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E E

B R I T I S H

A C A D E M Y

F I L M

A W A R D S

2 0 1 6

2016


WE PROUDLY CONGRATULATE OUR

EE British Academy Film Awards Nominees LEADING ACTOR

ADAPTED SCREENPLAY

TRUMBO

CAROL

BRYAN CRANSTON

PHYLLIS NAGY

ROOM

LEADING ACTRESS

EMMA DONOGHUE

THE DANISH GIRL

ALICIA VIKANDER

*†

SUPPORTING ACTOR

OUTSTANDING DEBUT BY A BRITISH WRITER, DIRECTOR OR PRODUCER

SPOTLIGHT

THEEB

MARK RUFFALO

NAJI ABU NOWAR

SUPPORTING ACTRESS

DOCUMENTARY

EX MACHINA

ALICIA VIKANDER

*†

EE RISING STAR AWARD

BEL POWLEY

HE NAMED ME MALALA

LAURIE MACDONALD WALTER PARKES SHERPA

JENNIFER PEEDOM

FILM NOT IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE CINEMATOGRAPHY

THEEB

NAJI ABU NOWAR

CAROL

ED LACHMAN, ASC

ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY BRIDGE OF SPIES

PRODUCTION DESIGN

ETHAN COEN JOEL COEN

CAROL

JUDY BECKER

Shared representation with: *Actors in Scandinavia; †Tavistock Wood Management; ‡Casarotto Ramsay & Associates


congratulates our clients on their 2016 EE British Academy Film Awards nominations Best Film THE BIG SHORT BRAD PITT DEDE GARDNER JEREMY KLEINER BRIDGE OF SPIES MARC PLATT STEVEN SPIELBERG CAROL CHRISTINE VACHON THE REVENANT ALEJANDRO G. IÑÁRRITU MARY PARENT

4

THE LOBSTER YORGOS LANTHIMOS**

HE NAMED ME MALALA DAVIS GUGGENHEIM LISTEN TO ME MARLON R.J. CUTLER SHERPA JOHN SMITHSON Director STEVEN SPIELBERG BRIDGE OF SPIES TODD HAYNES CAROL ALEJANDRO G. IÑÁRRITU THE REVENANT *Shared representation with The Agency **Shared representation with Sayle Screen ***Shared representation with Independent Talent Group ****Shared representation with United Agents †Shared representation with Troika Entertainment ††Shared representation with MacFarlane Chard & Associates

Adapted Screenplay THE BIG SHORT CHARLES RANDOLPH Leading Actor EDDIE REDMAYNE*** THE DANISH GIRL MICHAEL FASSBENDER† STEVE JOBS Leading Actress CATE BLANCHETT CAROL SAOIRSE RONAN†† BROOKLYN Supporting Actor BENICIO DEL TORO SICARIO Supporting Actress JENNIFER JASON LEIGH THE HATEFUL EIGHT KATE WINSLET** STEVE JOBS The EE Rising Star Award TARON EGERTON

T I T L E

Documentary CARTEL LAND MATTHEW HEINEMAN

BRIDGE OF SPIES MATT CHARMAN***

PA G E

Outstanding British Film 45 YEARS ANDREW HAIGH*

Original Screenplay


PA G E

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T I T L E


CO N T EN TS

WELCO M E

Spotlight

HRH The Duke Of Cambridge, KG, President of the Academy

A compelling true story based on the Boston Globe’s investigation into the cover-up of child abuse.

9

Amanda Berry OBE , Chief Executive of the Academy / Anne Morrison, Chair of the Academy

Words by Chris Tilly

11

Marc Allera, CEO, EE

N O M I N AT I O NS

62

Meet the Covers Artist: Levente Szabó

SPECI A L AWA RDS 64

The Fellowship

15

The Nominations in Full

The Academy’s highest accolade is presented to one of cinema’s greatest trailblazers, Sir Sidney Poitier.

40

Juries & Chapters

Words by Neil Smith

B EST FI L M N O M I N EES 42

78

Outstanding British Contribution to Cinema

Angels Costumes receives this special award for its immaculate work dressing the stars of stage and screen.

The Big Short

Banking chicanery and the economic crash of 2008 provide the driving force for this exquisite black comedy.

Words by Rich Matthews

Words by Charles Gant 46

Bridge of Spies

Political intrigue and nerve-wracking suspense abound in this richly detailed Cold War thriller.

D RE A M CR A F T: A PH OTO G R A PH I C ES SAY 89

A celebration of some of the world’s greatest dreamers. By Phil Fisk

108

In Memoriam

117

Officers of the Academy

119

Partners of the Academy

121

Film Awards Partners

123

Film Awards Gift Providers

125

Acknowledgements & Credits

Words by Terri White 50

Carol

A ravishing and touching portrait of lesbian love in 1950s’ New York, based on the novel by Patricia Highsmith. Words by Robbie Collin 54

The Revenant

A raw and powerful tale of hardship, endurance and revenge in the wild frontier of early 19th century America. Words by Karen Krizanovich

7

C O N T E N T S

58

8


8

H R H T H E D U K E O F C A M B RI D G E, KG President of the Academy


W ELCO M E EE

B R I T I S H

B A F T A

A N N E M O R R ISO N Chair of the Academy

T H E

A C A D E MY

AWA R DS

warm welcome to the EE British Academy Film Awards, which celebrate the very best films and the work of incredibly talented practitioners from the past year. The Awards acknowledge filmmaking from all over the world. We recognise and reward the greatest names in film, wherever they hail from, while also shining a very bright spotlight on the outstanding British talent who have contributed to so many of the nominated films tonight. Alongside established practitioners, the Awards also identify the next generation of talent: through our public-voted EE Rising Star Award, the Outstanding Debut and our British Shorts categories. It is hugely gratifying to be able to celebrate the achievements of those who have graduated from BAFTA initiatives, including our Breakthrough Brits and scholarships schemes. The highest honour of the evening is reserved for one of the greatest names in cinema, the truly remarkable Sir Sidney Poitier. His work on and off screen for more than 60 years has made him one of the most important figures of his generation. The determination and integrity he has displayed throughout his career, coupled with an extraordinary talent for filmmaking, are an inspiration to anybody starting out in the industry, and an encouragement to the next generation to tell their own stories and pursue their dreams. We are thrilled to honour Sir Sidney with the Fellowship tonight. This year’s Outstanding British Contribution to Cinema award goes to Angels Costumes, an iconic institution in the world of film, which has just celebrated 175 years providing costumes for the stage and screen. Congratulations to Tim Angel and everyone at Angels Costumes. Our sincere thanks to the Film Committee and its Chair and Deputy Chair, Dame Pippa Harris and Marc Samuelson; to Jane Lush, Deputy Chair of the Academy; to the incredible BAFTA staff; and to lead partner EE and to each and every one of our partners, who offer us such great support and truly believe in what we do. Have a wonderful evening.

F O L LO W U S | # E E B A F TA s | B A F TA .O R G

@ B A F TA

/ B A F TA

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W E L C O M E

FI L M

A M A N DA B ER RY OBE Chief Executive of the Academy

TO


CELEBRATING AN AWARD-WINNING NETWORK We’ve been proud sponsors of the British Academy Film Awards since 1998. Over the years we’ve won a few gongs of our own, too. In fact, we’ve won more awards for speed and reliability than any other network in the UK.

T I T L E

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PA G E

RootMetrics® RootScore® Award Winner Network rankings based on RootMetrics® UK RootScore® Report for mobile performance. As test on best available devices on 4 mobile networks across all available network types (Jan-Jun 2015). The RootMetrics awards is are not an endorsement of EE. Your results may vary. See rootmetrics.co.uk for more details.


W ELCO M E

S P O N S O R

M A RC A L L ER A CEO, EE

S P O N S O R

t gives me great pleasure to welcome you to this year’s celebration of the British film industry and the 19th year of EE’s partnership with BAFTA. Cinema is a fascinating reminder of where we have come from and a great predictor for where technology might take us in the future. Take last October’s Back to the Future day. In 1989, when the sequel to the original film was released, who would have thought that the self-drying jacket – just one of the futuristic gadgets Marty McFly encountered – would be with us less than 30 years later? Then, of course, there’s the latest Star Wars blockbuster: The Force Awakens (which my young sons love). We have been writing and making films about robots and droids for decades. But I don’t think any of us would have guessed that, in our lifetime, fully functioning robots would be on the cusp of becoming everyday household companions. But here we are, having created technology advanced enough for us to power billions of intelligent machines with internet connectivity, and fundamentally change the way that we go about our lives at home, at work and at leisure. And just over the horizon there is the prospect of even faster speeds and further innovation, which is incredibly exciting. At EE, the UK’s leading 4G network, we are committed to building a defect-free network experience. Imagine a world where you don’t have to worry about losing signal or dropping a call. A world where buffering as you watch television and films on the go is a thing of the past. It won’t happen overnight, but we have the assets, the ambition and the talent to make it a reality. Watch this space. Talent is a very apt subject tonight, and nurturing it is vital to the success of any industry. That is why I am proud for EE to sponsor the EE Rising Star Award again this year. Seeing a young person gain a fantastic boost to their career is one of my favourite parts of the evening. Each year we are treated to some incredible performances and our jury faces a tough task to choose a winner. Best of luck to all of the nominees and special thanks to this year’s judges, which included chair Marc Samuelson, Lucy Bevan, Olivia Colman, Charles Gant, Nina Gold, James King, Mike Newell, Jonathan Ross and Gabrielle Tana. By the time you read this message, you will hopefully be sitting comfortably and waiting for the show to start. Let’s enjoy an evening of great British cinema.

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W E L C O M E

O U R

FRO M


Film Finances congratulates all of this year’s BAFTA Nominees and is proud to have been the Completion Guarantor of Beasts of No Nation, Brooklyn, Carol, Ex Machina, The Hateful Eight, The Lady in the Van, Listen to Me Marlon, The Lobster and Room

Film Finances, world leader in the provision of Completion Guarantees for the Film and Television Industry since 1950


T I T L E PA G E

TO ALL TONIGHT’S NOMINEES SUPPORTED BY THE BFI FILM FUND 45 YEARS A SYRIAN LOVE STORY BROOKLYN THE LOBSTER SECOND COMING THE SURVIVALIST

#BFIBacked


T I T L E

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PA G E


T H E N O M I N A T I O N S

T H E

B R I T I S H

AC A D E MY

F I L M

AWA R D S

I N

2 016

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N O M I N A T I O N S

E E


WORKING TITLE WOULD LIKE TO THANK THE

BRITISH ACADEMY OF FILM AND TELEVISION ARTS AND ARE PROUD TO CONGRATULATE ALL OF TONIGHT’S OUTSTANDING NOMINEES

OUTSTANDING BRITISH FILM

Tom Hooper, Gail Mutrux, Anne Harrison, Lucinda Coxon, Eric Fellner, Tim Bevan

LEADING ACTOR Eddie Redmayne

LEADING ACTRESS Alicia Vikander

COSTUME DESIGN Paco Delgado

MAKE-UP AND HAIR Jan Sewell


T H E B I G SH O RT

B RO O K LYN

Adam McKay, Charles Randolph

Nick Hornby

C A RO L

RO O M

ST E VE J O B S

Phyllis Nagy

Emma Donoghue

Aaron Sorkin

A DA P T E D

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I NSI D E O U T

M I N I O NS

Pete Docter

Pierre Coffin, Kyle Balda

T H E

N O M I N A T I O N S

S C R E E N P L AY

SH AU N T H E SH EEP M OVI E A N I M AT E D F I L M

Mark Burton, Richard Starzak


TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX & FOX SEARCHLIGHT PICTURES would like to thank the BRITISH ACADEMY OF FILM AND TELEVISION ARTS and proudly congratulate our nominees.

