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the state of arizona’s hispanic market

2013

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is our common thread. diverse cultures and people have made arizona the great state it is today and they will continue to shape our future. that’s why Blue cross Blue shield of arizona is proud to support the arizona hispanic chamber of commerce and this year’s datos study. Your influence is

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WELCOME

WELCOME TO

DATOS TUCSON 2013

Virtually no corner of our global economy was left unscathed by the crushing impact of the Great Recession. In Arizona, the effects were made worse by the rancorous debate over immigration. Times have changed. Today, the world’s economy is rebounding. Arizona’s major industries are reclaiming pre-recession strength. Federal immigration reform legislation seems to be within reach. Helping to lead the way have been the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and the Tucson Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, our growing corporate and government partners, and the indisputable evidence that Latinos are vital to the state’s future economic prosperity. It’s hard to argue with facts. Arizona Latinos are now one-third of the state’s population, and by 2035 we will be the state’s majority. Arizona is now home to more than 67,000 Latino-owned businesses. One-third of those companies are owned by Latinas and one-third are owned by immigrants—the vast majority from Mexico, punctuating the intrinsic value of our cross-border relationship. Corporate Arizona, meanwhile, understands more than ever the value of supporting Latino- and immigrant-friendly community outreach and marketing campaigns. It’s no wonder. Consider that Tucson’s total average purchasing power exceeds $4.4 billion, contributing to statewide Latino consumer spending of an estimated $43.3 billion this year. Nationally, Hispanic buying power has reached $1.3 trillion, a figure greater than the economies of all but 13 countries in the world. Add to these trends the growing economic clout of the state’s 100,000 minority-owned firms, prompting more than a dozen major corporations to join the Arizona Hispanic Chamber’s “Million Dollar Circle of Excellence,” which recognizes companies that do $1 million or more in business annually with minority-owned and/or women-owned companies in the state. Challenges remain, but Arizona is reestablishing its reputation as an “opportunity oasis” for newcomers from across the country and around the world. Among the challenges: education and income gaps between Latinos and non-Latinos that, if unaddressed, could hobble Arizona’s long-term progress. Among the opportunities: Latinos are reinforcing Arizona’s entrepreneurial base, graduating from college in record numbers, climbing the state’s political leadership ranks, and helping rebuild ties with Mexico. The Tucson Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, for instance, is championing this rebuilding effort as “One Region, One Economy, One Border…Unlimited Opportunities” No one knows what the future holds, but Arizona’s economic outlook is bright because the business community at large has come to understand a diverse customer base means a strong customer base, while proving that a firm stance against intolerance coupled with a fact-based argument for inclusive economic and social policies can lead to greater alliances between all Arizonans.

Gonzalo A.

de la

Melena, Jr. Lea Márquez-Peterson

President & CEO Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce

President & CEO Tucson Hispanic Chamber of Commerce

1


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

2013

DATOS TUCSON 2013 CONTENT COMMITTEE

ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY DATOS CONTENT TEAM

(Listed in alphabetical order)

Andrea Whitsett

Larissa Acosta

Barbara Barelka

Laura Fullington

Carlos Cordoba

Lea Marquez-Peterson

Carmen G. Martínez

Marcela Houser

ASU MORRISON INSTITUTE BLUE CROSS BLUE SHIELD OF ARIZONA GEOSCAPE

AZHCC

TUCSON HISPANIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Michele Valdovinos

SRP

RESEARCHBYDESIGN

Cory Whittaker

Monica S. Villalobos

VALLEY METRO

AZHCC

Glenn Iwata

WESTGROUP RESEARCH AZHCC

MACERICH

DE RITO PARTNERS, INC.

Clare Felix

Gonzalo A.

APOLLO GROUP

de la

Melena, Jr.

Hector Peñuñuri SRP

James E. Garcia AZHCC

Jaime Boyd UNIVISION

Kevin Norgaard UNIVISION RADIO

TERMINOLOGY AND RESEARCH

Paige Chadwick

AAA OF ARIZONA

Sunnev Chang REPUBLIC MEDIA

Director

ANDREA WHITSETT Morrison Institute for Public Policy at ASU

STUDENT RESEARCHERS

Adriana Grado Finance Major

Anna Valenzuela Graduated, Spring 2013

Axel Martinez

Business Communications Major

Dedire Zuniga

Business Communications Major

Gilberto Lopez CIS Major

Kristell Millan Luis Rodriguez

AZHCC

Graduated, Spring 2013

Zac Emmons

PHOENIX INTERNATIONAL RACEWAY

Zaheer Benjamin

Marco Flores

Graduated, Spring 2013

Yuraidy Najera

Business Communications Major

PRODUCTION TEAM

In DATOS Tucson 2013, the terms Hispanic and Latino are used synonymously, as are Native American and American Indian and African-American and Black. White, non-Hispanic is sometimes referred to as non-Hispanic white. Hispanics may be of any race. The information presented here was selected from standard secondary sources. However, data changes quickly and is not always collected annually. Data often offers a static picture of an ever-changing situation. The numbers calculated for any statistic depend on the definitions and assumptions used to produce them.

2

DR. LOUI OLIVAS

Graduated, Spring 2013

Terri Morgan

PHOENIX SUNS

PROFESSIONAL RESEARCHERS

Carmen G. Martínez, Graphic Design Director James E. Garcia,

Co-Editor

Miguel Angel Lopez Gonzalez, Intern Monica S. Villalobos, Co-Editor Terri Morgan, Assistant Editor


TABLE OF CONTENTS

TABLE OF

Contents PURCHASING POWER

5

HEALTH CARE

24

MEDIA

33

DEMOGRAPHICS

39

EDUCATION

63

HISPANIC BUSINESS

73

TRADE WITH MEXICO

77

SEGMENTATION

85

RESOURCES

96

Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, 255 E. Osborn Rd., 2nd Floor, Phoenix, AZ 85012 (602) 279-1800, www.azhcc.com

This is a comprehensive compilation of secondary research made available to the AZHCC from various sources. It is used with permission from those sources.

3


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PURCHASING POWER

Purchasing Power In its report, The State of the Hispanic Consumer, Nielsen concluded “Latinos are no longer just a sub-segment of the economy, but a prominent player in all aspects of American life.” To that, we simply say, “¡Si! ¿Por supuesto?” Translation, “Yes, of course!” In the next decade, Latinos will add another 1 million in all aspects of Arizona life. Today, Arizona Latinos are more than one-third of the population and growing fast. In the past 20 years, the Latino population nearly doubled to more than 2 million people. In the next decade, Latinos will be another 1 million people to the population. By 2030, or soon thereafter, Latinos will be a majority of the state’s population. Bigger numbers mean more buying power. The purchasing power of Latinos will top $43.3 billion in 2013 and it is slated to reach $50 billion by 2015—a figure greater than the total gross domestic product of Costa Rica. Total Hispanic purchasing power in the United States will reach $1.5 trillion by 2015, equivalent to the 12th largest economy in the world. The greater promise of Latino purchasing power may be its potential for growth. Demographers estimate that the U.S. Latino population will increase at a rate four times faster than the general population between now and 2050. Today, Latinos are more than 16% of the total U.S. population, but 23% of the nation’s population under 18. That trend will likely continue, given that Hispanic households have twice as many children as non-Hispanic households. Now the nation’s largest ethnic community, U.S. Latinos have become an economic powerhouse within the framework of an increasingly multicultural society. Latinos will account for more than 40 percent of the $3.6 trillion in combined buying power of Latinos, African-Americans, Asian-Americans and Native Americans by 2015. The irony, according to one expert, is that even as U.S.-based corporations seek to cultivate new customers in the world’s major emerging markets, such as China, Russia, India and Brazil, “the per capita income of U.S. Hispanics is higher than [in] any one of those nations.” That income is growing. “Despite the recession, U.S. Latino households that earn $50,000 or more are growing at a faster rate than non-Latino U.S. households,” according to Nielsen. Contrary to popular misconceptions, most of the rapid population growth among U.S. Latinos is due not to immigration but native births, a reflection of the relative youth of the population. Census figures show the median age of U.S. Latinos is 28, nearly 10 years younger than the general market median age of 37. (Most families, incidentally, decide to buy homes in their mid-20s and early 30s, making Latinos a potentially lucrative market for the rebounding housing industry to consider.) Perhaps a byproduct of its bullish population growth, Latinos are apparently bullish on the future of our economy, too. About 60% of Hispanics versus 37% of non-Hispanics “strongly believe” their personal wealth will grow in the next four years. Nationwide, Hispanics are 41% more likely than non-Hispanics to buy a home in the next six months. More than 1 in 4 U.S. Hispanics plans to buy an automobile and 29% plan to buy furniture in that same period. In Arizona, Hispanics are now more than a third of the state’s population and we account for 18 percent of total purchasing power statewide.

5


PURCHASING POWER

PURCHASING POWER

6

• U.S. PURCHASING POWER


PURCHASING POWER

PURCHASING POWER

• U.S. PURCHASING POWER

+50%

2000 to 2011 Hispanic vs. Total

Market Income Growth 2000 TO 2011 PERCENT INCOME GROWTH

2011 INCOME

HISPANIC

TOTAL

HISPANIC

TOTAL

HISPANIC

HOUSEHOLD INCOME

<25K

24%

29%

-17%

-19%

25-34.9K

11%

14%

-13%

-10$

35-49.9K

15%

17%

-6%

0%

50-74.9K

19%

19%

0%

10%

75-99.9K

12%

10%

16%

31%

100K+

18%

11%

49%

71%

Source: U.S. Census, 2012

7


PURCHASING POWER

PURCHASING POWER

• U.S. PURCHASING POWER

Categories in Which Hispanics

Outspend General Population

8


PURCHASING POWER

PURCHASING POWER

• ARIZONA PURCHASING POWER

9


PURCHASING POWER

PURCHASING POWER

â&#x20AC;˘ U.S. INCOME & EXPENDITURES

While Hispanic Income Before Taxes is Lower than the Non-Hispanic, Their Average Annual Expenditure Continues to be a Higher Share of their Income, 84.2% to 77.4% respectively

2011 CONSUMER EXPENDITURE SURVEY

HISPANIC

NON-HISPANIC

Income Before Taxes

$49,966

$65,635

Average Annual Expenditure

$42,086

$50,782

84.2%

77.4%

Expenditure as a Percent of Income

Source: U.S. Department of Labor, Consumer Expenditure Survey 2011

10


PURCHASING POWER

PURCHASING POWER

• U.S. RETAIL/SHOPPING PREFERENCES

(%)

(%)

11


PURCHASING POWER

PURCHASING POWER

12

• U.S. RETAIL/SHOPPING PREFERENCES


PURCHASING POWER

PURCHASING POWER

â&#x20AC;˘ U.S. RETAIL/SHOPPING PREFERENCES

Shopping Trips Per Household (Per Year)

