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Nespresso is proud to be Co-Host of the official Nominees’ Party to the EE British Academy Film Awards in 2019. Nespresso Talents celebrates the next generation of film talent by promoting their art to a globally engaged audience Now in its fourth year, the competition challenges filmmakers to produce up to 3 minutes of content filmed in a vertical format.

Find out more at Nespresso.com/talents #EEBAFTAs #NespressoTalents


Champagne for the Independently Minded

www.taittinger.com #TaittingerTime ď…Ş @TaittingerUK

Champagne Taittinger

taittinger_uk


TA I T T I N G E R T I M E The House of Taittinger is headed up by Pierre-Emmanuel Taittinger, along with his daughter Vitalie, and son Clovis. Taittinger is the only Grande Marque (famous Champagne House) owned and run by its eponymous family.

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With 288 hectares of their own vineyards, Taittinger is the second largest grower in the region and is passionate about nature and taking care of the environment. Being ‘Green’ is in their everyday DNA, working with Mother Nature to produce the best Chardonnay (for floral elegance), Pinot Noir (for regal richness) and E Pinot Meunier (for fruity roundness). R Pick too early, and the wines U T A would be lean; pick too late, and they N would lack structure and durability. R

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Some 18 metres underground the UNESCO 4 th Century Roman cellars form Ta i t t i n g e r ’ s heart. Here, E FOR AGEING their crème de la crème cuvée – Comtes de Champagne ‘Blanc de Blancs’ (100% Chardonnay) – is left to FO gently mature and is only released R after a minimum of 8 years. E

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The blending o f Taittinger Brut Ré s e r ve ’s th r e e grape varieties, from a range of vintages, is an art. The elegant balance of the Chardonnay rich Taittinger style is vital.

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Champagne Officiel de BAFTA depuis 2003.

Official Champagne to BAFTA


CONTENTS

W E LC O M E

S P E C I A L AWA R D S

8 HRH The Duke of Cambridge, KG

62 The Fellowship

Trailblazing editor Thelma Schoonmaker is almost as synonymous with the films of Martin Scorsese as the director himself, having collaborated with him on more than 20 films. Her extraordinary and deft talent has earned numerous awards over the years, including two BAFTAs and three Oscars. Words by Christina Newland

9 Amanda Berry obe /

Dame Pippa Harris Dbe 11

Marc Allera

THE N O M I N AT I O N S 15

The Nominations in full

40

 Juries & Chapters

72

BEST FIL M NOM INEES 43 BlacKkKlansman

This latest Spike Lee Joint is a raucous satire of American white nationalism. Words by Sophie Monks Kaufman

FE AT U RES

47 The Favourite

83 Aspire to Achieve

Yorgos Lanthimos’ baroque comedy is a riot of love and Machievellian plots in the royal court. Words by Kambole Campbell

What drives the next generation of British talent to succeed and how does BAFTA help? Words by Toby Weidmann

51 Green Book

93 One Year On...

Peter Farrelly’s wonderful road movie lets Viggo Mortensen and Mahershala Ali shine. Words by Rich Cline

An update on the screen industries’ introduction of the first set of Principles and Guidance to tackle bullying and harassment.

55 Roma

94 Showing Face

Alfonso Cuarón’s glorious drama is inspired by his own upbringing in 1970s’ Mexico City. Words by Peter Bradshaw 59

 utstanding British Contribution to Cinema O With an illustrious history in the industry, producing partners and husband and wife team Stephen Woolley and Elizabeth Karlsen have made a huge impact on the landscape of British film. Words by Neil Smith

A new BAFTA Photography Exhibition is unveiled, showcasing highlights from our Recent Commissions.

 Star Is Born A Bradley Cooper’s impressive directorial debut superbly retells this timeless story. Words by Simran Hans

97 In The Wings: A Photographic Essay

What happens in the wings during the staging of the Film Awards? Photographer Gavin Bond pulls aside the red curtain to find out.

113 In Memoriam

121 Officers of the Academy

122 Partners of the Academy

123 Film Awards Partners

125 Film Awards Gift Providers

126 Acknowledgements & Credits

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H R H T H E D U K E O F C A M B RI D G E, KG President of the Academy

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WELCOM E EE

BRITISH

TO

ACA DE MY

THE FIL M

AWA RDS

I

t is always a pleasure to welcome you to the EE British Academy Film Awards – our celebration of the very best in film. As viewers, films can take us to realms we have never imagined, give us powerful experiences to treasure, inform our minds, open our eyes and lift our hearts high. All of this is thanks to the talented, creative, dedicated people who make them. BAFTA exists to support talent. To find it, nurture it, celebrate it and champion it to a wider audience – from the earliest promising steps to outstanding professional heights. Our Awards are a glamourous reminder of the triumphs of the past year, the final destination of the incredible and often difficult journeys practitioners take to create significant art. Through our numerous events, initiatives and programmes, we work hard all year round to ensure these aspirational stories are told. These journeys can and should come from any source and BAFTA is committed to promoting a diverse storytelling landscape. We are particularly delighted to see the success of the adoption of the BFI Diversity Standards for two of our categories, Outstanding British Film and Outstanding Debut by a British Writer, Director or Producer. This is the first time we have required entries to meet at least two of the four diversity standards and the response from the industry, at all levels, has been overwhelmingly positive. We feel equally strongly that everyone has the right to work in a safe, professional environment, free from bullying or harassment of any kind. Early in 2018, we worked alongside such organisations as the BFI, Women in Film & Television and Equity to create a unified set of Principles and Guidance to tackle this issue. Please take a moment to read the positive update on our endeavours on page 93. Finally, we want to thank you all for your continued support of BAFTA. Alongside our usual activities, we are currently raising funds to achieve our ambitious goals for the future of BAFTA. At the heart of this vision is a regeneration of our home at 195 Piccadilly, which will allow us to create both a stronger network of world-class professionals and provide more opportunities for talented practitioners, regardless of their background. We are truly grateful for the support we have already received. If you would like to help us reach our target and make a donation, please visit: www.bafta.org/about/fundraising/illuminating-bafta. With your support, we can make sure that our industries enjoy a robust, diverse and exciting future. Please enjoy tonight and congratulations to all of this year’s nominees. •

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A M AN DA BERRY

OBE

Chief Executive of the Academy

DA M E P I P PA H A R R I S

Chair of the Academy

FOLLOW US

#EEBA F TA s bafta.org /BA F TA @BA F TA BA F TA

DBE


FIVE YEARS AT THE TOP We’ve been awarded the UK’s No.1 Network again

Do more of what you love in more places. Who says you can’t? UK’S NO.1 NETWORK 5 YEARS RUNNING:Rankings based on the RootMetrics® UK RootScore® Report: From 2H 2013 to 1H 2018. Tested with best commercially available smartphones on 4 national mobile networks across all available network types. Your experiences may vary. The RootMetrics award is not an endorsement of EE.Visit www.rootmetrics.co.uk for more details.


WELCOM E

FROM

OUR

SPONSOR

W

elcome to the EE British Academy Film Awards, a celebration of another absorbing year in British and global filmmaking. I’m in awe of so much I have seen over the past 12 months, from Olivia Colman’s majestic turn as Queen Anne to Rami Malek’s pitch-perfect portrayal of Queen frontman, Freddie Mercury. And who can forget Widows? Steve McQueen’s ferociously entertaining heist drama caught my eye not least because it features 2018’s EE Rising Star Daniel Kaluuya, as well as one of this year’s contenders in multi-talented Cynthia Erivo. All of us at EE are proud to present the EE Rising Star Award, the only BAFTA voted for by the public. Thanks to our jury, including chair Alison Thompson, Rosamund Pike, Richard Madden, Ray Panthaki, Edith Bowman, Anna Smith, Georgina Lowe, Leo Davis and Lucy Bevan. You have given us a shortlist who have captured the imagination of both the public and film industry. And the very best of luck to our nominees: Jessie Buckley, Cynthia Erivo, Barry Keoghan, Lakeith Stanfield and Letitia Wright. We are continuingly looking for new ways of using our network technology to bring film fans closer to the action in partnership with BAFTA. This year we reached for the stars with our ‘4GEE Cinema in the sky’. Being suspended 100ft above the South Downs to watch a BAFTA-winning film, broadcast via our 4G network, was a truly novel experience for our audience of Goodwood Flying School students. And outside this evening’s ceremony, you might have rubbed virtual shoulders on the red carpet with Shudu, the world’s first digital supermodel, brought to life using 5G-powered holographic technology. She is a glimpse of the future and a demonstration of what is possible with 5G and AI. When we launch our 5G network this year, a faster, more reliable connection will make it even easier to watch a BAFTA-nominated film you might have missed on the big screen – wherever you are – on the screen in the palm of your hand. To that end, I hope you find plenty to inspire you this evening. Enjoy it! •

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MARC ALLERA

CEO, EE


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Exterion Media, proud to be a supporter of the EE British Academy Film Awards in 2019 noel.nallen@exterionmedia.co.uk T: 020 7428 5544 @ExterionMediaUK

www.exterionmedia.co.uk


HOLLYWOOD We're proud to be your airline.

Whether you’re based in London, LA or anywhere in-between, we’re proud to be the airline of the film & entertainment industry. The Official Airline of the EE British Academy Film Awards.

American Airlines, Flagship and the Flight Symbol logo are marks of American Airlines, Inc. oneworld is a mark of the oneworld Alliance, LLC. © 2019 American Airlines, Inc. All rights reserved.

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THE NOM INATIONS 17 ADAPTED SCREENPLAY /

31 ORIGINAL MUSIC /

ANIMATED FILM 19 BEST FILM /

ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY 33 OUTSTANDING BRITISH FILM /

BRITISH SHORT ANIMATION

OUTSTANDING DEBUT BY A BRITISH WRITER, DIRECTOR OR PRODUCER

21 BRITISH SHORT FILM /

CINEMATOGRAPHY 23 COSTUME DESIGN /

35 PRODUCTION DESIGN /

SOUND

DIRECTOR 25 DOCUMENTARY /

37 SPECIAL VISUAL EFFECTS /

SUPPORTING ACTOR

EDITING 27 FILM NOT IN THE

39 SUPPORTING ACTRESS /

EE RISING STAR AWARD

ENGLISH LANGUAGE / LEADING ACTOR 29 LEADING ACTRESS /

MAKE UP & HAIR

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THANKS THE BRITISH ACADEMY OF FILM AND TELEVISION ARTS AND PROUDLY CONGRATULATES

NOMINEE ANIMATED FILM /SpiderVerseFilm

#SpiderVerse


A DA PTED SCREENPL AY

BL ACKKKL ANSM AN

Spike Lee, David Rabinowitz, Charlie Wachtel, Kevin Willmott

INCREDIBLES 2

Brad Bird, John Walker C A N YO U E V E R F O R G I V E M E?

Nicole Holofcener, Jeff Whitty

FIRST MAN

ISLE OF DOGS

Josh Singer

Wes Anderson, Jeremy Dawson

C O U L D TA L K

Barry Jenkins

SPI D E R-M AN: I N TO T H E S PI D E R-V E RS E

Bob Persichetti, Peter Ramsey, Rodney Rothman, Phil Lord

A S TA R I S B O R N

Bradley Cooper, Will Fetters, Eric Roth

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ANIM ATED FIL M

IF BEALE STREET


WARNER BROS. PICTURES CONGRATULATES OUR NOMINEES AT THE EE BRITISH ACADEMY FILM AWARDS IN 2019 A STAR IS BORN BEST FILM BILL GERBER, p.g.a., BRADLEY COOPER, p.g.a., LYNETTE HOWELL TAYLOR, p.g.a. ORIGINAL MUSIC LADY GAGA BRADLEY COOPER LUKAS NELSON

DIRECTOR BRADLEY COOPER LEADING ACTRESS LADY GAGA LEADING ACTOR BRADLEY COOPER ADAPTED SCREENPLAY ERIC ROTH and BRADLEY COOPER & WILL FETTERS

PRODUCTION DESIGN STUART CRAIG, ANNA PINNOCK

SOUND ALAN ROBERT MURRAY STEVE MORROW TOM OZANICH DEAN ZUPANCIC JASON RUDER

SPECIAL VISUAL EFFECTS CHRISTIAN MANZ, TIM BURKE, ANDY KIND, DAVID WATKINS

SPECIAL VISUAL EFFECTS ROGER GUYETT, GRADY COFER, MATTHEW E. BUTLER, DAVID SHIRK

BEST DOCUMENTARY PETER JACKSON, CLARE OLSSEN

WWW.WARNERBROS2018.COM


BEST FILM

BL ACKKKL ANSM AN

Jason Blum, Spike Lee, Raymond Mansfield, Sean McKittrick, Jordan Peele

I ’M O K

Elizabeth Hobbs, Abigail Addison, Jelena Popović

T H E FAVO U R I T E

Ceci Dempsey, Ed Guiney, Yorgos Lanthimos, Lee Magiday

M A R FA

Greg McLeod, Myles McLeod

ROMA

Alfonso Cuarón, Gabriela Rodríguez ROUGHHOUSE

Jonathan Hodgson, Richard Van Den Boom

A S TA R I S B O R N

Bradley Cooper, Bill Gerber, Lynette Howell Taylor

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BRITISH SHORT ANIM ATION

GREEN BOOK

Jim Burke, Brian Currie, Peter Farrelly, Nick Vallelonga, Charles B Wessler


www.pinewoodgroup.com 2 0


BRITISH SHORT FILM

73 COWS

B O H E M I A N R H A P S O DY

Alex Lockwood

Newton Thomas Sigel

BACHELOR, 38

C O L D WA R

Angela Clarke

Łukasz Z∙ al

T H E FAVO U R I T E

Robbie Ryan

THE FIELD

FIRST MAN

Sandhya Suri, Thomas Bidegain, Balthazar de Ganay

Linus Sandgren

WA L E

ROMA

Barnaby Blackburn, Sophie Alexander, Catherine Slater, Edward Speleers

Alfonso Cuarón

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CINE M ATOGR A PHY

THE BLUE DOOR

Ben Clark, Megan Pugh, Paul Taylor


COSTUME DESIGN

THE BALL AD OF

BL ACKKKL ANSM AN

BUSTER SCRUGGS

Spike Lee

Mary Zophres

B O H E M I A N R H A P S O DY

C O L D WA R

Julian Day

Paweล‚ Pawlikowski

T H E FAVO U R I T E

T H E FAVO U R I T E

Sandy Powell

Yorgos Lanthimos

ROMA

Sandy Powell

Alfonso Cuarรณn

M ARY Q U EEN OF SCOTS

A S TA R I S B O R N

Alexandra Byrne

Bradley Cooper

DIRECTOR

M ARY POPPI NS RETU RNS

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Discover the total cinema experience with Dolby Cinema™ UK movie fans can now experience the magic of Dolby Cinema™ at the iconic ODEON Luxe Leicester Square, following a major transformation to the ‘home of the premiere.’ Screen One combines state-of-the-art Dolby Cinema™ technology with the grandeur of art deco architecture, to create an unforgettable cinematic experience in the heart of London’s West End.