BEST FILM - Kristie Macosko Krieger, Marc Platt, Steven Spielberg DIRECTOR - Steven Spielberg ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY - Matthew Charman, Ethan Coen, Joel Coen SUPPORTING ACTOR – Mark Rylance ORIGINAL MUSIC - Thomas Newman CINEMATOGRAPHY - Janusz Kamin ´ski EDITING - Michael Kahn PRODUCTION DESIGN - Adam Stockhausen, Rena DeAngelo, Bernhard Henrich SOUND – Drew Kunin, Richard Hymns, Andy Nelson, Gary Rydstrom

BEST FILM - Steve Golin, Alejandro G. Iñárritu, Arnon Milchan, Mary Parent, Keith Redmon DIRECTOR - Alejandro G. Iñárritu LEADING ACTOR – Leonardo DiCaprio ORIGINAL MUSIC – Ryuichi Sakamoto, Alva Noto CINEMATOGRAPHY - Emmanuel Lubezki EDITING - Stephen Mirrione MAKE UP & HAIR – Sian Grigg, Duncan Jarman, Robert Pandini SOUND – Lon Bender, Chris Duesterdiek, Martin Hernandez, Frank A. Montaño, Jon Taylor, Randy Thom

DIRECTOR - Ridley Scott LEADING ACTOR – Matt Damon EDITING - Pietro Scalia PRODUCTION DESIGN - Arthur Max, Celia Bobak SOUND – Paul Massey, Mac Ruth, Oliver Tarney, Mark Taylor SPECIAL VISUAL EFFECTS – Chris Lawrence, Tim Ledbury, Richard Stammers, Steven Warner

DOCUMENTARY - Davis Guggenheim, Walter Parkes, Laurie MacDonald

EE RISING STAR AWARD Taron Egerton


T H E B I G SH O RT

B RI D G E O F SPI ES

Dede Gardner, Jeremy Kleiner, Brad Pitt

Kristie Macosko Krieger, Marc Platt, Steven Spielberg

C A RO L

T H E R E VEN A N T

SP OT L I G H T

Elizabeth Karlsen, Christine Vachon, Stephen Woolley

Steve Golin, Alejandro G Iñárritu, Arnon Milchan, Mary Parent, Keith Redmon

Steve Golin, Blye Pagon Faust, Nicole Rocklin, Michael Sugar

B E S T

19

ED M O N D

M ANOM AN

Nina Gantz, Emilie Jouffroy

Simon Cartwright, Kamilla Kristiane Hodol

T H E

N O M I N A T I O N S

F I L M

PRO LO G U E B R I T I S H S H O R T A N I M AT I O N Richard Williams, Imogen Sutton


OV11479


EL EPH A N T

MINING POEMS O R O D ES

Nick Helm, Alex Moody, Esther Smith

Callum Rice, Jack Cocker

O PER ATO R

OVER

SA M U EL- 613

Caroline Bartleet, Rebecca Morgan

Jรถrn Threlfall, Jeremy Bannister

Billy Lumby, Cheyenne Conway

B R I D G E O F SPI ES

C A RO L

M A D M A X: FU RY ROA D

Janusz Kamii ski

Ed Lachman

John Seale

T H E R E VEN A N T

SI C A RI O

B R I T I S H F I L M

T H E

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N O M I N A T I O N S

S H O R T

CINEM ATOGR APHY

Emmanuel Lubezki

Roger Deakins


TH E AR R I VA L TH E W E L C O M E TH E S AV OY The luxury of a stay begins before you even check-in with The Savoy Suite Welcome. One-bedroom suites and above include one chauffeured transfer, 24-hour Butler service and courtesy car drop offs within a three mile radius (subject to availability). To book, please call +44(0)20 7836 4343 or email savoy@fairmont.com fairmont.com/savoy Follow us:


B RO O K LYN

C A RO L

Odile Dicks-Mireaux

Sandy Powell

CI N D ER EL L A

T H E DA N ISH G I RL

M A D M A X: FU RY ROA D

Sandy Powell

Paco Delgado

Jenny Beavan

T H E B I G SH O RT

B R I D G E O F SPI ES

C A RO L

Adam McKay

Steven Spielberg

Todd Haynes

T H E M A RT I A N

T H E R E VEN A N T

C O S T U M E

T H E

23

N O M I N A T I O N S

D E S I G N

D I R E C T O R

Ridley Scott

Alejandro G Iñárritu


for Warner Bros. Pictures to Thank the

British Academy of Film and Television Arts and Congratulate our Nominees at the

EE British Academy Film Awards in 2016 CINEMATOGRAPHY John Seale ASC, ACS

MAKE-UP AND HAIR Lesley Vanderwalt, Damian Martin

EDITING Margaret Sixel

SOUND Scott Hecker, Chris Jenkins, Mark Mangini, Ben Osmo, Gregg Rudloff, David White

PRODUCTION DESIGN Colin Gibson, Lisa Thompson COSTUME DESIGN Jenny Beavan

SPECIAL VISUAL EFFECTS Andrew Jackson, Dan Oliver, Tom Wood, Andy Williams

W W W . WA R N E R B R O S 2 0 1 5 . C O M


A MY

C A RT EL L A N D

Asif Kapadia, James Gay-Rees

Matthew Heineman, Tom Yellin

H E N A M ED ME MALALA

L IST EN TO M E M A RLO N

SH ER PA

Davis Guggenheim, Walter Parkes, Laurie MacDonald

Stevan Riley, John Battsek, George Chignell, RJ Cutler

Jennifer Peedom, Bridget Ikin, John Smithson

T H E B I G SH O RT

B R I D G E O F SPI ES

M A D M A X: FU RY ROA D

Hank Corwin

Michael Kahn

Margaret Sixel

T H E M A RT I A N

T H E R E VEN A N T

T H E

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N O M I N A T I O N S

D O C U M E N TA RY

E D I T I N G

Pietro Scalia

Stephen Mirrione


Proudly congratulates its nominees and wishes all a successful evening. ADAPTED SCREENPLAY

CHARLES RANDOLPH AND ADAM McKAY

DIRECTOR

ADAM McKAY

EDITING

HANK CORWIN, ACE

BEST FILM

BRAD PITT, p.g.a. DEDE GARDNER, p.g.a. JEREMY KLEINER, p.g.a.

SUPPORTING ACTOR

CHRISTIAN BALE

PARAMOUNT PICTURES UK Building 5, Chiswick Park, 556 Chiswick High Road, London W4 5YF www.Paramount.co.uk ©2016 Paramount Pictures. All Rights Reserved.


T H E A S SA S SI N

FO RCE M A J EU RE

Hou Hsiao-Hsien

Ruben ร–stlund

T H EEB

TIMBUKTU

WI L D TA L ES

Naji Abu Nowar

Abderrahmane Sissako

Damiรกn Szifron

B RYA N CR A NSTO N

ED D I E R ED M AYN E

L EO N A R D O D I C A PRI O

Trumbo

The Danish Girl

The Revenant

M AT T DA M O N

M I CH A EL FA S SB EN D ER

F I L M T H E

N O T

I N

E N G L I S H

T H E

27

N O M I N A T I O N S

L A N G UAG E

L E A D I N G AC T O R

The Martian

Steve Jobs


A L I CI A VI K A N D ER

B RI E L A RSO N

The Danish Girl

Room

C AT E B L A N CH E T T

M AG G I E SMITH

SAO I RSE RO N A N

Carol

The Lady in the Van

Brooklyn

B RO O K LYN

C A RO L

T H E DA N ISH G I RL

Morna Ferguson, Lorraine Glynn

Jerry DeCarlo, Patricia Regan, Morag Ross

Jan Sewell

M A D M A X: FU RY ROA D

T H E R E VEN A N T

L E A D I N G

T H E

29

N O M I N A T I O N S

AC T R E S S

M A K E &

Lesley Vanderwalt, Damian Martin

Sian Grigg, Duncan Jarman, Robert Pandini

U P

H A I R


Michael G Wilson and

Barbara Broccoli Congratulate all of tonight’s BAFTA nominees and winners


B R I D G E O F SPI ES

T H E H AT EFU L EI G H T

Thomas Newman

Ennio Morricone

T H E R E VEN A N T

SI C A RI O

STA R WA RS: T H E FO RCE AWA K ENS

Ryuichi Sakamoto, Alva Noto

J贸hann J贸hannsson

John Williams

B R I D G E O F SPI ES

E X M ACH I N A

T H E H AT EFU L EI G H T

Matthew Charman, Ethan Coen, Joel Coen

Alex Garland

Quentin Tarantino

I NSI D E O U T

SP OT L I G H T

O R I G I N A L

T H E

31

N O M I N A T I O N S

M U S I C

O R I G I N A L S C R E E N P L AY

Josh Cooley, Pete Docter, Meg LeFauve

Tom McCarthy, Josh Singer


80mm

1.6x

MADE IN THE UK

FIRST FOR WORLD-CLASS FILM AND TELEVISION PRODUCTION The British Film Commission congratulates the UK talent nominated for this year’s BAFTAs. For generous tax reliefs, outstanding facilities, stunning locations and award-winning talent and crew, base your next production in the UK. With offices in the UK and US, the British Film Commission provides free, tailored support to major productions from development through to delivery.

The British Film Commission is supported by

The British Film Commission thanks its gold sponsors

www.britishfilmcommission.org.uk @filminuk_BFC


B R I T I S H

F I L M

45 YE A RS

A MY

B RO O K LYN

Andrew Haigh, Tristan Goligher

Asif Kapadia, James Gay-Rees

John Crowley, Finola Dwyer, Amanda Posey, Nick Hornby

T H E DA N ISH G I R L

E X M ACH I N A

T H E LO B ST ER

Tom Hooper, Tim Bevan, Eric Fellner, Anne Harrison, Gail Mutrux, Lucinda Coxon

Alex Garland, Andrew Macdonald, Allon Reich

Yorgos Lanthimos, Ceci Dempsey, Ed Guiney, Lee Magiday, Efthimis Filippou

A L E X GA R L A N D

D EB B I E T U C K ER G R EEN

N A J I A B U N OWA R ( W R I T ER)

( D I R E C TO R)

( W R I T ER/D I R E C TO R)

& R U P ERT L LOY D ( P R O D U C ER)

Ex Machina

Second Coming

Theeb

T H E

33

N O M I N A T I O N S

O U T S TA N D I N G

S E A N M C A L L I S T ER ( D I R E C TO R/P R O D U C ER) EL H U M S H A K ER I FA R ( P R O D U C ER)

S T EP H EN F I N G L E TO N ( W R I T ER/D I R E C TO R)

O U T S TA N D I N G D E B U T By a British Writer, Director or Producer A Syrian Love Story

The Survivalist


WALT DISNEY STUDIOS MOTION PICTURES, UK THANKS THE BRITISH ACADEMY OF FILM AND TELEVISION ARTS AND PROUDLY CONGRATULATES ITS NOMINEES

Special Visual Effects Chris Corbould, Roger Guyett, Paul Kavanagh & Neal Scanlan Production Design Rick Carter, Darren Gilford & Lee Sandales

Special Visual Effects Jake Morrison, Greg Steele, Dan Sudick & Alex Wuttke

Š Disney 2016

Original Music John Williams Sound Matthew Wood, Stuart Wilson, David Acord, Andy Nelson & Christopher Scarabosio

Animated Film Peter Docter Original Screenplay Josh Cooley, Peter Docter & Meg Lefauve

Costume Design Sandy Powell


B R I D G E O F SPI ES

C A RO L

Adam Stockhausen, Rena DeAngelo, Bernhard Henrich

Judy Becker, Heather Loeffler

P R O D U C T I O N

M A D M A X: FU RY ROA D

T H E M A RT I A N

STA R WA RS: T H E FO RCE AWA K ENS

Colin Gibson, Lisa Thompson

Arthur Max, Celia Bobak

Rick Carter, Darren Gilford, Lee Sandales

B R I D G E O F SPI ES

M A D M A X: FU RY ROA D

T H E M A RT I A N

T H E

35

N O M I N A T I O N S

D E S I G N

Drew Kunin, Richard Hymns, Andy Nelson, Gary Rydstrom

T H E R E VEN A N T

Scott Hecker, Chris Jenkins, Mark Mangini, Ben Osmo, Gregg Rudloff, David White

Paul Massey, Mac Ruth, Oliver Tarney, Mark Taylor

STA R WA RS: T H E FO RCE AWA K ENS

S O U N D

Lon Bender, Chris Duesterdiek, Martin Hernandez, Frank A Monta単o, Jon Taylor, Randy Thom

David Acord, Andy Nelson, Christopher Scarabosio, Matthew Wood, Stuart Wilson


A N T- M A N

E X M ACH I N A

Jake Morrison, Greg Steele, Dan Sudick, Alex Wuttke

Mark Ardington, Sara Bennett, Paul Norris, Andrew Whitehurst

T H E M A RT I A N

STA R WA RS: T H E FO RCE AWA K ENS

S P E C I A L V I S UA L E F F E C T S

Andrew Jackson, Dan Oliver, Tom Wood, Andy Williams

Chris Lawrence, Tim Ledbury, Richard Stammers, Steven Warner

Chris Corbould, Roger Guyett, Paul Kavanagh, Neal Scanlan

B EN I CI O D EL TO RO

CH R IST I A N BA L E

I D RIS EL BA

Sicario

The Big Short

Beasts of No Nation

M A R K RU FFA LO

M A R K RYL A N CE

T H E

37

N O M I N A T I O N S

M A D M A X: FU RY ROA D

S U P P O R T I N G AC T O R

Spotlight

Bridge of Spies


CELEBRATING GREAT PERFORMANCES EE is proud to present the Rising Star Award for the 11th year. Who will join our list of prestigious past winners?