Hispanic-Spanish preferred

Hispanic-Spanish preferred

Hispanic-English preferred

Hispanic-English preferred

White Non-Hispanic

White Non-Hispanic

13


PURCHASING POWER

PURCHASING POWER

â&#x20AC;˘ U.S. PURCHASING POWER

% of Hispanic Population AZ GEONAME

% OF HISPANIC POPULATION (2013)

Flagstaff

14.6

Lake Havasu City-Kingman

16.2

Nogales

83.4

Payson

18.6

Phoenix-Mesa-Glendale

30.7

Prescott

15.0

Safford

35.2

Show Low

11.7

Sierra Vista-Douglas

33.0

Tucson

36.2

Yuma

62.0

Source: Geoscape State and Metro Consumer Spending

Percent of DMA Population and Growth since 2000 2011 U.S. Hispanic

DMA region - Designated Market Area: A term used by Nielsen to identify an area of counties in which the home market television stations hold a dominance of total hours viewed. Source: Nielsen Pop-Facts, 2011

14


PURCHASING POWER

PURCHASING POWER

• ARIZONA INCOME & EXPENDITURES

Aggregate Household Income INCOME: HISPANIC HOUSEHOLDS 2013 (MILLIONS)

INCOME: TOTAL HOUSEHOLDS 2013 (MILLIONS)

% OF AGGREGATE HISPANIC INCOME

Flagstaff

283

2,849

10%

Lake Havasu City-Kingman

427

4,234

10%

Nogales

504

786

64%

GEONAME

Payson

123

1,063

12%

17,974

107,181

17%

Prescott

421

5,109

8%

Safford

223

752

30%

Show Low

166

1,815

9%

Phoenix-Mesa-Glendale

Sierra Vista-Douglas

583

3,007

19%

Tucson

5,160

23,573

22%

Yuma

1,425

3,394

42%

Source: Geoscape State and Metro Consumer Spending 2013

Aggregate Annual Household Expenditures ANNUAL EXPENDITURES: HISPANIC HOUSEHOLDS 2013 (MILLIONS)

ANNUAL EXPENDITURES: TOTAL HOUSEHOLDS 2013 (MILLIONS)

% OF HISPANIC ANNUAL EXPENDITURES

Flagstaff

216

2,205

10%

Lake Havasu City-Kingman

344

3,448

10%

Nogales

436

632

69%

GEONAME

Payson

110

884

12%

15,919

90,778

18%

Prescott

337

4,049

8%

Safford

179

632

28%

Show Low

129

1,497

9%

Phoenix-Mesa-Glendale

Sierra Vista-Douglas

486

2,336

21%

Tucson

4,393

19,310

23%

Yuma

1,198

2,712

44%

Source: Geoscape State and Metro Consumer Spending 2013

15


PURCHASING POWER

PURCHASING POWER

• ARIZONA INCOME & EXPENDITURES

Aggregate Food Subtotal FOOD SUBTOTAL: HISPANIC 2013 (MILLIONS)

FOOD SUBTOTAL: TOTAL 2013 (MILLIONS)

% HISPANIC FOOD SUBTOTAL

Flagstaff

32

303

11%

Lake Havasu City-Kingman

53

486

11%

Nogales

71

96

73%

GEONAME

Payson

17

126

14%

2,397

11,814

20%

Prescott

51

549

9%

Safford

28

93

30%

Show Low

20

225

9%

Phoenix-Mesa-Glendale

Sierra Vista-Douglas

77

322

24%

Tucson

682

2,614

26%

Yuma

202

412

49%

Source: Geoscape State and Metro Consumer Spending 2013

Aggregate Housing Subtotal GEONAME Flagstaff

HOUSING SUBTOTAL: TOTAL 2013 (MILLIONS)

% OF HISPANIC HOUSING SUBTOTAL

75

723

10%

Lake Havasu City-Kingman

116

1,097

11%

Nogales

153

215

71%

38

281

14%

6,340

34,371

18%

Prescott

114

1,288

9%

Safford

61

208

29%

Show Low

44

478

9%

168

757

22%

1,613

6,752

24%

415

895

46%

Payson Phoenix-Mesa-Glendale

Sierra Vista-Douglas Tucson Yuma Source: Geoscape State and Metro Consumer Spending 2013

16

HOUSING SUBTOTAL: HISPANIC 2013 (MILLIONS)


PURCHASING POWER

PURCHASING POWER

• ARIZONA INCOME & EXPENDITURES

Aggregate Apparel and Services Subtotal GEONAME

Flagstaff

APPAREL AND SERVICES SUBTOTAL: HISPANIC 2013 (MILLIONS)

APPAREL AND SERVICES SUBTOTAL: TOTAL 2013 (MILLIONS)

% OF HISPANIC APPAREL AND SERVICES SUBTOTAL

9

73

12%

Lake Havasu City-Kingman

13

102

13%

Nogales

18

23

76%

Payson

4

26

16%

678

3,098

22%

Prescott

13

122

11%

Safford

7

21

34%

Show Low

5

47

11% 26%

Phoenix-Mesa-Glendale

Sierra Vista-Douglas Tucson Yuma

20

75

181

643

28%

50

95

53%

Source: Geoscape State and Metro Consumer Spending 2013

Aggregate Transportation Subtotal GEONAME

TRANSPORTATION SUBTOTAL: HISPANIC 2013 (MILLIONS)

TRANSPORTATION SUBTOTAL: TOTAL 2013 (MILLIONS)

% OF HISPANIC TRANSPORTATION SUBTOTAL

Flagstaff

40

378

11%

Lake Havasu City-Kingman

64

593

11%

Nogales

80

114

70%

Payson

20

150

13%

2,733

14,613

19%

Prescott

62

683

9%

Safford

34

114

30%

Show Low

24

256

9%

Phoenix-Mesa-Glendale

Sierra Vista-Douglas

88

403

22%

Tucson

784

3,212

24%

Yuma

223

479

47%

Source: Geoscape State and Metro Consumer Spending 2013

17


PURCHASING POWER

PURCHASING POWER

• ARIZONA INCOME & EXPEDITURES

Aggregate Health Care Subtotal HEALTH CARE SUBTOTAL: HISPANIC 2013 (MILLIONS)

HEALTH CARE SUBTOTAL: TOTAL 2013 (MILLIONS)

% OF HISPANIC HEALTH CARE SUBTOTAL

Flagstaff

10

149

7%

Lake Havasu City-Kingman

21

311

7%

Nogales

25

42

59%

GEONAME

Payson

7

82

8%

599

5,228

11%

Prescott

19

360

5%

Safford

10

45

22%

7

119

6%

Phoenix-Mesa-Glendale

Show Low Sierra Vista-Douglas Tucson Yuma

27

180

15%

202

1,290

16%

60

194

31%

Source: Geoscape State and Metro Consumer Spending 2013

Aggregate Entertainment Subtotal ENTERTAINMENT SUBTOTAL: HISPANIC 2013 (MILLIONS)

ENTERTAINMENT SUBTOTAL: TOTAL 2013 (MILLIONS)

% OF HISPANIC ENTERTAINMENT SUBTOTAL

Flagstaff

10

123

8%

Lake Havasu City-Kingman

15

190

8%

Nogales

19

30

64%

GEONAME

Payson

5

49

10%

617

4,387

14%

Prescott

15

226

7%

Safford

8

35

24%

Show Low

6

84

7%

22

128

17%

190

1,011

19%

52

137

38%

Phoenix-Mesa-Glendale

Sierra Vista-Douglas Tucson Yuma Source: Geoscape State and Metro Consumer Spending 2013

18


PURCHASING POWER

PURCHASING POWER

• BANKING AND ARIZONA HISPANICS

© Henry Schmitt| Fotolia.com

Expect their family’s financial situation to improve during the next 4 years

(Household Uses Any Bank/Credit Union) Hispanic Scarborough, 2013 Release 1 (Feb 2012 - Jan 2013), Adults 18+, Phoenix DMA Scarborough, 2013, Release 1, (Feb 2012 - Jan 2013), Adults 18+, Tucson DMA

19


PURCHASING POWER

PURCHASING POWER

• BANKING AND ARIZONA HISPANICS

Phoenix Hispanics are Using

Major Banks

Ranked on Hispanic Customers

BANK HOUSEHOLD USES

RANK

HISPANIC

NON-HISPANIC

HISPANIC INDEX (VS. TOTAL)

#1

Wells Fargo

36%

31%

112

#2

Chase

32%

37%

89

#3

Bank of America

26%

31%

88

#4

Any Credit Union

22%

40%

61

#5

None

13%

3%

237

#7

Other Credit Union

8%

17%

57

#8

Arizona Federal Credit Union

7%

6%

112

#9

Other Bank

6%

12%

52

#9

Desert Schools Federal Credit Union

6%

13%

51

#11

Other Financial Institution

5%

8%

70

#12

BBVA Compass

4%

4%

106

#12

Internet Bank (Such As Etradebank, Etc.)

4%

3%

127

Market Index: An index demonstrates what is above average (101 or greater), average (100), and below average (99 or less) of a given demographic. Hispanic Scarborough, 2013 Release 1 (Feb 2012 - Jan 2013), Phoenix DMA, Adults 18+

Tucson Hispanics are Using

Major Banks

Ranked on Hispanic Customers

BANK HOUSEHOLD USES

RANK

HISPANIC

NON-HISPANIC

HISPANIC INDEX (VS. TOTAL)

#1

Wells Fargo

39%

32%

114

#2

Chase

30%

31%

97

#3

Bank of America

27%

28%

99

#4

Other Credit Union

11%

15%

78

#5

Hughes Federal Credit Union

9%

8%

105

#6

Other Bank

6%

11%

65

#6

Pima Federal Credit Union

6%

6%

98

#6

Tucson Federal Credit Union

6%

6%

99

#9

Vantage West Credit Union

5%

13%

53

#10

BBVA Compass

4%

6%

67

#11

Bank of the West

2%

1%

122

#11

Other Financial Institution

2%

5%

46

Market Index: An index demonstrates what is above average (101 or greater), average (100) and below average (99 or less) of a given demographic. Scarborough,2012, Release 2, (Aug 2011 - Jul 2012), Tucson DMA, Adults 18+

20


PURCHASING POWER

PURCHASING POWER

• BANKING AND ARIZONA HISPANICS

An Opportunity to Grow Phoenix Hispanics into More

Financial Products Ranked on Hispanic Customers

RANK

FINANCIAL PRODUCTS

HISPANIC

NON-HISPANIC

HISPANIC INDEX (VS. TOTAL)

#1

Debit Card

68%

76%

92

#2

Checking Account

58%

86%

73

#3

Savings Account

56%

72%

82

#4

ATM Card

36%

49%

79

#5

Online Banking

24%

43%

63

#6

Home Mortgage

20%

34%

65

#7

Online Bill Paying

19%

42%

53

#8

Auto Loan

13%

24%

60

#9

401(k) Plan

12%

24%

56

#10

Money Market Account

7%

17%

46

#10

IRA (Individual Retirement Account)

