DOUGL AS MILLER

FOR SAMA W A A D A L- K A T E A B , EDWARD WAT TS

THE GREAT HACK KARIM A MER, JEHANE NOUJAIM

DIEGO MARADONA A SI F K A PA D IA , JA M ES GAY- REES, PAU L M A RTI N

25


MICHAEL G. WILSON & BARBARA BROCCOLI CONGRATUL ATE ALL OF TONIGHT’S BAFTA NOMINEES AND WINNERS

NO TIME TO DIE, NO TIME TO DIE,

© 2020 Danjaq, LLC and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc. and related James Bond Indicia © 1962-2020 Danjaq, LLC and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc. and related James Bond Trademarks are trademarks of Danjaq, LLC. All Rights Reserved.


EDITING

THE IRISHMAN THELMA SCHOONMAKER

JOJO RABBIT TOM EAGLES

LE M ANS ‘66 A N D RE W BU CK L A N D, MICHAEL MCCUSKER

ONCE UPON A TIME... I N H O L LY WO O D FRED RASKIN

JOKER JEFF GROTH

FIL M NOT IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE

THE FAREWELL LULU WA NG, DANIELE MELIA

FOR SAMA W A A D A L- K A T E A B , EDWARD WAT TS

PAR ASITE BONG JOON HO

PORTR AIT OF A L ADY ON FIRE CƒLINE SCIAMMA, BƒNƒDICTE COUVREUR

PAIN AND GLORY PEDRO AL MODîVAR, AGUSTêN AL MODîVAR

27


PARAMOUNTPICTURESPROUDLYCONGRATULATES ITSNOMINEESANDWISHESALLASUCCESSFULEVENING

LEADINGACTOR TARONEGERTON

OUTSTANDINGBRITISHFILM

EERISING STARAWARD MICHEALWARD

DEXTERFLETCHERADAMBOHLING DAVIDFURNISHDAVIDREID MATTHEWVAUGHNLEEHALL

SOUND

MATTHEWCOLLINGEJOHNHAYES MIKEPRESTWOODSMITH DANNYSHEEHAN

MAKEUP&HAIR

LIZZIEYIANNIGEORGIOU BARRIEGOWERTAPIOSALMI

©2020 Paramount Pictures. All Rights Reserved.


LEA DING ACTOR

LEONARDO DICAPRIO O N CE U PO N A TI M E... I N H O L LY WO O D

ADAM DRIVER M ARRIAGE STORY

JOAQUIN PHOENIX JOKER

JONATHAN PRYCE THE TWO POPES

TARON EGERTON ROCKETMAN

LEADING ACTRESS

JESSIE BUCKLEY WILD ROSE

SCARLETT JOHANSSON M ARRIAGE STORY

CHARLIZE THERON BOMBSHELL

RENÉ E ZELLWEGER JUDY

SAOIRSE RONAN LITTLE WOMEN

29


WWW.PAULEDMONDS.COM


MAKE UP & HAIR

1917 NAOMI DONNE, TRISTA N VERSLUIS

BOMBSHELL VIVIAN BAKER, K A ZU H I RO, ANNE MORGAN

JUDY JEREMY WOODHEAD

ROCKETMAN LIZ ZIE YIA NNI GEORGIOU, BARRIE GOWER, TA PI O SA L M I

JOKER K AY GEORGIOU, NICKI LEDERMANN

O R I G I N A L S C O R E

1917 THOMAS NEWMAN

JOJO RABBIT MICHAEL GIACCHINO

LITTLE WOMEN ALEXANDRE DESPLAT

STAR WARS: THE RISE OF SKY WALKER JOHN WILLIAMS

JOKER HILDUR GU�NADîT TIR

31


CONGRATULATIONS TO THIS YEAR’S NOMINEES We are proud to support BAIT | FOR SAMA | GOLDFISH | MAIDEN | PARASITE | SORRY WE MISSED YOU | WILD ROSE

From nurturing talent through to funding for development, production and reaching audiences across the UK - we support bold and original storytellers.

bfi.org.uk


ORIGINA L SCREENPL AY

BOOKSMART SUSANNA FOGEL, E M I LY H A L P ER N, SARAH HASKINS, KATIE SILBERMAN

KNIVES OUT RIAN JOHNSON

ONCE UPON A TIME... I N H O L LY WO O D QUENTIN TA R A NTINO

PAR ASITE HAN JIN WON, BONG JOON HO

MARRIAGE STORY NOAH BAUMBACH

OUTSTA NDING BRITISH FIL M

1917

BAIT

FOR SAMA

S A M M E N D E S , P I P PA H A R R I S , CA LLUM MCDOUGA LL, J AY N E - A N N T EN G G R EN, KRYST Y WILSON - CA IRNS

M ARK JENKIN, K ATE BYERS, LINN WAITE

W A A D A L- K A T E A B ,

ROCKETMAN

SORRY WE MISSED YOU

THE TWO POPES

DEXTER FLETCHER, ADA M BOHLING, DAVID FU RNISH, DAVID REID, M AT THEW VAUGHN, LEE HALL

KEN LOACH, REBECCA OÕBRIEN, PAU L L AVERT Y

FERNANDO MEIRELLES, JONATHAN EIRICH, DA N LIN, TR ACE Y SE AWA RD, ANTHONY MCCARTEN

EDWARD WAT TS

33


www.pinewoodgroup.com


OUTSTA NDING DEBUT BY A BRITISH WRITER, DIRECTOR OR PRODUCER

BAIT MARK JENKIN (WRITER/DIRECTOR), K ATE BYERS, LINN WAITE (PRODUCERS)

FOR SAMA W A A D A L- K A T E A B (DIRECTOR/PRODUCER), EDWARD WAT TS (DIRECTOR)

O N LY YO U HARRY WOOTLIFF (WRITER/DIRECTOR)

RETABLO ç LVA R O D ELGA D O A PA RI CI O (WRITER/ DIRECTOR)*

MAIDEN ALEX HOLMES (DIRECTOR)

*A L S O W R I T T E N B Y H ƒ C TO R Gç LV E Z

PRODUCTION DESIGN

1917 DENNIS GASSNER, LEE SANDALES

THE IRISHMAN B O B S H A W, REGINA GRAVES

JOKER M A RK FRIEDBERG, KRIS MORAN

ONCE UPON A TIME... I N H O L LY WO O D BA RBA R A LING, NANCY HAIGH

JOJO RABBIT R A V I N C E N T, NOR A SOPKOVç

35


SOUND

1917

JOKER

L E M A N S ’6 6

SCOT T MILL AN,

TO D M A ITL A ND,

DAVI D GIA M M A RCO,

O L I V E R TA R N E Y,

A L A N R O B E R T M U R R AY,

PA U L M A S S E Y,

R ACH A EL TATE, M A RK TAYLO R,

TOM OZ A NICH,

S T E V E N A M O R R O W,

STUART WILSON

DE A N ZU PA N CI C

D O N A L D SY LV ES T ER

ROCKETMAN M AT THEW COLLINGE,

STAR WARS: THE RISE OF SKY WALKER

JOHN HAYES,

DAV I D A CO R D, A N DY N E L S O N,

MIKE PRESTWOOD SMITH,

C H R I S TO P H E R S C A R A B O S I O,

DANNY SHEEHAN

STUART WILSON, M AT THEW WOOD

SPECIAL VISUAL EFFECTS

1917

AVEN GERS: EN DGA M E

THE IRISHMAN

GREG BUTLER,

M A T T A I T K E N , D A N D E L E E U W,

IVA N BUSQ UE TS,

GUILLAUME ROCHERON,

RUSSELL EARL, DAN SUDICK

DOMINIC TUOHY

LEANDRO ESTEBECORENA, STEPHANE GRABLI, PA B LO H EL M A N

ANDREW R JONES,

THE LION KING

STAR WARS: THE RISE OF SKY WALKER

RO BERT LEGATO,

R O G E R G U Y E T T, PA U L K A VA N A G H ,

ELLIOT NEWM AN,

N E A L SCANL AN, DOMINIC TUOHY

ADA M VALDEZ

37


CONGRATULATES OUR CLIENTS ON THEIR 2020 EE BRITISH ACADEMY FILM AWARDS NOMINATIONS

BEST FILM

A N I M AT E D F I L M

L E A D I N G AC T R E S S

1917

FROZEN 2

JESSIE BUCKLEY ***

SAM MENDES PIPPA HARRIS THE IRISHMAN

ROBERT DE NIRO JANE ROSENTHAL JOKER

BRADLEY COOPER TODD PHILLIPS

JENNIFER LEE TOY STORY 4

JOSH COOLEY

WILD ROSE

SCARLETT JOHANSSON MARRIAGE STORY

SAOIRSE RONAN ¥ D I R E C TO R

SAM MENDES 1917

LITTLE WOMEN

RENÉE ZELLWEGER JUDY

TODD PHILLIPS JOKER O U T S TA N D I N G B R I T I S H F I L M

S U P P O R T I N G AC T R E S S

1917

LAURA DERN

SAM MENDES PIPPA HARRIS ROCKETMAN

DEXTER FLETCHER

A D A P T E D S C R E E N P L AY

JOJO RABBIT

ALEX HOLMES*

MAIDEN

SCARLETT JOHANSSON

TAIKA WAITITI

JOJO RABBIT

JOKER

MARGOT ROBBIE ¥¥

TODD PHILLIPS O U T S TA N D I N G D E B U T B Y A BRITISH WRITER, D I R E C TO R O R P R O D U C E R

MARRIAGE STORY

BOMBSHELL

MARGOT ROBBIE ¥¥ BRITISH SHORT FILM

ONCE UPON A TIME... IN HOLLYWOOD

THE TRAP

LENA HEADEY **

S U P P O R T I N G AC TO R

TOM HANKS F I L M N OT I N T H E ENGLISH LANGUAGE

L E A D I N G AC TO R

PAIN AND GLORY

TARON EGERTON ***

PEDRO ALMODÓVAR

ROCKETMAN

A BEAUTIFUL DAY IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD

AL PACINO

THE IRISHMAN

BRAD PITT

ONCE UPON A TIME... IN HOLLYWOOD

D O C U M E N TA R Y

THE GREAT HACK

KARIM AMER JEHANE NOUJAIM

E E R I S I N G S TA R AW A R D

MICHEAL WARD¥¥¥

*SHARED REPRESENTATION WITH CURTIS BROWN

¥SHARED REPRESENTATION WITH MACFARLANE CHARD ASSOCIATES

**SHARED REPRESENTATION WITH TROIKA ENTERTAINMENT

¥¥SHARED REPRESENTATION WITH ARAN MICHAEL MANAGEMENT

***SHARED REPRESENTATION WITH UNITED AGENTS

¥¥¥SHARED REPRESENTATION WITH OLIVIA BELL MANAGEMENT


SUPPORTING ACTOR

TOM HANKS A BEAUTIFUL DAY IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD

ANTHONY HOPKINS THE TWO POPES

JOE PESCI THE IRISHMAN

BRAD PITT O N CE U PO N A TI M E... I N H O L LY WO O D

AL PACINO THE IRISHMAN

SUPPORTING ACTRESS

LAURA DERN M ARRIAGE STORY

SCARLETT JOHANSSON JOJO RABBIT

MARGOT ROBBIE BOMBSHELL

MARGOT ROBBIE O N CE U PO N A TI M E... I N H O L LY WO O D

FLORENCE PUGH LITTLE WOMEN

39


PROUD SPONSORS OF THE BRITISH ACADEMY FILM AWARDS SINCE 1998


EE RISING STA R AWA RD VOT ED F O R BY T H E P U B L I C

AWK WAFINA

K A I T LY N D E V E R

JACK LOWDEN

MICHEAL WARD

K E LV I N H A R R I S O N J R

Nominations are correct at the time of going to print. BAFTA reserves the right to make changes to the names listed at any time up until 2 February 2020.