Dolby Cinema™ Where Movies come to Life. D R A M AT I C I M A G I N G . M O V I N G A U D I O . I N S P I R E D D E S I G N .

Dolby CinemaTM combines the most powerful Dolby Atmos sound and Dolby VisionTM imaging technology with inspired design to create a truly immersive film experience. Dolby VisionTM offers spectacular, high-contrast, dramatic imaging, and the moving audio of Dolby Atmos brings the story to life with dynamic, emotive audio that flows around the room with pinpoint accuracy.

DOLBY.COM

ODEON.CO.UK/DOLBYCINEMA


DO CU M ENTA RY

FREE SOLO

B O H E M I A N R H A P S O DY

Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi, Jimmy Chin, Shannon Dill, Evan Hayes

John Ottman

MCQUEEN

T H E FAVO U R I T E

Ian Bonhôte, Peter Ettedgui

Yorgos Mavropsaridis

RBG

FIRST MAN

Julie Cohen, Betsy West

Tom Cross

THEY SHALL NOT

ROMA

GROW OLD

Alfonso Cuarón, Adam Gough

Peter Jackson, Clare Olssen

EDITING

THREE IDENTICAL

VICE

STR ANGERS

Hank Corwin

Tim Wardle, Grace Hughes-Hallett, Becky Read

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UNIVERSAL PICTURES WOULD LIKE TO THANK THE BRITISH ACADEMY OF FILM AND TELEVISION ARTS AND PROUDLY CONGRATULATE ITS NOMINEES

“A BLOCKBUSTER THAT’S OUT OF THIS WORLD” BRIAN VINER, DAILY MAIL

H H H H H HHHHH HHHHH HHHHH BRIAN VINER, DAILY MAIL

THE INDEPENDENT

NICHOLAS BARBER, BBC CULTURE

EMPIRE

“A REMARKABLE CINEMATIC ACHIEVEMENT” ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY

SUPPORTING ACTRESS • ADAPTED SCREENPLAY • CINEMATOGRAPHY • EDITING PRODUCTION DESIGN • SOUND • SPECIAL VISUAL EFFECTS

#BlacKkKlansman © 2018 FOCU S FEATURES LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

BEST FILM • DIRECTOR • SUPPORTING ACTOR • ADAPTED SCREENPLAY • ORIGINAL MUSIC

SUPPORTING ACTRESS • COSTUME DESIGN • MAKE UP & HAIR

www.UNIVERSALPICTURES.co.uk U niversal P ictUres UK

U niversal P ictUres UK

U niversal P ictUres UK

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U niversal P ictUres UK

U niversal UK


FIL M NOT IN THE ENGLISH L A NGUAGE

CAPERNAUM

BRADLEY COOPER

Nadine Labaki, Khaled Mouzanar

A Star Is Born

C O L D WA R

CHRISTIAN BALE

Paweł Pawlikowski, Tanya Seghatchian, Ewa Puszczyńska

Vice

DOGMAN

RAMI MALEK

Matteo Garrone

Bohemian Rhapsody

STEVE COOGAN

Stan & Ollie

SHOPLIFTERS

VIGGO MORTENSEN

Hirokazu Kore-eda, Kaoru Matsuzaki

Green Book

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LE A DING ACTOR

ROMA

Alfonso Cuarón, Gabriela Rodríguez


FILM4 AND CHANNEL 4 PROUDLY CONGRATULATE OUR BAFTA 2019 NOMINEES THE FAVOURITE BEST FILM

YOU WERE NEVER REALLY HERE

OUTSTANDING BRITISH FILM

OUTSTANDING BRITISH FILM

DIRECTOR Yorgos Lanthimos

BEAST

ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY Deborah Davis, Tony McNamara LEADING ACTRESS Olivia Colman SUPPORTING ACTRESS Emma Stone SUPPORTING ACTRESS Rachel Weisz CINEMATOGRAPHY Robbie Ryan EDITING Yorgos Mavropsaridis PRODUCTION DESIGN Fiona Crombie, Alice Felton COSTUME DESIGN Sandy Powell MAKE UP & HAIR Nadia Stacey

WIDOWS LEADING ACTRESS Viola Davis

OUTSTANDING BRITISH FILM OUTSTANDING DEBUT BY A BRITISH WRITER, DIRECTOR OR PRODUCER Michael Pearce (Writer / Director) Lauren Dark (Producer)

COLD WAR FILM NOT IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE DIRECTOR Paweł Pawlikowski ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY Janusz Głowacki, Paweł Pawlikowski CINEMATOGRAPHY Łukasz Żal

THREE IDENTICAL STRANGERS DOCUMENTARY


LEADING ACTRESS

GLENN CLOSE

B O H E M I A N R H A P S O DY

The Wife

Mark Coulier, Jan Sewell

L A DY GAGA

T H E FAVO U R I T E

A Star Is Born

Nadia Stacey

MELISSA MCCARTHY

M ARY Q U EEN OF SCOTS

Can You Ever Forgive Me?

Jenny Shircore

S TA N & O L L I E

The Favourite

Mark Coulier, Jeremy Woodhead, Josh Weston

V I O L A DAV I S

VICE

Widows

Kate Biscoe, Greg Cannom, Patricia DeHaney, Chris Gallaher

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MAKE UP & HAIR

OLIVIA COLMAN


FOX SEARCHLIGHT PICTURES & TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX would like to thank the BRITISH ACADEMY OF FILM AND TELEVISION ARTS and proudly congratulate our nominees.

© All rights reserved.


ORIGINAL MUSIC

BL ACKKKL ANSM AN

C O L D WA R

Terence Blanchard

Janusz Głowacki, Paweł Pawlikowski

IF BEALE STREET

T H E FAVO U R I T E

C O U L D TA L K

Deborah Davis, Tony McNamara

Nicholas Britell

ISLE OF DOGS

GREEN BOOK

Alexandre Desplat

Brian Currie, Peter Farrelly, Nick Vallelonga

ROMA

Marc Shaiman

Alfonso Cuarón

A S TA R I S B O R N

VICE

Bradley Cooper, Lady Gaga, Lukas Nelson

Adam McKay

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O RIGINA L SCREENPL AY

M ARY POPPI NS RETU RNS


BFI CONGRATULATES ALL OF THIS YEAR’S AMAZING NOMINEES, INCLUDING:

APOSTASY | BEAST | COLD WAR | THE FAVOURITE THE FIELD SUPPORTED BY BFI NETWORK | RAY & LIZ YOU WERE NEVER REALLY HERE

National Lottery funding helps us support filmmakers at every step – from shorts, through development, production and distribution


O UTSTA N DIN G BRITISH FIL M

BEAST

Michael Pearce, Kristian Brodie, Lauren Dark, Ivana MacKinnon

A P O S TA S Y

Daniel Kokotajlo (Writer/Director)

B O H E M I A N R H A P S O DY

Graham King, Anthony McCarten

BEAST

Michael Pearce (Writer/Director), Lauren Dark (Producer)

T H E FAVO U R I T E

Yorgos Lanthimos, Ceci Dempsey, Ed Guiney, Lee Magiday, Deborah Davis, Tony McNamara

A CAMBODIAN SPRING

Chris Kelly (Writer/Director/Producer) MCQUEEN

S TA N & O L L I E

Jon S Baird, Faye Ward, Jeff Pope

R AY & L I Z

Y O U W E R E N E V E R R E A L LY H E R E

Richard Billingham (Writer/Director), Jacqui Davies (Producer)

Lynne Ramsay, Rosa Attab, Pascal Caucheteux, James Wilson

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By a British Writer, Director or Producer

PILI

Leanne Welham (Writer/Director), Sophie Harman (Producer)

O UTSTA N DIN G DEBUT

Ian Bonhôte, Peter Ettedgui, Andee Ryder, Nick Taussig


PRODUCTION DESIGN

FA N TA S T I C B E A S T S :

B O H E M I A N R H A P S O DY

T H E C R I M E S O F G R I N D E LWA L D

John Casali, Tim Cavagin, Nina Hartstone, Paul Massey, John Warhurst

Stuart Craig, Anna Pinnock

T H E FAVO U R I T E

FIRST MAN

Fiona Crombie, Alice Felton

Mary H Ellis, Mildred Iatrou Morgan, Ai-Ling Lee, Frank A Montaño, Jon Taylor

FIRST MAN

M I S S I O N : I M P O S S I B L E – FA L L O U T

Nathan Crowley, Kathy Lucas

Gilbert Lake, James H Mather, Chris Munro, Mike Prestwood Smith

M ARY POPPI NS RETU RNS

A QUIET PL ACE

John Myhre, Gordon Sim

Erik Aadahl, Michael Barosky, Brandon Proctor, Ethan Van der Ryn

SOUND

ROMA

A S TA R I S B O R N

Eugenio Caballero, Bárbara Enríquez

Steve Morrow, Alan Robert Murray, Jason Ruder, Tom Ozanich, Dean Zupancic

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SPECIAL VISUAL EFFECTS

AV E N G E R S : I N F I N I T Y WA R

ADA M DRIVER

Dan DeLeeuw, Russell Earl, Kelly Port, Dan Sudick

BlacKkKlansman

B L AC K PA N T H E R

MAHERSHAL A ALI

Geoffrey Baumann, Jesse James Chisholm, Craig Hammack, Dan Sudick

Green Book

FA N TA S T I C B E A S T S :

RICHARD E GRANT

T H E C R I M E S O F G R I N D E LWA L D

Can You Ever Forgive Me?

Tim Burke, Andy Kind, Christian Manz, David Watkins

SAM ROCKWELL

Vice

R E A D Y P L AY E R O N E

TIMOTHÉ E CHAL AMET

Matthew E Butler, Grady Cofer, Roger Guyett, David Shirk

Beautiful Boy

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SUPPORTING ACTOR

FIRST MAN

Ian Hunter, Paul Lambert, Tristan Myles, J D Schwalm


INSPIRE THE NEXT GENERATION OF ACTORS. WHO SAYS YOU CAN’T?

Good luck to all our inspiring nominees for the EE Rising Star Award.


SUPPORTING ACTRESS

A MY ADA MS

BARRY KEO GHAN

Vice

C L A I R E F OY

CYNTHIA ERIVO

First Man

JESSIE BUCKLEY

The Favourite

MARGOT ROBBIE

L A K E I T H S TA N F I E L D

Mary Queen of Scots Voted for by the public

R ACHEL WEISZ

LETITIA WRIGHT

The Favourite

Nominations are correct at the time of going to print. BAFTA reserves the right to make changes to the names listed at any time up until 10 February 2019.

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THE EE RISIN G STA R AWA RD

EMMA STONE


JURIES

&

CHA PTERS

JURIES

BRITISH SHORT A N I M AT I O N Claire Jennings (Chair) Paloma Baeza Benoit Berthe Siward Marc Craste GaĂŤlle Denis Ralph Foster Pablo Grillo Gillian Higgins Fiona Lamptey Loraine Marshall Asa Shoul With thanks to Jackie Edwards and Carl Gorham for their help in the shortlisting stage.

BRITISH SHORT FIL M Alexandra Ferguson Derbyshire (Chair) Mo Ali Hugh Bonneville Lucy Cohen Tina Gharavi Nina Gold Nichola Martin Dan Mazer Ol Parker Amanda Posey Tim Webber With thanks to Cynthia De Souza and Chris Dickens for their help in the shortlisting stage, and to the BAFTA members who took part in the longlisting stage.

O U T S TA N D I N G BRITISH FIL M Marc Samuelson (Chair) SJ Clarkson Kwadjo Dajan Cynthia De Souza

CHAPTERS

Coky Giedroyc Uzma Hasan Anna Higgs Isaac Julien David Parfitt Nicole Taylor O U T S TA N D I N G D EB U T BY A B R I T I S H W R I T E R, D I R E C TO R OR PRODUCER Tanya Seghatchian (Chair) Anthony Chen Charlie Covell Lucinda Coxon Charles Gant Briony Hanson Elizabeth Karlsen Clare Stewart Matthew Warchus Ruth Wilson With thanks to Jinx Godfrey, Danny Leigh, Dixie Linder, and Rungano Nyoni for their help in the longlisting stages.

E E R I S I N G S TA R Alison Thompson (Chair) Lucy Bevan Edith Bowman Helen Bownass Leo Davis Lena de Casparis Larushka Ivan-Zadeh Georgina Lowe Tom Macklin Richard Madden Gillian Orr Ray Panthaki Rosamund Pike Anna Smith With thanks to Charles Gant for his help in the longlisting stages.