A L I CI A VI K A N D ER

J EN N I FER J A SO N L EI G H

Ex Machina

The Hateful Eight

JULIE WA LT ERS

K AT E WI NSL E T

RO O N E Y MARA

Brooklyn

Steve Jobs

Carol

B EL P OWL E Y

BRIE L A RSO N

DA KOTA J O H NSO N

JOHN BOYEGA

TA RO N EG ERTO N

S U P P O R T I N G

T H E

39

N O M I N A T I O N S

AC T R E S S

T H E

E E

S TA R

R I S I N G AWA R D

Voted for by the public

Nominations correct at time of press.


J U R I ES

&

CH A P T ERS

CH A PT ERS

O U TSTA N D I N G B R I T ISH FI L M

CR A F T CH A PT ERS

Iain Harvey (Chair) Andy Blazdell Gill Bradley Michael Chapman Temple Clark Gaelle Denis Venetia Hawkes Akiya Henry Tristan Oliver Andrew Pearce

Marc Samuelson (Chair) Rosie Alison Justin Chadwick Briony Hanson Rachel Hirons Isaac Julien Duncan Kenworthy OBE James Marsh Gugu Mbatha-Raw Marc Munden Nik Powell Penelope Skinner Kenith Trodd

Cinematography Costume Design Directing Editing Make Up & Hair Music Production Design Screenplay Sound Special Visual Effects

Andrew Curtis (Chair) Bola Agbaje Mahalia Belo Matt Charman Mackenzie Crook Anna Duffield Amit Gupta Ian Haydn Smith Kelly Hendry Shane Meadows Tess Morris

O U TSTA N D I N G D EB U T BY A B R I T ISH WR I T ER, D I R ECTO R O R PRO D U CER

Animation British Short Animation and British Short Film Documentary Film Not in the English Language Outstanding British Film

*The Academy wishes to thank Stephen Woolley for his five years as Chair of the Outstanding Debut jury.

Craft chapters are made up of Academy members with specialist experience in the relative field. Opt-in chapters are open to all members who are willing to commit to watching the eligible films. For full details of the voting process, please visit: www.bafta.org/film/awards

Tanya Seghatchian (Co-chair) Stephen Woolley (Co-chair)* John Akomfrah OBE David Arnold Clio Barnard Peter Bradshaw Moira Buffini Joe Cornish Kate Lee Clare Stewart Peter Straughan James Watkins

O PT- I N CH A PT ERS

&

B R I T ISH SH O RT FI L M

C HA P T E RS

B R I T ISH SH O RT A N I M AT I O N

J U R I E S

40

J U RI ES


FILM4 PROUDLY CONGRATULATES ALL OUR 2016 BAFTA NOMINEES

45 YEARS

EX MACHINA

OUTSTANDING BRITISH FILM – Andrew Haigh, Tristan Goligher

OUTSTANDING BRITISH FILM – Alex Garland, Andrew Macdonald, Allon Reich

AMY OUTSTANDING BRITISH FILM – Asif Kapadia, James Gay-Rees

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CAROL BEST FILM – Elizabeth Karlsen, Christine Vachon, Stephen Woolley DIRECTOR – Todd Haynes ADAPTED SCREENPLAY – Phyllis Nagy LEADING ACTRESS – Cate Blanchett SUPPORTING ACTRESS – Rooney Mara

ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY – Alex Garland SUPPORTING ACTRESS – Alicia Vikander SPECIAL VISUAL EFFECTS – Mark Ardington, Sara Bennett, Paul Norris, Andrew Whitehurst

THE LOBSTER OUTSTANDING BRITISH FILM – Yorgos Lanthimos, Ceci Dempsey, Ed Guiney, Lee Magiday, Efthimis Filippou

ROOM ADAPTED SCREENPLAY – Emma Donoghue LEADING ACTRESS – Brie Larson EE RISING STAR – Brie Larson

CINEMATOGRAPHY – Ed Lachman PRODUCTION DESIGN – Judy Becker, Heather Loeffler COSTUME DESIGN – Sandy Powell MAKE UP & HAIR – Jerry DeCarlo, Patricia Regan

SECOND COMING OUTSTANDING DEBUT BY A BRITISH WRITER, DIRECTOR OR PRODUCER – Debbie Tucker Green (Writer/Director)

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DOCUMENTARY – Asif Kapadia, James Gay-Rees

OUTSTANDING DEBUT BY A BRITISH WRITER, DIRECTOR OR PRODUCER – Alex Garland (Director)


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WO R DS BY CH A R L ES GA N T Charles Gant is film editor at Heat and contributing editor to Screen International

t first sight, Adam McKay might not seem the most obvious candidate to direct The Big Short, adapted from Michael Lewis’s book about the 2008 financial crisis. While that dense non-fiction bestseller garnered such prestigious accolades as an award bestowed by the Robert F Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights, McKay is best known as the former head writer on Saturday Night Live, the co-creator of the reliably mirthful Funny Or Die sketches, and the

co-inventor of Will Ferrell’s ‘doofus’ comedy persona. As the filmmaker himself said: “I’m the guy who did Step Brothers.” Viewed another way, the marriage of director and project makes perfect sense. In a succession of comedy hit films variously directed, written and produced by McKay, Ferrell has repeatedly mined the comic potential of what he calls “unearned confidence”: the chasm between a character’s uninhibited appreciation of his own talents


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B EST FI L M N O M I N EES Dede Gardner, Jeremy Kleiner, Brad Pitt OT H ER N O M I N AT ED C AT EG O RI ES Adapted Screenplay; Director; Editing; Supporting Actor

Wittrock and Charlie Geller); the socially awkward fund manager (Christian Bale), who sits in his office barefoot, listening to heavy metal; and America’s angriest hedge fund (Steve Carell, Jeremy Strong, Hamish Linklater, Rafe Spall) led by a man who loathes Wall Street. Even Ryan Gosling’s swaggering banker, the film’s narrator, is successfully positioned in opposition to his dopey, boorish colleagues. You want these guys to succeed. Despite McKay’s self-deprecating assessment of his own credentials, there does exist at least one clue to his suitability for this project. His 2010 cop comedy The Other Guys – in which the chief villain, played by Steve Coogan, is a brazen Wall Street embezzler – offers, with its end credits, an extended set of animated graphics illuminating topics such as Ponzi schemes, executive pay inflation and Troubled Asset Relief Programme (TARP) bailouts. What once was an acorn is now an

From the Little Tramp onwards, cinema audiences have rooted for underdogs, outsiders and mavericks. From the Little Tramp onwards, cinema audiences have rooted for underdogs, outsiders and mavericks, and these are the lead characters of Lewis’s book and McKay’s film: the scrappy young out-of-towners (portrayed here by Finn

oak. Landing in the lap of a filmmaker who has never seen any contradiction between political engagement and populist entertainment, The Big Short represents one of the year’s most felicitous collisions of material and talent.

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and the audience’s own estimation of them. Delusion, idiocy and petulant entitlement regularly go into the blender. In tragicomedy The Big Short, delusion, idiocy and petulant entitlement are all present and correct, although not so much among the film’s unlikely have-a-go heroes. Instead, it’s the little-seen antagonists – the sharp-suited investment bankers who found no irony in Tom Wolfe’s oft-quoted idiom, “Masters of the Universe” – that fall victim to these fatal flaws. Bamboozled by their own luxury lifestyles and multi-million dollar bonuses, America’s brightest and best have created mortgage-based products of such arcane complexity that they are confusing not just to everybody else but also to themselves. With The Big Short, McKay has succeeded in two tricky, but vital, tasks. One is to make a popular, wildly entertaining film about a seemingly dismal topic, the worst financial crisis of modern times. The other is to create for the film’s audience a rooting interest in traders and fund managers who made a killing out of these events. These are the savvy few who bothered to look at what was inside the ‘triple A’-rated mortgage bonds, deduced they were swilling in toxic ‘ninja’ (no income, no job, no assets) loans, and then made big bets against the housing market.


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WO R DS BY T ER R I WH I T E Terri White is the editor-in-chief of Empire magazine

hen first-time screenwriter Matt Charman began crafting a script based on the true-life tale of Brooklyn insurance lawyer James Donovan and the spy he was charged with defending, he couldn’t have known that many years before, another filmmaker had been enthralled by it too. A director who, as a teenager, heard a story from his father about a pilot who’d been shot down. That director was Steven Spielberg. Once Charman’s pages were in his hands, Spielberg enlisted the Coen brothers to tickle

the script and cast Tom Hanks and Mark Rylance in lead roles. The shoot lasted just 59 days and the result is a beautiful, well-crafted and exquisitely quiet thriller. Big-budget Le Carre this ain’t. Set in the late 1950s and early 60s, Donovan is the lawyer tasked with defending Soviet spy Rudolf Abel (Rylance), though it’s simply in the appearance of due process. Indeed, the verdict arrives as expected, although Donovan successfully argues against the death penalty. His work, however, is just beginning, as he’s


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asked to negotiate the release of American U2 pilot Francis Gary Powers (Austin Stowell) who has been captured by Soviet forces. Abel, the pawn to be traded. Here, Spielberg’s world is truly one in which words speak louder than action. Much of the ‘action’ happens in stifling courtrooms, in wood-panelled offices, in softly lit prison cells. While set in a time that the world sat in the suffocating grip of nuclear paranoia, the mounting hysteria – along with the dark shadows that gather shape alongside it – surfaces with an unsettling calm and stillness. Donovan’s family, including Amy Ryan as wife Mary – are the human face of this; her curls becoming tighter and smile ever more frozen beneath the 1950s’ celluloid sheen. Their son is discovered filling a bath with water to be used for drinking when the time comes – a scene Spielberg said was reminiscent of his own actions at the age of 13. This is just a taste of what Spielberg does so wonderfully as of late: taking towering events and historical characters and making them human; only just out of our reach, the tips of our fingers grazing their sleeves. This humanity is wrought largest and with most power in the character of Abel. The foreign spy who, against the questionable conduct of the film’s motherland, becomes sympathetic and hell, even heroic. Yes, he’s undoubtedly an agent (as the extraordinary opening scene reveals), but he is also a painter; a softly-spoken artist who may have the physicality of a crumpled piece of paper, but stands resolutely firm by his ideals and mission, regardless of the consequences.

It’s a triumphant performance from Rylance, who is equally unwavering, vulnerable and haunted. He also has wonderful moments of lightness – memorably answering, “Would it help?” with the shadow of a glint in his eye when Donovan questions his lack of fretting (a Coen touch, surely). Spielberg, as relevant as ever, has taken a footnote in textbooks and built a compelling, warm and, you feel, in some way, personal narrative that defies the tag thriller.

B EST FI L M N O M I N EES Kristie Macosko Krieger, Marc Platt, Steven Spielberg OT H ER N O M I N AT ED C AT EG O RI ES Cinematography; Director; Editing; Original Music; Original Screenplay; Production Design; Sound; Supporting Actor


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C A RO L WO R DS BY RO B B I E CO L L I N Robbie Collin is the Telegraph’s chief film critic

he moral of Carol is simple. If someone orders creamed spinach over poached eggs and a dry martini for lunch, they’re probably a keeper. Like all the details in Todd Haynes’s film, everything about that meal is tinglingly specific: the flavour memories it conjures, the Manhattan of 1952 it evokes, even the manner in which it’s ordered. Carol Aird, an elegant housewife part-way through a painful divorce, barely glances at the menu before asking for it

– and her younger companion, a hesitant shop girl and budding photographer called Therese Belivet, is so dazzled that all she can do is ask for the same. At work in the department store, Therese is surrounded by imitations of life: dolls packed away behind cellophane, toy trains whirring madly round a circular track. Then one day, Carol stops by, and Therese immediately recognises she’s the real thing. Against the shop’s polite mint-green and pink decor,


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her lips, nails, hat and scarf are like splashes of cherryade. Therese notices each of them approvingly in turn – and we notice her noticing, privy to this under-the-counter transaction carried out thrillingly in public. Cahiers du Cinema’s review of Douglas Sirk’s 1954 melodrama Magnificent Obsession praised the director’s ability to express through cinematography and set design the things his cast couldn’t – “the fugitive passing of a feeling” that would shrivel and die were it plainly spelled out. Haynes, who’s been called Sirk’s successor, pulls off this trick so deftly in Carol that its characters’ true feelings are black market commodities, only displayed when privacy seems assured. Carol and Therese are in love, but they can’t be honest about it – at first not even with each other, let alone the world at large. So we glean their relationship from everything that goes unsaid: via the gestural detail of Cate Blanchett and Rooney Mara’s interdependent performances, and the

[Carol captures] the New York of Edward Hopper: melancholic, composed and heavy with untold stories.