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BRITISH SHORT ANIMATION

OUTSTANDING BRITISH FILM

Claire Jennings (Chair) Joan Ashworth Morwenna Banks Francesca Berlingieri Maxwell Mark Burton Sarah Cox Marc Craste Jonathan Hodgson Fiona Lamptey Bronagh O’Hanlon

Anna Higgs (Chair) Moira Buffini Sarita Choudhury Anne Dudley Kwame Kwei-Armah Jo Hartley Jessica Hobbs Kim Longinotto Andrew Orr Derrin Schlesinger Diarmid Scrimshaw Rina Yang

With thanks to Pablo Grillo for his help in the shortlisting stages. BRITISH SHORT FILM

Alexandra Derbyshire (Chair) Simon Farnaby Simran Hans Julie Harkin Hong Khaou Louise Osmond Thea Sharrock David Vickery Erik Wilson With thanks to Ursula Macfarlane and Aysha Rafaele for their help in the shortlisting stages, and to the BAFTA members who took part in the longlisting stage. CASTING

Marc Samuelson (Chair) Leo Davis Gillian Hawser Jina Jay Malachi Kirby Pippa Markham Debbie McWilliams Rebecca O’Brien Jill Trevillick Sarah Trevis Aisling Walsh

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OUTSTANDING DEBUT BY A BRITISH WRITER, DIRECTOR OR PRODUCER

Briony Hanson (Chair) Adeel Akhtar Dominic Buchanan Anthony Chen Lucinda Coxon Charles Gant Elizabeth Karlsen Dixie Linder Penny Woolcock Justine Wright With thanks to Mandy Chang, Danny Leigh and James Marsh for their help in the longlisting stage. EE RISING STAR

Andrew Orr (Chair) Lucy Bevan Edith Bowman Helen Bownass Lena de Casparis Cynthia Erivo Nina Gold Uzma Hasan Larushka Ivan-Zadeh Vanessa Kirby

Georgina Lowe Tom Macklin Marc Samuelson Anna Smith Laura Weir Gemma Whelan With thanks to Charles Gant and Alison Thompson for their help in the longlisting stage. CHAPTERS

JURIES

JURIES & CHAPTERS

CRAFT CHAPTERS

Casting Cinematography Costume Design Directing Editing Make Up & Hair Music Production Design Screenplay Sound Special Visual Effects OPT-IN CHAPTERS

Animation British Short Animation and British Short Film Documentary Film Not in the English Language Outstanding British Film Craft chapters consist of Academy members with specialist experience in the relative field. Opt-in chapters are open to all members who are willing to commit to watching the eligible films. Special Award recipients are selected by the Film Committee. For full details of the voting process, please visit: www.bafta.org/film/awards


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SHORTLISTS BA F TA IS PUBLISHING SHORTLISTS FOR THE FOLLOWING CATEGORIES FOR THE FIRST TIME. THESE SHORTLISTS HAVE BEEN SELECTED BY JURIES, AND HIGHLIGHT A RANGE OF E XC EP T I O N A L B R I T I S H F I L M S A N D TA L EN T. W E ENCOUR AGE YOU TO WATCH THESE FIL MS A ND DISCOVER SOME EXCEPTIONAL VOICES IN BRITISH FI L M M A K I N G. N OM I N EES M A RK ED I N BO LD.

BRITISH SHORT ANIMATION

4:3 Ross Hogg Creepy Pasta Salad Lauren Orme, Amy Morris Grandad was a Romantic Maryam Mohajer In Her Boots Kathrin Steinbacher The Magic Boat Naaman Azhari, Lilia Laurel My Dad’s Name Was Huw. He Was an Alcoholic Poet. Freddie Griffiths

BRITISH SHORT FILM

Anna Dekel Berenson, Merlin Merton Azaar Myriam Raja, Nathanael Baring Goldfish Hector Dockrill, Laura Dockrill, Harri Kamalanathan, Benedict Turnbull Kamali Sasha Rainbow, Rosalind Croad Learning to Skateboard in a Warzone (If You’re a Girl) Carol Dysinger, Elena Andreicheva Madame Garth Jennings, Marine Dorfmann, Octavia Peissel The Nightcrawlers Alexander A Mora, Abigail Anketell-Jones, Doireann Maddock, Joanna Natasegara November 1st Charlie Manton, Teodora Shaleva The Trap Lena Headey, Anthony Fitzgerald We Are Dancers Joe Morris, Luz Alejandra Llano

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OUTSTANDING DEBUT BY A BRITISH WRITER, DIRECTOR OR PRODUCER

Animals Emma Jane Unsworth (Writer) Bait Mark Jenkin (Writer/ Director), Kate Byers, Linn Waite (Producers) Being Frank: The Chris Sievey Story Steve Sullivan (Director/Producer) Blue Story Rapman (Writer/Director), Joy Gharoro-Akpojotor (Producer)* For Sama Waad al-Kateab (Director/Producer), Edward Watts (Director) The Last Tree Myf Hopkins (Producer)** Maiden Alex Holmes (Director) Only You Harry Wootliff (Writer/Director) The Party’s Just Beginning Karen Gillan (Writer/Director) Retablo Álvaro Delgado-Aparicio (Writer/Director) *** * also produced by Damien Jones ** also produced by Lee Thomas *** also written by Héctor Gálvez


Y O U R

I N S P I R A T I O N

Nida Manzoor (r) with Lucie Cave at a BAFTA comedy writing masterclass, Guru Live 2019

S H A R E

BAFTA’s year -round learning programme provides the next generation of talent with inspiration from BAFTA winners and nominees as well as the year-round support they need to succeed. See what a difference your contribution can make at bafta.org/supporting-talent


1917 WORDS BY IA N HAYDN SM ITH 47


BEST FILM NOMINEE

I NSPI RED BY TH E RECO LLECTI O NS PASSED down to Sam Mendes by his grandfather, who fought in the Great War, 1917 is a moving and suspenseful portrait of a conflict that traumatised the first generation of the 20th century and forever changed the face of war. A technically audacious film, it is constructed as one single continuous shot, which increases the intensity of the central characters’ journey and our immersion within it.

THE CAMERA NEVER ONCE LEAVES ITS PROTAGONISTS, CAPTURING EVERY GRIMACE AS ONE HORROR LEADS TO A NOTHER.

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Mendes’ eighth feature as director tells the story of two ordinary soldiers sent on a mission that will hopefully stop Allied troops being massacred. Lance Corporal Blake (Dean-Charles Chapman) is charged by General Erinmore (Colin Firth) to make his way to the Frontline to deliver orders directly to the officer in charge, calling off the push forward against what appears to be a retreating German army. Contrary to initial reports, aerial reconnaissance has revealed that the enemy has created another line, with weaponry that will obliterate any advancing force. With his friend Schofield (George MacKay) joining him, Blake sets off, knowing that if they


1917

fail to cover the seven miles overnight, 1,600 men will die the following morning, including his elder brother (Richard Madden), a lieutenant leading a wave of the attack. Mendes and co-writer Krysty Wilson-Cairns send Blake and Schofield into a haunting world of the dead; from bodies perched on barbed wire fences and floating in pools of water that fill bomb craters, to the grim transformation of entire landscapes. Save for a crashed pilot and a couple of straggling drunks, the only Germans Blake and Schofield encounter are uniformed corpses strewn across battlefields. The film might be bookended with images of pastoral serenity, but elsewhere any semblance of a rural idyll has been replaced by a world torn asunder by the machinery of war; fields have become animal graveyards and destroyed farmhouses resemble oversized gravestones; towns rage with fire, lighting up the night. All of which is seen from the perspective of the two young men.

BEST FILM NOMINEES PI PPA HA RRIS CALLUM MCDOUGALL SA M MENDES JAYNE-A NN TENGGREN OTHER NOMINATED CATEGORIES C I N E M A T O G R A P H Y, DIRECTOR, ORIGINAL SCORE, OUTSTA NDING BRITISH FILM, MAKE UP & HAIR, PRODUCTION D ESI G N, SO U N D, SPECIAL VISUAL EFFECTS

Mendes previously experimented with the single take with his bravura Día de Muertos opening to the 2015 James Bond adventure Spectre. But with 1917, he and cinematographer Roger Deakins take the concept first employed by Alfred Hitchcock in his 1948 thriller Rope to its limit. From the soldiers’ journey through the trenches to No Man’s Land to the extraordinary sequence that takes us careering through the tumult of a turbulent river, the camera never once leaves its protagonists, capturing every grimace as one horror leads to another, while the clock ticks down in the race to save so many lives. Andrew Scott, Mark Strong and Benedict Cumberbatch play British officers at various stages on the journey, respectively embittered, hardened by conflict and despairing at the machinations of a high command despatching orders from afar. However, at its heart, 1917 is the story of ordinary soldiers, like Mendes’ grandfather, who gave up so much of their young lives in a brutal, seemingly unending war. Ian Haydn Smith is the author of Cult Writers and The Short Story of Film

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THE IRISHMAN WORDS BY ELL A KEMP

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BEST FILM NOMINEE

IT IS N OW 30 YE ARS since Martin Scorsese directed Goodfellas, the searing historic artefact that changed the optics of gangster films forever. A reunion between the director and stars Robert De Niro and Joe Pesci, with the addition of another seminal Mob man, Al Pacino, inevitably suggested an indulgent reminiscence on what was established, and couldn’t be trumped, in 1990. But The Irishman is invigorating and bold – nostalgic perhaps, but far more urgent than a mere skim through the archives.

The story follows Charles Brandt’s narrative non-fiction book I Heard You Paint Houses, revisiting the alleged ominous deals between driver turned hitman Frank Sheeran and the Bufalino crime family. The working relationship between Frank (De Niro) and Russell Bufalino (Pesci) becomes knottier when the safety and relevancy of politician Jimmy Hoffa – Al Pacino, nice guy, friend of the people, threat to the status quo – becomes paramount.

BEST FILM NOMINEES ROBERT DE NIRO JANE ROSENTHAL MARTIN SCORSESE EMMA TILLINGER KOSKOFF OTHER NOMINATED CATEGORIES A D A P T E D S C R E E N P L A Y, C I N E M A T O G R A P H Y, COSTUME DESIGN, DIRECTOR, EDITING, PRODUCTION DESIGN, SPECIAL VISUAL EFFECTS, SUPPORTING ACTOR (x2)

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De Niro carries the film with sandpapery charisma, mischievous and wise and heavyhearted in turn – spectacular like so few still alive can manage. Pesci is quiet and reserved, but his deafening silence carries cut-glass intimidation. Pacino deals in operatic spades of chutzpah, energising a hurricane of a life built on confident performance – there’s no room to tiptoe around what a man wants here. It’s what it is. The film’s pressurised tension, somehow maintained over 210 minutes, comes from every world-class ingredient Scorsese kneads into the fold. The director’s stamp is tangible in both visually adventurous framing and sonically vibrant design. Sixty years fly by seamlessly, as digital de-aging technology lets the viewer join Frank, Russell and Jimmy on a time-travelling meditation of the events guided by loyalty and responsibility. The world keeps shifting, and the players adapt without missing a beat. It’s kinetic filmmaking at its finest: nobody breaks a sweat as the story flits from war trenches animated by ultimatums to a low-lit booth occupied by two wine-drinking, bread-dipping tough guys negotiating a transaction. Kills are sharp and short, chased by a hobbling, ageing hitman. The days of limitless machine guns are long gone, and, in their place, the resentful stares of a silent daughter.


THE IRISHMAN

The Irishman crackles with the fire of being alive, because it is constantly questioning what that feeling means. Is it about the freezing sweetness of an ice cream sundae? Can you feel it in a hug goodnight? Is there any life worth remembering in the blood splatters of a completed assignment? The film both remembers and challenges the greying legacy of a perceived person of influence, and it is pertinent onscreen and off: the influence of a Mob boss, of a hitman, of a politician, of an actor, of a filmmaker.

THE IRISHMAN CRACKLES WITH THE FIRE OF BEING ALIVE, BECAUSE I T I S CO N S TA N T LY QUESTIONING WHAT THAT FEELING MEANS.

Watching The Irishman comes with a sense of anticipation and fear, as the viewer is forced to hold the anxiety that this could be the final curtain call for such tall artists. There might be further gangster movies, more impressive old men, more brave new avenues for Netflix titles. But a singular gift marrying cinema’s greatest manifestations of beauty, audacity and intelligence rarely comes along more than once in a lifetime. It’s here now – celebrate it unreservedly before time runs out. Ella Kemp is film editor at the Quietus and a critic for Empire and Sight & Sound

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JOKER WO R DS BY RO B C A R N E VA L E 55


BEST FILM NOMINEE

T WE LVE YE ARS AF TER H EATH LED GER’S Joker posed the question, ‘why so serious?’ in Christopher Nolan’s multi-BAFTA-nominated masterpiece The Dark Knight (2008), co-writer and director Todd Phillips answers it in the most emphatic way possible with 2019’s Joker.

PHILLIPSÕ FIL M EXISTS TO BE AS COMPLEX AND PROVOCATIVE AS ITS CENTRAL CHARACTER.

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The two films are unrelated, naturally, especially since Nolan chose to keep his Joker an enigma. But both are masterpieces and both show how superhero films can transcend genre. Phillips’ film, like Nolan’s, takes the 1988 graphic novel Batman: The Killing Joke as the basis for its premise but his gaze extends far beyond the comics. Rather, he opts for a filmmaking style akin to Martin Scorsese and such film classics as Taxi Driver (1976) and The King of Comedy (1982), even casting Robert De Niro as support. But, there’s equally important social commentary, too, whether taking aim at Trump’s America or – most pertinently – using a genre that the majority of audiences are flocking to and turning it into a forum for a timely debate on mental health. A backlash from certain quarters has inevitably followed.