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CR A F T CHA PTERS Cinematography Costume Design Directing Editing Make Up & Hair Music Production Design Screenplay Sound Special Visual Effects O P T- I N C H A P T ERS Animation British Short Animation and British Short Film Documentary Film Not in the English Language Outstanding British Film Craft chapters consist of Academy members with specialist experience in the relative field. Opt-in chapters are open to all members who are willing to commit to watching the eligible films. Special Award recipients are selected by the Film Committee. For full details of the voting process, please visit: www.bafta.org/film/awards


MICHAEL G. WILSON AND BARBARA BROCCOLI C O N G R AT U L AT E A L L O F T O N I G H T ’ S B A F T A N O M I N E E S A N D W I N N E R S.


BL ACKKKL A NSM A N WO R DS BY SO PH I E M O N KS K AU FM A N

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BEST

FI LM

NOM I N E E

B EST FI L M N O M I N EES Jason Blum, Spike Lee, Raymond Mansfield, Sean McKittrick, Jordan Peele

OT H ER N O M I N AT ED C AT EG O R I ES Adapted Screenplay, Director, Original Music, Supporting Actor

S

peaking at a Q&A after his mesmerising documentary Hale County This Morning, This Evening (2018), photographer/filmmaker RaMell Ross reminded the audience that representations of contemporary African-Americans cannot be divorced from their historic representations by white supremacists. Viewed from this vantage point, all humane depictions of black people are a reaction to the racist stereotypes that plague the dawn of cinema and whose ideology remains toxically embedded within our culture.

Spike Lee’s angry, funny, battering ram of a movie is more than aware of cinema’s role in shaping and corrupting our capacity for empathy. BlacKkKlansman spans multitudes, working as a cultural corrective, a stranger-than-fiction story, an absurdist comedy and a vehicle for furiously entertaining performances. The hero of our story is the handsome, fro-sporting, loneblack-officer-in-the-precinct, Ron Stallworth, drawn from a 2014 autobiography about a black cop who in 1979 infiltrated the Colorado branch of the Ku Klux Klan. Ron is a groovy übermensch whose desire to get

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one over on the KKK triumphs over fears for personal safety. John David Washington paints him in broad likeable strokes, complemented by Adam Driver as Flip, the white Jewish colleague who fronts as Ron in meetings with Klan members. Although there is a love interest in the picture, Lee is most interested in conducting relationship tensions across political lines. Ron’s passion catalyses Flip’s awakening to also having “skin in the game” (antisemitism is incorporated into the Klan’s vile rhetoric), and the sincerity between these two men is the heart of a movie that is otherwise a tonal riot.


BLACKKKLA N SM A N

SPIKE LEE’S ANGRY, FUNNY, BATTERING RAM OF A MOVIE IS MORE THAN AWARE OF CINEMA’S ROLE IN SHAPING AND CORRUPTING OUR CAPACITY FOR EMPATHY.

Jordan Peele acted as a producer here and while his Get Out (2017) satirised racism with a slyness that slow-burned into horror, Lee goes the opposite route, whacking viewers over the head with the primitive stupidity of his oppressors by using hate speech, accounts of historic violence and a tone of scornful ridicule cranked up to the level of a perpetual eye-roll. David Duke, the Grand Wizard of the KKK, is the central target. Over long phone conversations with Ron, he refers to the black cop as a “pure white American” and these scenes are played for gleeful ‘gotcha’ laughs. However, thanks

to Topher Grace’s finely-calibrated performance, menace still emanates from a man whose mild manners make his violent politics scan as more chilling than even those of the brutish grassroots members in Colorado. Although period setting is evoked through colourful ’70s stylings and contextual touches, such as a blistering speech by Kwame Ture (aka Stokely Carmichael) at the Colorado Student Union, Lee is more interested in playing with time than in verisimilitude. Stories and footage from before and after 1979 are mashed into the narrative, hammering the point

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that what we’re up against is old, insidious and not going away by itself. Lest there be any doubt over Lee’s view on the man currently in The White House, digs are knitted into the dialogue, building to a coda of bloodcurdling footage from Charlottesville. The fight to show that black lives matter is driven to correct both history and this painful moment, says Lee’s heartfelt work. •

Sophie Monks Kaufman is a freelance film journalist and contributing editor at Little White Lies


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T H E FA V O U R I T E WO R DS BY K A M BO L E C A M PB EL L

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BEST

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NOM I N E E

B EST FI L M N O M I N EES Ceci Dempsey, Ed Guiney, Yorgos Lanthimos, Lee Magiday

OT H ER N O M I N AT ED C AT EG O RI ES Cinematography, Costume Design, Director, Editing, Leading Actress, Make Up & Hair,  Original Screenplay, Outstanding British Film,  Production Design, Supporting Actress (x2)

es, it’s a period drama, but not as you know it. Other than his penchant for pitch black tragicomedy, Yorgos Lanthimos has proved masterful at defying expectations throughout his beguiling, acidic body of work. Following on from the disturbing, artificial worlds of The Lobster (2015) and The Killing of a Sacred Deer (2017), Lanthimos has found a new world of artifice to play with: the English aristocracy. Deborah Davis and Tony McNamara’s script boasts a twisted, grotesque vision of history, told with cutting

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frankness and an extremely creative form of threats and expletives. Set in the court of Queen Anne (Olivia Colman), stricken by both grief and gout, The Favourite follows a contest for her favour between her lifelong friend and lover Lady Sarah Churchill (Rachel Weisz) and the fallen from grace Lady Abigail (Emma Stone). The film shows an utter lack of concern with making these women likeable but celebrates their fortitude and cunning, and a capacity for “much unpleasantness”. The characters may be cruel to each other, but the film isn’t cold. All the backstabbing and

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absurdity of the court revolves around Queen Anne, and a striking turn from Colman. Anne could be a purely comic character, as a rich noble prone to childish outbursts, but in Colman’s hands she becomes a more tragic figure. What sets this apart from Lanthimos’ other work is the sincerity and pathos found in this performance, as Anne’s grief and loneliness is given as much care and attention as Abigail and Sarah’s vicious competition. Lanthimos views these past events through a modern eye, Robbie Ryan’s camerawork distorting the proceedings through


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THE FAVOURITE DELIGHTS IN PUNCTURING THE TRADITIONS OF THE GENRE WITH CUTTING, HILARIOUS ANACHRONISMS. fisheyes and wide angle lenses – it’s potentially the only film of its kind shot like an MTV skateboarding video. The Favourite delights in puncturing the traditions of the genre with cutting, hilarious anachronisms – the best of which can only be described as an 18th century take on Soul Train. This blend of the archaic with the modern extends to the production design. Sandy Powell’s thoughtful, detailed costumes combine old styles with modern patterns, and always feel like extensions of theme and character. Sarah, often costumed in more traditionally masculine attire,

looks more like a general than any man in the film. Queen Anne’s contrasting extravagant outfits and plain robes beautifully highlight the conflict between her royal facade and inner turmoil. Abigail’s transformation from Austen-esque country girl to decadent aristocrat speaks for itself. They are beautiful variations on what we’re used to, archaic costumes with modern flair, not unlike the film itself. The men, on the other hand, look appropriately ludicrous with big wigs and heavy make-up. Whether it’s the preening, wigged lords racing ducks or pelting nude fops with fruit, it all

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reveals the decadence that men of power enjoy, often built on the hardships of women. But what’s special about The Favourite is how it simply lets the women be the complicated figureheads, scheming power players and steadfast driving forces behind the narrative, rather than just cyphers for suffering. •

Kambole Campbell is a freelance film critic and contributor to Little White Lies, Birth.Movies.Death. and Curzon


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GREEN BOOK WO R DS BY R I CH CL I N E

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t can’t be easy to turn a true story about the height of racial tensions in the Deep South into a crowd-pleasing road movie, but director Peter Farrelly makes it look effortless. Green Book is one of those films that defies its own genre, keeping the audience laughing even as some of the darkest themes of the year rumble through the narrative. Farrelly is better known for making such goofy comedies as There’s Something About Mary (1998) and Dumb and Dumber (1994) alongside his brother Bobby. With Green Book, which

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he also co-wrote and produced, he creates a warm and funny movie that never lets the harsh social reality weigh it down. The title refers to The Negro Motorist Green Book, an annual travel guide (1936-1966) by Victor Hugo Green for AfricanAmericans visiting the South under Jim Crow laws, which enforced racial segregation. The story begins in 1962 New York, as Frank Anthony Vallelonga, better known as Tony Lip (Viggo Mortensen), is working as a bouncer when he’s hired to drive virtuoso pianist Don Shirley (Mahershala Ali) on

B EST FI L M N O M I N EES Jim Burke, Brian Currie, Peter Farrelly, Nick Vallelonga, Charles B Wessler

OT H ER N O M I N AT ED C AT EG O R I ES Leading Actor, Original Screenplay, Supporting Actor

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a tour through the Deep South. They will need the Green Book to sort out their separate accommodations in each city. What follows is an inversion on the usual buddy road movie, as the Italian-American tough guy Tony clashes with the African-American aesthete Don. Clearly they are going to sand down each other’s edges: Tony’s crude bluntness and Don’s meticulous perfectionism. What makes the film surprising is that these two don’t rub off on each other in the usual ways. This is partly because both are facing the issue of bigotry and


GREEN

prejudice from distinctly different backgrounds. So, it’s never a matter of one of them teaching the other something new: both are discovering something about themselves through this unlikely friendship. This allows Mortensen and Ali to deliver relaxed, earthy performances that are remarkably likeable, even when they’re at their most obnoxious. The surrounding cast is packed with lively characters who poke and prod them until they snap. And Linda Cardellini (as Tony’s patient wife) adds a welcome female touch.

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Films that frame historical events in this kind of personal way tend to catch on with audiences. Rather than focus on the grim truths of racial injustice, this movie lets those darker issues remain in the background while the humane drama plays out. This is similar to the approach taken by the 2016 hit Hidden Figures, as opposed to the more confrontational attack of equally engaging dramas such as Loving and Mudbound (both 2017). This past year has been full of racially themed movies that provoke the audience to a strong reaction, including

BlacKkKlansman, Sorry to Bother You and Blindspotting. By contrast, Green Book hooks the audience personally and emotionally. There may be huge issues nudging the viewer all the way through, but this is actually a film about how important it is to get to know people who seem utterly incomprehensible. Because they may turn out to be the kind of friend who enriches life exponentially. •

Rich Cline is a freelance film journalist who also chairs the London Critics’ Circle Film Awards

FARRELLY CREATES A WARM AND FUNNY MOVIE THAT NEVER LETS THE HARSH SOCIAL REALITY WEIGH IT DOWN. 5 3


NETFLIX

PROUDLY CONGRATULATES OUR

BAFTA AWARD NOMINEES ROMA

BEST FILM DIRECTOR

CINEMATOGRAPHY

ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY

PRODUCTION DESIGN

ALFONSO CUARÓN ALFONSO CUARÓN

EDITING

ALFONSO CUARÓN, ADAM GOUGH

ALFONSO CUARÓN

EUGENIO CABALLERO, BÁRBARA ENRÍQUEZ

FILM NOT IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE

THE BALLAD OF BUSTER SCRUGGS COSTUME DESIGN MARY ZOPHRES

AND SALUTES

THELMA SCHOONMAKER ON RECEIVING A

BAFTA FELLOWSHIP


ROM A WO R DS BY PE T ER B R A DSH AW

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lfonso Cuarón’s glorious film Roma is inspired by his own upbringing in early 1970s Mexico City, and about his family’s complex relationship with their beloved live-in maid. Its visual brilliance, emotional power, thrillingly choreographed set pieces and shrewd incidental detail all come together with Yalitza Aparicio’s wonderful lead performance to weave a spell. Part of it is Cuarón’s miraculously unforced narrative flow. So many studio movies look like they have come out of screenplay-seminar thinking: three acts, show-don’t-tell, character arc, obstacles surmounted, life-lessons learned.

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By contrast, Roma just spills out unhurriedly onto the screen, moving this way and that, like the water being patiently sploshed by the maid Cleo onto the tiled driveway under the film’s opening credits. In its way, it is a very novelistic film, with the accretion of detail you might expect from a Bildungsroman. Cleo’s experiences do not take her on anything as explicit as a personal ‘journey’, but something more mysterious and internalised. We see what Cleo sees, we wonder what and how she feels, we build up our investment of sympathy with her, and it all escalates to a heartrending payoff. The climactic scene is hard to

B EST FI L M N O M I N EES Alfonso Cuarón, Gabriela Rodríguez

OT H ER N O M I N AT ED C AT EG O R I ES Cinematography, Director, Editing, Film Not in the English Language, Original Screenplay, Production Design

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watch clearly, perhaps simply because you are so blinded by tears. Cleo is a young woman of Mixteco Mesoamerican heritage, working as a live-in maid for a beleaguered upper middle class family in Mexico City. Her personal life is beginning to disintegrate alongside that of her employer, Sofía (Marina de Tavira), mother to four lively kids – though it’s Cleo who has to do the childcare heavy-lifting. Cuarón shows, through a hundred little touches, that though their handsomely appointed household is superficially comfortable, the family is, in Tolstoy’s words, unhappy in its own way.