7%

20%

39

#12

Refinance Home Mortgage

4%

4%

113

Market Index: An index demonstrates what is above average (101 or greater), average (100) and below average (99 or less) of a given demographic. Hispanic Scarborough, 2013 Release 1 (Feb 2012 - Jan 2013), Phoenix DMA, Adults 18+

An Opportunity to Grow Tucson Hispanics into More

Financial Products Ranked on Hispanic Customers

RANK

FINANCIAL PRODUCTS

HISPANIC

NON-HISPANIC

HISPANIC INDEX (VS. TOTAL)

#1

Checking Account

68%

87%

84

#2

Debit Card

64%

68%

95

#3

Savings Account

60%

73%

87

#4

ATM Card

37%

49%

82

#5

Online Banking

25%

37%

77

#6

Online Bill Paying

23%

33%

76

#6

Home Mortgage

23%

30%

81

#8

Auto Loan

19%

24%

85

#9

401(k) Plan

9%

16%

62

#10

Personal Loan

8%

3%

173

#11

Money Market Account

6%

15%

49

#11

IRA (Individual Retirement Account)

6%

19%

39

Market Index: An index demonstrates what is above average (101 or greater), average (100) and below average (99 or less) of a given demographic. Scarborough,2012, Release 2, (Aug 2011 - Jul 2012), Tucson DMA, Adults 18+

21


Chambe

r of the Year by th USHCC e

awarded

OVER 1000 MEMBERS OFFICES IN TUCSON AND HERMOSILLO


PURCHASING POWER

PURCHASING POWER

© Maxim_Kazmin | Fotolia.com

RANK

TYPES OF CREDIT CARDS USED IN PAST 3 MONTHS

HISPANIC

NON-HISPANIC

HISPANIC INDEX (VS. TOTAL)

Any Credit Card

64%

80%

84

#1

Visa

61%

66%

94

#2

MasterCard

12%

34%

42

#3

Major Department Store Credit Card

9%

17%

57

#4

American Express

7%

18%

46

#5

Discover

4%

12%

43

#6

Other Major Credit Card

3%

3%

103

#6

Gasoline Credit Card

3%

5%

66

Market Index: An index demonstrates what is above average (101 or greater), average (100) and below average (99 or less) of a given demographic.

RANK

© Maxim_Kazmin | Fotolia.com

• BANKING AND ARIZONA HISPANICS

TYPES OF CREDIT CARDS USED IN PAST 3 MONTHS

HISPANIC

NON-HISPANIC

HISPANIC INDEX (VS. TOTAL) 87

Any Credit Card

66%

81%

#1

Visa

59%

69%

90

#2

MasterCard

22%

32%

75

#3

Major Department Store Credit Card

13%

14%

94

#4

American Express

8%

13%

69

#5

Discover

7%

20%

45

#6

Other Major Credit Card

3%

3%

97

#6

Gasoline Credit Card

2%

5%

55

Market Index: An index demonstrates what is above average (101 or greater), average (100) and below average (99 or less) of a given demographic.

23


HEALTH CARE

CASE STUDY

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona DATOS INSIGHT HELPS ARIZONANS FIND HEALTH INSURANCE COVERAGE In 2013, Arizona Hispanics accounted for $43.3 billion in consumer spending statewide. The growing influence of this important and diverse community cannot be understated. That’s why Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona, Inc.1 (BCBSAZ) relies on the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce (AZHCC) and the resources they provide, such as DATOS. The DATOS report is a major influence as we continually seek to increase the value of our products and services to the Hispanic market. Most recently, we’ve applied DATOS insight to a variety of educational outreach, marketing and community efforts related to the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

Increased opportunities for health coverage

Accounting for 1 in 4 eligible individuals nationally, the Hispanic population has historically been an underserved population when it comes to health insurance. Through the ACA more individuals will have access to plans with options to help pay for their coverage. Consider that 27 percent of Hispanics in Arizona are currently uninsured with 37 percent who are likely eligible for a subsidy/tax credit. Many consumers, especially those new to purchasing health insurance, will need help and support to understand what the law means to them. BCBSAZ is prepared to help. DATOS has helped us refine the information, resources and services BCBSAZ offers – such as: • • •

Spanish version of azblue.com. Spanish-member support line – Mi Consejero Azul. Community partnerships – not only have we supported and advocated for many of AZHCC’s Latino-owned businesses initiatives, we have developed outreach programs with Chicanos Por La Causa (CPLA), Telemundo and Univision to jointly educate the community on the impact of the ACA and the upcoming open enrollment beginning on Oct. 1, 2013.

Further, because consumers within the Hispanic community turn more often to insurers, pharmaceutical companies and hospitals than non-Hispanics for trusted health information2, we developed a comprehensive education program aimed to assist Spanish-language /bilingual households to help answer some basic questions: • • •

Health Care is changing. How will it impact you? Tax credits are available to pay for insurance immediately. Are you eligible? Open enrollment is Oct. 1 – March 31, 2014. Where can you buy insurance?

Through our partnership at AZHCC and its resources such as DATOS, we are better able to collaborate with governments, business and individuals to address this complex public issue, which cannot be solved by a single organization.

A heritage of service to the community

This year’s DATOS report shows once again the continued growing economic influence of Hispanics throughout Arizona and across the nation. It remains an invaluable resource helping us keep pace with consumers’ evolving needs and wants. BCBSAZ relies on the DATOS report to help us build strong and meaningful relationships within our communities and recognizes that these relationships will help improve health outcomes throughout Arizona. EDITED BY

1 2

24

An Independent Licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association

Univision / Experian Simmons/ Pharmaceuticals Advertising Awareness Study


HEALTH CARE

Health Care Arizona health care experts know Hispanic care consumers remain underserved. Federal data shows Hispanics are the least likely population to carry health insurance. Nationwide, 1 in 4 Hispanics do not have insurance. In Phoenix, 389,626 Hispanics, 30 percent of all Hispanics in the city, did not have health insurance in 2012. Not having health insurance does not mean Hispanics do not use health care services. It simply means that when they do seek medical treatment many either pay out-of-pocket or they wait until they have no choice but to seek emergency medical treatment. For instance, 90 percent of Hispanic families with children say they purchased medications in 2012; about 12 percent of Hispanic women versus 10 percent of non-Hispanic women received maternity care; and 16.5% of Hispanics sought pediatric treatment as compared to 12.5% of non-Hispanics, according to 2012-2013 data collected by Phoenix CBSA Scarborough. Enter the Affordable Health Care Act, also commonly known as Obamacare, which mandates that most people in the United States must have health insurance starting in January 2014. Next year, most individuals will be required to prove that they have health insurance they either pay for on their own, or receive through an employer, the military or an approved local, state or federal government program such as Medicare or Medicaid/CHIP. In October 2013, the federally mandated Health Insurance Marketplace was launched to provide people without health insurance the ability to shop online and compare insurance plans from a wide range of companies. While the website has been beset by technical problems, to help advertise the Affordable Health Care Act, the federal government is running a nationwide media education campaign in broadcast, print and online outlets. In Arizona, English- and Spanish-language television outlets are airing ads about the new health care law. A major target of the education campaign is the Hispanic community because so many are uninsured. In Arizona, 1 in 4 Hispanics, about 500,000 people, do not have health insurance. Many do not carry it because they cannot afford the monthly premiums, work for employers who do not provide insurance or do not believe they need to be insured. In some cases, language barriers are a problem. The Latino community also includes a large undocumented immigrant population, many of whom are low-income and not eligible for government-funded services. To support the federal education effort, AARP Arizona officials have appeared on the Univision and Telemundo networks in Nogales, Tucson, Phoenix and Yuma. People can also learn more by going online to CuidadoDeSalud.gov or HealthCare.Gov. Members of Congress and a wide range of other public officials have hosted informational conferences, public forums and town halls across the state to help explain the new law. Herb Schultz, regional director for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, told the Capitol Times newspaper that “state organizations such as local health centers and nonprofits, are paramount to informing citizens of the changes.” Schultz added, “We know not everyone has access to the Internet, so there have been significant dollars provided under the act to expand services for community health centers – a prime and very key way in rural areas and for aging Americans and seniors to be able to get their health care.” Federal health officials are especially determined to get young Hispanics, who often do not believe they will get sick, to sign up for health care. This is a bigger problem in the Hispanic community in part because the median age of Arizona Hispanics is 28 versus 41 in the general market.

25


Sp C rin om g in of g 20 14

Arizona-Sonora Business Resource Guide Meeting the critical need for cross-border connections

The Arizona Daily Star and the Tucson Hispanic Chamber of Commerce announce a landmark project in the field of regional cross-border trade: the first comprehensive directory of pivotal businesses, trade groups, economic development organizations and government agencies on both sides of the border. The inaugural Arizona-Sonora Business Resource Guide, which will be available in print and digital form in the spring of 2014, will also include current economic data, profiles of key players and tips from cross-border trade pros on how to get started or expand. The guide will be produced in both English and Spanish. To include your company or organization in the guideâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s directory, go to azstarnet.com/b2bform The directory listing is free for regional organizations, courtesy of the industry leaders sponsoring this project. A few sponsorship opportunities for the Arizona-Sonora Business Resource Guide are still available. For more information, contact: Arizona Daily Star: Bobbie Jo Buel, Editor bjbuel@azstarnet.com or 520.573.4217 Darrell Durham, Director of Market Development ddurham@tucson.com or 520.573.4412 Tucson Hispanic Chamber of Commerce: Lea MĂĄrquez-Peterson, President/CEO president@tucsonhispanicchamber.org or 520.620.0005

Presenting Sponsor

Partners City of Guaymas, Sonora City of Nogales, Arizona City of Nogales, Sonora Cushman & Wakefield | PICOR The Offshore Group

The Arizona-Sonora Business Resource Guide is a joint effort of the Arizona Daily Star and the Tucson Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.