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OT H ER N O M I N AT ED C AT EG O R I ES Cinematography; Costume Design; Director; Leading Actress; Make Up & Hair; Production Design; Supporting Actress

clean-edged economy of Phyllis Nagy’s screenplay, pruned from Patricia Highsmith’s 1952 novel The Price of Salt. That essential reticence means that, despite its setting and subject, Carol can’t be a melodrama – which is where it parts ways from Sirk and also Far from Heaven (2002), Haynes’s previous period romance and a full-blooded Sirkian homage. America of the 1950s was a country lost in war’s long shadow and mounting paranoia. (It’s no coincidence that when Carol and Therese finally consummate their relationship in a motel room in Waterloo, Iowa, it’s a clandestine tape recording that brings this flash of bliss to a wrenching halt.) As such, Haynes and his cinematographer, Edward Lachman, use doors, car windows, mirrors and walls to find frames within frames, placing the characters in boxes and behind glass, occluding their views with gauzes of rain and dust. It is, unmistakably, the New York of Edward Hopper: melancholic, composed and heavy with untold stories. But it’s also the city chronicled by street photographers such as Saul Leiter, Ruth Orkin and Vivian Maier: teeming, dirty, and aquiver with potential. Therese’s growing flair for photography – a Nagy addition – hints, as does the way she gazes at her lover from their first meeting onwards, that more honest modes of looking might not be too far away. Carol reminds us how much we’ve changed, and how little.


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THE REVENANT WO R DS BY K A R EN K R I Z A N OVI CH Karen Krizanovich is a journalist, writer and broadcaster for Monocle, Radio Times, The List and others. She is also honorary secretary of the Critics Circle – Film Section

ilm is the closest thing we have to real life. Its sound and vision can be vivid, visceral and immediate, but conjuring reality is not easy. The collaborative nature of filmmaking adds difficulty and even happy productions carry a secret history of travails. In director Alejandro Gonzalez Iñárritu’s sixth feature, The Revenant, travails are not secret. They are badges of honour that enhance its remarkable tale.

Set in 1823, The Revenant is based on the true story of Hugh Glass, a 19th century fur trapper whose life was fictionalised in Michael Punke’s The Revenant: A Novel of Revenge. Left for dead after being mauled by a mother bear protecting her cubs, Glass literally crawls from his grave, travelling 200 miles to find those who wronged him. Leonardo DiCaprio as Glass, under heavy latex scarring and a real beard, is brought to


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the desperate edge of his acting powers. Urged by Iñárritu to be broken and vulnerable, DiCaprio’s method reportedly went beyond health and safety: the starving Glass, wearing a soaked bearskin for warmth, eats a whole apparently live fish and famously tears into raw liver – a feat for any performer much less a vegetarian. Supporting DiCaprio are a superb team comprised of Tom Hardy, Will Poulter and Domhnall Gleeson, each giving careershaping performances. According to reports, the entire crew endured -25°C temperatures amid mountain locations in Canada and Argentina. Both the magnificent cinematographer Emmanuel ‘Chivo’ Lubezki and Iñárritu agreed that shooting only in available light, often for just 90 minutes a day, was the best way to capture a tale of this magnitude, in lands apparently untouched by man. If The Revenant was difficult by design, it couldn’t have been born at a better time.

B EST FI L M N O M I N EES Steve Golin, Alejandro G Iñárritu, Arnon Milchan, Mary Parent, Keith Redmon OT H ER N O M I N AT ED C AT EG O R I ES Cinematography; Director; Editing; Leading Actor; Make Up & Hair; Original Music; Sound

This was the year audiences demanded reality and Iñárritu’s film, along with Mad Max: Fury Road and Star Wars: The Force Awakens, pointedly brought practical effects, real stunts and stunning locations back to the big screen. As Iñárritu said himself, “if we ended up in green-screen with coffee and everybody having a good time, everybody will be happy, but most likely the film would be a piece of shit.” Suffering for one’s art isn’t new, but The Revenant’s scope is comparable to the beautiful jeopardy of Lawrence of Arabia (1962). Much like Lubezki’s work in Children of Men (2006) and Birdman (2014), The Revenant’s long, sweeping shots – some of which plunge effortlessly underwater and over cliff edges – are powerful images that deliver a graphic sense of immediacy: the camera is the audience and vice versa. Only the sun flares, water droplets, blood and breath on the lens remind us we are not actually Glass himself, fighting for our life in a hostile wilderness. Lubezki’s camera veers close but delivers us from evil, as Ryuichi Sakamoto and Alva Noto’s detached score leads us into a dream or oblivion. It would be easy to call The Revenant a kind of Dogma Hardcore. But with unpredictable yet immaculate choices, Iñárritu proves that in his hands the art of filmmaking has much further to go.

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is comparable to the beautiful jeopardy of Lawrence of Arabia.


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S P OT L I G H T WO R DS BY CH R IS T I L LY Chris Tilly is the film and television editor for IGN

potlight is a film that’s very much the sum of its parts, with every aspect of this engrossing drama – from script and direction to performance and score – working in tandem to tell a distressing story with sensitivity and compassion. The film charts The Boston Globe’s efforts to expose the corrupt actions of the Catholic Church, which for decades concealed and covered up the pedophile activities of scores of its priests in the city. The evidence was there, with the newspaper having written isolated

stories about abuse cases, but it took an outsider to finally join the dots. In 2001, Marty Baron moved from Miami to Boston to edit the paper, and on his first day he tasked Spotlight – the Globe’s four-person investigative team – with the job of figuring out the extent of the crime, and how high up the chain-of-command knowledge of it went. That investigation went right to the very top, uncovering abuse by more than 70 priests locally, and paving the way for national and global exposés, the reverberations of which are still being felt today.


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in the business delivering performances that burst with passion and intensity. support, while Stanley Tucci very nearly steals the show as Mitchell Garabedian, the paranoid, eccentric and ultimately heroic lawyer who was working these cases years before the investigation began and continued to do so long after its conclusion. It’s a superb ensemble; the actors’ combined efforts elevating the material and ensuring that Spotlight stirs both sadness and anger. But it’s also a film that celebrates the efforts of these courageous men and women who, through their tenacity and determination to do the right thing, broke a story that truly made a difference.

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Mike Rezendes was the Spotlight team’s pitbull, and Mark Ruffalo deservedly receives a Supporting Actor nomination for his work as the investigator who won’t take no for an answer. Meanwhile, Rachel McAdams brings great humanity to proceedings as Sacha Pfeiffer, the journalist whose job it was to interview both the victims and their abusers. John Slattery, Billy Crudup, Paul Guilfoyle and Brian d’Arcy James also lend muscular

B EST FI L M N O M I N EES Steve Golin, Blye Pagon Faust, Nicole Rocklin, Michael Sugar OT H ER N O M I N AT ED C AT EG O RI ES Original Screenplay; Supporting Actor

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Spotlight is an important film that’s worthy of their brave efforts. Director Tom McCarthy directs proceedings in precise, understated fashion, never sensationalising the subject matter, but equally never shying away from uncomfortable truths. He also manages to turn the business of cold-calling and fact-checking into edge-of-seat cinema. The tight, taut, BAFTA-nominated screenplay, which McCarthy co-wrote with Josh Singer, is a masterclass in economy, with not a single word going to waste. But the cast that delivers those lines is the film’s most potent weapon, with some of the best actors in the business delivering performances that burst with passion and intensity. Liev Schreiber manages to be both shy and authoritative as editor Baron, whose clarity of vision sets events in motion, while Michael Keaton imbues Walter Robinson – playermanager of the Spotlight team – with humour and intelligence. Born and bred in Boston, ‘Robby’ found himself torn between his ties to the community and a desire to do what’s right, and that conflict is etched on Keaton’s face throughout.


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true for Szabó. “I don’t know if I can express it politely, so let’s just say I was very delighted when I heard,” he notes. “The first time I read the email I thought it was a joke. Even the idea that I was being considered would have been a huge honour… Then, I was really happy with the brief, as it gave me a strong impetus to develop ideas. Almost immediately I started thinking about possible visual metaphors and then started furiously researching the films that might be nominated.” Ultimately, Szabó created the stunning artwork for all five variant brochure covers, each one representing one of the films nominated in the Best Film category, namely The Big Short, Bridge of Spies, Carol, The Revenant and Spotlight. He also illustrated BAFTA’s Film Awards poster for 2016.

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on his current career path. And creative agencies began to take note, including Human After All (HAA), the Londonbased agency that has designed BAFTA’s Film and Television Awards tickets and brochures for the past two years. When BAFTA was looking for an illustrator to create this year’s campaign, working to an overarching theme of ‘Dreams’, Szabó seemed like the perfect choice. “We were drawn to the strength and sense of narrative in Levente’s artwork,” says Paul Willoughby, creative director at HAA. “There’s strong symbolism and a visual poetry in his work, which he creates through the way he juxtaposes symbols with the worlds within. There’s also a liveliness to his work, and the colour palette he uses is very graphic, bold and storydriven. It was a natural fit.” In keeping with BAFTA’s ‘Dreams’ theme, working with the British Academy has been, well, like a dream come

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wanted to be many things within graphic design when I was younger,” explains freelance graphic designer, artist and illustrator Levente Szabó. “I really like designing logos, for instance. But after a while, I had to choose an area to focus on and, although I still consider myself a graphic designer, I only really accept illustrative work these days.” It was an art project of his own design – illustrating posters and covers for famous novels, including Gulliver’s Travels and The Old Man and the Sea – that really set Szabó

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Each year, BAFTA chooses an artist to illustrate both its Film Awards campaign poster and the brochure covers. This year, we chose Hungarian artist Levente Szabó.

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HACKET T LONDON I S P ROU D TO BE T HE O F F I C I A L M E N S WE A R S T Y L I S T TO T HE EE BR I T I SH AC ADEM Y FI L M AWA R D S I N 2 0 1 6

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WO R DS BY N EI L S M I T H Opening Portrait: Phil Fisk Film Stills: BFI Stills Library, Rex by Shutterstock

lmost 60 years have elapsed since BAFTA first recognised the talents of Sidney Poitier, the worthy recipient of this year’s Fellowship. The recognition came in the form of a nomination, in the now defunct Best Foreign Actor category, for 1957’s A Man is Ten Feet Tall (aka Edge of the City), a drama about New York longshoremen that saw Poitier become mentor to a youthful John Cassavetes. All but forgotten now, Martin Ritt’s film has not aged half as well as its star, who will celebrate his 89th birthday next week.


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“I never worked on a film where I did not learn something wonderful.” Further BAFTA nominations came for A Raisin in the Sun (1961), Lilies of the Field (1963) – the film for which Poitier won an Academy Award – A Patch of Blue (1965), and In the Heat of the Night, the 1967 murder mystery that, in detective ‘Mister’ Virgil Tibbs, gave him what is generally seen as his signature role. The success of Norman Jewison’s film, Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner and To Sir, with Love (both 1967) – a fondly remembered classroom drama, reminiscent of his 1955 title Blackboard Jungle, that saw Poitier play teacher to the likes of Judy Geeson and Lulu – ensured the actor was installed as the year’s top box office draw, the first black star to be so. They also helped bolster his stature as a role model and icon – epithets he accepted with both his customary humility and sliver of reluctance.