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The father, Antonio (Fernando Grediaga), is increasingly late home, parks his car with fanatical precision in the driveway in a way that hints at dysfunction and repressed anxiety. Soon, he is away on what Sofia tells the children is a business trip, but tearfully tells them to write letters to their papa begging him to come home. Meanwhile, Cleo forms a relationship with a dodgy martial arts enthusiast, Fermín (Jorge Antonio Guerrero), who is less than supportive when she explains she has missed her period. There are some amazing and almost dreamlike scenes in the film, left-field adventures that never look extraneous, but

like the things that can happen in real, rather than surreal life: a family trip to friends in the country featuring a hair-raising shooting trip, a New Year’s party that culminates in a forest fire and one guest singing an earnest Scandinavian hymn. Fermín demonstrates his martial arts moves to Cleo in a post-coital display of self-love. Cleo later tracks him down to a weird outdoor paramilitary motivational meeting outside of town. Cuarón finds these moments with serendipitous inspiration, and his Mexico City streetscapes are thrillingly alive, worthy of Scorsese – and, indeed, Cuarón’s own superb monochrome cinematography is reminiscent

of Michael Chapman’s work on Raging Bull. It is all heading to Cleo’s own terrifying moment of truth, to the revelation about her love for the four children under her care: what she has done for them, what she has sacrificed for them, and what life has given and taken from her. There is a quiet grandeur in these scenes. It’s easy to imagine Roma being adapted as an opera. But what a wonderful movie it is. •

Peter Bradshaw is chief film critic of The Guardian

CUARÔN FINDS MOMENTS WITH SERENDIPITOUS INSPIRATION AND HIS MEXICO CITY STREETSCAPES ARE THRILLINGLY ALIVE. 5 7


ENHANCE

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A S TA R I S B O R N WO R DS BY SI M R A N H A NS

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B EST FI L M N O M I N EES Bradley Cooper, Bill Gerber, Lynette Howell Taylor

OT H ER N O M I N AT ED C AT EG O RI ES Adapted Screenplay, Director, Leading Actor, Leading Actress, Original Music, Sound

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aybe it’s time to let the old ways die,” croons Jackson Maine, Bradley Cooper’s past-his-best country rock star. Buoyed by a guitar pick and a flask of whisky, his believably sozzled, swaggering cowboy troubadour is still on stage, still singing, but the world around him is changing. Indeed, many of Jackson Maine’s songs betray similar anxieties about being left behind or simply faded out (“Too far gone and I’m by the phone/And I’m all alone and I’m awful

lonely, by the wayside”, he sings in opening number, ‘Black Eyes’). His music is unfashionable, unable to survive in an economy that, by the film’s logic, demands artists optimise their art to maximise Spotify streams. Cooper’s slickly assured directorial debut catapults A Star Is Born’s classic Hollywood story into the present moment, using it as an opportunity to raise questions about artistry, authenticity and cultural relevance. Yet its tale of a gifted ingenue plucked from obscurity and lifted to new heights of stardom by a

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world-weary man – only to be knocked down again – is as old as time. This is its fourth official version; Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper follow Janet Gaynor and Fredric March (1937), Judy Garland and James Mason (1954), and Barbra Streisand and Kris Kristofferson (1976). A tough-talking waitress with a raw, soulful voice, Ally’s musicianship is glimpsed by Maine in an after-hours dive bar. Flanked by drag queens, she sings Edith Piaf ’s ‘La Vie en Rose’; the pair hit it off and later start riffing in a grocery store car park.


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STAR

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B O RN

A STAR IS BORN IS A REMINDER THAT CLASSIC DOESN’T HAVE TO MEAN FUSTY; THAT TIMELESS CAN FEEL FRESH. She sings a few lines she’s been working on; he looks at her, awestruck. It’s as though she’s an angel (or perhaps even an alien), dropped in from the heavens. “I just want to take another look at you,” he says, leaning out of a tinted window. Her luminosity is blinding. It’s a forgone conclusion that her talent will eclipse his. A star is born. Cooper’s casting of avantgarde pop superstar Lady Gaga is a stroke of studied genius, actively encouraging a blurring between performer and performance. Gaga’s portrayal

is stripped back; the naturalism is impressive given the wacky theatricality associated with her real-life star persona. She’s believable as a novice while at the same time able to telegraph that she belongs on billboards and in stadiums. It’s a transcendent, goosebump-inducing moment when she sings the soaring, Fleetwood Mac-esque power ballad ‘Shallow’ to an adoring crowd of thousands. “Having something to say is one thing,” cautions Maine. “Having a way to make people listen is a whole other bag.”

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A Star Is Born is a reminder that classic doesn’t have to mean fusty; that timeless can feel fresh. It’s a return to the glossy, grownup, built-to-last Hollywood melodrama. Explaining the anatomy of a pop song, Jackson Maine offers the theory that a hit is really “the same story told over and over”. “All the artist can offer the world is how he sees those 12 notes,” he says. If this is Cooper’s song, we can’t wait to hear it again. • Simran Hans is a writer and film critic for The Observer


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THEL M A SCHOONM AKER T H E FEL LOWS H I P Words by Christina Newland Portrait by John Clifford

• Images courtesy of BFI; the recipient;

Barry Z Levine (Woodstock); Brigitte Lacombe (Silence); Martin Scorsese Collection (The Color of Money); Marc Ohrem-LeClef (end portrait)

helma Schoonmaker is a film editor who has adopted a dazzling array of styles and approaches to her craft, from early screen work on the landmark 1970 documentary Woodstock to the present day, as she and Martin Scorsese complete the editing on his latest film, The Irishman (2019). Regardless of decades of technological shifts and sea changes in the film industry, Schoonmaker has remained in a fixed position as one of Scorsese’s longtime and key collaborators, working with him on 22 of his feature films. Following in the wake of Scorsese’s own 2012 Fellowship, Schoonmaker is this year’s deserving recipient of BAFTA’s highest honour. In her collaboration with Scorsese on the editing of his films, she has helped him carry out fresh, innovative ideas, whether in a family film, such as Hugo (2011), The Aviator’s (2004) sweeping epic or the uproariously crude The Wolf of Wall Street (2013). Chatting on the phone, Schoonmaker explains: “Scorsese has said that he feels I draw the humanity out in his movies, but he puts it there. It’s just that with the perspective of the editing room – away from the stress of working on a set – I think I can sometimes see things he might have missed.”  From 1980 onwards, Schoonmaker has edited every one of Scorsese’s feature films, and she affords the filmmaker a great deal of credit for her own success. She is among the most nominated and lauded film editors in American movie history, so it’s difficult to imagine her as a novice. But when she first began, she says: “Marty was the teacher and I was the student. I knew nothing about editing. Gradually, over time, as I gained more experience, it has become much more of a collaboration.”

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“FINDING THE SOLUTION CAN BE VERY FRUSTRATING, BUT I NEVER WANT TO GIVE UP... I LOVE SOLVING THE PUZZLE.”

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Schoonmaker and Scorsese’s long friendship began at New York University’s film school, where she volunteered to help him fix the mangled negative of his film, with their collaboration beginning with the director’s debut movie, Who’s That Knocking at My Door (1967). “Our collaboration has deepened greatly with time,” she notes. “It consists of a wonderful give and take of ideas, humour and Scorsese’s tough high standards for his films.” One only has to watch Scorsese’s reaction to Schoonmaker’s Academy Award win for The Departed (2006) to see how close the two are – he wells up in tears as he watches her accept the Oscar. She credits the longevity of their relationship to a deep mutual understanding, but also to the total lack of “ego collision” between them: they almost never argue.

Incredibly, the very first of Schoonmaker’s Hollywood projects was Raging Bull (1980) – a triumphant masterpiece in many respects, particularly in its expressive editing style. “I felt like I had pure gold in my hands there,” she says. In the boxing scenes, which feature a barrage of punches rained down on the subject (namely Robert De Niro playing Jake La Motta), Scorsese and Schoonmaker broke traditional continuity rules, showing a fighter lining up a right hook and De Niro absorbing a nasty blow from the left. This jarring, destabilising editing choice reflects Jake’s determination to never go down – no matter how brutal the punishment he is absorbing – just one of the many ingenious flourishes they created for the film.

“SCORSESE HAS SAID HE FEELS I DRAW THE HUMANITY OUT IN HIS MOVIES, BUT HE PUTS IT THERE.” 

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One challenge that began with Raging Bull and would continue through several of Schoonmaker’s projects was actor improvisation. It can be difficult to find a through-line and structure for even the most brilliant of actors’ off-piste moments, as witnessed in several great scenes between Joe Pesci and Robert De Niro. But Schoonmaker relishes such challenges. Through her background in documentary, where “raw footage has to be shaped as though it’s been scripted”, she learned a knack for dealing with the unpredictable. She says: “Finding a solution can be very frustrating, but I never want to give up. I just bang away at it, because I love solving the puzzle and bringing the brilliant improvisations to an audience.”

Opposite page, top left: Editing Woodstock (1970); Left: Thelma Schoonmaker and Martin Scorsese on location in Taiwan for Silence (2016); This page, right: Goodfellas (1990); Below: The Aviator (2004)

The tools that Schoonmaker employs to put together those jigsaw pieces have altered significantly since she first began on a Moviola in the 1960s. She says she was “grumpy” about the switch to digital editing with Casino (1995), but now can’t imagine working without it. Scorsese mostly shoots on film and converts to digital for editing, and the fact that she can ask an assistant to digitally remove someone’s arm from a shot is an asset she wouldn’t like to go without.


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Far left: Martin Scorsese, Michael Powell and Schoonmaker on The Color of Money (1986); Left: Schoonmaker editing Gangs of New York (2002); Below: The Departed (2006); Below left: The Wolf of Wall Street (2013)

The radical use of jump cuts, freeze frames, and juxtapositions would come in handy again for Goodfellas (1990), for which both she and Scorsese were awarded BAFTAs for their efforts. Indeed, Schoonmaker has two BAFTAs to her name and seven nominations, highlighting a longstanding connection to the UK’s film culture and the British Academy. But there’s another reason why this Fellowship and British cinema are so close to Schoonmaker’s heart; her late husband was Michael Powell, a giant of British filmmaking and a recipient of the BAFTA Fellowship himself in 1981. She has spent much of her time since his passing in 1990 celebrating, restoring, and educating people about the incredible work of Powell and Pressburger. In many respects, Powell and his films had fallen into obscurity by the time of Scorsese’s rise to fame, and it was he who helped revive the director’s reputation – not to mention play matchmaker to the pair.

“THE FILMS OF POWELL AND PRESSBURGER WERE A HUGE INFLUENCE ON US.”

“Michael was a wonderful man to live with,” says Schoonmaker. “The films of Powell and Pressburger were a huge influence on us. As filmmakers, they appreciated the audience. Michael used to tell Marty and me, ‘Never underestimate your audience, it is always lightyears ahead of you.’ And, ‘Never explain’, he would say. That was a benchmark for us, always.

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Particularly on the film we’re working on right now, The Irishman. Scorsese is adamantly opposed to explaining. He wants the audience to come to the movie and figure things out for themselves.” Schoonmaker celebrated her 79th birthday in January, but shows no signs of slowing down. With characteristic modesty, she says: “I work very long hours. But I love my job. Boy, what a privilege!” • Christina Newland is a freelance journalist on film and culture for The Guardian,  Sight & Sound and Little White Lies

FIL MO GR A PHY 2016 2014 2013 2011 2010 2006 2004 2002 2001 1999 1997 1996

Silence Learning to Drive The Wolf of Wall Street Hugo Shutter Island The Departed The Aviator Gangs of New York My Voyage to Italy Bringing Out the Dead Kundun Grace of My Heart

AWA RDS

&

1995 1993 1991 1990 1988 1986 1985 1982 1980 1979 1970 1967

Casino The Age of Innocence Cape Fear Goodfellas The Last Temptation of Christ The Color of Money After Hours The King of Comedy Raging Bull The McCartney Years Woodstock Who’s That Knocking at My Door

NOM INATIONS

(SELECT)

BA F TA W I N S

AC A D E MY AWA R D W I N S

1991 Goodfellas 1982 Raging Bull

2006 The Departed 2004 The Aviator 1980 Raging Bull

BA F TA N O M I N AT I O N S AC A D E MY AWA R D N O M I N AT I O N S

2014 2012 2007 2005 2003 1993 1984

The Wolf of Wall Street Hugo The Departed The Aviator Gangs of New York Cape Fear The King of Comedy

2011 2002 1990 1970

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Hugo Gangs of New York Goodfellas Woodstock


Director


FELLOWS

OF

THE

1971 Alfred Hitchcock 1972 Freddie Young obe 1973 Grace Wyndham Goldie 1974 David Lean 1975  Jacques Cousteau 1976 Sir Charles Chaplin 1976 Lord Olivier 1977 Sir Denis Forman 1978 Fred Zinnemann 1979 Lord Grade 1979 Sir Huw Wheldon 1980 David Attenborough cbe 1980  John Huston 1981 Abel Gance 1981 Michael Powell 1981 Emeric Pressburger 1982 Andrzej Wajda 1983 Sir Richard Attenborough cbe 1984 Sir Hugh Greene 1984 Sam Spiegel 1985  Jeremy Isaacs 1986 Steven Spielberg 1987 Federico Fellini 1988 Ingmar Bergman 1989 Sir Alec Guinness ch, cbe 1990 Paul Fox 1991 Louis Malle 1992 Sir John Gielgud 1992 David Plowright 1993 Sydney Samuelson cbe 1993 Colin Young cbe 1994 Michael Grade cbe 1995 Billy Wilder 1996 Jeanne Moreau 1996 Ronald Neame cbe 1996 John Schlesinger cbe 1996 Dame Maggie Smith 1997 Woody Allen 1997 Steven Bochco 1997  Julie Christie 1997 Oswald Morris obe 1997 Harold Pinter cbe 1997 David Rose 1998 Sean Connery 1998 Bill Cotton cbe 1999 Eric Morecambe & Ernie Wise 1999 Elizabeth Taylor 2000 Michael Caine 2000 Stanley Kubrick (posthumous) 2000 Peter Bazalgette

ACA DE MY

2001 Albert Finney 2001  John Thaw 2001 Dame Judi Dench 2002 Warren Beatty 2002 Merchant Ivory Productions 2002 Andrew Davies 2002 Sir John Mills 2003 Saul Zaentz 2003 David Jason 2004  John Boorman 2004 Roger Graef 2005  John Barry obe 2005 Sir David Frost obe 2006 Lord Puttnam cbe 2006 Ken Loach 2007 Anne V Coates obe 2007 Richard Curtis cbe 2007 Will Wright 2008 Sir Anthony Hopkins cbe 2008 Bruce Forsyth cbe 2009 Terry Gilliam 2009 Nolan Bushnell 2009 Dawn French & Jennifer Saunders 2010 Vanessa Redgrave cbe 2010 Shigeru Miyamoto 2010 Lord Bragg 2011 Sir Christopher Lee cbe 2011 Peter Molyneux obe 2011 Sir Trevor McDonald obe 2012 Martin Scorsese 2013 Sir Alan Parker 2013 Gabe Newell 2013 Michael Palin cbe 2014 Dame Helen Mirren 2014 Rockstar Games 2014  Julie Walters cbe 2015 Mike Leigh 2015 David Braben obe 2015  Jon Snow 2016 Sir Sidney Poitier 2016  John Carmack 2016 Ray Galton obe & Alan Simpson obe 2017 Mel Brooks 2017  Joanna Lumley obe 2018 Sir Ridley Scott 2018 Tim Schafer 2018 Kate Adie obe

Names and honours correct at time of presentation.