JOKER

But Phillips’ film exists to be as complex and provocative as its central character. And in leading man, Joaquin Phoenix, he has a masterful actor who can, and regularly does, toy with audience perception, flirting with their sympathies before delivering a truly terrifying hammer blow. His Arthur Fleck is a party clown and stand-up comedian hopeful who is also a social outsider. He lives with his mother, Penny (Frances Conroy), in a rundown neighbourhood of Gotham, in 1981, and he has a rare mental health condition that causes him to laugh inappropriately whenever he encounters awkward situations. As Arthur is increasingly let down by those around him, he struggles to keep a grip on both reality and sanity, despite the support of a seemingly sympathetic neighbour (Zazie Beetz) and a close family link to mayoral hopeful Thomas Wayne (Brett Cullen). When he becomes the victim of a vicious assault, he is given a gun... For long periods, Joker grips by virtue of its stunning central performance and the way in which it holds a mirror up to society’s failings, posing uncomfortable questions about the treatment and understanding of people with mental health conditions. It doesn’t offer easy answers or seek to justify its character’s eventual turn towards villainy. Rather, the violence is cold and brutal. And it shocks. But Joker is aware of its place in the DC comic book world, too, and it honours Batman mythology in exemplary fashion, neatly feeding into what fans have come to expect from this particular character. The climax, set amid the riot-strewn streets of Gotham, is eerily thrilling and iconic in its own memorable way. Phillips has delivered a powerful example of how superhero films can be taken seriously and offer more than just ‘theme park’-style thrills and spills. Joker provides a dark descent into madness that could yet have the last laugh on its fellow award contenders. Rob Carnevale is a freelance film journalist who contributes to the Glasgow Herald and IndieLondon

BEST FILM NOMINEES BRADLEY COOPER TODD PHILLIPS, EMMA TILLINGER KOSKOFF

OTHER NOMINATED CATEGORIES A D A P T E D S C R E E N P L AY, CASTING, C I N E M A T O G R A P H Y, DIRECTOR, EDITING, LEADING ACTOR, MAKE UP & HAIR, ORIGINAL SCORE, PRODUCTION DESIGN, SOUND

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E X P E R I E N C E B AA FF TT AA PP II CC CC AA DD II LL LL YY

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ONCE UPON A T I M E... I N H O L LY W O O D WORDS BY K ATE STA BLES

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BEST FILM NOMINEE

Q U ENTI N TAR ANTI N O’S GLIT TE RI N GLY A M BITI OUS, MU LTI -

BEST FILM NOMINEES DAVID HEYM AN SHA NNON MCINTOSH Q U ENTIN TA R A NTIN O OTHER NOMINATED CATEGORIES CA STING, COSTUM E DESIGN, DIRECTOR, EDITING, LE A DING ACTOR, ORIGINA L S C R E E N P L A Y, PRODUCTION DESIGN, SUPPORTING ACTOR, SUPPORTING ACTRESS

L AYE RE D comedy drama is an unabashed love letter to Los Angeles in 1969, when the counter-culture collided with classic Hollywood, and auteurs replaced the Western ‘oaters’. A richly packed and highly personal remaking of the era, rather than a ‘realistic’ recreation, it upends period drama norms by winding compelling fiction around historical fact.

Leonardo DiCaprio’s waning television cowboy, Rick Dalton, reduced to villain-of-the-week slots, finds his new next door neighbours are ‘director du jour’ Roman Polanski and his actress wife, Sharon Tate (Margot Robbie), busy enjoying Hollywood’s hottest spots. Cliff Booth (Brad Pitt), Dalton’s laconic stuntman-turned-driver, also brushes up against history, becoming intrigued by a crew of young hitchhiking, dumpster-diving hippie girls, haunting Hollywood Boulevard. Playfully plaiting fact and fiction, but going way beyond the historical score-settling of Django Unchained (2012) and Inglourious Basterds (2009), Tarantino creates an intriguing, genre-scrambling narrative, packed with the pleasures of a buddy movie, lurid spaghetti Westerns, and a fierce burst of revisionist history. Viewing the city’s past through a pop culture prism of film and television, it has Rick and Cliff face down Western-style trials, as Rick battles to regain his acting mojo as a scene-stealing heavy in the (real-life) television series Lancer, while Cliff is the stranger blowing in to disturb the Manson Family’s cult corner at the Spahn Movie Ranch. Vintage film and television don’t just shape this narrative, they also erupt into it audaciously, clips of Rick’s hit 50s’ series Bounty Hunter and his fire-wielding war movie, giving the film a crackling variety of textures. Full of respect for the craft of movie-making, especially stunt work, it also revels in the joy of cinemagoing, as Tate ducks into a matinee of her latest movie (the real-life Tate’s The Wrecking Crew, 1968) to enjoy the public’s laughter. The film becomes an encyclopaedic elegy for 60s pop culture, heady and exotic in our atomised streaming age. The saturated colour LA that Robert Richardson’s stunning 35mm photography conjures, full of neon signs and snaking canyons, is wrapped in time capsule pop music blaring from car radios, ubiquitous television shows flickering in corners, a drive-in movie beaming into the night sky.

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O N CE U P O N A T I M E... I N H O L LY W O O D

Packed around the film’s wily, winding story and punchy set pieces, this layering gives Once Upon A Time... in Hollywood an extraordinary resonance. A new and moving tone for Tarantino emerges, too, as the action slides from the sweetness of Sharon Tate’s starlet-on-the-rise to the Manson Family’s grisly quest, and from parody to pathos as Al Pacino’s agent Marvin teaches Rick the industry’s cruel rules for fading stars.

P L AY F U L LY P L A I T I N G FA C T A N D FI C T I O N, TA R A NTIN O CRE ATES A N INTRI GU IN G, GENRE-SCRA MBLING NARRATIVE.

With winking irony, DiCaprio and Pitt give outstanding performances as Hollywood near-has-beens: DiCaprio is superb as a tearily insecure B-movie stalwart, while Pitt’s laid-back brawler struggles to keep his violence strictly onscreen. When it’s unleashed in the film’s shattering climax, it snaps the film’s strands together with brio and a blackly comic force. A mature and considerable achievement, Tarantino’s dark fairytale finds a redemptive power in film, one that can reframe myth and dare a second draft of history. Kate Stables is a freelance film critic and monthly contributor to Sight & Sound and Total Film

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PA R A S I T E WORDS BY TIM ROBEY 63


BEST FILM NOMINEE

PA R A SI T E CO U L D WELL BE BONGÔS M ASTERPIECE, DISHING OUT AN INGENUITY THAT VERGES ON CRUEL.

O N E BY O N E, FI B BY fib, a happy but hard-up family scheme their way into another’s designer household, plotting a devious takeover, which for a brief while gives them a bite of the good life. Bong Joon Ho’s brilliant Parasite is a class-war parable taken over by a heist flick, gazumped by black comedy, and then infected by a lethal strain of satirical horror. No other contender has managed such bold swerves, from hysterical laughter to savage shock, while keeping a storytelling grip this white-knuckled, and still managing to say so much: about the yawning divide between these clans, which only widens when the poor lot seemingly get the upper hand.

Bong has long been a cult-championed director in and outside of South Korea for his mischievous concepts and genre-splicing virtuosity, bringing us a bumbling procedural epic in Memories of Murder (2003), the sewer-monster Spielberg-ian thriller The Host (2006), and a post-apocalyptic Noah’s Ark parable set on a constantly moving train in 2013’s Snowpiercer. Parasite could well be his masterpiece, dishing out an ingenuity that verges on cruel –

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PA R A SI T E

how much can we sensibly relish the fate of a chirpy housekeeper being poisoned to get rid of her? – but then showing us the greater cruelties, and far more diabolical traps, which society has up its sleeve. The film’s longest sequence takes place over one stormy night, when the invading four think they are sitting pretty, with the host family away on a camping trip. Bong’s choreography of the ensuing mayhem has exhilarating wit and timing, and his gift for visual jokes – just wait for the bag of peaches as an assault weapon – could be the envy of most directors who attempt straight comedy.

BEST FILM NOMINEES BONG JOON HO KWAK SIN AE OTHER NOMINATED CATEGORIES DIRECTOR, FIL M NOT IN THE ENGLISH L ANGUAGE, ORIGINA L SCREENPL AY

But this is the same part of the film where everything falls apart, when the house reveals a secret cellar with unsavoury contents, and the quartet who have tricked their way in are made to realise the tragedy of their predicament: they can only pretend they have gained a lasting purchase on all this wealth. It takes a rainstorm to annihilate their footing, when the semi-basement where they live is flooded. Home destroyed, they still find themselves waiting hand-and-foot on their employers, their temporary power a charade, as they are left more than ever to the mercy of heartless, mocking economics. Bong’s whole cast do him proud, managing the deft balance of sympathies this juggling act requires: the incomers, led by Song Kang Ho’s chummy chauffeur, are a delightful unit who start to seem dangerously self-serving. Meanwhile, the rich brigade are entitled, alienated weirdos we can’t help but like, especially Cho Yeo Jeong’s stricken housewife. Their home is the work of a master architect, we hear: and the building’s design is an astonishingly dynamic feat in polished concrete, a space we know inside out by the end, heightening every dash across the kitchen or tumble downstairs. Immaculate as an exercise, the film gains serious heft when it asks us to spot the disgust of the elite at the hapless stink of poverty, and retaliates with psychotic – but bitterly understandable – fury. Tim Robey is a film critic for The Telegraph

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K ATHLEEN KENNEDY THE FELLOWSHIP WORDS BY CL ARISSE LOUGHREY PORTR AIT BY BAFTA/ BENJAMIN MCMAHON IMAGES COURTESY OF LUCASFILM, REX FEATURES, UNIVERSAL PICTURES

K ATH LEEN KEN N EDY M I GHT BE H O LLY WOO D’S most powerful woman, but she’s still a little unused to the spotlight. For years, she’s served comfortably as a puppeteer – an invisible hand pulling at the strings. The producer has left her mark on many of celluloid history’s great moments, even if her contributions weren’t always so widely known. It’s Kennedy who figured out how to make the glistening, planet-sized orbs of E.T.’s eyes look so human. She’d rushed off to an ophthalmology centre and brought back trays of prosthetic eyeballs, in order to pick just the right shade and pupil size. She’s responsible, too, for making the stampede of ostrich-like Gallimimus in Jurassic Park (1993) a reality. Steven Spielberg wanted his dinosaurs to run and it was Kennedy who first proposed using groundbreaking CGI to make it happen.

Now it’s Kennedy’s moment to step out of the shadows. As the president of Lucasfilm, she’s the name and face behind a new generation of Star Wars films, television shows, books and games. “I am much more comfortable behind the camera,” she jokes. “But I like being a role model. It’s exciting to me that young women are inspired by what I’ve done.” ÓI LIKE BEING A ROLE MODEL. ITÔS EXCITING TO ME THAT YOUNG WOMEN ARE INSPIRED BY W H AT I Ô V E D O N E.Ò

And how could anyone not be dazzled by her career? Her films, including those produced under Amblin Entertainment and The Kennedy/Marshall Company, have landed 119 BAFTA nominations and 27 wins. They have also earned more than £9bn at the box office. Alongside her Fellowship award, Kennedy was last year appointed Honorary Commander of the Order of the British Empire. She’s especially moved to see her work recognised in the UK, where many of her productions have been based. “I feel like this is even more than just a second home,” she says. There’s a hint of destiny to Kennedy’s story. Even during her childhood, spent in sun-dappled California, she was the one people always turned to when there was a school talent show or an assembly to organise. She first found work in local television, before receiving a moment of clarity when, in 1977, she sat down to watch Spielberg’s Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977).

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“I was so transported by what Steven had done with that story and just connected to the movie on so many levels,” she says. From that day on, Kennedy knew she wanted to be in the film business. It didn’t take long for her to land a role as Spielberg’s assistant, though the director frequently jokes that she was always too busy contributing ideas to fulfil the job requirements. “I wasn’t a good note taker and I definitely didn’t understand that I wasn’t supposed to join in the creative discussion,” Kennedy says with a smile. Thankfully, Spielberg got the hint. She became a producer on E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (1982), kicking off a lengthy series of collaborations between the pair. Alongside the Indiana Jones and Jurassic Park franchises, Kennedy also served as a producer on the likes of Schindler’s List (1993) and Munich (2005). In 1981, she co-founded – with Spielberg and her future spouse, Frank Marshall – Amblin Entertainment, the production company behind Gremlins (1984), The Goonies (1985), and the Back to the Future trilogy. She and her husband then formed The Kennedy/Marshall Company in 1992. Four of its films have earned her BAFTA nominations: The Sixth Sense (1999), The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (2007), The Curious Case of Benjamin Button (2008) and Lincoln (2012). 

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Above: On the Millennium Falcon, with director JJ Abrams; Opposite: With executive producer George Lucas and actor Harrison Ford on the set of Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull


In 2012, George Lucas sat Kennedy down to propose that she take over Lucasfilm after he retired. “At first, I actually thought he was asking me for who I thought might come in and take over,” she says. “I didn’t realise he was actually asking me.” But she gratefully accepted the role and became president when Lucasfilm was acquired by Disney several months later – for a staggering $4bn. So far, she’s overseen five new Star Wars films; most crucially, she brought four decades of the Skywalker saga to a close with last year’s thrilling ninth episode, The Rise of Skywalker (2019).