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Like many of Poitier’s pictures, though, it was imbued with the values the actor has endeavoured to instill in all his work: dignity, humanity and a steadfast refusal to accept that the way things are are the way they should remain. BAFTA made good on that nomination the following year by giving Poitier the Foreign Actor award for The Defiant Ones, Stanley Kramer’s landmark drama about two escaped prisoners (the other being Tony Curtis) whose initially antagonistic relationship becomes a bond every bit as strong as the iron chain that shackles them together. “I have to acknowledge Stanley as probably the most important element in my career,” says Poitier, who would collaborate with the director again, nine years later, on the no less resonant Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner (1967). “He was a remarkable, extraordinary and very principled man who was pivotal to moving me forward in my craft.”


in In the Heat of the Night (1967) Above: On the run wth Tony Curtis in The Defiant Ones (1958) Left: Glenn Ford meets his match in 68

“[Director] Stanley Kramer was pivotal to moving me forward in my craft.” “I felt fortunate to play parts in movies that challenged prejudices, took on repressive regimes or involved interracial relationships, whose storylines dared to show a black man as powerful, articulate and important at a time when that wasn’t acceptable to many,” he says. “But I don’t pretend to be an icon, because I only got that from the opportunities that

were given to me and the people who gave me those opportunities.” It’s undeniable, though, that the films and roles that made Poitier’s name became rallying calls in a greater debate about civil rights and racial equality – something which BAFTA itself reflected by selecting three of those films (The Defiant Ones, In the Heat of the Night and Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner) as the winner of its United Nations award, a prize given annually between 1949 and 1975 to works seen to positively embody the principles of the UN’s charter. By the end of the 1960s, Poitier had sufficient commercial clout to join Barbra Streisand and Paul Newman in the creation of First Artists, a production outfit intended to

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Blackboard Jungle (1955)

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Above: With River Phoenix in Little Nikita (1988)

afford them and others a greater say over the films in which they starred. (“The industry is moving into a new era,” Poitier said at the time. “You either lead it, or move with it, or follow it. We have opted for leadership.”)

“I feel and have always felt a remarkable connection to England.” Poitier’s primary contribution was a triptych of spirited comedies – Uptown Saturday Night (1974), Let’s Do It Again (1975) and A Piece of the Action (1977). They also saw him move behind the camera, a transition he says he was more than prepared for after two decades in front of it. “I was exposed to filmmakers who were extremely gifted and I came away from all those experiences knowing how they did

things in such a remarkable way,” he explains. “I never worked on a film where I did not learn something wonderful from a very good director or a very good writer.” Stir Crazy, a 1980 prison caper with Gene Wilder and Richard Pryor, made more than $100 million at the US box office, the first film to be directed by an African-American to ever pass that benchmark. In the 35 years since, though, Poitier’s influence has been more keenly felt away from the soundstage. A dedicated activist and humanitarian, he served as Bahamian ambassador to Japan from 1997 to 2007, while also representing the Bahamas at UNESCO. He has written three bestselling memoirs: This Life (1980), The Measure of a Man (2000) and Life Beyond Measure: Letters to My Great-Granddaughter (2008). He has received an honorary Oscar, a BAFTA Britannia award, the Cecil B DeMille Award and the Presidential Medal of Freedom. He has also had the distinction of having an incident in


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L’Instant Champagne, with Vitalie Taittinger.

Vitalie Taittinger is an active member of the family Champagne House.

Champagne for the Independently Minded

Official Champagne to BAFTA Champagne Taittinger is widely stocked in many independent wine merchants, Majestic Wine Warehouse, ASDA, Morrisons, Sainsbury’s, Tesco, Waitrose, Harrods and Fortnum & Mason. @TaittingerUK · www.taittinger.com


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including Lulu (right), fall under the spell of teacher Mark Thackeray in To Sir, with Love (1967) Above right: Playing siblings with Diana Sands in A Raisin in the Sun (1961) Left: With Lilia Skalia in Lilies of the Field (1963)

his own life – the exposure of a con artist who gained money and advantage by pretending to be Poitier’s non-existent son – inspire an award-winning play, John Guare’s Six Degrees of Separation, that went on to be filmed in 1993. It’s all a far cry from Poitier’s humble beginnings as the son of impoverished tomato farmers: a man who, after emigrating to the US, slept in public restrooms and on rooftops before being finally accepted at Harlem’s American Negro Theater.

Yet Poitier, whose Bahamian ancestry enabled him to be knighted by the Queen in 1974, can see a clear path between his early days in what was then a British Crown Colony and the BAFTA Fellowship, an accolade he says he is “honoured in the extreme” to receive. “I feel and have always felt a remarkable connection to England, not just in filmmaking but culturally too,” the BAFTA Fellow concludes. “What you have passed on to me I will remember – always.”

F E L L O W S H I P

Above left: East End students,


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FEL LOWS

1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1976 197 7 1978 1979 1980 1980 1981 1981 1981 1982

198 4 1985 1986 1988 1989 19 9 0 19 91 19 92 19 92 19 93 19 93 19 94 19 95 19 96 19 96 19 96 19 96 19 97 19 97 19 97 19 97 19 97 19 97 19 98 19 98

Eric Morecambe & Ernie Wise Elizabeth Taylor 20 0 0 Michael Caine 20 0 0 Stanley Kubrick (posthumous) 20 0 0 Peter Bazalgette 20 01 Albert Finney 20 01 John Thaw 20 01 Dame Judi Dench 20 02 Warren Beatty 20 02 Merchant Ivory Productions 20 02 Andrew Davies 20 02 Sir John Mills 20 03 Saul Zaentz 20 03 David Jason 20 0 4 John Boorman 20 0 4 Roger Graef 20 05 John Barry OBE 20 05 Sir David Frost OBE 20 0 6 Lord Puttnam CBE 20 0 6 Ken Loach 20 07 Anne V Coates OBE 20 07 Richard Curtis CBE 20 07 Will Wright 20 08 Sir Anthony Hopkins CBE 20 08 Bruce Forsyth CBE 20 0 9 Terry Gilliam 20 0 9 Nolan Bushnell 20 0 9 Dawn French & Jennifer Saunders 2010 Vanessa Redgrave CBE 2010 Shigeru Miyamoto 2010 Lord Bragg 2011 Sir Christopher Lee CBE 2011 Peter Molyneux OBE 2011 Sir Trevor McDonald OBE 2012 Martin Scorsese 2013 Sir Alan Parker 2013 Gabe Newell 2013 Michael Palin CBE 2014 Dame Helen Mirren 2014 Rockstar Games 2014 Julie Walters CBE 2015 Mike Leigh 2015 David Braben OBE 2015 Jon Snow Names and honours correct at time of presentation. 19 9 9

A C A D E M Y

1987

19 9 9

T H E

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A C A D E MY

O F

1983

Alfred Hitchcock Freddie Young OBE Grace Wyndham Goldie David Lean Jacques Cousteau Sir Charles Chaplin Lord Olivier Sir Denis Forman Fred Zinnemann Lord Grade Sir Huw Wheldon David Attenborough CBE John Huston Abel Gance Michael Powell Emeric Pressburger Andrzej Wajda Sir Richard Attenborough CBE Sir Hugh Greene Sam Spiegel Jeremy Isaacs Steven Spielberg Federico Fellini Ingmar Bergman Sir Alec Guinness CH, CBE Paul Fox Louis Malle Sir John Gielgud David Plowright Sydney Samuelson CBE Colin Young CBE Michael Grade CBE Billy Wilder Jeanne Moreau Ronald Neame CBE John Schlesinger CBE Dame Maggie Smith Woody Allen Steven Bochco Julie Christie Oswald Morris OBE Harold Pinter CBE David Rose Sean Connery Bill Cotton CBE

T H E

F E L L O W S

1979

O F


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Angels Costumes Outstanding British Contribution to Cinema

WO R DS BY R I CH M AT T H E WS Imagery: Angels

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“The film industry is a bit like the Bible – seven years of plenty followed by seven years of drought.” o says Tim Angel OBE , who has worked in the British film industry for more than 50 years and, as the seventh generation of Angel to run the family business, Angels Costumes, he is talking from experience. The former chairman of BAFTA and governor of the BFI runs the world’s preeminent film, television and theatre costumiers, which is celebrating its 175th year in the normally precarious business of show. This is an incredible feat of endurance all on its own, and it’s hard to think of any other single company that has contributed more to the British film industry. That it is receiving the Outstanding British Contribution to Cinema award from BAFTA in its anniversary year means a lot to the Angel family.


O U T S T A N D I N G

Previous page: The Angels’ warehouse, with its eight miles

B R I T I S H

of costume rails Above: One of Angels’ designers makes some final amends

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“As one of the tiny cogs in the wheel that makes all movies happen, being recognised [by BAFTA] in this way is fantastic.”

C I N E M A

area as Charles Dickens, who was a customer as it happens,” says Angel. “His son, Morris, took over the business, and because we were in the heart of ‘theatreland’ and actors used to supply their own clothes, someone said, ‘Can we borrow some costumes just for the evening?’ The word ‘borrow’ doesn’t exist in the Angel vocabulary; it’s called ‘hire’. That’s how it started.” From that fateful exchange on, Angels continued to adapt to the changing needs of the growing costume industry,

T O

“We’re over the moon,” Angel says. “It recognises what the company has done over probably the best part of more than 100 years. But good costumes are like good lighting – you shouldn’t notice them. It should look natural. It’s a like a painting, it’s about the whole. And there’s never enough time or money, so when it all comes together it’s genuinely special. As the people in the background, one of the tiny cogs in the wheel that makes all movies happen, being recognised in this way is fantastic.” To fully understand the sheer scale of Angels’ role in the history of film, you simply have to stand in their storage facility, looking at eight miles of costumes on rail after rail after rail – like the warehouse at the end of Raiders of the Lost Ark, if you need a film comparison – stretching off into the distance. The history of film, television, theatre, music videos and advertising is right there, hanging on the racks. “When my great great great grandfather came over in 1790 from Germany, he was a second-hand tailor in a slum area – the same

C O N T R I B U T I O N

Right: Vintage men’s tailoring


D I D

YO U

K N OW?

Angels Costumes 1840

The company was formed in London by Morris Angel as Morris Angel & Son, providing costumes for the theatre.

1913

1920s

In the late 1920s, Madame Tussauds was destroyed by fire. Angels re-dressed all the waxworks and provided uniforms and livery for the staff.

1940-45

1948

Angels’ work was first recognised by the Academy Awards for Laurence Oliver’s Hamlet. Costume designer Roger K Furse collected the Best Achievement in Costume Design.

Angels acquired costume house Bermans, moving its professional hiring service for film, television and the theatre to Camden. The original Shaftesbury Avenue premises became Angels Fancy Dress, now one of the UK’s foremost suppliers of fancy dress outfits.

2015

TODAY

Angels Costumes remains a family enterprise with the seventh generation of the Angels family now running the company: namely Tim Angel (chairman) and his three children, Daniel (costume director), Emma (director of Angels Fancy Dress) and Jeremy (creative director).

From 1940 to 1945, Angels provided dress uniforms for the Free French Army and for Entertainments National Service Association (ENSA), the army entertainment troupe.

1992

2002

Angels moved its film and television stock to a 160,000-square foot purpose-built facility in Hendon. The building includes a suite of 15 designer offices and more than eight miles of costume rails.

Some of the earliest films dressed by Angels were The Maid of the Mountains (1913), The Lodger (1927) and several other Michael Balcon produced films.

Angels supplied costumes to all five of the films nominated in the Costume Design category at the EE British Academy Film Awards in 2015: The Grand Budapest Hotel; The Imitation Game; Into the Woods; Mr. Turner; The Theory of Everything; and Maleficent. The winner was The Grand Budapest Hotel.


O U T S T A N D I N G

you had to be aware that you couldn’t put someone in a green dress on a green sofa. You had to work out what clashed. Without our passion to get these things right, the business wouldn’t have survived.”

T O

“Good costumes are like good lighting – you shouldn’t notice them.” Did Angel ever contemplate doing anything else and not going into the family business? “The family business was movie stars, theatre stars, television stars… who wouldn’t want to

C I N E M A

expanding from theatre to motion pictures then to television. “Each generation has had a passion for what they do,” Angel states. “When I joined the company I was very lucky because the BBC was going over to colour television, and it was the advent of all those incredible historical dramas. A lot of the great film designers of today cut their teeth in the costume department at the BBC, which is where we started working with them. The survival of the family business has been all about passion and adapting to the times. “While what we do hasn’t changed, the technology around us has – even recently we’ve had HD, now 3D, for instance. That has a huge effect on the clothes. Like going from black and white to colour movies – with black and white you only had to get the tones right, then suddenly colour came along and

C O N T R I B U T I O N

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B R I T I S H

Above: The wondrous sounding ‘Badge Room’


HOLLYWOOD TO THE BAFTAS (AND BACK FOUR TIMES A DAY ) Proud to be the official airline to the EE British Academy Film Awards.