HEALTH CARE

HEA;LTH

• NATIONAL STATISTICS

27


HEALTH CARE

HEA;LTH

• LOCAL INFO

Health Net, CIGNA, Humana & State Farm

Over-index on Hispanic Members Ranked on Hispanics GROUP OR INDIVIDUAL HEALTH INSURANCE PROVIDERS (AMONG THOSE WITH INSURANCE)

HISPANIC

NON-HISPANIC

HISPANIC INDEX (VS. TOTAL)

Blue Cross Blue Shield

23%

28%

87

UnitedHealthcare

16%

23%

76

Health Net

13%

4%

240

CIGNA

104

11%

11%

Aetna

9%

12%

79

Humana

7%

5%

123

State Farm

3%

1%

214

Aflac

2%

2%

94

PacifiCare/Secure Horizons

1%

3%

48

© Valua Vitaly | Fotolia.com

Among those with Any Group/Individual Health Insurance Hispanic Scarborough, 2012 Release 2 (Aug 2011 - Jul 2012), Adults 18+, Phoenix DMA

28


HEALTH CARE

HEALTH

• TUCSON

29


HEALTH CARE

HEALTH

30

• TUCSON


HEALTH CARE

HEALTH

• TUCSON

31


MEDIA

Media The mass media marketing tools used to reach Latinos are changing. Whether it’s television, radio, online or print, the job of effectively reaching Latinos requires an understanding of the community’s wants, needs, interests and habits. In short, media outlets must understand what makes Latinos tick, or, put another way, how acculturated they are. For instance, reaching Latino audiences has never been as simple as translating an advertisement or news report into Spanish. While Spanish-language media will be an industry powerhouse for years to come, the Latino market has always been diverse and grows more diverse every day. Univision, UniMas (owned by Univision) and Telemundo, remain the most popular Spanish-language television stations watch in Arizona. Univision Tucson is a top 5 station, regardless of language, as well as Tucson’s #1 Spanish language station. The reference to Tucson in this last sentence is from the Univision Corporate website about their Tucson station. Earlier this year, Univision was ranked as the No. 1 national network during the July sweeps “ahead of ABC, CBS, Fox and NBC among the valued adults ages 18-49 and 18-34,” according to a report in the Denver Post. In Phoenix, an average of 43 percent of Hispanic adults 18-49 and 66 percent of all Hispanic adult Spanish-language viewers, 18-49, watched Univision between November 2012 and July 2013. Other Hispanics, however, even some who self-identify as bilingual, watch little, if any, Spanish-language television, preferring one of the sundry other English-language broadcast, cable or online networks. And like all Americans, Hispanics, who are quickly adopting smartphones and other wireless and online technology, are increasingly turning to new media outlets like Netflix, Hulu, Youtube and other video/television services. A Pew Hispanic Research study, for instance, earlier this year found “a growing share of Latinos get their news in English.” According to Pew’s survey, “In 2012, 82% of Hispanic adults said they got at least some of their news in English, up from 78% who said the same in 2006.” Still, Nielsen, regarded as the most accurate in the industry at tracking television viewing habits, found in a one-week period in May 2013 that 8.7 million Hispanic adult viewers in the U.S., 18-49, watch news in Spanish versus 5.7 million who watch news in English. Nielsen also found that 17 of the top 20 rated news programs watched by Hispanic adults, 18-49, during a six-month period from December 2012 to June 2013, were watched in Spanish. Immigration also impacts how media messaging occurs. While anywhere from 35 to 40 percent of Latinos in the United States are foreign-born, the great proportion of Latino population growth in the United States is not due to immigration but native births. About 800,000 Latinos who were born in the United States turn 18 every year, according to the U.S. Census. Still, with predictions that immigrants over the next 40 years will make up a growing proportion of the overall U.S. population, media aimed at Spanish-speakers will remain a formidable force. Radio remains an important way to reach all Americans listeners, but especially U.S. Latino audiences. Hispanics represent the largest ethnic group in the national radio market, with regional Mexican music the most popular genre. There are 338 Mexican Regional music stations in the U.S. About 77 percent of Spanish speaking Hispanics listen to regional Mexican format in Arizona. Growing income earnings among Latino families also play a role in the community’s media consumption habits. As more Latinos earn higher degrees, more Latinos are entering the middle-class, becoming entrepreneurs and climbing the ranks of politics and business. Nielsen describes this expanding segment of the community as “upscale Latinos” who earn $50,000 to $100,000 in annual income, adding that “this viable and sophisticated market….lives in a world of cultural duality.”

33


MEDIA

MEDIA

34

• ADVERTISING ATTITUDES


MEDIA

MEDIA

• MEDIA CONSUMPTION

Ad Spending

by Top Spanish-Language Advertisers PARENT COMPANY

TOTAL $ (MILLION)

NATIONAL MAGAZINE % OF TOTAL

SPANISH LANGUAGE CABLE TV % OF TOTAL

SPANISH LANGUAGE NETWORK TV % OF TOTAL

SPOT RADIO % OF TOTAL

SPOT TV % OF TOTAL

PROCTER AND GAMBLE

225.6

13%

13%

73%

1%

0%

BANCORP INC

193.1

0%

0%

98%

0%

2%

160

1%

8%

89%

0%

2%

MCDONALD’S

131.2

1%

4%

72%

10%

13%

AT&T

130.5

0%

9%

42%

7%

42%

VERIZON

125.6

0%

10%

67%

4%

18%

TOYOTA

DISH NETWORK

100.5

1%

8%

77%

4%

10%

GENERAL MILLS

94.8

0%

5%

93%

1%

1%

KRAFT FOODS

91.8

3%

15%

77%

4%

2%

90.8

3%

9%

71%

8%

8%

1,343.8

3%

8%

76%

3%

9%

GENERAL MOTORS TOP 10

Source: Q2 2012 Nielsen, “State of the Hispanic Consumer,” P.14.

Overall Hispanic

Ad Spending Across Media MEDIA

2011 (THOUSANDS)

% GROWTH 2010-2011

Spanish TV Network

3,268,707

13%

Spanish Spot TV

1,153,639

1%

Spanish Cable TV

452,207

21%

Spot Radio

664,375

1%

National Magazine

136,305

26%

61,225

-4%

5,736,458

11%

Local Newspaper Total

Source: Q2 2012 Nielsen, “State of the Hispanic Consumer,” P.14.

35


MEDIA

MEDIA

36

• MEDIA CONSUMPTION


MEDIA

MEDIA

• MEDIA CONSUMPTION

37


MEDIA

MEDIA

38

• MEDIA CONSUMPTION


DEMOGRAPHICS

Population In 2035, Arizona will mark a milestone in its remarkable, ongoing demographic shift. If census forecasts hold true, by the time a Hispanic child born in Arizona today is a young adult he or she will be a member of the state’s majority population. Today, Arizona’s more than 2 million Latinos are 31 percent of the total population—more than double the number of Hispanics who lived here in 1990. Between now and 2035, the Hispanic community is expected to double in size yet again to about 4 million people, or more than 50 percent of all Arizonans, based on census data analysis by Pew Hispanic Research. On the national level, the Hispanic population has topped 53 million people, or 17 percent of the population, and demographers predict Hispanics, who can be of any race, will be 30 percent of the U.S. population by 2060. Arizona’s Maricopa County, which includes Phoenix and several major suburbs, is home to more than half of the state’s Latino population. As the country’s minority communities grow, the non-Hispanic White population will peak in 2024, and non-Hispanic Whites skew older and have fewer children. Latinos tend to be comparatively younger and have more children. The median age for Whites is 41; African-Americans, 32; Asians, 31.6; and Latinos, 27. America in 2050, long known as a nation of immigrants will become a nation of minorities, as the non-Hispanic White share of the total U.S. population dips to 47 percent. Non-Hispanic Whites today are about two-thirds of the country’s population. In 1960, they were 85 percent of the population. Population growth among non-Hispanic Whites already has slowed to a crawl. Between 2000 and 2011, the Non-Hispanic White population grew only 1.5 percent, while Hispanics increased by 46 percent. Most Latino population growth today, contrary to popular belief, is attributed to native births and not immigration. While 35 to 40 percent of the country’s Hispanic population today is foreign-born, U.S.-born Latinos account for 90 percent of Hispanic population growth. In a stark example of these contrasting trends, about 80 percent of senior citizens today are Non-Hispanic Whites, while minority babies born in the U.S. outnumbered White babies for the first time in 2011. The implications of these trends are far-reaching. As the White population ages, the nation’s workforce-aged population will become increasingly minority. At the same time, a greater number of jobs in the U.S. labor market will require more training and education. How our nation addresses today’s gaps in educational achievements between Whites and NonWhites will affect our economic and overall societal development.

39


DEMOGRAPHICS

POPULATION

40

• U.S. POPULATION


DEMOGRAPHICS

POPULATION

• U.S. POPULATION

41


DEMOGRAPHICS

POPULATION

• U.S. POPULATION

5.0

42


DEMOGRAPHICS

POPULATION

• U.S. POPULATION

.0

43


DEMOGRAPHICS

POPULATION

44

• AZ POPULATION


DEMOGRAPHICS

POPULATION

• AZ POPULATION

45


DEMOGRAPHICS

POPULATION

46

• AZ POPULATION


DEMOGRAPHICS

POPULATION

• AZ POPULATION

47


DEMOGRAPHICS

POPULATION

• AZ POPULATION

Hispanic

48

White, Non-Hispanic


DEMOGRAPHICS

demographics

Population Marcela Houser, CCIM Investment / Sales De Rito Partners, Inc. Hispanics continue to be the fastest growing ethnic group in the USA. By 2050 it is estimated that Hispanics will be 130M in the USA (Peter Reuell - Harvard Staff Writer). Many retailers/investors are well aware of the statistics and the importance that the Hispanic market has. Retailers are taking steps to accommodate the Hispanic needs and are focusing on providing shopping centers that offer cultural activities and events that idenify with the Hispanic community. Big supermarket chains over the years have offered more and more Hispanic food products in their aisles, not to mention the increase of Hispanic music, celebrities, politicians etc., that presently influence our society. The statistics above show a total of 25,802 firms that in 2007 were owned by Hispanics in the 15 cities with the highest Hispanic Population in the Valley. Phoenix, Mesa and Glendale (in that order) take the lead as the cities with the highest Hispanic population and the highest Hispanic owned firms. The graphics above show how the business owned by Hispanics goes in proportion to the Hispanic population in each city. The average rate is 3.18%. However, it is interesting to observe that cities like Scottsdale and Queen Creek have more Hispanic Owned Businesses in relation to their Hispanic population. Hispanic business owners are also reaching out to cater to other ethnic groups. The growth rate of Hispanics in the Valley slowed down in the past few years due in part to anti-immigration legislation and slow economy in the State and the Country. However, the retail market as well as other commercial real estate markets such as industrial, office and multi-family, are recovering steadily. In Commercial Real Estate we are experiencing increased interest from eager Hispanic entrepreneurs to open their first business location or additional ones. We also see an increase of foreign Hispanics looking for commercial real estate investment opportunities nationwide. Hispanics in the Valley have always been interested in learning the ins and outs of Commercial Real Estate Investment and how they can benefit from it. Residential Real Estate has had a strong comeback since 2012 and Commercial Real Estate is definitely following its steps. Something interesting to keep in mind is the recent increase in Consumer Confidence which is a very important factor in the economic recovery of the Country and a good sign. That could indicate that the economy is going in the right direction. We at De Rito Partners, Inc. are glad to be a part of these exciting times and are well prepared to meet the Hispanic ever growing market Commercial Real Estate needs en Espa単ol. Marcela Houser has over 11 years of experience in Commercial Real Estate. She holds the CCIM designation. Originally from Guadalajara, Mexico, studied at ITESO University and is fluent in English and Spanish. sponsored by

49


DEMOGRAPHICS

demographics

Arizona Market Snapshot The Arizona Hispanic population continues to represent a substantial portion of the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s population, accounting for close to one-third of Arizona residents. The 2013 statewide Hispanic population exceeds 2 million individuals. Arizona Hispanics are primarily of Mexican ancestry. 52% of all Hispanics may be considered bicultural or less acculturated. Aggregate household expenditures (all consumer products and categories) among Arizona households exceeds $23.8 billion annually, 18% of total.