FILMOGRAPHY 2019 2018 2017 2016

2016 2015 2012 2011 2011 2010 2008 2008

2008 2008 2005

Star Wars: The Rise of  Skywalker Solo: A Star Wars Story Star Wars: The Last Jedi  Rogue One: A Star Wars Story  The BFG * Star Wars: The Force Awakens Lincoln War Horse The Adventures of Tintin Hereafter  The Curious Case of  Benjamin Button  Indiana Jones and the  Kingdom of the  Crystal Skull *   The Diving Bell and the Butterfly Munich War of the Worlds

( S E L E C T, A S P R O D U C E R )

2003  Seabiscuit 2002  Signs * 2001 Jurassic Park III 2001  A.I. Artificial 1999 1999 1997 1996 1995 1995 1995 1993 1993 1993 1993 1992 1991 1991 1991

 Intelligence Snow Falling on Cedars The Sixth Sense The Lost World: Jurassic Park * Twister Balto * Congo The Bridges of Madison  County Schindler’s List * A Dangerous Woman *  Jurassic Park  Alive Noises Off... *  Hook   An American Tail: Fievel  Goes West * Cape Fear *

1990 1990 1990 1990 1989 1989 1988 1987 1987 1986 1986 1986 1985 1985 1985 1984 1982

Arachnophobia Gremlins 2: The New  Batch * Back to the Future  Part III *  Joe Versus the Volcano *  Always Back to the Future  Part II * Who Framed Roger Rabbit * *batteries not included *  Empire of the Sun An American Tail * The Money Pit The Color Purple Young Sherlock Holmes * Back to the Future * The Goonies * Gremlins *  E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial * as executive producer

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ÓWHAT I THINK PEOPLE LOVE SO MUCH [A BO U T STA R WA RS] IS THAT SENSE OF C O M M U N I T Y.Ò

Kennedy is particularly struck by the immense sense of history and tradition that’s come to characterise the franchise, as it’s passed down from generation to generation. “That’s the amazing thing that George has created here – it’s a place that people hold near and dear,” she says. “What I think people love so much is that sense of community and the ability to share it.”

Above: With E.T.; Opposite: On location for Jurassic Park, with director Steven Spielberg

ÓI FEEL LIKE [THE UK] IS EVEN MORE THAN JUST A S E CO N D H O M E.Ò

Under Kennedy, Star Wars has also allowed that community to feel more inclusive than ever. Not only is the new trilogy led by a female hero, Daisy Ridley’s Rey, but more than half of Kennedy’s own executive team at Lucasfilm are women. In her eyes, the advantage of stepping into such a powerful public position is, in a phrase she lovingly borrows from Russian Doll (2019-) co-creator Leslye Headland, the opportunity to “send the elevator back down”. And she’s found numerous ways to do so, either by mentoring young filmmakers or helping to establish the Hollywood Commission to Eliminate Sexual Harassment and Advance Equality, founded in 2017. She’s excited by television – “I think many more voices are being allowed to participate in that space” – and the ways technology can help storytellers. She loved working with Jon Favreau on The Mandalorian (2019-), the first live-action Star Wars television show, and its brand-new ILM Stagecraft tech system, which uses virtual backdrops displayed on massive LED screens. To Kennedy, a good producer has three main skills: communication, flexibility, and empathy. But it’s clear, even if she doesn’t say it, that her success also comes from how forward-thinking she’s remained. “I get asked a lot: ‘Are you going to write a book? Have you kept a journal?’’’ she says. “And, no – I don’t have time!” Well, why look back when the future has so much to offer? Clarisse Loughrey is chief film critic for The Independent

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AWA RDS & NOMINATIONS BAFTA NOMINATIONS (FILM, UNLESS STATED)

OTHER HONOURS (SELECT)

2019 Academy Awards, Irving G Thalberg

2016 Feature Film, Star Wars: The Force

2013 2009

2008

2000 1983

 Awakens, with JJ Abrams, Lawrence Kasdan, Bryan Burk (Children’s) Best Film, Lincoln, with Steven Spielberg Best Film, The Curious Case of  Benjamin Button, with Frank Marshall,  Céan Chaffin  Film Not in the English Language,  The Diving Bell and the Butterfly, with Jon Kilik, Julian Schnabel  Best Film, The Sixth Sense, with Frank Marshall, Barry Mendel  Best Film, E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, with Steven Spielberg

Memorial Award 2013 Academy Awards nomination, Best

Picture, Lincoln, with Steven Spielberg 2012  Academy Awards nomination, Best

Picture, War Horse, with Steven Spielberg 2009 Academy Awards nomination, Best

2006

2004

2000

1986

1983

Picture, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, with Frank Marshall, Céan Chaffin Academy Awards nomination, Best Picture, Munich, with Steven Spielberg, Barry Mendel Academy Awards nomination, Best Picture, Seabiscuit, with Frank Marshall, Gary Ross Academy Awards nomination, Best Picture, The Sixth Sense, with Frank Marshall, Barry Mendel   Academy Awards nomination, Best  Picture, The Color Purple, with Steven  Spielberg, Frank Marshall, Quincy Jones Academy Awards nomination, Best  Picture, E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, with  Steven Spielberg

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FELLOWS OF THE ACA DEMY

1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1976 1977 1978 1979 1979 1980 1980 1981 1981 1981 1982 1983

1984 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1992 1993 1993 1994 1995 1996 1996 1996 1996 1997 1997 1997 1997 1997

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Alfred Hitchcock Freddie Young obe Grace Wyndham Goldie David Lean  Jacques Cousteau Sir Charles Chaplin Lord Olivier Sir Denis Forman Fred Zinnemann Lord Grade Sir Huw Wheldon David Attenborough cbe  John Huston Abel Gance Michael Powell Emeric Pressburger Andrzej Wajda Sir Richard Attenborough cbe Sir Hugh Greene Sam Spiegel  Jeremy Isaacs Steven Spielberg Federico Fellini Ingmar Bergman Sir Alec Guinness ch, cbe Paul Fox Louis Malle Sir John Gielgud David Plowright Sydney Samuelson cbe Colin Young cbe Michael Grade cbe Billy Wilder Jeanne Moreau Ronald Neame cbe John Schlesinger cbe Dame Maggie Smith Woody Allen Steven Bochco  Julie Christie Oswald Morris obe Harold Pinter cbe

1997 1998 1998 1999

David Rose Sean Connery Bill Cotton cbe Eric Morecambe & Ernie Wise 1999 Elizabeth Taylor 2000 Michael Caine 2000 Stanley Kubrick (posthumous) 2000 Peter Bazalgette 2001 Albert Finney 2001  John Thaw 2001 Dame Judi Dench 2002 Warren Beatty 2002 Merchant Ivory Productions 2002 Andrew Davies 2002 Sir John Mills 2003 Saul Zaentz 2003 David Jason 2004  John Boorman 2004 Roger Graef 2005  John Barry obe 2005 Sir David Frost obe 2006 Lord Puttnam cbe 2006 Ken Loach 2007 Anne V Coates obe 2007 Richard Curtis cbe 2007 Will Wright 2008 Sir Anthony Hopkins cbe 2008 Bruce Forsyth cbe 2009 Terry Gilliam 2009 Nolan Bushnell 2009 Dawn French & Jennifer Saunders 2010 Vanessa Redgrave cbe 2010 Shigeru Miyamoto 2010 Lord Bragg 2011 Sir Christopher Lee cbe 2011 Peter Molyneux obe 2011 Sir Trevor McDonald obe 2012 Martin Scorsese 2013 Sir Alan Parker

2013 Gabe Newell 2013 Michael Palin cbe 2014 Dame Helen Mirren 2014 Rockstar Games 2014  Julie Walters cbe 2015 Mike Leigh 2015 David Braben obe 2015  Jon Snow 2016 Sir Sidney Poitier 2016  John Carmack 2016 Ray Galton obe

2017 2017 2018 2018 2018 2019 2019

& Alan Simpson obe Mel Brooks  Joanna Lumley obe Sir Ridley Scott Tim Schafer Kate Adie obe Thelma Schoonmaker Dame Joan Bakewell dbe

Names and honours correct at time of presentation.


C E L E B R AT I N G YO U

THIS EVENING C O N G R AT U L AT I O N S T O A L L

NOMINEES AND WINNERS

A N D T O K AT H L E E N K E N N E D Y O N R E C E I V I N G A B A F TA F E L L O W S H I P

www.pinewoodgroup.com


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A NDY SERKIS OUTSTA NDING BRITISH CONTRIBUTION TO CINEM A

WORDS BY NEIL SMITH PORTR AITS BY BAFTA/PHIL FISK IMAGES COURTESY O F BA F TA/G UY LE V Y ( F I L M AWA R D S 2 019), REX FEATURES

TH ROUGH TH E CRE ATI O N O F SUCH characters as Gollum in the Lord of the Rings and Hobbit series, Caesar in the Planet of the Apes trilogy and the titular gorilla in 2005’s King Kong, the recipient of this year’s Outstanding British Contribution to Cinema award, one of BAFTA’s highest honours, has both pioneered the evolving art of performance capture (Pcap, or sometimes known as MoCap) and widened the parameters of what it means to be an actor in the 21st century. It is surprising to learn then that the future filmmaker born Andrew Clement Serkis in April 1964 had no intention of becoming an actor when he was growing up and was heading towards a different career when the performing bug struck.

“I went to college to study visual arts and in my first year had to choose a subsidiary subject,” Serkis reveals. “There was a very strong theatre studies department at the University of Lancaster, so I did a subsidiary course in theatre. Gradually I started to take on acting roles, which made me realise that being on stage, rather than being behind a drawing board or easel, was what I wanted to do. I was very fortunate that I was able to change my degree to one that involved all aspects of theatre design and movement.” ÒMIKE LEIGHÕS PROCESS WAS INVA LUA BLE AND I LEARNED AN ENORMOUS A M O U N T F R O M I T.Ó

Starting out at the Duke’s Playhouse in Lancaster under the tutelage of Jonathan Petherbridge, Serkis would soon accrue a wealth of theatre credits that included roles at the Royal Exchange in Manchester (where he met his future wife, Lorraine Ashbourne) and London’s Royal Court (where he originated the part of Potts in Jez Butterworth’s debut play, Mojo). Television parts also came his way, as did a small yet memorable role in Mike Leigh’s 1997 film Career Girls. “Mike’s process was invaluable and I learned an enormous amount from doing it,” he recalls. “You give yourself to this extraordinary process of deep-diving into the life of the role you’re playing, without knowing what the outcome might be.” (Serkis would collaborate with Leigh again on Topsy-Turvy, his 1999 film about Gilbert and Sullivan.) Around the turn of the century, however, an entirely new opportunity came Serkis’ way when he was approached to voice 77


the role of corrupted halfling Gollum in Peter Jackson’s adaptation of JRR Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings. “I didn’t consider myself a voice actor, so I was sort of ambivalent about it,” Serkis admits. “But Peter was interested in using a new technology called motion capture that was in its very early stages, and I was fascinated by that.” Working on The Lord of the Rings films saw Serkis act as a physical presence on the New Zealand set, supplying a reference for their visual effects artists and digital animators to create a computer-generated Gollum. “I loved the concept of being able to disappear inside a character to the point you are completely unrecognisable,” he explains. “I’d always loved the notion of transformation as an actor, but doing it this way offered a great sense of freedom.”

Above: As singer Ian Dury in Sex & Drugs & Rock & Roll; Opposite: BAFTA portrait

Serkis’ portrayal of Gollum, a treacherous yet pitiable outcast consumed by his desire for his “precious” One Ring, brought him worldwide acclaim and made him the obvious choice to be Kong in Jackson’s subsequent epic. That in turn led to his involvement in the rebooted Planet of the Apes films, playing a super-intelligent primate who goes from laboratory experiment to revolutionary leader over the course of three movies. “Performance capture was the only way you could have achieved that,” says Serkis. “Yet, it’s not just a generic ape or gorilla – you’re playing a very specific role. Obviously, if you are playing a creature you learn their behaviour and physicality. But at the end of the day, you are playing a character that only happens to be from the animal world.”

ÒI LOVED BEIN G A BLE TO DISA PPE A R INSIDE A CHA R ACTER TO THE POINT YOU A RE U N R E CO G N I S A B L E.Ó

Serkis’ extensive experience in the performance capture sphere saw him increasingly sought after by various film and game projects. This soon made him aware how much the UK needed a facility as advanced and knowledgeable as the ones he’d witnessed in New Zealand. “There wasn’t a performance studio in the UK that had the quality, equipment, understanding and knowledge base I had experienced,” he explains. “I realised at that point I felt behoven to start some kind of experimental workspace-slash-performance capture studio to enhance work flow and push forward.” The result was The Imaginarium, a production company-cum studio space in west London dedicated to emerging technologies and, what Serkis describes as, “next generation storytelling” in film, television, games and theatre.