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Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K


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“WE SHARE A SENSIBILITY. IT’S VERY RARE WE DISAGREE ABOUT THE FILMS WE SEE OR WANT TO DEVELOP.”


ELIZABETH KARLSEN & STEPHEN WOOLLEY O U TSTA N D I N G B R I T I S H CO N T R I B U T I O N TO CI N E M A Words by Neil Smith

• Portrait by BAFTA/Charlie Clift

Images courtesy of BFI; the recipients; Number 9 Films; Robert Viglasky (Colette); Tom Hilton (The Crying Game); Wilson Webb (Carol); Nicola Dove (The Limehouse Golem); BAFTA/Doug McKenzie (Film Awards, 1993)

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ith one win and nine nominations between them, Stephen Woolley and Elizabeth Karlsen are certainly no strangers to BAFTA voters. Yet that’s only a part of the story, the films they have produced either separately or together having notched up more than 50 BAFTA nominations over the course of four prolific decades. From The Company of Wolves (1984), Mona Lisa (1986) and Scandal (1989) to Little Voice (1998), Made in Dagenham (2010) and Carol (2015), the producing partners have shown a staunch commitment to independent cinema that has been celebrated by audiences, critics and Awards bodies alike. Despite this, however, the news they had been chosen by BAFTA to receive its Outstanding British Contribution to Cinema award came as a shock. “Stephen came into the office, tossed a letter down and said, ‘Look at this – your mum will be pleased!’” Karlsen smiles. “I read it and it was impossible to comprehend. I read it, read it again and thought, ‘Wait, is this a joke?’ It was amazing to receive it; such a validation of our work.” “We were thrilled, honoured and pleased for everybody who’s been associated with our films and us,” says Woolley, who considers Michael Balcon, the British producer in whose honour this special award is annually presented, one of his own personal heroes. “Filmmakers like Balcon came to the forefront during World War II because they had to mix movies about reality with movies that entertained,” he continues. “Our career has similarly been about making films without money under a kind of duress, and yet through that process we’ve been able to make some good movies.”

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Fittingly enough, Woolley’s life in film began at his local cinema (formerly The Rex in Islington, now called the Everyman Screen On The Green) where, at the age of 18, he got his first job. “I tore tickets, humped prints upstairs, changed the letters on the canopy – everything, basically,” he recalls. “It was all very exciting and I loved it.” Under the management of influential cinema owner Romaine Hart, The Screen On The Green gave the young Stephen Woolley and many others their first exposure to European arthouse, US indie and late-night cult cinema. Yet, he also learned a valuable lesson in balancing artistic aspiration with financial pragmatism. “Romaine taught me how important it was to keep the Kia-Oras cold,” he

laughs fondly. “Running a cinema is about selling Kia-Oras; it’s maximising the ups and minimising the downs. As producers, we always have to find the balance between business and art – between what you want to do and what you think an audience might want.” Woolley went on to own and run his own repertory cinema, the legendary Scala in Kings Cross, before going into distribution through Palace Pictures. Producing movies with then partner Nik Powell was the logical next step. “I was buying such films as A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984) and When Harry Met Sally... (1989) based on their screenplays, so I said, ‘Perhaps we should create our own screenplays,’” Woolley explains. “On one side, there was the commercial instinct, but secondly there was the sense of wanting to create movies.”

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Clockwise from top left: Karlsen and Pam Koffler on location for Colette (2018); Karlsen on the set of Carol (2015); Woolley on the set of The Limehouse Golem (2016); Woolley with director Neil Jordan and director of photography Ian Wilson on The Crying Game (1992)


FIL MO GR A PHY 2018 2017 2016 2016 2015 2015 2012 2010 2005 2005 2004 2003 1999 1998 1997

Colette On Chesil Beach Their Finest The Limehouse Golem Youth Carol Great Expectations Made in Dagenham Stoned Mrs. Harris Ladies in Lavender Intermission The End of the Affair Little Voice The Butcher Boy

AWA RDS

1996 1996 1995 1994 1994 1992 1991 1990 1989 1989 1986 1986 1985 1984

&

(SELECT)

Michael Collins Hollow Reed The Neon Bible Interview with a Vampire Backbeat The Crying Game A Rage in Harlem Hardware Shag Scandal Mona Lisa Absolute Beginners Letter to Brezhnev The Company of Wolves

NOM INATIONS

BA F TA W I N S

(SELECT)

AC A D E MY AWA R D N O M I N AT I O N

1993 The Crying Game, Outstanding British 1993 The Crying Game, Best Picture

Film – Stephen Woolley, Neil Jordan BA F TA N O M I N AT I O N S

PRI M ETI M E EM MY N O M I N AT I O N

2016 Carol, Best Film – Elizabeth Karlsen, 2006 Mrs. Harris, Outstanding Made

Christine Vachon, Stephen Woolley 2011 Made in Dagenham, Outstanding British

Film – Nigel Cole, William Ivory, Elizabeth Karlsen, Stephen Woolley 2000 The End of the Affair, Best Film – Stephen Woolley, Neil Jordan 1999 Little Voice, Outstanding British Film – Elizabeth Karlsen, Mark Herman 1995 Backbeat, Outstanding British Film – Finola Dwyer, Stephen Woolley, Iain Softley 1993 The Crying Game, Best Film – Stephen Woolley, Neil Jordan 1987 Mona Lisa, Best Film – Stephen Woolley, Patrick Cassavetti, Neil Jordan Right: Woolley with his BAFTA for The Crying Game (1993)

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for Television Movie – Elizabeth Karlsen, Pamela Koffler, Christine Vachon, Chrisann Verges, John Wells


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BR I TI S H

CON TRI B U TI O N

Spearheaded by Woolley’s highly profitable collaboration with director Neil Jordan, Palace enjoyed such success that Woolley soon found himself overstretched. Enter Karlsen, with a degree in critical theory, whose experiences working with director Bill Sherwood on his landmark drama Parting Glances (1986) had made her keen to become a producer herself. “Elizabeth had a brilliant knowledge of cinema but also understood bottom lines,” remembers Woolley. “She understood the balance, which was quite rare in those days.” Palace eventually ceased operations in 1992, but not before producing a huge hit – Jordan’s The Crying Game (1992) – that led to he and Stephen Woolley making Interview with the Vampire (1994) in Hollywood. Having married in 1990, though, Woolley and Karlsen continued making films together and had a big success with Little Voice. Their professional partnership was formalised four years later with the foundation of Number 9 Films which, thanks to such movies as Made in Dagenham, Great Expectations (2012), Their Finest

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(2016) and On Chesil Beach (2017), has established itself as one of the UK’s leading independent production companies. “It felt like a natural thing to have a company together,” says Karlsen from Number 9’s office, just off Tottenham Court Road in London. “Even when Stephen was off making big budget films with Neil, and I was making independent films in the UK, we were always sharing problems, talking about ideas and looking at edits of each other’s films. There was a very close creative bond, and we share a sensibility. It’s very rare we disagree about the films we see or films we want to develop.” Woolley concurs, saying Number 9 – whose name comes from ‘Revolution 9’, an experimental sound collage off The Beatles’ White Album – “seemed to make sense to us personally and professionally.” “We’ve always worked with like-minded people,

Top left: The Crying Game (1992); Top right: The Company of Wolves (1984); Left: On Chesil Beach (2017); Above: Interview with the Vampire (1994)

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As official scrutineers, when BAFTA needs our help we act. Providing them with confidence in the results during the awards season. It’s what we do that makes the difference. Many congratulations to all of tonight’s nominees and winners.


O U T ST AND I NG

“WE’RE THRILLED, HONOURED AND PLEASED FOR EVERYBODY WHO’S BEEN ASSOCIATED WITH OUR FILMS AND US.”

BR I TI S H

CON TRI B U TI O N

who share the same tastes that we do and like the idea of cinema as an international language,” he continues. “Although we are a British company, based in Europe, we’ve always had a very international outlook.” With projects in development including a Dusty Springfield biopic, starring Gemma Arteton, and an adaptation of Graham Swift’s Mothering Sunday, the future certainly looks bright for Number 9 Films. (The company is also moving into television, with adaptations of The Portrait of a Lady by Henry James and The Sea, The Sea by

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Iris Murdoch.) Small wonder, then, that both Woolley and Karlsen feel upbeat about British film and the industry in general. “There’s still a market for the kind of movies we make, so we’re optimistic we’re going to carry on making films,” says Woolley. “Everyone says streaming is the death knell for cinema, but attendances are the highest they’ve ever been.” Karlsen, for her part, believes there’s nothing to be gained from following the pack. “You shouldn’t just chase the money or the idea you think everyone is looking for,” she states. “Typically, it will be that black swan, the idea nobody saw coming, that takes everyone by storm.” • Neil Smith is a contributing editor of Total Film magazine

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WATCH A MOVIE IN MID-AIR WHO SAYS YOU CANT? Our 4G network lets us take the movies to places you least expect to find them. Which means more great British films, on more screens, for more people. Find out more at: ee.co.uk/cinema


ASPIRE TO ACHIEVE B A F TA’S S U P P O RT O F N E W A N D E M ER G I N G TA L EN T COMES IN M A NY FOR MS, BUT A LL WITH T H E SA M E G OA L: TO PROV I D E A ST RO N G, INSPIR ATIONA L A ND NURTURING PL ATFOR M – U N FE T TERED BY BA RRI ERS – FO R A SPI RI N G CR E AT I V ES TO R E A L ISE T H EI R D R E A M S. H ER E A R E J UST A FE W O F T H EI R STO R I ES. Words by Toby Weidmann | Images courtesy of Rienkje Attoh (portrait); BAFTA/Phil Fisk (Michael Pearce portrait; Breakthrough Brits 2018); Gagandeep Kalirai (on set); BAFTA/Richard Kendall (EE Rising Star); BAFTA/Jamie Simonds (Will Poulter portrait; BAFTA Elevate; Film Awards 2019 nominations); BAFTA/Jordan Henderson (Gagandeep Kalirai portrait; 2018 Scholars); BAFTA/Danny Cozens (Short Sighted); BAFTA/Jonathan Birch (Give Something Back)

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hile films are all about telling stories – wonderful, entertaining, engaging, sometimes provocative stories – the actual filmmaking process and, indeed, the journey to get to that point, can also be inspirational tales in themselves. The passion and drive to make significant art and the necessary nous needed to overcome the many obstacles and pitfalls that lie in wait cannot be underestimated.

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Many of BAFTA’s charitable activities seek to give talented new and emerging creatives the opportunity to thrive and establish themselves in an often unforgiving industry. This can take the form of our internationally-recognised Awards, where we can help bring public and professional attention to aspiring practitioners through our various debut categories. Or it can be more practical; our international Learning & New Talent events, programmes and initiatives provide unprecedented access to some of the world’s most inspiring talent, and offer everything from direct mentorship to financial support. “It’s still a little bizarre when anyone refers to me as a BAFTA winner,” says actor Will Poulter, who won the EE Rising Star category at the 2014 Film Awards. “It’s not something I think about regularly, because I honestly don’t want it to put myself at risk of resting on my laurels, but I’ve undoubtedly benefitted from that support from BAFTA. “I’m so grateful to have been recognised by an organisation that I’m very proud to say I’m affiliated with. BAFTA does so much work in the interest of recognising underrepresented people and helping them gain entry into the industry. I was lucky: I had a really

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supportive experience at home and at school, but I realise that is not something everyone is gifted. I love that BAFTA dedicates so much time and effort to helping people who don’t necessarily come from that same kind of privilege. To have their support is amazing.” SU PP O RT I N G TA L EN T This is a sentiment repeated time and again by the recipients of our initiatives. These include, among others (see box outs), our flagship emerging talent programme, Breakthrough Brits, and our annual scholarships, which provide financial support to students on a post-graduate course related to a career in film, games or television. In 2018, Gagandeep Kalirai was given a scholarship to study an MA in Directing Animation at the National Film and Television School (NFTS). She is receiving BAFTA mentorship from award-winning director Philippa Lowthorpe. “I thought BAFTA was something unobtainable,” she notes, “but when I got the scholarship, it really felt that it was a place that I could reach. It’s been so valuable... The relationship I have with Philippa is special. There’s nothing quite like sitting down with someone who has so much

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FEATURE Below: The 2018 Breakthrough Brits

experience and knowledge in filmmaking. In animation, you become so used to sitting at your computer drawing, you forget that you’re also a director and filmmaker as well, and there’s a lot you need to learn and think about. The scholarship has been exactly what I needed to get myself out of a certain headspace.” Many of our scholars have gone on to have a rewarding career in their chosen profession. Cinematographer Craig Dean Devine, for instance, a scholar in 2012, was director of photography on Pili, which has been nominated this year in the Outstanding Debut by a British Writer, Director or Producer category. In 2013, Rienkje Attoh received one of only three annual Prince William Scholarships in Film, Games and Television, supported by BAFTA and Warner Bros. After finishing her MA in Producing at the NFTS and setting up her own production company, So&So, she became a fully-fledged member of BAFTA in 2018. “Having an academy such as BAFTA support you and say that actually you’re a talent they want to nurture is truly a big deal,” she states. “It’s helped

“MAKING A FILM IS AN ATTEMPT TO EXPLORE THOSE VERY HUMAN QUESTIONS AND INVITE THE AUDIENCE ON THAT JOURNEY.” – MICHAEL PEARCE

BA F TA G U RU BAFTA Guru is our online learning channel, offering easy access to unique insight, expert knowledge and practical advice from some of the world’s best talents from across a wide range of crafts. Most of our masterclasses, Q&As, lectures and debates are filmed or recorded and then uploaded to this site, aimed at helping and inspiring new and emerging talent.