% OF POPULATION

2013 POPULATION

100%

6,573,587

Hispanic

31%

2,032,405

White Non-Hispanic

56%

3,689,612

Black Non-Hispanic

4%

260,622

Asian Non-Hispanic

3%

194,601

Other Non-Hispanic

6%

396,347

POPULATION

Total

50


DEMOGRAPHICS

DEMOGR APHICS

• ARIZONA

Hispanics represent the second-largest population group in the state at close to one-third of total.

HISPANICITY HA1: Americanizado English dominant (nearly no Spanish) Born in US; 3rd+ generation Few Hispanic cultural practices

Fully 53% of the Hispanics in the Phoenix DMA are ranked as HA3, HA4 or HA5 and 25% fall into the Bicultural category of the Hispanicity segmentation model..

HA2: Nueva Latina English preferred (some Spanish) Born in U.S.; 2nd generation Some Hispanic cultural practices; often “retro-acculturate” HA3: Bicultural Bilingual (equal or nearly) Immigrant as child or young adult Many Hispanic cultural practices HA4: Hispano Spanish preferred (some English) Immigrant as adult, in U.S. 10+ years Pre-dominant Hispanic cultural practices HA5: Latinoamericana Spanish dominant (nearly no English) Recent immigrant as adult (less than 10 years ago) Primarily Hispanic cultural practices Identify with home country more so than U.S.

51


DEMOGRAPHICS

DEMOGR APHICS

• ARIZONA

P. 888.211.9353 | E. geoscape@geoscape.com | URL. www.geoscape.com Source: Geoscape American Marketscape DataStream™ and/or Consumer Spending Dynamix™ Series 2013 The Designated Market Area (DMA) boundaries are defined by Nielsen.

This Market Snapshot is produced by Geoscape using the Geoscape Intelligence System (GIS) and the American Marketscape DataStream™ Series 2013 and Consumer Spending Dynamix™ Series 2013. For a FREE test drive of GIS, point your browser to: http://gis4.geoscape.com/testdrive/ Copyright 2013© All rights reserved. Reproduction rights are granted provided the material is reproduced in its entirety and sourced to Geoscape and the American Marketscape DataStream, Series 2013. P. 888.211.9353 | E. geoscape@geoscape.com | URL. www.geoscape.com Source: Geoscape American Marketscape DataStream™ and/or Consumer Spending Dynamix™ Series 2013 The Designated Market Area (DMA) boundaries are defined by Nielsen.

52


DEMOGRAPHICS

demographics

Phoenix Market Snapshot The Phoenix Metro Hispanic population continues to represent a substantial portion of the local population, accounting for close to one-third of Phoenix residents. The 2013 metro Hispanic population exceeds 1.3 million individuals. Phoenix Hispanics are primarily of Mexican ancestry. 52% of all Hispanics may be considered bicultural or less acculturated. Aggregate household expenditures (all consumer products and categories) among Phoenix Hispanic households exceeds $15.9 billion annually, 18% of total.

POPULATION

% OF POPULATION

2013 POPULATION

100%

4,318,869

Hispanic

31%

1,323,928

White Non-Hispanic

57%

2,454,532

Black Non-Hispanic

5%

212,809

Asian Non-Hispanic

4%

154,826

Other Non-Hispanic

4%

172,774

Total

53


DEMOGRAPHICS

DEMOGR APHICS

• PHOENIX

Hispanics in the Phoenix Metro area account for 31% of the local population and represent the second largest ethnic group.

Hispanic Population White Non-Hispanic Black Non-Hispanic Asian Non-Hispanic American Indian Non-Hispanic

HISPANICITY HA1: Americanizado English dominant (nearly no Spanish) Born in US; 3rd+ generation Few Hispanic cultural practices HA2: Nueva Latina English preferred (some Spanish) Born in U.S.; 2nd generation Some Hispanic cultural practices; often “retro-acculturate” HA3: Bicultural Bilingual (equal or nearly) Immigrant as child or young adult Many Hispanic cultural practices HA4: Hispano Spanish preferred (some English) Immigrant as adult, in U.S. 10+ years Pre-dominant Hispanic cultural practices HA5: Latinoamericana Spanish dominant (nearly no English) Recent immigrant as adult (less than 10 years ago) Primarily Hispanic cultural practices Identify with home country more so than U.S.

54

Other Non-Hispanic

25% of Phoenix Hispanics are bicultural with an additional 29% less acculturated


DEMOGRAPHICS

DEMOGR APHICS

• PHOENIX

P. 888.211.9353 | E. geoscape@geoscape.com | URL. www.geoscape.com Source: Geoscape American Marketscape DataStream™ and/or Consumer Spending Dynamix™ Series 2013 The Designated Market Area (DMA) boundaries are defined by Nielsen.

This Market Snapshot is produced by Geoscape using the Geoscape Intelligence System (GIS) and the American Marketscape DataStream™ Series 2013 and Consumer Spending Dynamix™ Series 2013. For a FREE test drive of GIS, point your browser to: http://gis4.geoscape.com/testdrive/ Copyright 2013© All rights reserved. Reproduction rights are granted provided the material is reproduced in its entirety and sourced to Geoscape and the American Marketscape DataStream, Series 2013. P. 888.211.9353 | E. geoscape@geoscape.com | URL. www.geoscape.com Source: Geoscape American Marketscape DataStream™ and/or Consumer Spending Dynamix™ Series 2013 The Designated Market Area (DMA) boundaries are defined by Nielsen.

55


DEMOGRAPHICS

demographics

Tucson Market Snapshot Tucson Metro Hispanics represent a substantial portion of the population, accounting for more than one-third of local residents. The 2013, the population of Tucson Hispanics exceeded 360,000 of the more than 1 million people in the community. Tucson Hispanics are primarily of Mexican ancestry. Half the Hispanic population be considered bicultural or less acculturated. Aggregate household expenditures (all consumer products and categories) among Tucson Metro Hispanic households approaches $4.4 billion annually, 23% of the metro total.

POPULATION

% OF POPULATION

2013 POPULATION

100%

1,007,418

Hispanic

36%

364,369

White Non-Hispanic

53%

538,771

Black Non-Hispanic

3%

32,914

Asian Non-Hispanic

3%

26,974

Other Non-Hispanic

4%

44,390

Total

56


DEMOGRAPHICS

DEMOGR APHICS

• TUCSON

Over one-third of the Tucson Metro population is of Hispanic ancestry.

Hispanic Population White Non-Hispanic Black Non-Hispanic Asian Non-Hispanic American Indian Non-Hispanic Other Non-Hispanic

Tucson’s population is evenly divided between the more acculturated and the bicultural & less acculturated segments.

HISPANICITY HA1: Americanizado English dominant (nearly no Spanish) Born in US; 3rd+ generation Few Hispanic cultural practices HA2: Nueva Latina English preferred (some Spanish) Born in U.S.; 2nd generation Some Hispanic cultural practices; often “retro-acculturate” HA3: Bicultural Bilingual (equal or nearly) Immigrant as child or young adult Many Hispanic cultural practices HA4: Hispano Spanish preferred (some English) Immigrant as adult, in U.S. 10+ years Pre-dominant Hispanic cultural practices HA5: Latinoamericana Spanish dominant (nearly no English) Recent immigrant as adult (less than 10 years ago) Primarily Hispanic cultural practices Identify with home country more so than U.S.

57


DEMOGRAPHICS

DEMOGR APHICS

• TUCSON

P. 888.211.9353 | E. geoscape@geoscape.com | URL. www.geoscape.com Source: Geoscape American Marketscape DataStream™ and/or Consumer Spending Dynamix™ Series 2013 The Designated Market Area (DMA) boundaries are defined by Nielsen.

This Market Snapshot is produced by Geoscape using the Geoscape Intelligence System (GIS) and the American Marketscape DataStream™ Series 2013 and Consumer Spending Dynamix™ Series 2013. For a FREE test drive of GIS, point your browser to: http://gis4.geoscape.com/testdrive/ Copyright 2013© All rights reserved. Reproduction rights are granted provided the material is reproduced in its entirety and sourced to Geoscape and the American Marketscape DataStream, Series 2013. P. 888.211.9353 | E. geoscape@geoscape.com | URL. www.geoscape.com Source: Geoscape American Marketscape DataStream™ and/or Consumer Spending Dynamix™ Series 2013 The Designated Market Area (DMA) boundaries are defined by Nielsen.

58


DEMOGRAPHICS

demographics

Yuma

Market Snapshot The Yuma Metro population has a majority Hispanic presence, accounting for 62% of the metroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 200,733 persons and driving the local population growth. Yuma Hispanics are primarily of Mexican ancestry. 58% of all Hispanics may be considered bicultural or less acculturated. Aggregate household expenditures (all consumer products and categories) among Flagstaff Hispanic households exceeds $1.2 billion annually, 44% of total.

POPULATION

% OF POPULATION

2013 POPULATION

100%

200,733

Hispanic

62%

124,402

White Non-Hispanic

33%

66,348

Black Non-Hispanic

2%

3,109

Asian Non-Hispanic

1%

2,232

Other Non-Hispanic

2%

4,642

Total

59


DEMOGRAPHICS

DEMOGR APHICS

• YUMA

Metro Yuma’s population is driven by the local Hispanic presence, at 62% of all residents.

Hispanic Population White Non-Hispanic Black Non-Hispanic Asian Non-Hispanic American Indian Non-Hispanic Other Non-Hispanic

Acculturation levels are driven by the bicultural and less acculturated Hispanics

HISPANICITY HA1: Americanizado English dominant (nearly no Spanish) Born in US; 3rd+ generation Few Hispanic cultural practices HA2: Nueva Latina English preferred (some Spanish) Born in U.S.; 2nd generation Some Hispanic cultural practices; often “retro-acculturate” HA3: Bicultural Bilingual (equal or nearly) Immigrant as child or young adult Many Hispanic cultural practices HA4: Hispano Spanish preferred (some English) Immigrant as adult, in U.S. 10+ years Pre-dominant Hispanic cultural practices HA5: Latinoamericana Spanish dominant (nearly no English) Recent immigrant as adult (less than 10 years ago) Primarily Hispanic cultural practices Identify with home country more so than U.S.