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FILMOGRAPHY 2019 2018 2018 2017 2017 2017 2015 2015 2014 2012 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011

Long Shot Mowgli: Legend of the Jungle * Black Panther Star Wars: The Last Jedi Breathe * War for the Planet of the Apes Star Wars: The Force Awakens Avengers: Age of Ultron Dawn of the Planet of the Apes The Hobbit:  An Unexpected Journey Arthur Christmas The Adventures of Tintin Wild Bill Death of a Superhero Rise of the Planet of the Apes

2011 2010 2010 2008 2008 2007 2007 2006 2006 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2002 2002 2002

Burke and Hare Brighton Rock Sex & Drugs & Rock  & Roll **  Inkheart The Cottage  Sugarhouse Extraordinary Rendition Flushed Away The Prestige Alex Rider: Operation  Stormbreaker King Kong 13 Going on 30 The Lord of the Rings:  The Return of the King  The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers Deathwatch The Escapist 24 Hour Party People

2001  The Lord of the Rings:

2000 2000 2000 1999 1999 1998 1997 1997 1996 1994

The Fellowship of the Ring  Five Seconds to Spare  Pandaemonium  The Jolly Boys’ Last Stand Topsy-Turvy Shooting the Past Among Giants Mojo Career Girls Stella Does Tricks  Royal Deceit * also director ** also executive producer

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Ó I TÔS A LWAYS A N HONOUR TO B E A CCO L A D ED, ES P E C I A L LY BY B A F TA .Ò

Below: Co-presenting the Original Music award at the 2019 Film Awards; Opposite: Pcap in action for War for the Planet of the Apes

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Founding The Imaginarium in 2012 with his producing partner Jonathan Cavendish, together with his experience of directing second unit on Peter Jackson’s Hobbit trilogy, made Serkis’ transition to director a formality. Yet, he could hardly have chosen two more diverse projects for his two debut films – Mowgli: Legend of the Jungle (2018), an exploration of Rudyard Kipling’s Jungle Book stories using performance capture technology, and Breathe (2017), a drama inspired by Diana Cavendish’s polio-afflicted father, Robin. “It all depends on the stories you want to tell,” says Serkis, recently to be found directing Tom Hardy and Michelle Williams in Venom 2 (slated for release in 2020). “We’re in a really fortunate position, and I feel very lucky to be able to choose interesting projects to work on.” Previously nominated for BAFTAs for playing Ian Brady in Long ford (2006) and Ian Dury in Sex & Drugs & Rock & Roll (2010), Serkis says it is “very gratifying” to be recognised for a body of work that runs the gamut from independent British cinema to


the blockbuster Star Wars and Marvel franchises. “It’s always an honour to be accoladed, especially by BAFTA,” he says. “I’ve had a long association with BAFTA over the years and it’s an extraordinary organisation.”

AWA RDS & NOMINATIONS BAFTA NOMINATIONS (FILM, UNLESS STATED)

As the father of three budding actors, meanwhile, he is ideally placed to offer advice to those hoping to follow in his footsteps. “Know why you do it,” Serkis declares. “It’s tempting to get caught up in the superficiality and Instagram of it all, so it helps to have a specific goal.”

2010 Leading Actor, Sex & Drugs

& Rock & Roll 2007  Actor, Longford (Television)

Neil Smith is a journalist, critic and contributing editor of Total Film

OTHER HONOURS (SELECT)

2015 Empire Awards win, Best Actor,

 Dawn of the Planet of the Apes

2014 Satellite Awards nomination,

2011

2010

2009 2004

 Best Actor in a Supporting Role,  Dawn of the Planet of the Apes Satellite Awards nomination,  Best Actor in a Supporting Role,  Rise of the Planet of the Apes Evening Standard British Film Awards win, Best Actor, Sex & Drugs & Rock & Roll  BIFA nomination, Best Actor, Sex & Drugs & Rock & Roll  Empire Awards win, Best British  Actor, The Lord of the Rings: The  Return of the King

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TRIP THE LIGHT FA N TA S T I C WORDS BY TOBY WEIDM ANN PORTRAITS & IMAGES BY BA F TA/M AT T H O LYOA K ; B A F TA / MISHA MEGHNA; BAFTA/FELICITY

T H E J O U R N E Y TO E XCEL L EN CE I N T H E FI L M I N D U S T R Y C A N B E LO N G A N D H A R D, U S U A L LY R I D D L ED W I T H O B S TA CL ES A N D H I G H S A N D LOWS. S U CCES S D EP EN DS O N H AV I N G A L I G H T A N D N I M B L E TO U CH; TA L EN T B O L S T ER ED BY DEDICATION A ND PERSE VER A NCE.

MCCABE; BAFTA/ JAMIE SIMONDS; B A F T A /J O N N Y B I R C H ; SARAH BROCKLEHURST

with multiple meanings. For some, it’s about financial reward or critical acclaim; for others, it’s about creative fulfilment. Maybe it means achieving the seemingly impossible. Perhaps it’s simply about fulfilling a dream. While the destination may be similar and experiences shared, the journey to get there is individual to each. SUCCESS IS A N EBU LOUS CO N CEP T

Taking that first step is often the hardest, especially when you have no experience or insider knowledge on how to proceed. “The

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idea of film felt like something far away from me,” explains Sarah Brocklehurst, now the producer of Animals (2019) and a co-nominee for BAFTA’s Outstanding Debut by a British Writer, Director or Producer for Black Pond back in 2012. “It felt like something that happened to people that I didn’t know... I always loved film, but I came to it after being very passionate about theatre. I never thought film was something that was especially accessible.”

From l-r: Lynne Ramsay, Anthony Welsh, Emily Morgan (with director Rungano Nuoni, left), Sarah Brocklehurst, James Harkness

The experience of actor Anthony Welsh, who made his film debut in Red Tails (2012) and recently starred in The Personal History of David Copperfield (2020), parallels that of Brocklehurst. “There was no direct link, that I could see, between looking at people on the screen and believing I could be them. It was a distant galaxy away,” he says. “I really enjoyed drama at high school and showed a lot of passion for it, but no one in my family was an actor or anything like that.” Double BAFTA-winning writer-director Lynne Ramsay started her journey by accident, explaining that she fell into it inadvertently through being a photographer. “Film director wasn’t a career option where I came from, a typical working class Glaswegian family, [although] my parents were film buffs, so from an early age I was exposed to their passion for old Hollywood classics.” As chance would have it, her teacher showed her class Maya Deren’s short film Meshes of the Afternoon (1943), with and without the soundtrack. “I was mesmerised by it. So, I applied to film school on a whim the day before the deadline expired,” she explains.

ÓTHE IDEA OF FI L M FELT LI K E S O M E T H I N G FA R AWAY F R O M M E.Ò SARAH BROCKLEHURST

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BA F TA ELE VATE Actors Anthony Welsh and James Harkness were selected to benefit from BAFTA’s Elevate initiative, which this year is supporting 21 film and television actors. Elevate was created to support those from

underrepresented groups progress in their careers, and to help tackle the issue of inclusion in our industries. Those selected receive a bespoke 12-month programme of support, including networking

opportunities, introductions, mentoring, tailored panel discussions, masterclasses and workshops focused on professional development.

On the back of her stills portfolio, Ramsay landed an interview at the National Film & Television School: “Although I was really into films, loved movies and watched them all the time, I went to film school not really knowing anything about them, having never made one. It was Walter Lassally, a great DoP, who I think thought he could see an eye there... I was discovering what films were and learning how to move the camera and everything else. It was a different language, but I learned pretty fast.” Fellow Glaswegian James Harkness’ journey into acting was one that originated out of a truly horrific moment in his life. On his 18th birthday, he was the victim of an unprovoked attack with an axe that left him hospitalised. Born and raised in the deprived area of Gorbals, Harkness’ teenage years had been combative, although he had found solace in a local theatre group. “I was just a wee kid having fun,” he explains. “It was like mucking about with your pals. The older I got, people started telling me I could make a career out of it, but I wasn’t really looking at that. I started in the Citizens Theatre Young Company where Neil Packham got his hands on me. He fought for me to pursue it because there were a lot of distractions in my area.”

ÓA LT H O U G H I WA S R E A L LY I N TO F I L M S , I WENT TO FIL M S C H O O L N OT R E A L LY KNOWING ANYTHING A B O U T T H E M .Ò LY N N E R A M S AY

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Harkness, who landed roles in 2015’s Macbeth and 2019’s Wild Rose, discovered his love for film as a child through a “treasure trove” of VHS given to him by his neighbours, who were upgrading their collection to DVD. However, he had stepped away from acting to earn a trade when the fateful night with the axe happened. “Before the incident, that part of my life wasn’t right. When I awoke in the hospital, I knew going back to acting was the right thing to do... When I was asked to go to drama school [he was sponsored to go to LAMDA – ed.], I didn’t think it was possible. I thought you had to go to university or something. I thought this was my chance; I nearly died, this is my second go at life and I’m going to go for it.”


Harkness’ passion is something shared with all of those interviewed for this feature, something perhaps consistent with all those who work in the industry. Emily Morgan, the BAFTA-winning producer of I Am Not a Witch (2017), knew she wanted to make films from a young age, although initially she was unsure of which craft to pursue. “It was an instant obsession and passion,” she says, recalling her early experiences watching 80s’ flicks at home courtesy of her babysitter. “I just loved being transported by cinema. That’s always carried me through in my projects. I choose to make films that tend to be quite far flung and otherworldly. Even if they are about feelings that are very close to me, the setting is often very different... I knew I loved film and that I wanted to work in film. The first thing I hooked onto was editing and then it just kept evolving. I was working in postproduction and then distribution, hands-on production, production coordination and that evolved into more creative producing.” Once the journey has commenced, navigating a path becomes the next hurdle: the film industry is a notoriously risky business and many obstacles can lie in the way. Actors, in particular, face a life of rejection through the audition process, interspersed with the occasional win. Welsh experienced this early on, having applied to both RADA and LAMDA and being initially rejected by both. It was only when one of his teachers at Richmond Drama School pointed out that LAMDA allows students to re-apply in the same year, which he did successfully, that his career trajectory got back on track. “I was devastated,” he says about that first double rejection. “There was nothing I wanted to do more... Once my teacher suggested I re-audition, it was like, ‘why not?’ I had nothing to lose... Rejection is really tough, especially as an actor because it’s you walking into that room, your physical self. So when you’re told ‘no’, it’s easy to think it’s personal. The more experience I’ve had, I’ve realised it’s really not a lot of the time. There are so many other things that have nothing to do with your talent... It’s interesting because people only see the wins, they don’t see the ones you don’t get, which are so much more. But if it’s something you love, the way that I love it, and have been obsessed by it, then you just have to keep going.”

ÓIT WAS A N INSTA NT OBSESSION AND PA S SI O N. I J UST LOVED BEING TRANSPORTED BY C I N E M A .Ò E M I LY M O R GA N

Emily Morgan on location for Make Up, with star Molly Windsor and director Claire Oakley

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Ó P E O P L E O N LY SEE THE WINS, THEY DONÔT SEE THE ONES YOU D O N Ô T G E T.Ò ANTHONY WELSH

Harkness concurs: “It’s a bit like a boxer having to learn to be punched in the face; it’s up to you whether you get back up or not. It’s never going to be easy. If you don’t care, maybe your heart’s not in it.” Bumps in the road for a producer can be anything from a financier pulling out to conflicting schedules forcing unexpected changes. “I overcome the disappointments quite quickly,” notes Brocklehurst. “I’m pretty strong willed in that respect. You have to feel it, absorb the blow, for however long that takes, and then just move on. Because you care for a project so much, it feels like an indictment of the thing you love, but I tell myself people pass for all sorts of reasons. It doesn’t reflect on the quality of my project... A practical way I tell myself this is that they have spent two hours deliberating on it, and I’ve spent four years thinking about it. So, therefore, my opinion matters more.” Morgan adds that you can’t be too single-minded. While tenacity and perseverance are important attributes for any producer, she notes that you have to learn from setbacks, too. “It’s worth thinking about what that setback is telling you and then taking your next step based on that,” she says. “It might simply be that they have something else that’s too similar or are already committed to something else. So, learning from the setbacks and really analysing them is important.”