Together with British Airways. American Airlines, the Flight Symbol logo and the Tail Symbol are marks of American Airlines, Inc. oneworld is a mark of the oneworld alliance, LLC. Š 2016 American Airlines, Inc. All rights reserved.


O U T S T A N D I N G

This page: A selection of costumes

B R I T I S H

provided by Angels for Star Wars: Episode V – The Empire Strikes Back, 1980 (above left); The Red Shoes, 1948 (above right); and Dracula Has Risen from the Grave, 1968 (right) 84

C O N T R I B U T I O N C I N E M A

have to make a profit to survive, there’s also this awareness of what has gone before, and protecting and honouring that legacy. You need vocational training. We get a lot out of the industries we serve, and it’s really important to put something back in. As such, in recent times we’ve worked hard to get our apprenticeship schemes going, along with internships and work experience. It’s very, very important to us. “I always say to anyone who wants to be a film designer, ‘That’s great, but do you realise how many more people work on the wardrobe side?’ Dressers, assistants, supervisors: for every design job, there’s probably 30 or

T O

go into that?” he grins. “Growing up around that and seeing it up close was fantastic. I used to get starstruck all the time, but now it has to be a really big Hollywood star to do that to me.” A large part of Angels’ passion translates into ensuring that the skills of its trade continues to be passed on to each successive generation of costumier, even as the nature of the industry has moved from secure “jobs for life” to a more freelancer-based structure. “Most of the people through our history didn’t have any training outside of the business, they cut their teeth at Angels,” he explains. “With a family business, while you


www.farmgroup.tv @TheFarmGroup


86

Above: The Angel family (from l-r) Jeremy, Emma, Tim and Daniel

40 other jobs. What does my heart good is knowing that everyone who went through our apprenticeship is now working. And we’re now also working with CreativeMediaSkills, based out of Pinewood, running three-day courses for different aspects of the industry, which is a good way for people to get into the industry.”

“We get a lot out of the industries we serve, and it’s really important to put something back in.” It’s this focus on the work, rather than the acclaim and the glamour, that underpins Angels work, which is reflected by Tim Angel’s response when asked what his own personal highlights have been over his 50 years making costumes. “Films that have won Oscars or BAFTAs are great – especially when the Awards season comes around and we’ve got four or five films nominated,” he smiles. “But the films I’ve enjoyed working on the most are ones such as

The Shooting Party (1985), which was a lovely film to work on and had every great actor of the time in it [including James Mason and John Gielgud]. And Alan Parker’s Evita (1996), because every single costume in the opening funeral cortege scene came from our stock. That gave me a real kick.” Angel’s unbound enthusiasm for his craft, his company and its storied history stays with you long after meeting him, with his boyish glee for the sartorial side of cinema proving infectious. “I suppose I am a bit of a kid – when I walk around Leicester Square and I see so many films that we worked on, that gives me a genuine thrill,” he laughs. And with Tim’s children, Jeremy, Emma and Daniel, now running the company alongside him, there’s every chance that the tradition of passion and commitment will continue for another 175 years.

A detailed history of Angels’ 175 years is chronicled in Behind the Seams, a book by James Bellini and Sally Angel. Visit www.angelsbehindtheseams.com


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A

P H O T O G R A P H I C

Films are the stuff of dreams. They are fantasies, both in a practical sense and metaphorically, writ large on the big screen for all to see. They explore what has been, what is and what could be, through fiction and reality, all beautifully, lovingly

E S S AY

BY

P H I L

F I S K

captured through the lens of the camera. The elegance and creativity of these dreams are a reflection of the remarkable imaginations of the artists who weave them, and this year’s photographic essay gathers together some of the world’s best practitioners as they work their magic. Dream a little dream…


90

From previous page...

T ER RY

G I L L I A M

“This was the first picture we took and it set the tone for the rest of the essay. It’s Terry on a voyage into his imagination. I had Where the Wild Things Are in my head. I wanted each photo to be more like a scene from a film, the key being to leave the story open.” – Phil Fisk

Writer, Director, The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus (2009), Brazil (1985)


91

DA N T ER RY

N OTA RY

L E M M O N, &

“We originally wanted to get on set [of War of the Planet of the Apes], but when we got there, Dan had this huge container behind the scenes and I thought it looked great, with the scale of the set behind it. Everything Weta uses is captured here – their aerials and various tools.” – PF

B EN

M U R R AY

D L (C e n t re) Visual

Effects Supervisor, Weta Digital T N ( Rig h t) Movement Choreographer, Stunt Coordinator B M ( L e f t) Motion Capture Supervisor, Weta Digital The Planet of the Apes series (2011-ongoing)


92

N I N A

G O L D

“This is Nina with her shredded Spotlight books, the actors directory. She spends her life in front of a laptop usually, so this metaphorically represents her tearing through her contact books. The Spotlight sculptures are by an artist called Sally O’Sullivan, she’s known as the Book Wrecker.” – PF

Casting Director The Danish Girl (2015) Star Wars: The Force Awakens (2015)


93

K EI R

B E CK

“With a stunt man, you immediately think of explosions or car chases and it’s all really fast, but I wanted something more static for this shot. I thought of the Indian rope trick as I felt that’s kind of what a stunt man does, a lot of it’s about rope. As soon as I said it, Keir got it. It’s kind of like he’s falling, or is he falling and controlling it?” – PF

Stunt Coordinator, Stunts Mad Max: Fury Road (2015) Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows (2011)


94

DAV I D

OY ELOWO

“I had the idea of using a mirror in a bit of an Alice Through the Looking Glass type nod. We also played with the idea of the actor taking on different personalities through the poses in the reflection.” – PF

Actor Selma (2014) A Most Violent Year (2014)


95

H OY T E

VA N

H OY T E M A

“I was nervous about this one as it could have just looked like a man with a big camera on his shoulder. But the shadows worked and made it a little bit more surreal. Light and shadow are very important for a cinematographer.” – PF

Cinematographer Spectre (2015) Interstellar (2014)


96

ST EPH EN

FR E A RS

“Stephen thought he was being shot in a hotel suite, but he makes films that are about real places and quite often about the things you don’t see, the hidden stuff. So I shot him in a dirty, dark alleyway, with a bunch of smoking, bored waiters.” – PF

Writer, Director The Program (2015) The Queen (2006)


97

J O H N

R I CH A R DS O N

“This is very much the special effects guy in his environment with all his tools. This is John in his own workshop at Leavesden. You may spot the smoke and mirror.” – PF

Special Effects Supervisor The Harry Potter series (2001-2011) Aliens (1986)


98

S K I P

L I E VS AY

“Skip works in a room, behind a big screen and desk with lots of knobs on it. So we moved him into a foley studio because I thought we could use objects that make sound to represent his craft. Filmmakers make dreams come to life, but often they work in very mundane, practical environments. We tried to make those environments come to life, too.” – PF

Supervising Sound Editor He Named Me Malala (2015) Gravity (2013)


99

A L I S O N

OW EN

“How do you shoot a producer in terms of their craft? Ultimately, I thought it was all about telephone calls. I imagine Alison spends hours and hours on the phone. The cigar was a last minute idea. She’s a modern female producer, so I thought we’d slightly lampoon the historical caricature of the producer with a cigar.” – PF

Producer Suffragette (2015) Elizabeth (1998)


100

N A O M I E

H A R R I S

“All of the other pictures were shot in camera, but have a fantasy edge. With Naomie, we have a shot that looks real, like she’s on a beach, but was actually taken in the Savoy. The footsteps are walking away from her – it’s the moment the crew have left and she’s now the only one in shot. It has a sense of trepidation and loneliness about it.” – PF

Actress Spectre (2015) Southpaw (2015)


101

A N DY

S ER K I S

“Andy is quite an obvious one. Essentially this is his alter ego now, this guy in a suit who’s anything but a human most of the time. I just wanted to do something that was classic Americana. Maybe because it’s that classic scene of two guys hanging out in a bar, one’s his real self and the other is a fantasy.” – PF

Actor Avengers: Age of Ultron (2015) The Planet of the Apes series (2011-ongoing)


102

J A CQ U EL I N E

A B R A H A M S

“This was just Jacqueline’s place, it’s where she lives. We added a projection of an image onto the wall, to represent the kind of random locations that she might think about, but this is who she is and actually how she researches her films. She has magazines and books piled high for research.” – PF

Production Designer The Lobster (2015) War Book (2014)


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N EI L L

G O RTO N

“Neill’s workshop was as I expected – macabre, with limbs and lifeless corpses littering the place. I thought we should try and simplify the shot and turn Neill into one of his creations. In keeping with the project, we just added a touch of the surreal… or a couple of massive legs.” – PF

Prosthetic Effects Designer Ex Machina (2015) Saving Private Ryan (1998)


C R E D I T S

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E S S A Y

CH R I S

K I N G

“Chris spends his time working in a pretty normal room with a computer. But I thought we could get film stock to dance using wind, and then capture it in different shapes. The idea is that he’s at his desktop and making film come to life, which is essentially what an editor does.” – PF

Editor Amy (2015) Senna (2010)


ES S AY

CR ED I TS

PH OTO G R A PH ER Phil Fisk phil@philfisk.com www.philfisk.com

FO R BA F TA

PH OTO G R A PH ER ’S A S SISTA N TS

Janette Dalley Photography Director

Rory Mulvey Barry Woods

E S S A Y

WI T H T H A N KS BA F TA PA RT N ERS Lancôme Official Beauty Atelier Swarovski Official Jewellery The Savoy London Official Hotel

ST YL I N G Naomie Harris Alex Babsky for Lancôme; Ben Talbott (hair); Atelier Swarovski Core Collection – Kalix Double Stud Earrings and Kalix Open Ring; Burberry Alison Owen Lancôme; Atelier Swarovski by Jason Wu – Lava Earrings Nina Gold Lancôme David Oyelowo Lancôme

Warner Bros, Leavesden and Los Angeles for generosity in locations www.cinelab.london and @cinelablondon for film stock for Chris King Laurie Wright and Megan MacFadgen for Andy Serkis and Weta Digital Terry Gilliam Dinghy, Marine Film Services Ltd Oliver Laker for assistance on the Keir Beck shoot Sally O’Sullivan The Book Wrecker for Spotlight artwork on Nina Gold Spotlight – www.spotlight.com for books for Sally O’Sullivan and Nina Gold The Ovaltine Café Vancouver Larry Hezzelwood from Panavision, LA

105

C R E D I T S

Amy Bliss Shoot Assistant


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M E M O R I A M

The following pages honour the esteemed contribution to the film industry by those individuals who have sadly died in the last 12 months. To learn more about their many achievements, visit bafta.org/heritage/inmemoryof