60


DEMOGRAPHICS

DEMOGR APHICS

• YUMA

P. 888.211.9353 | E. geoscape@geoscape.com | URL. www.geoscape.com Source: Geoscape American Marketscape DataStream™ and/or Consumer Spending Dynamix™ Series 2013 The Designated Market Area (DMA) boundaries are defined by Nielsen.

This Market Snapshot is produced by Geoscape using the Geoscape Intelligence System (GIS) and the American Marketscape DataStream™ Series 2013 and Consumer Spending Dynamix™ Series 2013. For a FREE test drive of GIS, point your browser to: http://gis4.geoscape.com/testdrive/ Copyright 2013© All rights reserved. Reproduction rights are granted provided the material is reproduced in its entirety and sourced to Geoscape and the American Marketscape DataStream, Series 2013. P. 888.211.9353 | E. geoscape@geoscape.com | URL. www.geoscape.com Source: Geoscape American Marketscape DataStream™ and/or Consumer Spending Dynamix™ Series 2013 The Designated Market Area (DMA) boundaries are defined by Nielsen.

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EDUCATION

demographics

Education When it comes to understanding Hispanic student education trends, it only requires basic math to read the writing on the wall. In short, Latino student achievement is slowly improving, but serious education gaps remain. Consider the following: • Hispanics are less likely than any other major population segment in the U.S. to be enrolled in college or graduate school: 18% of Hispanics are enrolled in higher education, versus 38% of Asians, 30% of Non-Hispanic Whites and 27% of African-Americans, according to the U.S. Census. • Nationally, while 31% of non-Hispanic Whites and 18% of African-Americans have completed at least a bachelor’s degree, only 13% of Hispanics have attained the same level of education. • High school graduation rates among Hispanics continue to lag, though recent news on that front is promising. “The share of Hispanics ages 18 to 24 who have not completed high school and were not enrolled in school fell to a record low of 15% in 2012,” less than half the rate of 32% in 2000, according to Pew Hispanic Research, among the nation’s top public policy think tanks. That marks an important development, though it remains twice as high as the national average of 8 percent for non-Hispanics, 18-24, who had not completed high school and were not enrolled in school in 2012. In other encouraging news from Pew Hispanic Research, Latinos now represent the largest single minority group at fouryear colleges and universities in the United States; a record number of Hispanic high school graduates nationwide, nearly 46%, are enrolled in two- or four-year college programs; and, for the first time, a higher percentage of Hispanic high school graduates, 69 percent, entered college than non-Hispanic Whites high school graduates, 67 percent of whom enrolled in college in 2012. Nevertheless, major challenges lie ahead, much of it tied to the Latino community’s booming population growth. Hispanic children now account for 1 in 4 public elementary students nationwide, foreshadowing ever-larger Latino student populations in secondary and higher education institutions. In Arizona, nearly 90 percent of new K-12 students between 1998 and 2010 in Arizona were Hispanic; and a record 44 percent of all K-12 students statewide in 2012 were Hispanic and will soon be the majority here. Nationally, the Census Bureau estimates the number of Hispanic elementary and secondary education students nationwide will grow by 94 percent between 2000 and 2050. And the number of Hispanic college students in that same period will increase 60 percent. Given the critical role education plays in any community’s economic prospects, the single greatest long-term challenge facing Arizona Latinos may not be immigration or health care, but improving the quality of education for our children. The Dropped? report published by the ASU Morrison Institute for Public Policy in 2012 found that unless the education gap between Latinos and non-Latinos is closed, “This imbalance represents a grave threat to Arizona’s future economic health.” The primary issue, according to the report: “Education and skills training are expected to become even more important drivers of workforce quality, earning potential and economic growth than they are today…..Low educational achievement is usually linked to low earning power.… Less income means less purchasing power, which drags down overall economic growth and, consequently, tax revenues. Lower tax revenues means additional strains on state budgets and services.” Briefly stated, failing to properly educate Latino children in Arizona could limit the entire state’s long-term economic prosperity. To read the full Dropped? report, visit the Morrison Institute website at morrisoninstitute.asu.edu/‎

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EDUCATION

EDUCATION

64

• ENROLLMENT TRENDS


EDUCATION

EDUCATION

• ENROLLMENT TRENDS

65


EDUCATION

EDUCATION

66

• ENROLLMENT TRENDS


EDUCATION

EDUCATION

• ENROLLMENT TRENDS

Over 8 out of 10 new students were Hispanic, Grade Level K-12, Fall 1998-Fall 2012 TOTAL

HISPANIC

WHITE

BLACK

ASIAN

NATIVE AMERICAN

Fall 1998

847,762

268,098

466,597

38,421

16,171

58,475

Fall 2012

1,096,037

473,793

456,478

57,384

30,822

53,852

Net Gain

248,275

205,695

-10,119

18,963

14,651

-4,623

100%

83%

-4%

8%

6%

-2%

% of Total Growth

© Andres Rodriguez | Fotolia.com

Hispanic Scarborough, 2013 Release 1 (Feb 2012 - Jan 2013), Adults 18+, Phoenix DMA

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EDUCATION

EDUCATION

68

• ENROLLMENT TRENDS


EDUCATION

EDUCATION

• ENROLLMENT TRENDS

College Enrollment by Race in AZ Enrollment in Postsecondary Education Fall 2010 TOTAL FALL ENROLLMENT

ARIZONA

U.S. AVERAGE

Total fall enrollment - Male

305,782

171,951

Total fall enrollment - Female

522,849

228,592

Total fall enrollment - American Indian or Alaska Native

19,300

3,725

Total fall enrollment - Asian, Native Hawaiian, of Pacific Islander

22,850

23,351

Total fall enrollment - Black or African American

93,533

51,584

Total fall enrollment - Hispanic or Latino

101,617

44,808

Total fall enrollment - White

383,779

226,071

2,107

1,691

185,975

36,005

19,470

13,304

Total fall enrollment - Undergraduate

706,866

344,418

Total fall enrollment - Graduate

121,765

56,125

Degrees / certificates awarded - Total

158,882

78,228

Degrees / certificates awarded - American Indian or Alaska Native

3,042

647

Degrees / certificates awarded - Asian, Native Hawaiian, of Pacific Islander

4,777

4,446

Degrees / certificates awarded - Black or African American

15,227

8,701

Degrees / certificates awarded - Hispanic or Latino

19,270

7,264

Degrees / certificates awarded - White

83,244

47,570

420

326

27,795

5,919

Total fall enrollment - Two or more races Total fall enrollment - Race/ethnicity unknown Total fall enrollment - Nonresident alien

Degrees / certificates awarded - Two or more races Degrees / certificates awarded - Race/ethnicity unknown

5,107

3,350

Degrees / certificates awarded - Associate’s

50,252

16,655

Degrees / certificates awarded - Bachelor’s

44,339

32,353

Degrees / certificates awarded - Master’s

34,860

13,588

Degrees / certificates awarded - Doctor’s

2,684

Degrees / certificates awarded - Nonresident alien

*Hispanic enrollment comprises 12.3% of total college enrollment in Arizona. Source: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS). (2011). Institutional counts are from the Fall 2010, Institutional Characteristics component; Degrees awarded are from the Fall 2010, Completions component (Awards/degrees conferred between July 1, 2009 and June 30, 2010); and Fall enrollment data are from the Spring 2010, Enrollment component (Fall 2009). Washington. D.C. Retrieved July 29, 2013 from http://nces.ed.gov/programs/stateprofiles/sresult.asp?mode=full&displaycat=4&s1=04 Courtesy of University of Phoenix

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EDUCATION

EDUCATION

• ENROLLMENT TRENDS

‘Hispanic Serving Institutions’ in AZ Federally designated

CITY

TOTAL UNDERGRAD FTE ENROLLMENT

HISPANIC

% HISPANIC

Arizona Western College

YUMA

4,687

2,796

59.7

Central Arizona College

COOLIDGE

4,020

1,058

26.3

Conchise College

DOUGLAS

2,748

1,172

42.6

AVONDALE

4,411

1,872

42.4

SCOTTSDALE

6

2

33.3

GateWay Community College

PHOENIX

3,195

848

26.5

Glendale Community College

GLENDALE

12,160

3,471

28.5

Phoenix College

PHOENIX

6,542

2,517

38.5

Pima Community College

TUCSON

21,532

7,904

36.7

South Mountain Community College

PHOENIX

2,573

1,062

41.3

61,874

22,702

36.7

INSTITUTION

Estrella Mountain Community College Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture

Arizona Total

Source: Excelencia in Education. (2012). Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSIs): 2011-12. Retrieved July 29, 2013 from http://www.edexcelencia.org/sites/default/files/hsilist-2011-12.pdf Courtesy of University of Phoenix

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EDUCATION

CASE STUDY

Morrison Institute Latino Public Policy Center Think of Arizona demographics as an hourglass.

The bottom half of the hourglass is mostly a White population whose time of employment is largely up, as Baby Boomers en masse join the retiree generation. Meanwhile, the hourglass’ top half is a largely much younger Latino population who are quickly coming of age to form the state’s dominant workforce. Median age for Whites in Arizona is 44, while for Latinos it’s 25, a prime family-building age. For the first time, this year there were more Latino children in Arizona K-12 schools than Whites. By 2030, Arizona is expected to be a “majorityminority” state. That’s what data tell us – that the face of Arizona is changing, along with everything that comes with such a defining dynamic. But data also tell us Arizona is headed for a crisis unless we prepare our future workforce through education, skills, certification and college degrees, which as a state we are not doing at the level necessary to compete regionally, nationally and internationally. In fact, the Latino education gap is relatively the same today as it was in 2000. High school dropouts remain at unacceptable rates. “College” is not part of the daily vocabulary for the burgeoning younger Latino population, including too often among those most scholastically able. Low expectations – from educators to parents to students themselves – become a self-fulfilling prophecy of lower achievement. Education is the lynchpin for economic success in Arizona, which is noted in many of the reports by the Morrison Institute Latino Public Policy Center at Arizona State University. But time is of the essence. More to the point, the hourglass is running. MorrisonInstitute.asu.edu/Latinos

“In a very short time, Morrison Institute Latino Public Policy Center has demonstrated its relevance in helping Arizonans better understand Latino issues and how they affect Arizona. The Morrison Institute’s longtime trusted brand for independent and nonpartisan research and analysis give its Latino Center immediate credentials in clarifying how the growing Latino community more and more will shape our state’s future.” —Max Gonzales, Vice President, Administration, Chicanos Por La Causa, Inc. sponsored by