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my career and given me confidence and belief in myself. I’ve benefitted from the masterclasses greatly and I’ve met some amazing people. One job tends to lead to another, and the contacts and friendships I’ve made since my scholarship and film school is basically what’s kept me going as an independent filmmaker.” About her recent membership, she adds: “It’s very important to have an academy that reflects the world that I see. As a female of African heritage, I wanted to be part of that drive to support [women and diversity]. It’s really important. BAFTA did so much for me, so if I can mentor someone or help in any way, I want to do that. It’s important to be part of the Academy as a community. I’ve got nothing but praise for everything it’s doing to up representation.” “BAFTA is one of the most recognised film organisations in the world,” notes 2018 Breakthrough Brit recipient, Michael

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Pearce, who is now a four-time BAFTA nominated director, having had two shorts nominated in 2011 and 2014 (Rite and Keeping Up with the Joneses, respectively) before notching up two nominations for his debut feature, Beast, this year. “It was great to get that recognition from BAFTA and it kind of validates all the hard work that you put into it. It appeases some of your self-doubt and encourages you to keep working. It’s been a great experience.” FI N D I N G I NSPI R AT I O N While these four have all taken different routes into the business, they all share the common experience of being inspired by a film or person when they were younger. For Pearce, the moment came when he saw Akira Kurosawa’s Seven Samurai for the first time. “I was 17 when I watched it,” he says. “I thought, ‘I want to do what this guy does’. It really was from one moment

“THERE’S NOTHING QUITE LIKE SITTING DOWN WITH SOMEONE WHO HAS SO MUCH EXPERIENCE AND KNOWLEDGE IN FILMMAKING.” – GAGANDEEP KALIRAI

Right: Scholar Gagandeep Kalirai on set with her BAFTA mentor, Philippa Lowthorpe; Opposite page: Will Poulter with his EE Rising Star Award, with citation readers, actors Eddie Redmayne and Alicia Vikander, in 2014

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FEATU RE

to the next. That was two decades ago. I instantly changed my mind from wanting to be a painter to being a film director. “What dawned on me when I watched that film was how multifaceted the medium is. It incorporated so many things I was interested in. There was literature, theatre, performance, painting and music and this extra concept of time and editing. I wanted to be the person involved in every single aspect of filmmaking.” For Kalirai, watching Bollywood movies provided her early inspiration. “Being part of the Punjabi community, that’s what I watched all the time. We watched Disney films as well, but there was something about watching Indian films. It was the only way I could watch something and see my culture in it... Initially, I never really thought about film as a career. It was more about the art side, because I always wanted to draw. I asked my teacher what job I could do where I could draw every day and he mentioned animation... There’s a film called Tekkonkinkreet, by Michael Arias and Studio 4˚C, too. It was the first animation film that got to me emotionally. I was really moved by it, so a lot of my inspiration comes from that film.”

BA F TA EL E VAT E BAFTA Elevate was created to support those from underrepresented groups progressing in their careers, and to help tackle the issue of diversity in our industries as a whole. Those selected to participate receive a bespoke 12-month programme of support, including networking opportunities, introductions, mentoring, tailored panel discussions, masterclasses and workshops focused on professional development. Our 2018 programme is supporting a group of film and television writers (pictured above) who represent a range of abilities, genders, races, sexual orientations or socioeconomic backgrounds. The inaugural programme – for female directors – continues to support 15 talented women.

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“I’M SO GRATEFUL TO HAVE BEEN RECOGNISED BY AN ORGANISATION THAT I’M VERY PROUD TO SAY I’M AFFILIATED WITH.” – WILL POULTER

Attoh’s fire was sparked by her mother. “She used to come home with films and say to me, ‘I want you to watch this and write about it.’ I was around eight or nine years old... Willow was one that was watched quite a bit, and The Five Heartbeats, the Robert Townsend film.” She throws Steven Spielberg, Woody Allen, Meryl Streep, Spike Lee and John Singleton into the mix, adding, “We watched a lot of films as a family... I remember going with my family to see Inception and being blown away by it. I came out of the cinema and told my mum, ‘That’s it, I’m going to be a producer.’” The late, great Robin Williams was one of Poulter’s main inspirations: “I’ve had a few and probably too many to mention them all. As a comedian and a dramatic artist, I thought Robin Williams was exceptional and one of the best. Hook was one of the first films I remember seeing as a kid that really impacted on me in a very emotional way and also sparked, perhaps

subconsciously, a desire to perform and do both drama and comedy.” TA K I N G T H E N E X T ST EP Being inspired is only part of the story, naturally, then it’s about finding the motivation within yourself to commit to the future. Poulter is a more established actor now, having appeared in some high profile films, but he is conscious he still has a lot to learn. “If there is one goal it’s not to lapse in terms of concentration and always have a conscientious attitude towards work,” he says. “I never want to take what I do for granted... I’m 100 per cent still learning. That’s one of the things that really excites me looking forward, the potential to learn. I’ve come into contact with some amazing people as a result of being in this business, and I look forward to more of the same.”

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FEATURE

Pearce’s enthusiasm for directing comes from a fascination with human behaviour. “It’s like the fascination an alien would have if they landed on planet Earth,” he notes. “They would find such a strange and varied species, capable of some of the most beautiful, generous and altruistic acts, but also capable of extreme cruelty. Making a film is an attempt to explore those very human questions and invite the audience on that journey.” “I’d like to do more documentaries in animation,” states Kalirai, who has an interest in addressing cultural issues that perhaps are largely unknown to a western audience. “I grew up in a culture where a lot of our issues and problems were buried, which I think comes from a place of being scared that other people won’t understand them. I want to give the audience a new perspective about other cultures and their issues... I definitely want to push animation as a serious filmmaking tool. A lot of people think animation is quite jokey or only used for cartoons, but I’ve found it to be a great tool for hitting home a message without people realising that’s what it’s doing.”

WRI T I N G CO M PE T I T I O NS Each year, the BAFTA Rocliffe New Writing Competition calls for submissions of film, television drama, children’s media and television comedy scripts. Following a blind judging process, selected script extracts are performed by a professional cast to an audience of producers, development executives, directors, actors and literary agents, aiming to give a platform to emerging writing talent from across the UK. The benefits include: hearing work read by professional actors; a development focused discussion generated by the readings; feedback and advice from experienced industry members; and an invaluable method to test out new concepts and material on an audience.

Opposite page: Actors Will Poulter and Hayley Squires announced this year’s Film Awards nominations; Left: Michael Pearce joined Gavin Humphries, Anna Duffield and James Mullighan at the Short Sighted event in London; Above: The 2018 UK scholars, with BAFTA CEO Amanda Berry (far left) and Sara Putt from Sara Putt Associates (far right)

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For Attoh, it’s all about her love for storytelling. “There’s nothing better than when I see a film that makes the hairs on my arm stand up or brings me to tears. I want to be able to tell stories that give other people those same emotions... As I get older, it’s the stories that I don’t necessarily get to hear that interest me, and they can be from anywhere in the world. There are so many amazing human beings out there, who are doing incredible things. It’s about being able to tell those unique stories, and the power of connection, understanding and empathy. These stories must have a heart, have meaning and be able to resonate.” And BAFTA must be there too, to ensure talent like Poulter, Pearce, Attoh and Kalirai have the opportunity to tell these stories to as wide an audience as possible. We’ll leave the last word to Kalirai who is still very much in the early stages of developing her talent and career.

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“I guess I’d just like to say thank you to BAFTA,” she concludes. “I really appreciate everything that’s been given to me, all the advice, all the events and talks. It’s a new world for me still, it’s all so surreal, but it’s made me realise I can do what I set out to do now. I can reach where I’ve always wanted to go. Having the opportunity of being able to go somewhere and meet people in the industry, it’s something I’ve never had before. I’m really holding that experience close to my chest right now.” •

Below: Rienkje Attoh, next to the two Prince William scholars, Sam Browne and Sam Hughes, meets BAFTA president, HRH The Duke of Cambridge, at the launch of the Give Something Back campaign in 2013

“BAFTA DID SO MUCH FOR ME, SO IF I CAN MENTOR SOMEONE OR HELP IN ANY WAY, I WANT TO DO THAT.” – RIENKJE ATTOH

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Trusted to deliver Outside Broadcasts for the world’s greatest events

CTV Outside Broadcasts Ltd - 3 The Merlin Centre, Lancaster Road, High Wycombe, HP12 3QL Adam Berger: adam@ctvob.co.uk / Bill Morris: bill@ctvob.co.uk / hello@ctvob.co.uk / 020 8453 8989 / www.ctvob.co.uk Photo credits: FIFA World Cup: Kremlin Pool/Alamy Stock Photo. Crufts Dog Show: Jon Freeman/Alamy Stock Photo. Ryder Cup: Action Plus Sports Images/Alamy Stock Photo. Pakistan Tour of England: Matt West/BPI/REX/Shutterstock. Royal Wedding: Ian Skelton/Alamy Stock Photo. Golf Open Championship: Dave Shopland/BPI/REX/Shutterstock. London Marathon: Alex Cavendish / Alamy Stock Photo. Pyeongchang Winter Games: Chris Pendlebury/CTV OB. Brit Awards, Robbie Williams: David Fisher/REX/Shutterstock. BAFTA: David Fisher/BAFTA/REX/Shutterstock. NFL International Series: Action Plus Sports Images/Alamy Stock Photo


O N E Y E A R O N ... TA C K L I N G B U L LY I N G A N D H A R A S S M E N T A N U PDAT E O N T H E SCR EEN I N D UST RI ES’ I N T RO D U CT I O N O F T H E FI RST SE T O F G U I DA N CE A N D PRI N CI PL ES TO TACK L E B U L LYI N G A N D H A R A S S M EN T.

head of last year’s EE British Academy Film Awards, the industry came together with the BFI and BAFTA to support published guidance that helps us all to change a workplace culture, which, in too many cases, has allowed bullying and harassment to go unchecked. The focus of the guidance is on prevention and on creating a climate where workers feel able to speak up, secure in the knowledge that they will be taken seriously. It gives employers simple tools to ensure they are able to tackle unacceptable behaviour. Actor Emma Watson was just one of the industry voices who supported the principles, saying: “The guidance is designed to ensure that workers know what their rights are, that they know

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how to seek help and support should they need it, to make sure they understand the law that is in place and how to properly report incidents. I will be asking all productions I work on to adopt the recommendations in the guidance and encourage all who are able to, to do the same.” Since the guidance was launched, 31 industry organisations have signed up – several of which have created bespoke guidance for their members – and it is now a condition of funding from the BFI and BBC Films that productions must have processes in place to tackle bullying and harassment. There have been more than 1,500 calls to the Film & Television Charity’s helpline, a number which we recommend should be included on all call sheets. We have piloted training

for the industry, to give them the skills they need to manage reports and become the ‘designated individuals’, which the guidance also suggests should be named on all call sheets. This training will be rolled out in 2019. We encourage everyone to make themselves familiar with the guidance – whether employer or worker. Look out for news about the guidance training later this year. • The Guidance is available on the BFI website: www.bfi.org.uk/about-bfi/ policy-strategy/set-principlesscreen-industry Film & Television Charity’s helpline: 0800 054 0000

“I WILL BE ASKING ALL PRODUCTIONS I WORK ON TO ADOPT THE RECOMMENDATIONS IN THE GUIDANCE AND ENCOURAGE ALL WHO ARE ABLE TO, TO DO THE SAME.” – EMMA WATSON 9 3


S H O W I N G FA C E T H E L AT EST E X H I B I T I O N AT O U R H ISTO R I C L O N D O N H E A D Q U A R T E R S , 1 9 5 P I C C A D I L L Y, FOCUSES ON RECENT COM MISSIONS FROM O U R V E R Y O W N P H OTO G R A P H Y D E PA R T M E N T.

ithin the treasure trove that is the BAFTA Archive, lies a collection of exclusive photography documenting the changing face of the film, games and television industries. Our unique collection dates back to the establishment of the then British Film Academy in 1947 and comprises more than 200,000 images… and counting. Since 2016, our photography programme has significantly expanded to cover our flagship emerging talent initiative, Breakthrough Brits, BAFTA New York and the British Academy Games Awards, to name a few.