RO B ERT CH A RTO FF

CH A N TA L A K ER M A N

T H EO D O R E B I K EL

J ACK I E CO L L I N S OBE

Director, Writer, Actress 06 June 1950 — 05 October 2015

Actor, Singer 02 May 1924 — 21 July 2015

Writer, Actress 04 October 1937 — 19 September 2015

L A U R A A N TO N EL L I

M I CH A EL B I R K E T T

C AT H ER I N E CO U LS O N

Actress 28 November 1941 — 22 June 2015

Assistant Director, Producer 22 October 1929 — 03 April 2015

Actress, Camera Operator 22 October 1943 — 28 September 2015

V I CEN T E A R A N DA

M I CH A EL B L A K E

M A LCO L M CR A D D O CK

Director, Writer 09 November 1926 — 26 May 2015

Writer 05 July 1945 — 02 May 2015

Producer 02 August 1938 — 15 August 2015

G EO RG E BA R R IS

DAV I D B OW I E

Y VO N N E CR A I G

Car Designer 20 November 1925 — 05 November 2015

Singer, Songwriter, Actor 08 January 1947 — 11 January 2016

Actress 16 May 1937 — 17 August 2015

TO M B E A R D

BA R BA R A

J O H N DA R K

Actor 25 April 1965 — 20 July 2015

B R ECH T– S CH A L L

Producer 07 April 1927 — 29 June 2015

J A M ES B EST

M OV I TA C A STA N EDA

J E A N DA R L I N G

Actor 26 July 1926 — 06 April 2015

Actress, Singer 12 April 1916 — 12 February 2015

Actress 23 August 1922 — 04 September 2015

M E M O R I A M

Actress 28 October 1930 — 31 August 2015

Producer 26 August 1933 — 10 June 2015

I N

108

I N


I N

M E M O R I A M

A L B ERTO D E M A RT I N O

EL L EN A L B ERT I N I D OW

A L E X A N D ER FA R IS

Director, Writer 12 June 1929 — 02 June 2015

Actress 26 November 1913 — 04 May 2015

Composer 11 June 1921 — 28 September 2015

M A N O EL D E O L I V EI R A

B E TSY D R A K E

GA B R I EL E FER ZE T T I

Director, Writer, Editor 11 December 1908 — 02 April 2015

Actress 11 September 1923 — 27 October 2015

Actor 17 March 1925 — 02 December 2015

DA N I ÈL E D ELO R M E

R I CH A R D DYSA RT

SA L LY FO R R EST

Actor, Producer 09 October 1926 — 17 October 2015

Actor 30 March 1929 — 05 April 2015

Actress, Dancer 28 May 1928 — 15 March 2015

M A RU J I TA D I A Z

CL I FFO R D E A R L

STA N FR EB ERG

Actress, Singer 27 April 1932 — 23 June 2015

Actor 29 August 1933 — 30 July 2015

Actor 07 August 1926 — 07 April 2015

ED GA R D O C TO ROW

J EN N Y EDWA R DS

PH I L I P FR EN CH OBE

Novelist, Writer 06 January 1931 — 21 July 2015

Producer 30 May 1944 — 28 January 2015

Critic 28 August 1933 — 27 October 2015

DIANA DOUGL AS

PEG GY E VA N S

G EO RG E FROST

Actress 22 January 1923 — 03 July 2015

Actress 10 January 1921 — 26 July 2015

Make Up Artist 26 November 1922 — 01 July 2015

DONNA DOUGLAS

B I L L E V ER E T T

ALEX GIANNINI

Actress 26 September 1932 — 01 January 2015

Actor, Lecturer, Producer, Director 20 June 1925 — 12 February 2015

Actor 06 June 1958 — 02 October 2015

109

M E M O R I A M

I N


M E M O R I A M

G U N N A R H A N S EN

PEN ELO PE H O USTO N

Director, Writer, Producer 28 January 2015 — 10 March 2015

Actor 04 March 1947 — 07 November 2015

Critic 09 September 1927 — 26 October 2015

JOHNNY GOODM AN

S E TSU KO H A R A

A L A N H OWA R D CBE

Producer 15 December 1927 — 30 January 2015

Actress 17 June 1920 — 05 September 2015

Actor 05 August 1937 — 14 February 2015

CL A I R E G O R D O N

J U L I E H A R R IS

BA R R I E I N G H A M

Actress 16 January 1941 — 13 April 2015

Costume Designer 26 March 1921 — 30 May 2015

Actor 10 February 1932 — 23 January 2015

SEAN GR AHA M

M ERC Y H AYST E A D

FR A N CO I N T ER L EN G H I

Writer, Producer 26 June 1920 — 05 October 2015

Actress 02 February 1930 — 11 January 2015

Actor 29 October 1931 — 10 September 2015

G Ü N T ER G R A S S

GRAHA M HEADICAR

SA EED J A FFR E Y OBE

Writer 16 October 1927 — 13 April 2015

Sound Editor 31 May 1965 — 12 October 2015

Actor 08 January 1929 — 14 November 2015

CO L EEN G R AY

CH A R L ES H ER B ERT

R I CH A R D J O H N S O N

Actress 23 October 1922 — 03 August 2015

Actor 23 December 1948 — 31 October 2015

Actor, Producer, Writer 30 July 1927 — 05 June 2015

GAYL E G R I FFI T H S

J A M ES H O R N ER

J O H N J O R DA N

Producer 02 October 1966 — 23 October 2015

Composer 14 August 1953 — 22 June 2015

Sound Recordist 11 November 1940 — 03 May 2015

M E M O R I A M

R I CH A R D G L AT ZER

I N

110

I N


I N

M E M O R I A M

LO U IS J O U R DA N

RO B ERT LO G G I A

RO D M CKU EN

Actor 19 June 1921 — 14 February 2015

Actor 03 January 1930 — 04 December 2015

Songwriter, Composer 29 April 1933 — 29 January 2015

A N N A K A S H FI

TO M M I E M A N D ERS O N

K EI T H M I CH EL L

Actress 30 September 1934 — 16 August 2015

Make Up Artist 13 September 1912 — 28 January 2015

Actor 01 December 1926 — 20 November 2015

S I R CH R ISTO PH ER L EE

M A RY EL L EN M A R K

WA R R EN M I TCH EL L

Actor 27 May 1922 — 07 June 2015

Photographer 20 March 1940 — 25 May 2015

Actor 14 January 1926 — 14 November 2015

J OA N L ES L I E

M EL IS SA M AT H IS O N

RO N M O O DY

Actress 26 January 1925 — 12 October 2015

Writer 03 June 1950 — 04 November 2015

Actor 08 January 1924 — 11 June 2015

A N D R E W L ES N I E

A L B ERT M AYS L ES

D I CK I E M O O R E

Cinematographer 01 January 1956 — 27 April 2015

Documentary Filmmaker 26 November 1926 — 05 March 2015

Actor 12 September 1925 — 07 September 2015

G EO FFR E Y L E W IS

FR A N K M A Z ZO L A

A U B R E Y M O R R IS

Actor, Writer 31 July 1935 — 07 April 2015

Actor, Editor 07 March 1935 — 13 January 2015

Actor 01 June 1926 — 15 July 2015

ST EPH EN L E W IS

G ER A L D I N E M CE WA N

EN YO M O RT T Y

Actor, Writer 17 December 1926 — 12 August 2015

Actress 09 May 1932 — 30 January 2015

Unit Driver 11 October 1955 — 19 September 2015

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M E M O R I A M

I N


I N

L EO N A R D N I M OY

H A R RY PI TCH

B E T H RO GA N

Actor, Director, Producer 26 March 1931 — 27 February 2015

Musician 09 May 1925 — 15 July 2015

Actress 19 July 1931 — 25 November 2015

M I ROS L AV O N D

EK

J ACK RO L L I N S

Script Supervisor, Continuity 26 June 1927 — 18 January 2015

Producer, Talent Manager 23 March 1915 — 18 June 2015

S I LVA N A PA M PA N I N I

A L R EES

FR A N CES CO ROS I

Actress 25 September 1925 — 06 January 2016

Writer 18 May 1949 — 28 November 2014

Director 15 November 1922 — 10 January 2015

N ATA S H A PA R RY

RO G ER R EES

G EN E SA KS

Actress 02 December 1930 — 22 July 2015

Actor 05 May 1944 — 10 July 2015

Actor, Director 08 November 1921 — 28 March 2015

A N GA D PA U L

A L A N R I CK M A N

DAV I D SA M U ELS O N

Producer 06 June 1970 — 08 November 2015

Actor 21 February 1946 — 14 January 2016

Cameraman 06 July 1924 — 28 October 2015

TO M PE VS N ER

RO B ERT R I E T T I

SA M SA R P O N G

Assistant Director, Producer 02 October 1926 — 18 August 2014

Actor 08 February 1923 — 03 April 2015

Actor, Producer 19 December 1975 — 26 October 2915

N OVA PI L B E A M

A L E X RO CCO

L I Z A B E T H S COT T

Actress 15 November 1919 — 17 July 2015

Actor 29 February 1936 — 18 July 2015

Actress 29 September 1922 — 31 January 2015

M E M O R I A M

J U N E R A N DA L L

Cinematographer 04 November 1934 — 28 March 2015

I N

112

M E M O R I A M


I N

M E M O R I A M

OM AR SHARIF

ER I C TO M L I N S O N

G R ACE L EE W H I T N E Y

Actor 10 April 1932 — 10 July 2015

Music Engineer 08 January 1931 — 24 November 2015

Actress 01 April 1930 — 01 May 2015

ROS E TO B I A S S H AW

J O H N T R U D EL L

EL I Z A B E T H W I LS O N

Casting Director 07 September 1919 — 27 October 2015

Actor 15 February 1946 — 08 December 2015

Actress 04 April 1921 — 09 May 2015

S H EI L A S I M

TO N Y VO G EL

G EO RG E W I N S LOW

Actress 05 June 1922 — 19 January 2016

Actor 29 June 1942 — 27 July 2015

Actor 03 May 1946 — 13 June 2015

S ERG I O S O L L I M A

D ER EK WA R E

CL I V E W I N T ER

Writer, Director 17 April 1921 — 01 July 2015

Actor, Stunt Performer 27 February 1938 — 22 September 2015

Sound Mixer 03 January 1932 — 16 January 2016

R I CH A R D TAYLO R

J ER RY W EI N T R A U B

CH R ISTO PH ER WO O D

Filmmaker 10 August 1933 — 24 February 2015

Producer, Actor 26 September 1937 — 06 July 2015

Writer 05 November 1935 — 09 May 2015

N I G EL T ER RY

CO L I N W EL L A N D

H O L LY WO O D L AW N

Actor 15 August 1945 — 30 April 2015

Actor, Screenwriter 04 July 1934 — 02 November 2015

Actress 26 October 1946 — 06 December 2015

FR ED T H O M PS O N

H A S K EL L W E X L ER

V I L M OS ZS I G M O N D

Actor 19 August 1942 — 01 November 2015

Cinematographer, Director 06 February 1922 — 27 December 2015

Cinematographer 16 June 1930 — 01 January 2016

The Academy has made every effort to compile an accurate In Memoriam listing of film practitioners between 08 January 2015 and 15 January 2016.

113

M E M O R I A M

I N


T I T L E

114

PA G E


Congratulations to all nominees and winners at the EE British Academy Film Awards Pinewood are proud to have hosted the following nominees:

ANT-MAN

BROOKLYN

CINDERELLA

EX MACHINA

PINEWOOD ATLANTA STUDIOS

PINEWOOD POST PRODUCTION

PINEWOOD STUDIOS

PINEWOOD POST PRODUCTION

ROOM

SPOTLIGHT

STAR WARS: THE FORCE AWAKENS

STEVE JOBS

PINEWOOD TORONTO STUDIOS

PINEWOOD TORONTO STUDIOS

PINEWOOD STUDIOS

PINEWOOD POST PRODUCTION

PA G E

ARC3579_BAFTA film prog ad 2016 170x120.indd 1

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T I T L E

PINEWOOD STUDIOS GROUP Studios | TV | Water | Digital | Post | Production Services | Funding | Consultancy CANADA | DOMINICAN REPUBLIC | MALAYSIA | UK | USA T: 01753 651 700 | www.pinewoodgroup.com

26/01/2016 16:51


B

A

F

T

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O FFI CERS

O F

CO M M I T T EES

HRH The Duke of Cambridge, KG Academy President

EL ECT ED M E M B ERS O F T H E FI L M CO M M I T T EE

A C A D E M Y T H E

Anne Morrison Chair of the Academy Jane Lush Deputy Chair of the Academy Harvey Elliott Chair, Games Committee Dame Pippa Harris Chair, Film Committee Krishnendu Majumdar Chair, Television Committee Emma Morgan Deputy Chair, Television Committee Sara Putt Chair, Learning & New Talent Committee Marc Samuelson Deputy Chair, Film Committee

Medwyn Jones Chair, Commercial Committee Paul Morrell OBE Co-optee Samir Shah OBE Co-optee John Smith Chair, Finance & Audit Committee

Amanda Berry OBE Chief Executive Kevin Price Chief Operating Officer

Dame Pippa Harris - Chair Marc Samuelson - Deputy Chair Rosie Alison Noel Clarke Andrew Curtis Christopher Figg Pippa Markham Nik Powell Kenith Trodd Clare Wise

EL ECT ED M E M B ERS O F T H E T EL E VISI O N CO M M I T T EE Krishnendu Majumdar - Chair Emma Morgan - Deputy Chair Otto Bathurst Helen Bullough* Daniel Isaacs Laurence Marks Elizabeth McIntyre Sara Putt Brian Woods Hannah Wyatt

EL ECT ED M E M B ERS O F T H E GA M ES CO M M I T T EE Harvey Elliott - Chair* Georg Backer Nick Button-Brown Ray Maguire Jo Twist * Children’s Representatives

117

O F

A C A D E MY

O FFI CERS

BOA R D O F T RUST EES

O F F I C E RS

T H E


Helping you to shine Congratulations to the winners and nominees of the EE British Academy Film Awards in 2016. Deloitte have been the scrutineers of BAFTA’s awards for ten years, alongside supporting the wider media industry through research and insights as well as providing financial, taxation, accounting and consultancy advice to our clients. Whether or not today is your day in the spotlight, find out how we’re helping the industry to stand out by visiting www.deloitte.co.uk/tmt

© 2016 Deloitte LLP. All rights reserved.