71


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HISPANIC BUSINESS

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

Hispanic-owned Business Enterprises

Today, about 100,000 minority-owned companies call Arizona home. The state has an estimated 67,300 Hispanicowned businesses that will generate $10.2 billion in annual gross receipts in 2013. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a 28 percent increase since 2007, despite the Great Recession and the passage of tough immigration legislation. Nationwide, there are approximately 3 million Hispanic-owned businesses growing at a rate 2.5 times faster than nonLatino-owned firms, according to U.S. Census Bureau. Companies owned by Hispanic women are growing at an even faster rate: at least three times the overall growth rate of all businesses in the United States. Among the distinct characteristics of Hispanic-owned firms: One-third nationwide are owned by women. In Arizona, about 30 percent of Hispanic-owned companies are owned by immigrants. Most Hispanic-owned companies are sole proprietorships and/or family owned. Arizona, meanwhile, has the fifth-largest percentage of Hispanic-owned businesses in the United States. About 30 percent of Hispanic-owned firms are in construction or service sectors such as repair and maintenance and restaurants. Hispanic-owned firms also are flourishing in health care, retail trade and transportation, U.S. Census data show. The rapid growth rate of Hispanic-owned small businesses is largely tied to overall booming population growth among U.S. Latinos, which nearly doubled in Arizona between 1990 and 2010 to more than 2 million people. The United States is now home to more than 53 million Hispanics. One troubling note: Average annual gross receipts by Hispanic-owned businesses, estimated at $152,000, continued to lag behind non-Latino companies, which had annual average gross receipts of more than $490,000 per year in 2007 (the last figures available from the Census). In Arizona, the biggest challenges faced by Latino business owners are mostly the same as those confronted by any small business, though unique challenges do remain, according to The Hispanic Business Enterprise Study, a new report by the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce that surveyed Arizona Hispanic business owners in 2012 and provides insights into their challenges, strategies, needs and resources. Continued on next page

AZHCC Hispanic Business Research Series sponsored by

73


HISPANIC BUSINESS

HISPANIC BUSINESS

• HISPANIC-OWNED BUSINESS ENTERPRISES

Among the survey’s highlights: •

62 percent of Hispanic business owners surveyed said they planned on expanding their business during the next few years

63 percent believe their company’s financial status will improve in the next few years

Asked about the “most significant challenges and barriers” they faced: 23 percent said the challenges they face are “no different” than for other small businesses, 9% reported “making enough money” is a big problem, 9% reported “securing loans/funding for the business” among their major challenges, 7% cited “overcoming the economic downturn” and 6% said discrimination was a significant barrier

Asked if overcoming negative perceptions tied to being Hispanic Business Enterprises was a problem, 38% said yes

32% felt that cultural differences had an impact on their business practices

26% agreed with the statement that they were treated differently by suppliers/customers because they were an HBE

22% said they were not treated with respect when applying for loans

In those cases where being a Hispanic-owned business served as an obstacle, the survey found that most Latino business owners said they “work harder” to overcome the discrimination that surfaced in the course of doing business. As one business owner noted, “Being a minority is my biggest challenge, because I’ve been here 41 years and it’s funny because someone comes in they are looking for a white person to talk to and they look you over like, ‘Huh, you’re the owner?’” Despite facing some unique challenges that come with being a Latino-owned firm, the survey found that there was a 17% increase from 2007 to 2012 in firms that leverage their minority status as a strategy to build successful businesses and as a tool to survive the economic downturn by: •

networking with other minority-owned businesses

using their status to pursue contracts

promoting their “Minority Business Enterprise” status to potential customers

One surprising result: Only three companies out of the 380 surveyed mentioned SB 1070, the state’s 2010 immigration bill, as being a challenge to them, though it must be noted that the people surveyed were not directly asked a question about SB1070. The three responses came from the open-ended question asking about the challenges they face.

74


HISPANIC BUSINESS

HISPANIC BUSINESS

• HISPANIC-OWNED BUSINESS ENTERPRISES

HISPANIC-OWNED BUSINESSES HAVE A STRONG PRESENCE IN THE U.S. ECONOMY

Nearly 3 million Hispanic-owned businesses in the United States generate annual combined revenues of $420 billion.

75


TRADE WITH MEXICO

Trade with Mexico Courtesy of

NORTH AMERICA: A REGION OF OPPORTUNITIES A new era of opportunities stands before the region North America is and should remain a region of opportunities for all. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), bilateral trade and investment within the region have grown exponentially. In 2012 alone, Mexico-US total trade reached 494 billion dollars â&#x20AC;&#x201D;more than 1.3 billion dollars per day, almost 1 million dollars per minute. Mexico is the third largest US trading partner. Positive dynamics are now in place, benefitting both societies.

The Mexican market is fundamental to the US economy In 2012, US exports to Mexico were 216.3 billion dollars. This is more than the 210 billion dollars of combined US exports to all the countries with which it has a trade agreement in place (excluding Canada). It is more than U.S. exports to Japan and China combined (180.6 billion dollars) and the sum of its exports to France, Germany, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom (175 billion dollars).

77


TRADE WITH MEXICO

CONSUMER DEMOGR APHICS

â&#x20AC;˘ TRADE WITH MEXICO

Exports to Mexico maintain and create jobs in the United States The US Government estimates that each additional billion dollars in new exports supports more than 6,000 new jobs. Exports to Mexico increased 18 billion dollars in 2012 alone, thus potentially helping create over 107,000 new US jobs. Almost six million US Jobs rely on trade with Mexico, according to the US Chamber of Commerce.

US states benefit from exports to Mexico In 2012 Mexico was the main destination for exports of 3 US states (Arizona, California and Texas), the second destination for exports from 20 states and was ranked one of the top-five export destinations for 34 states (2012 data). 17 states send more than 10% of their exports to Mexico.

Mexico and the United States compete together in the global economy Production and supply chains in North America are deeply integrated. The US content of Mexican exports to the US is estimated at around 40%. In contrast, it stands at about 25% for Canadian exports, 4% for China and only 2% for the European Union.

78


TRADE WITH MEXICO

CONSUMER DEMOGR APHICS

• TRADE WITH MEXICO

Investment flows are mutually beneficial According to data compiled by the USTR, sales of services in Mexico by majority US-owned affiliates were 34.4 billion dollars in 2010. Sales of services in the United States by majority Mexico-owned firms were 4.8 billion dollars.

Mexico is a global player The Mexican economy is open for business. The country has one of the largest trade and investment agreement networks in the world: 12 free trade agreements with 44 partners, 28 international investment agreements and 9 trade agreements that cover important sectors. These allow for privileged access to markets in the Americas, Europe and Asia. Mexico is part of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) negotiations and has launched alongside other Latin American countries the ambitious Pacific Alliance liberalization mechanism.

MEXICO IN MOTION: PROGRESS AND STRUCTURAL TRANSFORMATIONS Even within 2012’s complex global context, Mexico’s economy grew 3.9%. It is ranked as the 13th largest in the world. If current trends continue, it could become the 8th largest by 2050, according to projections made by Goldman Sachs. At the beginning of the new Administration, the major political forces signed the “Pact for Mexico”, a set of agreements that reflect a shared commitment to promote economic development and social welfare.

OUR COMMON BORDER: AN AREA OF PROSPERITY AND COMPETITIVENESS Our border is more dynamic and secure than it has ever been Over the last few years, our common border has increasingly become an area of prosperity and regional competitiveness. The total population of the border municipalities and counties, on both sides, is 14 million people. The ten border states in Mexico and the United States would constitute the world’s 4th largest economy. Mexico and the United States continue to work closely together on a day to day basis. Much remains to be done, but our countries’ progress can be objectively measured. Bilateral cooperation is stronger than ever in areas such as infrastructure development, security and trade facilitation. Positive dynamics are now in place, benefitting both societies and our common values and cultural ties are nowhere more visible than at our shared border. The level of ongoing cooperation between Mexico and the United States on border issues is a testament of the maturity and strength of the bilateral relationship.

79


TRADE WITH MEXICO

CONSUMER DEMOGR APHICS

â&#x20AC;˘ TRADE WITH MEXICO

A SMARTER BORDER AND HISTORIC INVESTMENTS IN INFRASTRUCTURE Better use of government resources, greater cooperation Smart and common sense approaches improve the quality of life and trade at the border. Mexico and the United States work towards ensuring regional security and agile inspection procedures. Several programs contribute to these goals: FAST, SENTRI, Ready Lane and Global Entry, to mention a few. The Single Rail Manifest allows companies to send their manifest, simultaneously and electronically, to customs authorities of both countries.

More bridges, more trade The border between Mexico and the United States is one of the busiest in the world, with 56 ports of entry. Around 1 billion dollars is traded every day and 300,000 vehicle crossings take place (including 70,000 trailers). Three new border crossings are in operation as of 2010, two between the states of Texas and Tamaulipas and one between Arizona and Sonora. The crossing between Boquillas del Carmen/ Big Bend binational park, between Texas and Coahuila, began its operations last April. In the coming months, the first new railway crossing in over 100 years will be inaugurated.

80


TRADE WITH MEXICO

CONSUMER DEMOGR APHICS

• TRADE WITH MEXICO

Modern crossings for modern cities San Diego and Tijuana are increasingly intertwined. Both cities, together, have become a hub for manufacturing with a strong presence of high technology businesses. A new southbound crossing at Tijuana —San Ysidro, “El Chaparral” (October 2012) is in operation, expanding capacity and using non-intrusive inspection devices to facilitate the movement of people and goods. The northbound crossing project remains a priority for both countries, along with the establishment of a pedestrian access point in the United States to the international airport in Tijuana.

MEXICANS IN THE UNITED STATES: THE IMPORTANCE OF THEIR CONTRIBUTIONS The Mexican population is an engine for the US economy and society The 11.7 million Mexicans living in the United States in 2011 represented 29% of immigrants and 4% of the US population. Most Mexicans live in California (37%, 4.3 million) and Texas (21%, 2.5 million), the two largest state economies. According to the Migration Policy Institute, based on data from US Census Bureau, the cities with more Mexican immigrants are Los Angeles (15%, 1.7 million), Chicago (6%, 684,000) and Dallas (5%, 610,000), whose economies grew faster than the national av"Our nation has always been improved by erage in 2011. Mexicans, including 2nd and 3rd immigrants seeking the freedom to grow, generations, contribute approximately 8% of US prosper and innovate. Nowhere is that GDP (BBVA Bancomer Foundation, 2012).