Sarah Brocklehurst on location with Animals director Sophie Hyde

Ramsay prefers to focus on the good stuff. While the politics of making a film can be trying, she uses the creative process that she loves to motivate herself onwards. “I think I just get over any setbacks by thinking creatively,” she laughs. “A new idea is really exciting to me and that takes me over the hump... You do get the knocks, but you just have to put them into perspective. I’ve been lucky enough to make the films I’ve wanted to make, and I’ve had final cut. It’s a tough job, film director, there’s no question about that, but it’s also a brilliant job. I think every director feels like giving up sometimes, but you could never give it up because you so love filmmaking.” Clearly, it’s the wins that make the journey worthwhile, whether it’s landing that special role or finally releasing your film into the wild. If awards success follows, then all’s the better. “It can be such a struggle to get a film made,” says Brocklehurst, “but there is a huge buzz and overall satisfaction about seeing the film you’ve willed into existence, that you’ve spent years plotting with your creative team, collaborators and partners. When it’s as wonderful as you’d dreamed, that’s a huge thrill. It’s also incredibly rewarding to feel like you’ve honoured the vision of the people who trusted you in the beginning.” “It’s always nervewracking seeing a film with an audience for the first time,” adds Ramsay, “as you definitely

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BA F TA BRE A K THROUGH Producer Sarah Brocklehurst was selected to benefit from BAFTA’s Breakthrough programme in 2019. Since 2013, BAFTA Breakthrough has showcased and supported the next generation of creative talent

in film, games and television. This initiative identifies the most exciting new and aspiring talent breaking through in the film, games and television industries, giving them access to unique career development

feel the atmosphere, but it’s also exhilarating if they seem to be going with it... You spend a lengthy time thinking, planning and questioning your ideas then questioning them again, reaching for something that connects with people in ways that are sometimes beyond words or explanation... It’s going beyond the surface that excites me. I think people can sense when something is phoney. That’s what I find so powerful about film: you can be transported without really knowing why. It appeals to the senses like music. You just hope you have done something that really immerses an audience into the world you’ve created.” For those starting out on their journey into the film industry, Harkness, Morgan and Brocklehurst offer some thoughts on how best to navigate your way. “It’s a cliché, but take a breath, just be confident and believe in yourself,” states Harkness. Morgan agrees confidence is key: “It’s tough as a woman starting out. Things are changing thankfully and I feel a lot luckier than those in the generations before me... There are always setbacks, but you have to be confident and rise above them.” Brocklehurst, meanwhile, offers this: “Find the people who share your passions and ambitions and make them your team. Dream big, work hard, support each other and keep going.”

and mentoring opportunities. BAFTA Breakthrough gives talented individuals bespoke support, enabling them to build on their success and ensuring continued development in their field.

BAFTA's Breakthrough Brits, in partnership with Netflix in 2019 and 2020

ÓTA K E A BRE ATH, JUST BE CONFIDENT AND BELIEVE IN Y O U R S E L F. Ò JAMES HARKNESS

“There isn’t one route to success,” concludes Welsh, referring to the journey itself. “Whenever I think about any of the really famous people, the icons who made it to the spotlight, often you will find that their journeys are totally different. Embrace your journey... and don’t take that first rejection as the only option!”

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RE- CREW-TING THE BEST WORDS BY TOBY WEIDM ANN IMAGES COURTESY OF B A F TA /P O L LY T H O M A S, BAFTA/IAN WELDON, BAFTA/L AUR A PAL MER, BA F TA/GA BI TO RRES

B FI N E T WO RK X BA F TA CRE W IS A U K-WI D E PRO FESSI O NA L D E VELO PM ENT PRO G R A M M E F O R E M E R G I N G F I L M M A K I N G TA L E N T, A CR OS S A L L D EPA R TM EN TS. I T CO U L D B E T H E PERFECT PL ACE TO FI N D E XCI T I N G, N E W A N D U K- BA SED TA L EN T YO U N EED FO R FUTURE PROJECTS.

mission is to support the growth of creative talent in the UK, so although breaking into the industry can be difficult, BAFTA is there to help. Through its year-round programme of Learning & New Talent events and initiatives, BAFTA strives to give creatives unique opportunities to develop their skills and make vital connections. A KEY PART O F BAF TA’S

ÒITÔS A WONDERFUL OPPORTUNITY FOR PROFESSIONALS AND ASPIRANTS WITH A VISION TO ENHANCE THEIR C A R EERS.Ó

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One such initiative is BFI NETWORK x BAFTA Crew. This year-long professional development programme has been designed to provide an environment in which like-minded UK creatives in film and television can meet other professionals at a similar level in the industry and gain a broader understanding of their work. Many bespoke events are held throughout the year, covering creative and technical topics, and hosting masterclasses, round tables and livestreams with expert BAFTA-nominated speakers. The aim is to provide not just networking opportunities but also a chance to explore the challenges of approaching a first feature, understand the relationship between craft and technical departments and hear insights from BAFTA-nominees in cinematography, costume, production design, editing and so on. Including our cohort in Games, BAFTA Crew supports more than 1,000 participants, covering a range of crafts and skillsets, providing a unique pool of upcoming British talent from the film, games and television industries. BFI NETWORK x BAFTA Crew supports writers, directors and producers who are on the way to making their debut project in film or a television project, and


below-the-line craft and technical practitioners with two to four main team credits across all key roles within production. The participants are selected by a committee of industry representatives, from BFI NETWORK, BAFTA and BAFTA-nominated professionals. BAFTA aims to ensure the programme is as inclusive as possible – 52 per cent are women, 25 per cent are BAME and 19 per cent identify themselves as having a disability. BFI NETWORK x BAFTA Crew also offers additional support for those from underrepresented groups, who can apply for mentoring. The past year has seen such mentors as Katherine Bridle (head of film development, See-Saw Films), Bart Layton (BAFTA-winning director), Stephen Beresford (BAFTA-winning writer), Emily Morgan (BAFTA-winning producer) and Celine Haddad (creative project manager, Irish Film Board), among many more, take appropriate mentees under their wing.

From l-r: Meet the Agents roundtable at the Bristol Watershed; The Importance of Writers Q&A in Tyneside with Nicole Taylor; a roundtable with Walter Murch on Sound and Film Editing; The Pinewood Vision Lab for female cinematographers, with speakers Jet Omoshebi (colourist), Emma McCleave (assistant editor), Nuria Perez (digital imaging technician) and Noga Alon-Stein (visual effects producer)

Feedback from participants has been overwhelmingly positive, with one stating: “BFI NETWORK x BAFTA Crew is a one of the best programmes available to emerging talent. The best advice I can give is to grab every opportunity, every masterclass, every livestream offered to you, even if it’s not in your expertise, and soak up the experience. The more you give the more you get in return.” And the mentoring, too, has had very positive results: “It gave me access to someone at the heart of project development for the highlevel documentary programming and films I want to work towards. Their experience and insights continue to be invaluable. I also live in north-east Scotland; I felt like I was at least having some connection to London, to what at times seems a very far-off land in terms of distance and attitude.”

ÒITÔS REASSURING TO HAVE SOMEONE MORE ADVANCED IN THEIR CAREER SUPPORTING YOU IN YOURS.Ó

BAFTA has seen the success of the initiative directly, notably at this year’s Film Awards, with two female director participants earning a nomination in the British Short Film category, Sasha Rainbow (Kamali) and Myriam Raja (Azaar). Equally, cinematographer Jon Muschamp shot The Trap for writer-director Lena Headey, which is also nominated for the same award. So, if you’re looking for upcoming talent for a future film project, we urge you to consider looking through the BFI NETWORK x BAFTA Crew directory. Split into region, and listed by name and craft, it’s a one-stop shop for some incredible emerging talent: www.bafta.org/supporting-talent/crew-directory-2019-20

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LOCA L HEROES FOR THE LOVE OF FIL M WORDS BY TOBY WEIDM ANN IMAGES COURTESY OF BAFTA/DANA THOMPSON, JAM JAR CINEMA

IAIN MACCOLL SCREEN MACHINE

DAN ELLIS JAM JAR CINEMA

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A T T H E E N D O F 2 018 , B A F T A L A U N C H E D A N E W CO M PE T I T I O N TO R ECO G N I S E I N D I V I D UA LS FROM ACROSS THE UK WHO HAVE GONE A B OV E A N D B E YO N D TO B R I N G FI L M TO T H EI R CO M M U N I T I ES. F O L LOW I N G H U N D R EDS O F A PPLICATIONS, NOM INATING A HOST OF INSPIR ATIONA L FIGURES, THE COM PE TITION H A S G O N E FRO M ST R EN GT H TO ST R EN GT H, PROMPTING THE L AUNCH OF THE COMPE TITION F O R A S E CO N D Y E A R. OV ER T H E F O L LOW I N G PA G E S , W E T E L L T H E S TO R Y O F T H E I N A U G U R A L W I N N ERS O F T H E F O R T H E LOV E O F FI L M COMPE TITION, A ND PROFILE THIS YE A RÔS T W O R E C I P I E N T S ... FO R H IS REVI EW O F BI LL Forsyth’s wonderful film Local Hero (1983), critic Roger Ebert wrote: “Nothing is more absorbing than human personalities, developed with love and humour.” While this is a nearperfect observation of Forsyth’s heartwarming comedy (for which he won a BAFTA for his direction), it’s also an apt description of the winners of BAFTA’s For the Love of Film competition, first launched in December 2018.

Across the country, unsung heroes go the extra mile to share their love of film with others. Some save their local cinemas from closure, some run film clubs in local care homes, others have made a social impact on a grand scale through their joy for cinema. Whatever their contribution, they have become legends in their local communities.  Iain MacColl and Dan Ellis, the winners of the inaugural For the Love of Film competition (selected by a panel of expert industry judges), not only approach their work with great love and humour, they are also local heroes to those who benefit from their passion. MacColl is the senior operator of Screen Machine, the UK’s only full-time, self-contained mobile cinema, serving 40 communities across some of the remotest areas of Scotland since 1998. Ellis is the founder and managing director of Jam Jar Cinema in Whitley Bay, near Newcastle, one of the largest towns in the country without a cinema before its opening in 2013. As independent exhibitors, their


work goes far beyond simply screening films; they connect with their local communities on a much deeper level.

The Screen Machine truck out in the wild

“Screen Machine is a cultural event,” explains MacColl, who has been with Screen Machine from the very beginning (as an aside, Local Hero is one of his favourite films). “It brings the high street cinema experience to your doorstep. It’s also important from a social aspect: young and old, families, they all come together to watch a film in a lovely, comfortable auditorium, which is as good as any multiplex. The picture and sound quality is exactly the same as you’d get in any cinema. In some of the small villages, they actually tell me they’d rather wait and watch a film in the Screen Machine, because it’s a whole other experience. It’s friendly, everybody knows everybody. It really creates a social occasion for the local people in that village.” Ellis’ Jam Jar Cinema was named after a tradition where you could go to a cinema at a discounted rate or for free if you brought along a jam jar, an idea originated in Tyneside. For Ellis, his cinema provides a vital social service to Whitley Bay and its community, with the town’s 36,000 population and businesses hit hard by the recession. “I firmly believe everybody should have access to an independent cinema in their town,” he says. “For us, cinema isn’t just about watching films. There are plenty of ways to do that these days. Cinema is about that shared, collective experience, whether it’s

ÓSCREEN MACHINE BRINGS THE HIGH STREET CINEM A TO Y O U R D O O R S T E P. ITÕS A SOCIAL O CC A S I O N .Ò 91


going to see the latest blockbuster, or finding an excuse to get out of the house or just wanting a really positive social occasion with the family. Cinemas are fast becoming social hubs of the community and that’s what we were lacking in Whitley Bay. The town was really down on its luck, we had a lot of businesses close, we had a lot of people living in terrible temporary accommodation and we didn’t have a community centre. So as much as we are a cinema, we’re also a hub for all of the community.” Top: Dan Ellis in the Jam Jar foyer; Above: Iain MacColl inside the Screen Machine; Overleaf: Helpful staff at Jam Jar Cinema and a peek inside the screening theatre

ÒA S M U C H A S W E ARE A CINEMA, JAM JAR IS ALSO A HUB FOR ALL OF T H E C O M M U N I T Y.Ó

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Originally Jam Jar was a volunteer organisation, but the cinema’s success has meant it’s now a fully-fledged business, with a team of dedicated staff who are all locals and share Ellis’ passion for film and bringing people together. It welcomes more than 45,000 cinema-goers and screens 200-plus films a year in a programme that Ellis describes as “a little bit independent, a little bit blockbuster, a lot of British and a few other things speckled in”. Ellis also subsidises special fundraising events, raising money for local good causes. Screen Machine, meanwhiule, is funded by Creative Scotland and Highlands and Islands Enterprise, with further support from Caledonian MacBrayne. Housed in a large articulated truck, which transforms into a comfortable 80-seat auditorium, it’s no easy feat to bring the Screen Machine to some very remote areas – if you’ve driven round any of Scotland’s tight winding roads, you will understand the skill it needs. It has a 40-stop schedule, which is repeated three times a year, with its mix of blockbusters and more arthouse, independent fare reaching more than 30,000 people. “We would love to do more,” MacColl notes, who as a Screen Machine operator must do everything, from driving to the venue to setting up, selling and collecting the tickets and projecting the films (he also maintains the equipment and lorry). “Screen Machine is a victim of its own success. More and more villages are asking us to come to them, but we’re at the maximum of what we can do. If finances allow, we’d love to run two Screen Machines because there’s certainly a need for it... We have regulars in every venue we play, who have been coming for years – they even have their favourite seats. The cinema belongs to the community. It’s their cinema. They often remember the first film they ever watched in the Screen Machine. These are strong memories and cherished memories.” He adds, laughing: “It’s such an intimate experience here that the customers will give me a hard time if they haven’t enjoyed a film, like I’m the director, writer and producer.”