PA RT N ERS

BAFTA’s partners have shown great loyalty in their year-round association with the BAFTA brand, and share our commitment and passion for the industries we represent. We warmly thank them for their commitment to the Academy and our mission to support, develop and promote excellence in the film, television and games industries.

O F PA RT N E RS

88 Rue Du Rhone Audi UK Badoit bottlegreen Champagne Taittinger Deloitte Denmaur Independent Papers evian Fortnum & Mason Grolsch Hotel Chocolat Republic of Photography Villa Maria A C A D E MY S U P P O RT ERS Alpha Grip Barco Brightcove Channel 4 CTV Outside Broadcast Dolby The Farm Portaprompt B A F TA C YM R U AB Acoustics Aberystwyth University Access Bookings AGFX Audi UK BBC Cymru Wales Bluestone National Park Resort Capital Law Cardiff Airport Cardiff and Vale College Cardiff Business Council Cardiff Council Commercial Radio Systems Champagne Taittinger Cuebox .Cymru.Wales Deloitte Denmaur Independent Papers DW ELP Ethos Elin Rees Public Relations Great Western Railway Gorilla Genero Glynd r University HMV Holiday Inn Express

T H E

Hotel Chocolat Just Perfect Catering Ken Picton M·A·C Cosmetics manorhaus Mint National Screen and Sound Archive of Wales Mr Producer Pinewood Studios Group Prince’s Gate Royal Welsh College of Music & Drama S4C Sony St David’s St David’s Hall St David’s Hotel & Spa Sunflower&I Trosol University of Wales Trinity St David Villa Maria Warner Edwards Wales Games Development Show Welsh Government Wow Event Hire B A F TA S COT L A N D Access Bookings Anta Arran Aromatics Audi UK Aveda BBC Scotland Blue Parrot Company bottlegreen Champagne Taittinger Channel 4 Cineworld Cocoa Mountain The Corinthian Club Creative Scotland Deloitte Denmaur Independent Papers Designs by M Edit 123 Eteaket evian The Galashan Trust Grosvenor Cinema M·A·C Cosmetics Material Menabrea MCL Create PRS for Music Radisson Blu Hotel, Glasgow Rekorderlig Rock Rose Gin Saint Lager STV Virgin Trains The Woven Thread Wire Media

A C A D E MY

American Airlines BBC America The Beazley Group Best Practices Laboratory British Film Commission Burberry Creative Artists Agency The Camera House Dana and Albert R Broccoli Charitable Foundation Deadline The Farm LA The Four Seasons Hotel Los Angeles at Beverly Hills FremantleMedia North America The GREAT Britain campaign The Hollywood Reporter ICM Partners Jaguar Land Rover Kodak Mandarin Oriental Hyde Park London Mark Pigott Mulberry Outpost Worldwide Pinewood Studios Group Screen International Technicolor United Talent Agency Violet Grey Wiston Estates Winery William Morris Endeavor The Wrap B A F TA N E W YO R K AMC BBC America Diageo The East India Company Elemis The GREAT Britain Campaign HBO The Hollywood Reporter L’Oreal The Republic of Tea The Savoy Schweppes The Standard Tribeca Shortlist Variety B A F TA A S I A Champagne Taittinger M·A·C Cosmetics The Peninsula Beijing and Hong Kong Swarovski

For further information about partnership opportunities, please contact:

B A F TA LOS A N G EL ES

Louise Robertson +44 (0)20 7292 5844 louiser@bafta.org

Adrian Flambard AKA Hotel Residences AMD

Natalie Moss +44 (0)20 7292 5846 nataliem@bafta.org

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T H E

A C A D E M Y

A C A D E MY PA RT N ERS

O F


Exterion Media, proud to be a supporter of the EE British Academy Film Awards in 2016 noel.nallen@exterionmedia.co.uk T: 020 7428 5544 @ExterionMediaUK

www.exterionmedia.co.uk


FI L M

AWA R D

PA RT N ERS

F I L M

88 R U E D U R H O N E

E X T ER I O N M ED I A

Official Watch

Official Outdoor Media

A M ER I C A N A I R L I N ES

F O RT N U M & M A S O N

Official Airline

Official Tea

AT EL I ER SWA R OVS K I

G LO B E -T ROT T ER

Official Jewellery

Official Gift Bag

AUDI UK

G RO L S C H

Official Car

Official Beer

BADOIT

HACKET T

Official Bottled Water

Official Menswear Stylist

B OT T L E G R EEN

H OT EL C H O CO L AT

Official Cordial

Official Chocolate

C H A M PA G N E TA I T T I N G ER

L A N CÔ M E

Official Champagne

Official Beauty and Nominees’ Party Co-Host

C H A R L ES WO RT H I N GTO N

R EP U B L I C O F

Official Hair Stylist

P H OTO G R A P H Y

121

A W A R D

PA RT N E RS

With enduring thanks to all the Official Partners to the EE British Academy Film Awards in 2016.

Official Photobooth D EN M A U R

TC M

I N D EP EN D EN T PA P ERS

Official Placemats

Official Paper D I G I TA L C I N E M A M ED I A

T H E S AVOY

Official Cinema Media

Official Hotel

EVIAN

VILL A M ARIA

Official Bottled Water

Official Wine


T I T L E

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PA G E


A W A R D S F I L M

AWA R DS

G I F T

PROV I D ERS

A huge thanks to the following brands which have generously provided gifts for this year’s nominees and citation readers.

F O RT N U M & M A S O N

88 R U E D U R H O N E

G LO B E -T ROT T ER

An exclusive discount voucher across a stunning range of timepieces. www.88rdr.com

The iconic cabin size Trolley Case with BAFTA name plaque. www.globe-trotter.com

AT EL I ER SWA R OVS K I

G RO L S C H

Engraved crystal paperweight. www.atelierswarovski.com

Sleek, black notepad with embossed Grolsch branding. www.grolsch.com

B OT T L E G R EEN

HACKET T

A range of bottlegreen’s famous cordials. www.bottlegreendrinks.com

A classic cotton white pocket square, a timeless addition to a tailored suit. www.hacket.com

C H A M PA G N E TA I T T I N G ER

H OT EL C H O CO L AT

A bottle of Champagne Taittinger Brut Réserve NV in a gift box. www.taittinger.com

Twenty-seven iconic milk, dark and white chocolates. www.hotelchocolat.co.uk

C H A R L ES WO RT H I N GTO N

L A N CÔ M E

Volume & Bounce BAFTA Limited Edition duo. www.charlesworthington.com

Lancôme’s Hypnôse mascara and iconic La Vie Est Belle fragrance. www.lancome.co.uk

CO CO ROS E LO N D O N

NOBLE ISLE

Exclusively designed foldable ballet pumps. www.cocoroselondon.com

An exquisite bath and body gift set, made with natural British extracts. www.nobleisle.com

C ROS S

T H E S AVOY

A sophisticated instrument for effortless writing. www.cross.com

The Savoy’s own-recipe English Breakfast Marmalade. www.fairmount.com/savoy-london

EVIAN

VILL A M ARIA

A refreshing, moisturising brumisateur facial spray. www.evian.com

A tour, wine tasting and lunch at the Villa Maria winery, Auckland. www.villamaria.co.nz

A specifically selected, bespoke blend of finest quality loose leaf tea. www.fortnumandmason.com

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G I F T

P R O V I D E RS

FI L M


> freuds

is proud to be entering its nineteenth year as the retained agency for the EE British Academy Film Awards. —

T I T L E

Kate Lee Director +44 (0) 20 3003 6349 kate@freuds.com

PA G E

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For further information contact:


A CK N OW L ED G E M EN TS

EE Our title sponsor

Film companies and distributors for their invaluable assistance

Dame Pippa Harris (Chair), Marc Samuelson (Deputy Chair) and members of the Film Committee

Stephen Fry Our Host

Film voting juries and members

Angela Scanlon Host, BBC Three Red Carpet show

All staff at the Academy

Zoë Ball Host, BAFTA Online Content

AD Events International Limited Design of the Awards dinner and after party

freuds

125

A C K N O W L E D G E M E N T S

T H E AC A D E MY WISH ES TO T H A N K…

Odeon Regional tour partner

BBC Royal Opera House Covent Garden London Grosvenor House a JW Marriott Hotel Helen Preece Red Carpet Consultant

West Design Royal Opera House Red Carpet and Press Area production Whizz Kid Television

Film Awards trailer created by Über Agency for BAFTA Supported by Digital Cinema Media, Dolby, Pearl And Dean, The Farm Group and Pinewood Studios Group


T I T L E

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PA G E


EN D

CR ED I TS

E N D

Director of Production Clare Brown

Director of Awards Emma Baehr

Awards Event Producer Rachel Nichols

Head of Film Jim Bradshaw

Senior Production Coordinator Sophie Klein

Senior Awards Officer Bradley Down

Awards and Voting Team Kelly Smith, Siobhan Pridgeon, David Lortal, Kerry Rizzo, Sam Rhodes, Imogen Faris, Maeve Hickey, Georgina Norton, Kemuel Solomon, Serena Deakin, Ben Jefferson

BAFTA Productions Cassandra Hybel, Ryan Doherty, Daniel Dalton, Georgina Cunningham, Jamie Ryan, Clare Rankin

Partnerships Louise Robertson, Natalie Moss, Amy Elton, Roisin Devine

Communications Team Nick Williams, Oli Goldman, Joe Lawrence, Jess Lenten, Emma Raczkowski, Abigail Fiedler

Ticketing Gabby Taranowski

Accounts Graham Bowen

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C R E D I T S

AT B A F TA


B RO CH U R E

AT B A F TA Editor Toby Weidmann Advertising Amy Elton

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Photography Director Janette Dalley

Production Manager Hannah El-Boghdady Cover Illustrations Levente Szab贸 www.briskgraphics.com

PRINTING Team Impression Tel: +44 (0)113 272 4800 hello@team-impression.com www.teamimpression.com

The Academy chooses Denmaur Independent Papers, supporting excellence in print. Printed on Amadeus Offset 150g / m2 and 300g / m2 and Amadeus Primo Gloss 170g/ m2. Supplied by Denmaur Independent Papers. www.denmaur.com

Photography Essay Phil Fisk www.philfisk.com Twitter: @phil_fisk

Published by British Academy of Film and Television Arts 195 Piccadilly London W1J 9LN Tel: +44 (0)20 7734 0022

DESIGN & A RT DIRECTION

reception@bafta.org www.bafta.org

Human After All +44 (0)207 490 6767 www.humanafterall.co.uk

Although every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this publication, the Publishers cannot accept

Art Director Paul Willoughby

liability for errors or omissions. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written permission of BAFTA.

Designer James Round Producer Lucia McGuinness Rhiannon Jones

漏 BAFTA Publishing 2016 All nominees imagery used with kind permission from the distributors/filmmakers. Rising Stars images courtesy of EE.

C R E D I T S

Picture Editor Christine Robertson

B R O C H U R E

Contributors Robbie Collin Charles Gant Karen Krizanovich Rich Matthews Neil Smith Chris Tilly Terri White

CR ED I TS


Our congratulations to all nominees. From your friends at iTunes.

Celebrate this year’s nominees and winners at itunes.com/bafta


CAPTURING GREAT PERFORMANCES

T I T L E

EE, proud sponsors of the British Academy Film Awards since 1998.

PA G E

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EE British Academy Film Awards in 2016 programme – The Revenant  

The official programme given to attendees of the EE British Academy Film Awards on 14 February 2016. Five variant covers were created by art...

EE British Academy Film Awards in 2016 programme – The Revenant  

The official programme given to attendees of the EE British Academy Film Awards on 14 February 2016. Five variant covers were created by art...

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