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We’ve also brought in new talent to shoot some of our longest-standing portraiture commissions, including the Life In Pictures series and the EE British Academy Film Awards photography studio. Our new displays highlight just some of this brilliant work by our prized roster of 20 acclaimed photographers, and celebrate a number of the incredible practitioners who have supported our initiatives and taken home our highly coveted awards. The exhibition will be running at 195 Piccadilly until the end of June 2019. • Discover more photography from BAFTA’s archive at heritage.bafta.org

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Opposite: Make up artist Morag Ross, by Phil Fisk. This page (clockwise from top left): Actor Dev Patel, by Greg Williams; I Am Not a Witch team writer and director Rungano Nyoni and producer Emily Morgan, by Matt Holyoak; Actor Daniel Kaluuya, by Matt Holyoak; Actor Gary Oldman, by Paul Gilmore; Actor Frances McDormand, by Charlie Clift

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EXPERIENTIAL PHOTOGRAPHY & LUXURY PHOTOBOOTHS P R O U D PA R T N E R S o f BA F TA S I N C E 2 0 1 0

republicofphotography.com

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IN T HE W I N G S B A F TA P H O TO G R A P H Y BY GA VI N BO ND

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hen the lights are on and the cameras rolling, all eyes in the house and at home are fixed on the stage of the EE British Academy Film Awards. Well, not all eyes – some, such as acclaimed photographer Gavin Bond, are focused elsewhere, observing everything that’s happening around the big show. For the previous three years, Bond has been BAFTA’s official Film Awards winners portraiture photographer, but in 2018 we asked him to step outside his normal backstage studio and concentrate on guerilla-style reportage. Bond took the opportunity to document the Awards from the wings, shooting those moments of quiet reflection, the nervous laughter and the deep breaths of last year’s citation readers as they prepared to step onto the centre stage and announce the winners. Bond lends his expertise in fashion photography (his clients include Vanity Fair, Vogue, GQ and he has a longstanding relationship with Victoria’s Secret) to the narrative of these Awards. While the results are both intimate and playful, his images also elicit the beauty of the individual rather than the facade of the celebrity persona. Collected over the next few pages are just some of his wonderful and rarely seen pictures...

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A N YA T AY L O R - J O Y & L E T I T I A W R I G H T

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DENNIS QUAID

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R E B E C C A F E R G U S O N & TO BY J O N E S

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S A L M A H AY E K

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CHIWETEL EJIOFOR

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Photographer Gavin Bond www.gavinbond.com

Picture Editor Jordan Anderson Venue The Royal Opera House

BAFTA Photography Director Claire Rees

O R L A N D O B LO O M & G U G U M BAT H A- R AW

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IN M EMO R I AM The following pages honour the esteemed contribution to the film industry by those individuals who have sadly died in the last 12 months. To learn more about their many achievements, visit bafta.org/heritage/inmemoryof

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IN

M E MORIA M

VICTOR ADEBODUN

BERNARDO BERTOLUCCI

DEBBIE LEE CARRINGTON

Producer, Director

Writer, Director

Actress, Stunt Artist

22 July 1984 – 11 April 2018

16 March 1941 – 26 November 2018

14 December 1959 – 23 March 2018

L ASSIE LOU AHERN

Y VONNE BL AKE

JOHN CARTER

Actress

Costume Designer

Editor

25 June 1920 – 15 February 2018

17 April 1940 – 17 July 2018

22 September 1922 – 13 August 2018

BILL ALLAN

VERNA BLOOM

C A R L O S C A R VA L H O

Producer, Executive

Actress

Cinematographer

15 December 1949 – 12 August 2018

7 August 1938 – 9 January 2019

d: 2 May 2018 (age 47)

MICHAEL ANDERSON

FR ANÇOISE BONNOT

Actor

Director, Actor

Editor

30 January 1920 – 25 April 2018

17 August 1939 – 9 June 2018

18 August 1958 – 9 February 2018

S U S A N A N S PAC H

PHILIP BOSCO

Actress

Actress

Actor

23 November 1942 – 2 April 2018

26 September 1930 – 3 December 2018

11 March 1964 – 21 February 2018

STÉ PHANE AUDR AN

CLIFTON BR ANDON

Actress

Production Manager

Executive, former BAFTA treasurer and Acting CEO

8 November 1932 – 27 March 2018

26 January 1927 – 20 September 2018

30 December 1937 – 5 April 2018

C H A R L E S A Z N AVO U R

MARTIN BREGMAN

R AY M O N D C H O W

Actor, Singer, Composer

Producer

Producer

22 May 1924 – 1 October 2018

18 May 1926 – 16 June 2018

8 October 1927 – 2 November 2018

P E T E R BAT H

M ARY CARLISLE

S T E LV I O C I P R I A N I

Cinematographer

Actress

Composer

3 October 1926 – 8 May 2018

3 February 1914 – 1 August 2018

20 August 1937 – 1 October 2018

R E G E C AT H E Y

EMMA CHAMBERS

JOHN CHAMBERS

1 1 4

OBE


IN

M E MORIA M

A N N E V C OAT E S

NELSON PEREIRA

M I L OŠ F O R M A N

Editor

DOS SANTOS

Director

12 December 1925 – 8 May 2018

Director

18 February 1932 – 13 April 2018

22 October 1928 – 21 April 2018

VI N CENT G COX

CORNELIA FR ANCES

Director, Producer, Cinematographer

ROBIN DOUET

Actress

17 October 1933 – 30 July 2017

Production Manager

7 April 1941 – 28 May 2018

3 July 1931 – 12 January 2018

P H I L I P D ’A N T O N I

ARETHA FR ANKLIN

Producer, Writer

S TA N D R AG OT I

Singer, Actress

19 February 1929 – 15 April 2018

Director

25 March 1942 – 16 August 2018

4 October 1932 – 13 July 2018

HUGH DANE

LIZ FR ASER

Actor

JA MES EMSWILLER

Actress

21 October 1942 – 16 May 2018

Sound Mixer

14 August 1930 – 6 September 2018

1 December 1957 – 11 October 2018

W I N D S O R DAV I E S

JOEL FREEMAN

Actor

R LEE ERMEY

Producer

28 August 1930 – 17 January 2019

Actor

12 June 1922 – 21 January 2018

24 March 1944 – 15 April 2018

BRADFORD DILLMAN

J O H N G AV I N

Actor

PA B L O F E R R O

Actor

14 April 1930 – 16 January 2018

Title Designer

8 April 1931 – 9 February 2018

15 January 1935 – 16 November 2018

ROBERT DIX

E U N I C E G AY S O N

Actor

FENELL A FIELDING

8 May 1935 – 6 August 2018

Actress

17 November 1927 – 11 September 2018

P E T E R D O N AT

OBE

Actress

17 March 1928 – 8 June 2018 PA M E L A G I D L E Y

Actor

MICHAEL FORD

Actress

20 January 1928 – 10 September 2018

Art Director, Set Director

11 June 1965 – 16 April 2018

11 June 1928 – 31 May 2018

1 1 5


IN

M E MORIA M

JO GILBERT

LI N DA GREGORY

JANIE JENKINS

Producer, Casting Director

Production Accountant

Talent Agent

7 June 1955 – 15 September 2018

12 June 1944 – 12 April 2018

18 July 1963 – 29 October 2018

LEWIS GILBERT

SA MUEL HADIDA

GEORGE JENSON

Director, Producer, Writer

Producer

Production Illustrator

6 March 1920 – 23 February 2018

17 December 1953 – 26 November 2018

24 June 1930 – 25 May 2018

HUBERT DE GIVENCHY

BARBAR A HARRIS

MICKEY JONES

Costume Designer

Actress

Actor

21 February 1927 – 10 March 2018

25 July 1935 – 21 August 2018

10 June 1941 – 7 February 2018

P E T E R G L E AV E S

SHINOBU HASHIMOTO

SRIDEVI KAPOOR

Sound Engineer

Writer

Actress

19 July 1962 – 18 February 2018

18 April 1918 – 19 July 2018

13 August 1963 – 24 February 2018

BILL GOLD

BERNARD HEPTON

JA MES K AREN

Graphic Designer

Actor

Actor

3 January 1921 – 20 May 2018

19 October 1925 – 27 July 2018

28 November 1923 – 23 October 2018

WILLIAM GOLDMAN

M ARGARET HINX M AN

G LO R I A K AT Z

Writer

Critic

Writer, Producer

12 August 1931 – 16 November 2018

8 October 1924 – 16 October 2018

25 October 1942 – 25 November 2018

ALIXE GORDIN

MICHAEL HOWELLS

MARGOT KIDDER

Casting Director

Production Designer

Actress

10 April 1922 – 28 November 2018

13 January 1957 – 19 July 2018

17 October 1948 – 13 May 2018

RICHARD GREENBERG

TA B H U N T E R

RICHARD H KLINE

Title Designer, Visual Effects Designer

Actor

Cinematographer

21 January 1947 – 16 June 2018

11 July 1931 – 8 July 2018

15 November 1926 – 7 August 2018

c be

R I C K Y J AY

Actor

26 June 1946 – 24 November 2018

1 1 6


IN

M E MORIA M

A R N O L D KO PE L S O N

ROBBIE LITTLE

ROGER M AINWOOD

Producer

Producer, Executive

Animator, Director

14 February 1935 – 8 October 2018

d: 4 May 2018 (age 73)

31 July 1953 – 20 September 2018

M ARK LIVOL SI N I C H O L A S KO R DA

Editor

J ERRY M AREN

Sound Editor

10 April 1962 – 23 September 2018

Actor

15 January 1945 – 8 October 2018

24 January 1920 – 24 May 2018

SONDR A LOCKE GARY KU RTZ

Actress

RICHARD MARKS

Producer

28 May 1944 – 3 November 2018

Editor

27 July 1940 – 23 September 2018

10 November 1943 – 31 December 2018

BUD LUCKEY FR ANCIS L AI

Character Designer, Animator

PENNY MARSHALL

Composer

28 July 1934 – 24 February 2018

Actress, Director, Producer

26 April 1932 – 7 November 2018

15 October 1943 – 17 December 2018

DEANNA LUND CL AUDE L ANZM ANN

Actress

ELSA MARTINELLI

Filmmaker, Journalist

30 May 1937 – 22 June 2018

Actress

27 November 1925 – 5 July 2018

30 January 1935 – 8 July 2017

DON LUSK C H R I S TO P H E R L AW F O R D

Animator, Director

A L M AT T H E WS

Actor

28 October 1913 – 30 December 2018

Actor

29 March 1955 – 4 September 2018

D A M E G I L L I A N LY N N E

21 November 1942 – 22 September 2018 DBE

ROBIN LEACH

Choreographer, Dancer

B I L L M AY N A R D

Actor

20 February 1926 – 1 July 2018

Actor

29 August 1941 – 24 August 2018

8 October 1928 – 30 March 2018

CR AIG M ACK S TA N L E E

Composer, Rapper

A L LY N A N N M C L E R I E

Writer, Editor, Actor

10 May 1970 – 12 March 2018

Actress

28 December 1922 – 12 November 2018

JOHN MAHONEY DANNY LEINER

Actor

Director

20 June 1940 – 4 February 2018

13 May 1961 – 18 October 2018

1 1 7

1 December 1926 – 21 May 2018


IN

M E MORIA M

IAN MCMILLAN

MIRIAM NELSON

CHARLOTTE R AE

Cinematographer

Choreographer, Dancer, Actress

Actress

15 July 1934 – 10 January 2018

21 September 1919 – 12 August 2018

22 April 1926 – 5 August 2018

PETER MILES

D O R K A N I E R A DZI K

Actor

Make-up Artist

Actor

29 August 1928 – 26 February 2018

5 March 1949 – 12 February 2018

13 March 1928 – 11 November 2018

WA R R E N M I L L E R

DERRI CK O’CON N OR

BURT REYNOLDS

Director

Actor

Actor, Director, Producer

15 October 1924 – 24 January 2018

3 January 1941 – 29 June 2018

11 February 1936 – 6 September 2018

D O N A L D M O F FAT

KITTY O’NEIL

NICOLAS ROEG

Actor

Stunt Artist

Director, Cinematographer

26 December 1930 – 20 December 2018

24 March 1946 – 2 November 2018

15 August 1928 – 23 November 2018

PAT R I C I A M O R I S O N

DAV I D O G D E N S T I E R S

ARTHUR B RUBINSTEIN

Actress

Actor

Composer

19 March 1915 – 20 May 2018

31 October 1942 – 3 March 2018

31 March 1938 – 23 April 2018

JOHN MORRIS

ERMANNO OLMI

GREGG RUDLOFF

Composer

Director

Re-recording Mixer

18 October 1926 – 25 January 2018

24 July 1931 – 5 May 2018

2 November 1955 – 6 January 2019

R O B BY M Ü L L E R

JACQUELINE PEARCE

LUCY SCHER

Cinematographer

Actress

Executive, Writer

4 April 1940 – 4 July 2018

20 December 1943 – 3 September 2018

6 June 1965 – 1 August 2018

GEOFF MURPHY

WILLIAM PHIPPS

FR ANK SER AFINE

Director, Producer, Actor

Actor

13 October 1938 – 3 December 2018

4 February 1922 – 1 June 2018

Sound Designer, Sound Editor, Composer

MBE

MICHAEL PICK WOAD

Production Designer

11 July 1945 – 27 August 2018

1 1 8

DOUGLAS RAIN

CBE

1953 – 12 September 2018


IN

M E MORIA M

M I C H A E L S E YM O U R

I SAO TA K A H ATA

DA ME JUNE WHITFIELD

Production Designer

Animator, Director, Producer, Writer

Actress

30 October 1932 – 9 December 2018

29 October 1935 – 5 April 2018

11 November 1925 – 28 December 2018

SHIN SEONG-IL

V I T T O R I O TAV I A N I

PAT R I C K W I L L I A M S

Actor

Director, Writer

Composer

8 May 1937 – 4 November 2018

20 September 1929 – 15 April 2018

23 April 1939 – 25 July 2018

WILLIA M MORGAN

D E L O R E S T AY L O R

SCOTT WILSON

S H E P PA R D

Actress, Producer, Writer

Actor

Actor

27 September 1932 – 23 March 2018

29 March 1942 – 6 October 2018

24 August 1932 – 6 January 2019

R O N N I E T AY L O R

PAU L J U N G E R W I T T

NEIL SIMON

Cinematographer

Producer

Writer, Producer

27 October 1924 – 3 August 2018

20 March 1943 – 27 April 2018

4 July 1927 – 26 August 2018

V E R N E T R OY E R

R ALPH WOOLSEY

S T E FÁ N K A R L

Actor

Cinematographer

S T E FÁ N S S O N

1 January 1969 – 21 April 2018

1 January 1914 – 23 March 2018

HARRY J U FL AN D

C E L E S T E YA R N A L L

Producer, Actor

Actress

12 March 1936 – 2 March 2018

26 July 1944 – 7 October 2018

MOR AG WEBSTER

CR AI G Z ADAN

Set Nurse

Producer

6 November 1969 – 31 October 2018

15 April 1949 – 20 August 2018

Actor

10 July 1975 – 21 August 2018 JOHN STRIDE

Actor

11 July 1936 – 20 April 2018 DUDLEY SUTTON

Actor

6 April 1933 – 15 September 2018

DBE

AUDREY WELLS

Writer, Director O L E G TA BA KOV

Director, Actor

29 April 1960 – 4 October 2018

17 August 1935 – 12 March 2018

The Academy has made every effort to compile an accurate In Memoriam listing of film practitioners between 20 January 2018 and 15 January 2019.