THIS YEARÔS WINNER LIZZIE BANKS, OS K A B R I G H T FI L M FES TI VA L

l i z z i e ba n k s is the first of two winners of BAFTA’s For the Love of Film Competition in 2020. As the producer of the Oska Bright Film Festival, the world’s leading showcase of short films made by or featuring people with learning disabilities, autism or Asperger’s, she has fought hard to put representation in the spotlight. Under Banks’ stewardship, the past nine years has seen the festival grow dramatically, with the four-day event providing a much-needed platform for unique stories, filmmakers and actors. In 2019, the festival

(which has its home in Brighton) screened 99 films from 17 different countries, with more than 3,000 people in attendance. Passionate about both film and representation, Banks has made it her mission to tackle the issue of inclusion in film and television. She supports the learning disabled team who plan, manage and deliver Oska Bright each year, as well as overseeing the festival’s international touring programme and its marketing and social media presence. Banks also helps the team secure screenings for the

films across the UK. Oska Bright is now funded by the BFI and has BAFTA-qualifying status. Banks also lobbies television and film executives to make the industry fully inclusive, and she has joined the Independent Cinema Office’s Women in Leadership programme. She is a leading figure in promoting inclusion in the screen industries and has ambitious plans for not only the future of the Festival but its filmmakers as well.

FOR THE LOVE OF FILM 2020 COMPETITION JURY

Both MacColl and Ellis were surprised when they were chosen as the winners of the For the Love of Film competition. However, they say it’s the knock-on effects that have been so meaningful.

AMMA ASANTE

“It’s opened Screen Machine up to a wider audience, more people are aware, not just in the Highlands and islands but all over the world, of what we do,” MacColl says. “It’s gone way beyond the reach of what a normal competition would do. The exposure alone is invaluable and for BAFTA to recognise the small guys is incredible. I did not think for a second that BAFTA would even know what the Screen Machine was, far less pick me as the winner. BAFTA made a three-minute video about the Screen Machine and it’s been viewed more than 240,000 times. That’s special. You can’t buy that kind of publicity.”

JACK HOWARD

EDITH BOWMAN PAUL GREENGR ASS ANDREW ORR

Ellis adds: “It’s a brave and bold way for BAFTA to look at places that are actually exhibiting and support the exhibitor sector. It gave us great profile and we managed to raise some finance on the back of the publicity. A year down the line, we’ve added a second and third screen. On the surface, it is just a lovely reward, but in the real

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THIS YEARÔS WINNER JANET DUNN & MARTIN FOL, PLAZA COMMUNITY CINEMA JAN ET DU N N AN D M ARTI N

are the second winners of the 2020 competition. Together, they fund and operate Liverpool’s Plaza Community Cinema. Run predominantly by volunteers, the cinema offers dynamic film-based educational programmes to schools, the volunteer sector and the public. FO L

The Plaza has been an integral part of its local community since its opening in 1939. When the cinema was threatened with closure in 1995, Dunn stepped forward to secure a 10,000-signature petition to save it. It re-opened on 18 July 1997,

after being registered as a charity that would benefit the community through the power of film. The community benefits from various film courses for young people aged 13-19, helping to train them in film production and giving them the opportunity to experience the magic of showcasing their films on the big screen of the Plaza itself. The cinema also hosts autism and disability- and dementia-friendly screenings. The films shown for the latter are specifically chosen to trigger strong memories; the lights are left on low, with the provision of

world it’s actually enabled us to do so much more. It’s helped our business and it’s helped our staff. The feeling of pride in our town afterwards was huge.” With so much to focus on the creation, promotion and exhibition of feature films, it’s easy to become blinkered to how they are enjoyed by the public. As Jam Jar Cinema and Screen Machine illustrate, where a film is shown plays a vital role in the power of cinema and its positive effects on communities. “Our biggest asset is people,” concludes Ellis, “from punters who come through the door to staff who help run the venue. Little things can make a huge difference to a town. And if we can do it here, then there are plenty of other towns that could benefit from the same thing.”

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easy wheelchair access, volume adjustment and an interval serving free tea and biscuits. In the decades since its re-opening, the Plaza has provided a safe, welcoming and affordable hub for its local residents and is an inclusive space for all. It has thrived thanks to the Plaza team’s enthusiasm, the integral support of its volunteers and the devotion of its community.


Director


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THE ART OF PERFORMANCE BA F TA PHOTOGR A PHY BY M AT T H O LYOA K 97


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FRANCES MCDORMAND & SAM ROCKWELL

I N H O N OU R O F TH E I NTRO DUCTI O N of a new category at these Awards, Casting, this year’s photographic essay focuses on the ultimate subject of this craft: actors. Casting the right people in a role can make or break a film, with actors elevating the words of a script and bringing to life the vision of directors and producers. For the audience, actors can make us laugh, they can make us cry and they can capture our hearts in such a deep manner that we will forever cherish the characters they create and the journeys they take us on.

This essay features some of the incredible official BAFTA portraiture taken at the Film Awards over the past two years by photographer Matt Holyoak. Across a diverse career, Holyoak has captured some of the world’s most famous subjects, from Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II to Kanye West and Yasmin Le Bon. His exceptional portraiture has appeared in Vanity Fair, Harper’s Bazaar, The Times, Rolling Stone, GQ and many more. He describes his style and aesthetic as one of strength and elegance, perfectly illustrated in these wonderful images. 99


CHIWETEL EJIOFOR OPPOSITE: OLIVIA COLMAN

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CYNTHIA ERIVO

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OPPOSITE: JOSH OÕCONNOR JESSIE BUCKLEY

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RAMI MALEK 106


GUGU MBATHA-RAW & ORL A NDO BLOOM

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MAHERSHALA ALI

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MICHELLE YEOH OPPOSITE: FLORENCE PUGH

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L I LY CO L L I N S

ESSAY CREDITS PHOTOGRAPHER M AT T H O LYOA K

www.mattholyoak.com info@mattholyoak.com DIGITAL TECHNICIAN BEN COLSON RETOUCHING BELINDA COLEMAN, S H O E M A K E RS E LV ES

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IN MEMORIAM T H E FO L LOWI N G PAG ES H O N O U R THE ESTEEMED CONTRIBUTION TO THE FIL M INDUSTRY BY THOSE I N D I V I D U A L S W H O H AV E S A D LY D I E D I N T H E L A S T 12 M O N T H S . TO LEA RN MORE A BOUT THEIR M A N Y A C H I E V E M E N T S , V I S I T: B A F TA .O R G/H E R I TA G E/I N M E M O R YO F

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IN MEMORIAM

JULIE ADAMS

Actress 17 October 1926 – 3 February 2019

DANNY AIELLO

Actor 20 June 1933 – 12 December 2019

BIBI ANDERSSON

Actress 11 November 1935 – 14 April 2019

ROBERT ANGELL

Producer 3 December 1921 – 3 December 2019

CARMEN ARGENZIANO

Actor 27 October 1943 – 10 February 2019

RENÉ AUBERJONOIS

Actor 1 June 1940 – 8 December 2019

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ROBERT AXELROD

Actor 29 May 1949 – 7 September 2019

THOMAS BAPTISTE

Actor, Singer 17 March 1929 – 6 December 2018

TONY BRITTON

Actor 9 June 1924 – 22 December 2019

JOHN CARL BUECHLER

Special Effects Artist, Make-up Artist 18 June 1952 – 18 March 2019

BEN BARENHOLTZ

Producer 5 October 1935 – 26 June 2019

CARMINE CARIDI

Actor 23 January 1934 – 28 May 2019

E R I C A B E N S LY

Production Manager 7 November 1963 – 9 December 2018

SEYMOUR CASSEL

Actor 22 January 1935 – 7 April 2019

CAMERON BOYCE

Actor 28 May 1999 – 6 July 2019

JAMES CELLAN JONES

Director, former BAFTA Chair 13 July 1931 – 30 August 2019

ROBERT BRADFORD

Producer 25 May 1925 – 2 July 2019

MARTIN CHARNIN

Lyricist, Director 24 November 1934 – 7 July 2019


PETER CLIFTON

Director 1 April 1941 – 31 May 2018

STANLEY DONEN

Director, Producer 13 April 1924 – 21 February 2019

DAVID COBHA M

B I L LY D R AG O

Director, Producer, Writer 11 May 1930 – 25 March 2018

Actor 30 November 1945 – 24 June 2019

LARRY COHEN

Writer, Producer, Director 15 July 1941 – 23 March 2019

VALENTINA CORTESE

Actress 1 January 1923 – 10 July 2019

WILLIAM CREBER

Production Designer, Art Director 26 July 1931 – 7 March 2019

ALBERT FINNEY

Actor 9 May 1936 – 7 February 2019

WAY N E FITZGERALD

Titles Designer 19 March 1930 – 30 September 2019

NICHOLAS ELLIS

Production Designer 4 April 1962 – 26 January 2020

PETER FONDA

Actor, Director, Screenwriter 23 February 1940 – 16 August 2019

HANNELORE ELSNER

Actress 26 July 1942 – 21 April 2019

ROBERT FORSTER

Actor 13 July 1941 – 11 October 2019

ROBERT EVANS

Producer 29 June 1930 – 26 October 2019

DAVID FOSTER

Producer 1929 – 23 December 2019

N I C K FI N L AYS O N D O R I S DAY

Actress, Singer 3 April 1922 – 13 May 2019

Special Effects Technician 31 July 1955 – 21 January 2019

MIKE FRIFT

Camera Operator, Cinematographer 14 September 1941 – 26 June 2019

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IN MEMORIAM

YAS U O FU RU H ATA

Director 19 August 1934 – 20 May 2019

BRUNO GANZ

Actor 22 March 1941 – 15 February 2019

TONY GARNETT

Producer, Actor 3 April 1936 – 12 January 2020

NORMAN GARWOOD

Production Designer 8 January 1946 – 13 April 2019

NIGEL GOLDSACK

Executive, Producer 5 January 1957 – 18 October 2019

STEVE GOLIN

Producer 6 March 1955 – 21 April 2019

JOHN GRANT

Matte Painting Cameraman 31 August 1943 – 23 March 2019

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MICHELLE GUISH

Casting Director 9 March 1954 – 24 January 2020

SID HAIG

Actor 14 July 1939 – 21 September 2019

KENNETH HAIGH

Actor 25 March 1931 – 4 February 2018

RUTGER HAUER

Actor 23 January 1944 – 19 July 2019

BUCK HENRY

Writer, Actor, Director 9 December 1930 – 8 January 2020

NICKY HENSON

Actor 12 May 1945 – 15 December 2019

N O R M A N H O L LY N

Film Editor, Music Editor 11 May 1952 – 17 March 2019

NEIL INNES

Actor, Writer, Comedian, Musician 9 December 1944 – 29 December 2019

RO B E RTA H AY N ES

Actress 19 August 1929 – 4 April 2019

LARRY ‘FLASH’ JENKINS

Actor, Director, Producer, Writer 10 May 1955 – 25 April 2019

DAVID HEDISON

Actor 20 May 1927 – 18 July 2019

DEL HENNEY

Actor 24 July 1935 – 14 January 2019

FREDDIE JONES

Actor 12 September 1927 – 9 July 2019


ANNA KARINA

Actress 22 September 1940 – 14 December 2019

BARRIE KEEFFE

Writer, Playwright 31 October 1945 – 10 December 2019

MACHIKO KYO

Actress 25 March 1924 – 12 May 2019

PAUL LEBL ANC

Make Up and Hair Artist 1946 – 2 October 2019

MICHEL LEGRAND

Composer 24 February 1932 – 26 January 2019

GERRY LEWIS

Marketing and Publicity Executive 1928 – 5 January 2020

PIERRE LHOMME

Cinematographer 5 April 1930 – 4 July 2019

C A R O L LY N L E Y

Actress 13 February 1942 – 3 September 2019

M I C H A E L LY N N E

Producer 23 April 1941 – 24 March 2019

S U E LYO N

Actress 10 July 1946 – 26 December 2019

TANIA MALLET

Actress 19 May 1941 – 30 March 2019

JOHN MARKWELL

Special Effects Supervisor 26 May 1931 – 26 December 2019

VANESSA M ARQUEZ

Actress 21 December 1968 – 30 August 2018

B RYA N M A RS H A L L

Actor 19 May 1938 – 25 June 2019

MARDIK MARTIN

Writer 16 September 1936 – 11 September 2019

PE TE R M AY H E W

Actor 19 May 1944 – 30 April 2019

SYD MEAD

Designer, Concept Artist 18 July 1933 – 30 December 2019

JONAS MEKAS

Director, Cinematographer 24 December 1922 – 23 January 2019

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IN MEMORIAM

S Y LV I A M I L ES

Actress 9 September 1924 – 12 June 2019

MURIEL PAVLOW

Actress 27 June 1921 – 19 January 2019

DICK MILLER

DA PENNEBAKER

Actor 25 December 1928 – 30 January 2019

Director, Cinematographer, Editor 15 July 1925 – 1 August 2019

RON MILLER

Director 17 April 1933 – 9 February 2019

Actor 11 October 1966 – 4 March 2019

Animator, Artist, Actor 22 August 1913 – 18 June 2019

TERRY R AWLINGS BARRINGTON PHELOUNG

Composer 10 May 1954 – 1 August 2019

DENISE NICKERSON

Actress 1 April 1957 – 10 July 2019

A N N A Q UAY L E

Actress 6 October 1932 – 16 August 2019

MILTON QUON LUKE PERRY

LOUISA MORITZ

Actress 25 September 1936 – 4 January 2019

ANDRÉ PREVIN

Composer, Arranger, Conductor 6 April 1929 – 28 February 2019

Editor, Sound Editor 4 November 1933 – 23 April 2019

MALCOLM JOHN REBENNACK JR, MICHAEL J POLLARD

Actor, Comedian 30 May 1939 – 20 November 2019

AKA DR JOHN

Musician 21 November 1941 – 6 June 2019

TERRY O’NEILL

Photographer 30 July 1938 – 17 November 2019

L AWRENCE G PAULL

Production Designer, Art Director 1938 – 10 November 2019

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N I K POWE LL OBE

Producer, Distributor, former BAFTA Film Committee Chair and Trustee 4 November 1950 – 7 November 2019

NADJA REGIN

Actress 2 December 1931 – 7 April 2019


SHANE RIMMER

Actor 28 May 1929 – 29 March 2019

A LV I N SA RG E N T

Writer 12 April 1927 – 9 May 2019

JOHN SARGENT

Executive 16 August 1944 – 3 July 2019

ELIZABETH SELLARS

Actress 6 May 1921 – 30 December 2019

JOHN SINGLETON

Producer, Writer, Director 6 January 1968 – 29 April 2019

DANIEL C STRIEPEKE

Make-up Artist 8 October 1930 – 17 January 2019

RUSS I TAY LO R

Voice Actress 4 May 1944 – 26 July 2019

CLEMENT VON FRANCKENSTEIN

Actor 28 May 1944 – 9 May 2019

RIP TORN

Actor 6 February 1931 – 9 July 2019

JAMES JOSE WALKER

Producer 11 May 1981 – 30 September 2019

PIERO TOSI

Costume Designer 10 April 1927 – 10 August 2019

RICHARD WILLIAMS

Animator, Director 19 March 1933 – 16 August 2019

MARK URMAN

Producer, Distributor, Executive 24 November 1952 – 12 January 2019

ALLEE WILLIS

Composer, Art Director 10 November 1947 – 24 December 2019

AGNÈ S VARDA

Director, Writer, Editor 30 May 1928 – 29 March 2019

JOHN WITHERSPOON

Actor, Comedian 27 January 1942 – 29 October 2019

JAN-MICHAEL VINCENT

Actor 15 July 1945 – 10 February 2019

FRANCO ZEFFIRELLI

Director, Production Designer 12 February 1923 – 15 June 2019

BRIAN TARANTINA

Actor 27 March 1959 – 2 November 2019

The Academy has made every effort to compile an accurate In Memoriam listing of film practitioners between 16 January 2019 and 12 January 2020.

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HRH The Duke of Cambridge, kg Academy President Barbara Broccoli obe Vice-President, Film David Gardner obe Vice-President, Games

Maria Ishak Co-optee Kathryn Busby Co-optee

COMMITTEES

OFFICERS

OFFICERS OF THE ACADEMY

ELECTED MEMBERS OF THE FILM COMMITTEE

Marc Samuelson Chair

Sir Lloyd Dorfman cbe Co-optee

Anna Higgs Deputy Chair

Paul Morrell obe Co-optee

Dame Pippa Harris dbe Chair of the Academy

Amanda Berry obe Chief Executive

Isabel Begg Simon Chinn                           Noel Clarke                                         Alexandra Derbyshire*    Joanne Hartley     Gillian Hawser                                             Alison Thompson David Thompson

Krishnendu Majumdar Deputy Chair of the Academy

Kevin Price Chief Operating Officer

ELECTED MEMBERS OF THE GAMES COMMITTEE

Greg Dyke Vice-President, Television BOARD OF TRUSTEES

Anna Higgs Deputy Chair, Film Committee Sara Putt Chair, Learning & New Talent Committee, and Deputy Chair, Television Committee Marc Samuelson Chair, Film Committee Dr Jo Twist obe Chair, Games Committee Hannah Wyatt Chair, Television Committee John Smith Co-optee and Chair, Commercial Committee Paul Taiano obe Co-optee and Chair, Finance and Audit Committee

Medwyn Jones Honorary Advisor

Dr Jo Twist obe Chair Claire Boissiere Dave Ranyard* Tara Saunders Catherine Woolley ELECTED MEMBERS OF THE TELEVISION COMMITTEE

Hannah Wyatt Chair Sara Putt Deputy Chair Phillippa Giles Elizabeth McIntyre Emma Morgan                                   Ade Rawcliffe                                  Beryl Richards*            John Strickland Liz Trubridge Claire Zolkwer  Children’s Representatives

*

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PA RT N ERS O F T H E AC A D E MY B A F TAÕ S PA R T N E R S H AV E S H OW N G R E AT LOYA LT Y IN THEIR YEAR-ROUND ASSOCIATION WITH THE BA F TA B R A N D, A N D S H A R E O U R CO M M I TM EN T A N D PA S S I O N F O R T H E I N D U S T R I ES W E R E P R ES E N T. W E WA R M LY T H A N K T H E M F O R T H E I R CO M M I TM E N T TO T H E A C A D E MY A N D O U R M I S S I O N TO S U P P O R T, DE VELOP A ND PROMOTE E XCELLENCE IN THE FIL M, GA MES AND TELEVISION INDUSTRIES. ACADEMY PARTNERS

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17 – 28 JUNE 2020

Call: 020 7589 8212 royalalberthall.com


FI L M AWA R DS PA RT N ERS WITH ENDURING THA NKS TO A LL THE OFFICIA L PA RT N ERS TO T H E EE B R I T I S H A C A D E MY FI L M AWA RDS IN 2020.

TITLE SPONSOR

OFFICIAL PARTNERS

ACQ UA PAN NA

DIGITAL CINEM A

Official Water

MEDIA

PAU L E DMO N DS LONDON

Official Cinema Media

Official Hair Stylist

AMERICAN AIRLINES

DELOITTE

S.PELLEGRINO

Official Airline

Official Scrutineers

Official Water

ATE LI E R SWAROVSKI

GLOBAL

TH E SAVOY

Official Jewellery

Official Outdoor Media

Official Hotel

AUDI UK

GROUNDTRUTH

VILLA MARIA

Official Car

Official Gift Service Provider

Official Wine

C HA M PAG N E

LANCÔME

TAIT TINGER

Official Beauty

Official Champagne

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FIL M AWA RDS GIF T PROVIDERS

WALLET

A H U G E T H A N KS TO T H E PA RT N ERS T H AT H AVE G E N E R O U S LY P R OV I D E D G I F T S F O R T H E N O M I N E ES A ND CITATION RE A DERS. THIS YE A R, BA F TA IS D O I N G M O R E T H A N E VER TO R ED U CE I TS I M PAC T O N T H E EN V I R O N M EN T. I N S T E A D O F A G I F T B A G, WE HAVE A BESPOKE GIF TING WA LLET FILLED WITH UNIQUE EXPERIENCES COURTESY OF OUR GIFT PA RT N ERS. T H E WA L L E TS A N D C A R DS WI T H I N A R E M A D E FR O M 10 0 P ER CEN T R E C YCL ED M AT ER I A L.

GROUNDTRUTH

EXPERIENCES

A bespoke travel wallet, made from 100 per cent recycled material, which removes eight plastic bottles from our environment. www.groundtruth.global/en

AMERICAN AIRLINES

LANCÔME

TH E SAVOY

An exclusive VIP personal assistant at the airport, with the gift of five-star service. www.aa.com

Discover and create your unique Custom-Made Foundation, Le Teint Particulier. Exclusively available at Selfridges or Harrods, London. www.lancome.co.uk

A complimentary three-course dining experience for two with sommelier’s choice wine at The Savoy. www.fairmont.com/ savoy-london

CHA MPAGNE

PAUL EDMONDS

VILLA MARIA

TAITTINGER

LONDON

A wine tasting, tour and lunch for two at the Villa Maria Winery. www.villamaria.co.nz

A bottle of Taittinger Brut Réserve NV, with our compliments at BAFTA’s new home, 194 Piccadilly. www.taittinger.com

An exclusive annual discount on hair or beauty services at all Paul Edmonds London Salons. www.pauledmonds.com

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

THE ACADEMY WISHES TO THANK

Dermot O’Leary Red Carpet Host, BAFTA Content

EE Our title sponsor

Krishnendu Majumdar Deputy Chair of the Academy

Marc Samuelson, Anna Higgs and members of the Film Committee (see below)

Film voting juries and members

Pippa Harris Chair of the Academy

Graham Norton Our Host

All staff at the Academy

AD Events International Limited Design of the Awards dinner and after party

Grosvenor House A JW Marriott Hotel

Sola Associates Limited

Film companies and distributors for their invaluable assistance

Edith Bowman Red Carpet and Backstage Host, BAFTA Content

Luzia, by Cirque du Soleil

West Design Royal Albert Hall Red Carpet and Press Area production

Creative Technology Limited

Whizz Kid Television

Pace Prestige Services Limited

freuds Royal Albert Hall www.royalalberthall.com

BAFTA FILM COMMITTEE

Marc Samuelson (Chair), Anna Higgs (Deputy Chair), Isabel Begg, Simon Chinn, Noel Clarke, Alexandra Derbyshire, Sally El Hosaini, Jinx Godfrey, Joanne Hartley, Gillian Hawser, Andrew Orr, David Parfitt, Ula Pontikos, Alison Thompson, David Thompson

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END CREDITS

AT BAFTA

Director of Production Clare Brown Head of Production Cassandra Hybel Awards Event Producer Lucy Waller Assistant Awards Event Producer Ciara Teggart BAFTA Productions Olivia Comer Ella Coveney Georgina Cunningham Daniel Dalton Rosie Fenning Ellen Franklin Kylie McCarroll Robbie McHugh Looloo Murphy Joe Okell Helen Preece Jamie Rowland Victoria Walker Amy Wilson

Director of Awards & Membership Emma Baehr Head of Film Deirdre Hopkins Film Officer Imogen Faris Awards & Membership Team Kelly Smith Timothy Hughes Sam D’Elia Harriet Humphries Natalie Gurney Lewis Peet Jessica Rogers Ada Kotowska Lisa Gault

Director of Partnerships Louise Robertson Partnerships Team Natalie Moss Amy Elton Charlie Perkin Emma Tarcy Marketing & Communications Director Ellen Johnson Communications Team Katie Williams Nick Williams Fiona Simpson Sophie Dudhill Ashley McKay Dana Thompson Meredith Kenton Ben Smart Dave Hudson Charlotte Cooper Ticketing Gabby Taranowski Accounts Lucy Burks

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BROCHURE CREDITS

Editor Toby Weidmann Design Émilie Chen Lucy Shephard Ad Sales Charlie Perkin Editorial Contributors Rob Carnevale Ian Hadyn Smith Ella Kemp Clarisse Loughrey Tim Robey Neil Smith Kate Stables Photography Director Claire Rees

Printing

FE Burman Ltd London www.feburman.co.uk The Academy chooses Edixion and Claro, supporting excellence in print. Printed on Edixion Offset 350gsm (cover), Edixion Offset 140gsm (text) and Claro Gloss 170gsm (photo essay). Supplied by Antalis. The carbon impact of this paper has been measured and balanced through the World Land Trust, an international conservation charity.

All nominees imagery used with the kind permission from the distributors/filmmakers. Quentin Tarantino image courtesy of A Cooper/Sony/Columbia/ Kobal/Shutterstock Executive portraits: James Gourley/ BAFTA/Rex/Shutterstock (Pippa Harris), BAFTA/Jonathan Birch (Amanda Berry). Rising Star images courtesy of EE. Jack Lowden image by Charlie Gray.

Photography Coordinator Jordan Anderson Brochure Cover Design Gramafilm info@gramafilm.com +44 (0)203 051 8619 www.gramafilm.com

Published by British Academy of Film and Television Arts 195 Piccadilly London W1J 9LN Tel: +44 (0)20 7734 0022 reception@bafta.org www.bafta.org

Certificate no.: CBP002196 The papers used for the EE British Academy Film Awards in 2020 tickets and brochure are Forest Stewardship Council® certified, and are 100% recyclable.

Features, film stills: Fellowship courtesy of Lucasfilm/Paramount Pictures/Kobal/Shutterstock (Indiana Jones 4), and Moviestore/ Shutterstock (Jurassic Park). OBCC stills courtesy of UK Film Council/Kobal/Shutterstock (Sex & Drugs), 20th Century Fox/Kobal/ Shutterstock (Planet of the Apes). Feature, For the Love of Film: BAFTA/Jack Ehlen.

Although every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this publication, the Publishers cannot accept liability for errors or omissions. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written permission of BAFTA. © BAFTA 2020

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