1 1 9


AD Events Ltd are especially proud to support BAFTA with the design and production of tonight’s dinner and after-party T: +44(0) 20 7635 7372 E: enquiries@adevents.co.uk W: www.adevents.co.uk

Creative ideas, Technical reality across world stages

ASIA PACIFIC EUROPE MIDDLE EAST NORTH AMERICA

Tel: +44 (0)1293 582000 | www.ct-group.com Digital

Display

Audio

Video

Email: nmaag@ctlondon.com


OFFICERS

OF

THE

OFFICERS

ACA DE MY

Amanda Berry obe Chief Executive Kevin Price Chief Operating Officer

HRH The Duke of Cambridge, KG Academy President Barbara Broccoli obe Vice President, Film

COM M IT TEES

Greg Dyke Vice President, Television ELECTED MEMBERS

David Gardner obe Vice President, Games

OF THE FILM COMMITTEE

Marc Samuelson ‒ Chair Alison Thompson ‒ Deputy Chair Isabel Begg Simon Chinn Noel Clarke Alexandra Ferguson Derbyshire * Gillian Hawser Anna Higgs Pippa Markham David Thompson

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

Dame Pippa Harris dbe Chair of the Academy Jane Lush Deputy Chair of the Academy Dr Jo Twist obe Chair, Games Committee Krishnendu Majumdar Chair, Television Committee Sara Putt Chair, Learning & New Talent Committee

ELECTED MEMBERS

Marc Samuelson Chair, Film Committee

Dr Jo Twist obe ‒ Chair Nick Button-Brown Dave Ranyard * Tara Saunders Mike Simpson

OF THE GA MES COMMIT TEE

Alison Thompson Deputy Chair, Film Committee Hannah Wyatt Deputy Chair, Television Committee

ELECTED MEMBERS OF THE TELEVISION COMMITTEE

 John Smith Co-optee and Chair, Commercial Committee Paul Taiano obe Co-optee and Chair, Finance and Audit Committee Arianna Bocco Co-optee Kieran Breen Co-optee Sir Lloyd Dorfman cbe Co-optee Paul Morrell obe Co-optee

Krishnendu Majumdar ‒ Chair Hannah Wyatt ‒ Deputy Chair Richard Boden Phillippa Giles Laurence Marks Elizabeth McIntyre Emma Morgan Sara Putt Beryl Richards * Liz Trubridge *Children’s

1 2 1

Representatives


PA RTNERS

OF

THE

ACA DE MY

BAFTA’s partners have shown great loyalty in their year-round association with the BAFTA brand, and share our commitment and passion for the industries we represent. We warmly thank them for their commitment to the Academy and our mission to support, develop and promote excellence in the film, games and television industries.

A C A D E MY PA RT N ERS Acqua Panna Audi UK Champagne Taittinger Deloitte S.Pellegrino Taylor Bloxham Villa Maria A C A D E MY SU P P O RT ERS Alpha Grip Barco CTV Outside Broadcast Dolby The Farm Group Portaprompt Republic of Photography B A F TA C YM R U AB Acoustics Aberystwyth University Acqua Panna Audi UK Bad Wolf BBC Cymru Wales Bluestone Brewery Buzz Magazine Capital Law Cardiff Council Champagne Taittinger Channel 4 Chapter Arts Centre, Cardiff Cineworld Cardiff Clarins Cuebox Dà Mhìle Gin Deloitte DRESD

Elstree Light & Power FOR Cardiff Galeri, Caernarfon Genero Glyndwr University Gorilla Hotel Chocolat Iceland ITV Wales Ken Picton Mad Dog 2020 Casting My First Job in Film Pinewood Pontio, Bangor Radisson Blu S4C S.Pellegrino St David’s Hall Sugar Creative Taylor Bloxham The Social Club, Agency Trosol Translation University of South Wales University of Wales Trinity Saint David Villa Maria Waterstone Homes Welsh Government Working Word Yr Egin B A F TA S COT L A N D Acqua Panna Audi UK BBC Scotland Blue Parrot Company British Airways Champagne Taittinger Channel 4 Cherry Blossom Cineworld

Deloitte Edinburgh Gin Edit 123 The Galashan Trust Grosvenor Cinema Lauren Gollan Academy Material MCL Create Radisson Blu Hotel, Glasgow Rainbow Room International S.Pellegrino Screen Scotland Skills Development Scotland Staropramen STV Taylor Bloxham Villa Maria Virgin Trains B A F TA LOS A N G EL ES Ace Hotel Los Angeles American Airlines BBC America British Film Commission CineFocus Productions Cunard Luxury Cruises Dana and Albert R Broccoli Charitable Foundation Deadline Diageo The Farm LA The Four Seasons Hotel Los Angeles at Beverley Hills Global Student Accommodation Group The GREAT Britain Campaign Heineken The Hollywood Reporter

For further information about partnership opportunities, please contact: partnerships@bafta.org

1 2 2

Jaguar Land Rover North America Laika Entertainment Mandarin Oriental Hyde Park London Netflix Production Resource Group Ruffino Screen International Variety The Wrap B A F TA N E W YO R K HBO The Hollywood Reporter Retro Report Variety B A F TA I N A S I A British Airways Champagne Taittinger Swarovski


FIL M

AWA RDS

PA RTNERS

With enduring thanks to all the official partners to the EE British Academy Film Awards in 2019.

P L A T I N U M T I E R PA R T N E R NESPRESSO

Co-Host ‒ Official Nominees’ Party

O F F I C I A L PA R T N E R S

AC Q UA PA N N A

LANCÔME

Official Bottled Water

Official Beauty

AMERICAN

PAU L E D M O N D S

AIRLINES

LONDON

Official Airline

Official Hair Stylist

AT E L I E R S WA R OV S K I

REPUBLIC OF

Official Jewellery

PHOTOGR APHY

Official Photobooth AUDI S.PELLEGRINO

Official Car

Official Bottled Water BOT TLETOP T H E S AVOY

Official Bag

Official Hotel C H A M PAG N E TA I T T I N G E R

T AY L O R B L O X H A M

Official Champagne

Official Printer and Paper Supplier

D I G I TA L CINEMA MEDIA

VILLA MARIA

Official Cinema Media

Official Wine

EXTERION MEDIA

Official Outdoor Media

1 2 3


BOTTLETOP is an award winning British sustainable luxury fashion brand. We use the finest sustainably sourced and up-cycled materials; empowering artisans with skills and livelihoods by creating collections in developing parts of the world. BOTTLETOP’s flagship store at 84 Regent St is the world’s first zero waste retail environment, created using up-cycled plastic 3D printed by robots. #SustainableLuxury

Official bag parter to the EE British Academy Film Awards

bottletoppers bottletopUK bottletop.com


FIL M GIF T

AWA RDS

PROVIDERS

A huge thanks to the following partners, which have generously provided gifts for this year’s nominees and citation readers.

AMERICAN AIRLINES

NESPRESSO

Enjoy an exclusive VIP personal assistant at the airport, with the gift of Five Star Service. www.americanairlines.co.uk

Nespresso VertuoPlus provides quality coffee at home, or on-the-go with the Touch Travel Mug. www.nespresso.com

AT E L I E R S WA R OV S K I

PAU L E D M O N D S L O N D O N

Delicate silk cord bracelet with bead and crystal in Swarovski’s exclusive pointiage technique. www.atelierswarovski.com

A luxury lifestyle collection of beautifully scented hand lotions and handwashes. pauledmonds.com

BOTTLETOP

S.PELLEGRINO

Exclusive BOTTLETOP tote bag produced by female artisans in Kathmandu, Nepal. bottletop.org

A magnum of sparkling water. www.sanpellegrino.com

C H A M PAG N E

T H E S AVOY

TA I T T I N G E R

A bottle of Champagne Taittinger Brut Reservé NV in a gift box. www.taittinger.com

A beautifully leather-bound black, ruled notebook embossed with lettering. www.thesavoylondon.com

LANCÔME

VILLA MARIA

An Advanced Génifique Serum and bespoke makeup experience with Le Teint Particulier Custom-made Foundation. www.lancome.co.uk

A tour, wine tasting and lunch at the Villa Maria winery, Auckland and a luggage tag. www.villamaria.co.nz

1 2 5


ACKNOWLEDGE M ENTS

T H E A C A D E MY W I S H ES TO T H A N K …

EE Our title sponsor

Film companies and distributors for their invaluable assistance

Marc Samuelson, Alison Thompson and members of the Film Committee

Joanna Lumley obe our Host

Dame Pippa Harris dbe Chair of the Academy

Dermot O’Leary Red Carpet Host, BAFTA Online Content

Jane Lush Deputy Chair of the Academy

Edith Bowman Red Carpet and Backstage Host, BAFTA Online Content

Film voting juries and members All staff at the Academy

AD Events International Limited Design of the Awards dinner and after party www.royalalberthall.com

Totem by Cirque Du Soleil

West Design Royal Albert Hall Red Carpet and Press Area production

Creative Technology Limited freuds

Whizz Kid Television Grosvenor House A JW Marriott Hotel

Film Awards trailer created by Gramafilm for BAFTA Supported by DCM, Dolby, Pearl & Dean, Pinewood and The Farm Group

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END

CREDITS

A T B A F TA

Director of Production Clare Brown

Director of Awards & Membership Emma Baehr

Head of Production Cassandra Hybel

Head of Film Awards Jim Bradshaw – to January 2019 Deirdre Hopkins – from January 2019

Awards Event Producer Amy Wilson

Film Officer Imogen Faris

Assistant Awards Event Producer Ciara Teggart

Awards & Membership Team Kelly Smith, Gemma Thomas, Sam D’Elia, Harriet Humphries, Timothy Hughes, Natalie Gurney, Lewis Peet, Jessica Rogers, Ada Kotowska

BAFTA Productions Lottie Gazzard, Georgina Cunningham, Daniel Dalton, Rosie Wilson, Ian Lowe, Brogan Wallace, Jamie Rowland, Stephanie Rowe, Helen Preece, Looloo Murphy, Karen Rosie

Director of Partnerships Louise Robertson Partnerships Team Natalie Moss, Amy Elton, Charlie Perkin, Georgi Taroni Director of Communications Ellen Johnson Communications Team Nick Williams, Clare Isaacs, Sophie Dudhill, Dave Hudson, Shani Reid, Fiona Simpson, Ben Smart, Dana Thompson, Jack Singer Ticketing Gabby Taranowski Accounts Lucy Burks

1 2 7


BRO CHURE

CREDITS

A T B A F TA

PRINTING

Editor Toby Weidmann

Taylor Bloxham www.taylorbloxham.co.uk

Design  Joe Lawrence Marc Marazzi

The Academy chooses Soporcet and Symbol, supporting excellence in print. Printed on Symbol Matt Plus 350gsm (cover), UPM Fine Offset 150gsm (text) and Symbol Freelife Gloss 170gsm (photo essay). Supplied by Taylor Bloxham.

Ad Sales Charlie Perkin Contributors Peter Bradshaw Kambole Campbell Rich Cline Simran Hans Sophie Monks Kaufman Christina Newland Neil Smith

The carbon impact of this paper has been measured and balanced through the World Land Trust, an ecological charity.

Published by British Academy of Film and Television Arts 195 Piccadilly London w1j 9ln Tel: +44 (0)20 7734 0022 reception@bafta.org www.bafta.org

Photography Director Claire Rees Picture Editor  Jordan Anderson

All nominees imagery used with kind permission from the distributors/filmmakers. Rising Star images courtesy of EE. BAFTA Executive portraits: James Gourley/ BAFTA/Rex/Shutterstock (Pippa Harris), BAFTA/Jonathan Birch (Amanda Berry). One Year On feature: rakus/Alamy Stock Photo.

BRO CH U RE COVER DESI GN

Gramafilm info@gramafilm.com +44 (0) 203 051 8619 www.gramafilm.com

Although every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this publication, the Publishers cannot accept liability for errors or omissions. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written permission of BAFTA. © BAFTA 2019

1 2 8


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Celebrate this year’s nominees and winners at iTunes.com/bafta


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