Mexican immigrants are entrepreneurs that create jobs 40% of the companies included in Fortune 500 were founded by first and second generation immigrants, creating 10 million jobs. According to a study by the Partnership for a New American Economy (PNAE), 28% of the businesses established in 2011 are owned by immigrants and employ 10% of US workers. Mexicans make up 12% of the immigrants that own a small business. Around 570,000 businesses in the United States, more than 1 in 25, are owned by a Mexican immigrant and together they generate over 17 billion dollars in revenue per year. According to the Center for American Progress, immigrant women are more likely to have their own business than women born in the United States, 9% versus 6.5%.

more evident than with Arizona's Hispanic communities, especially those from Mexico, which have proved to be a driving political and economic force. Mexico is not only Arizona's largest trading partner, it is also one of our most compelling assets when we're working to attract new companies to Greater Phoenix. As a result, a strong partnership with both our Mexican neighbors and Hispanic communities is one of Arizona's best opportunities to create a thriving economic engine." ­—Barry Broome, GPEC, President & CEO

81


TRADE WITH MEXICO

CONSUMER DEMOGR APHICS

• TRADE WITH MEXICO

The Hispanic market is critical to US prosperity Hispanics are the largest minority market in the country and global US consumer spending drives 70% of US GDP. According to a study by the Selig Center at University of Georgia, Hispanics’ purchasing power may exceed $1.5 trillion in 2015, about 11% of the US total. In 2009, the average monthly wage of Mexican workers in the United States was 2,190 dollars and the average monthly amount of a remittance was 317 dollars. Therefore, more than 87% of Mexican workers’ wages were spent in the US economy (Center for Latin American Monetary Studies, CEMLA and Banco de Mexico).

82


TRADE WITH MEXICO

CONSUMER DEMOGR APHICS

• TRADE WITH MEXICO

ARIZONA-MEXICO: QUICK ECONOMIC TIES Arizona’s export shipments of merchandise in 2012 totaled $18.4 billion. The state’s largest market was Mexico. Arizona posted merchandise exports of $6.3 billion to Mexico in 2012, 34.2 percent of the state’s total merchandise exports. Mexico was followed by Canada ($2.2 billion), China ($1.3 billion), Japan ($920 million) and the United Kingdom ($915 million).

• Immigrants (the foreign born) make up 13.4% of Arizona’s population. • Immigrants in Arizona comprised 16.8% of the state’s workforce in 2011 (or 510,990 workers), according to the U.S. Census Bureau. • Unauthorized immigrants in Arizona paid $443.2 million in state and local taxes in 2010. Rodrigo Navarro Garcia Cónsul de Asuntos Comunitarios Consulado General de México Secretaría de Relaciones Exteriores

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SEGMENTATION

segmentation

Acculturation Marketing to U.S. Hispanics requires understanding role of acculturation Experts say effective marketing campaigns must consider range of culturally rooted traits, values and behaviors of Hispanics What is acculturation? Acculturation is the process by which individuals of one cultural group, typically a minority group and often an immigrant group, adopts elements of the larger culture/community. This process may include the adoption of the larger culture’s attitudes, values, customs, beliefs and behaviors. For some groups, this may also include changes in language preference. Fundamental to acculturation is its distinction from assimilation, which is the total adoption of the larger culture at the cost or dismissal of the original cultural traits. Individuals who are in the process of acculturation may or may not ever totally discard key elements of their culture of origin. In fact, it is most common to develop a blended existence where some elements are maintained.

Examples of acculturation in play…. Because acculturation happens at an individual level and over a period of time, it can manifest in a gradual manner. A recent immigrant to a foreign country may hold on fiercely to their home country (native) culture yet adapt some new shopping behavior by visiting supermarkets instead of the local corner market in their neighborhood. The children of that same immigrant may more aggressively adopt elements of the new culture by following new celebrities and fashion, adapting new foods and language quite quickly.

Why does acculturation matter? The traits, values and behaviors of one’s native culture are filters that impact comprehension of communications. Messages that are not relevant cannot resonate, which seriously reduces the effectiveness of a marketing campaign. For marketers, careful attention to both language and acculturation are essential to success. Since a large share of the Hispanic population in the U.S. will continue to be new immigrants and their second generation children, the acculturation process may not happen has quickly or as thoroughly as with past immigrant groups. Marketers need to be acutely aware that both language and acculturation matter when crafting marketing strategies. Marketers must shift their focus from thinking about whether Hispanics can understand their advertising to creating campaigns that speak to the heart of the Hispanic consumer in the U.S. (Nielsen 2013).

How to measure acculturation? Measuring acculturation can be complicated because it is not automatic and not linear – some consumer behaviors acculturate faster than others and the process of acculturation does not take place at the same rate with every person.

85


SEGMENTATION

SEGMENTATION

• ACCULTURATION

Acculturation in today’s U.S. Hispanic population is even more complex than that of previous groups of immigrants. The context is very fluid compared to earlier groups for several reasons: •

Technology allows continual and real-time access to news/events in home country as well as contact and communication with loved ones still there

Transportation to and from Latin American countries is much more accessible, providing some measure of back and forth to maintain a connection to home countries

Media is extensive and offers a very deep base of access to cultural icons, cues and popular points of connection within the Hispanic community

The pace of Hispanic acculturation in the U.S. will depend on many factors. However, it will likely never mirror the same assimilation patterns of immigrants from past generations. The ready availability of Spanish media (television, radio, newspapers, websites) and the easy ability to communicate with friends and family who have not come to the U.S. slows the pace of acculturation, as does the continuing influx of new immigrants who reinforce the native cultural experience in Hispanic communities. Unlike immigrants from earlier in the history of the U.S., Hispanics today can participate in society while still retaining strong aspects of their Latino culture—including a preference for speaking Spanish at home or with their families and friends. (Nielsen 2009). Each individual’s acculturation level is generally measured as a point in time reference on a dynamic spectrum. Factors that contribute to the degree of acculturation present at that moment are tabulated to place an individual at a reference point along the continuum. Factors that are commonly considered to be closely aligned with acculturation level include: •

Language aptitude and preference

Years in the U.S. / Nativity (born inside/outside the U.S.)

Generation

Education

Social Network (inside/outside native culture)

Many researchers, marketers and advertising agencies in the U.S. Hispanic industry have developed extensive acculturation measurement systems. This includes Nielsen, Geoscape, ResearchByDesign and many more. Each group contributes unique and important insight to understanding the factors, attributes and triggers that define acculturation level among U.S. Hispanics. To provide a sample of these methods, we offer a few examples of modeling and methodology. To support the concept that language alone does not define acculturation, Nielsen offers a consumer behavioral acculturation metric that includes self–identity. How do Hispanics in the U.S. see themselves?

86


SEGMENTATION

SEGMENTATION

• ACCULTURATION

These findings are critical because those who defined themselves as following only Hispanic or Latino culture purchased products very differently from demographically similar non-Hispanics. Hispanic households are considered “behaviorally acculturated” when purchasing patterns match the behavior of non-Hispanic households. (Nielsen 2009). In a recent Nielsen Report, Latina Power Shift (2013), they use “Ambicultural,” which has been trademarked by EthniFacts. The diagram below illustrates this concept of being “able to pivot from English to Spanish, Latina to American and back again without thinking about it.”

87


SEGMENTATION

SEGMENTATION

• ACCULTURATION

Geoscape builds on the acculturation model by adding a dimension related to the individual’s location in the U.S. Geoscape’s Hispanicity segments are an important strategic element because Metros and DMAs across the country differ widely in Hispanic presence across acculturation levels, reflecting local dynamics such as length of residency, Hispanic population density and other factors. Geoscape’s proprietary acculturation methodology is based on several immigration and language usage variables, including (but not limited to):

88

Place of birth

Foreign-born year of entry to United States

Foreign language usage versus English language usage for individuals and households

Educational attainment

Demographic characteristics of the neighborhood (both overall and for the subject ethnic population)

Family composition


SEGMENTATION

SEGMENTATION

• ACCULTURATION

U.S. Hispanics Acculturation Levels

<--- HIGH ACCULTURATION ------------------------------------------- LOW ACCULTURATION ---> HISPANICITY: BICULTURAL HISPANICS (HA3) % (2013)

HISPANICITY: HISPANO (HA4) % (2013)

HISPANICITY: LATINOAMERICANA (HA5) % (2013)

27.9%

24.9%

14.0%

14.7%

31.6%

27.5%

14.6%

8.5%

14.9%

26.0%

24.4%

18.7%

16.0%

7.7%

23.4%

23.6%

18.0%

27.3%

20.1%

31.9%

28.4%

12.7%

7.0%

HISPANICITY: AMERICANIZADO (HA1) % (2013)

HISPANICITY: NUEVA LATINA (HA2) % (2013)

Phoenix

18.5%

Tucson

17.8%

METRO

Arizona Metros

Other Metros Los Angeles Miami San Antonio

Source: Geoscape 2013 American Marketscape Datastream

89


SEGMENTATION

SEGMENTATION

• ACCULTURATION

Geoscape divides the Hispanic population into five segments from highest level of acculturation (HA1) to the least acculturated (HA5): •

HA1: Americanizado. English dominant (nearly no Spanish); born in US and often 3rd+ generation; has few Hispanic cultural practices. Some personalities in this segment may include NFL QB Mark Sanchez NFL Quarterback, singer Selena Gomez and actress Cameron Diaz.

HA2: Nueva Latina. English preferred (some Spanish); born in U.S. and typically 2nd generation; some Hispanic cultural practices and often “retro-acculturate.” Examples: TV host Mario Lopez, entertainer George Lopez and actress America Ferrera.

HA3: Bicultural Hispanic. Bilingual (equal or nearly); immigrated as child or young adult; has many Hispanic cultural practices.

HA4: Hispano. Spanish preferred (some English); immigrated as adult and in U.S. 10+ years; pre-dominant Hispanic cultural practices. Examples: actor Antonio Banderas, TV personality Cristina Saralegui and actress Kate del Castillo.

HA5: Latinoamericana. Spanish dominant (nearly no English); recent immigrant as adult (less than 10 years ago); primarily Hispanic cultural practices and identifies with home country more so than U.S. Hispanic. Examples: Singer Marco Antonio Solis and Radio DJ “EL Piolin.”

ResearchByDesign has also furthered the discussion on acculturation by investigating the intriguing behavior of RETROacculturation. This refers to the search for ethnic identity or roots, especially by second, third, or fourth-generation Latinos who feel they have lost their cultural identity. These individuals are part of mainstream American culture yet would like to enjoy and recover the culture of their parents and grandparents. Hispanics who choose retro-acculturation typically want to learn Spanish, have their children learn Spanish and appreciate their cultural heritage (values, music, arts, food and so on). They are proud of their heritage and welcome ethnic recognition in advertising and promotion of brands and services. As consumers, they may patronize brands that target Hispanics, or may watch Spanish-language TV and listen to Spanish-language programming. They also tend to support Hispanic-related candidates. A sense of ethnic identity and pride tends to motivate these behaviors. This sub-segment of the Hispanic market is growing steadily as the Latino middle class continues to grow. (Hispanic Marketer’s Guide 2008).

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SEGMENTATION

SEGMENTATION

• ACCULTURATION

The Process of Retro-Acculturation ResearchByDesign has coined the term “REACTs” (short for Retro-Acculturators) to describe those who are part of a mainstream population but seek to retain differentiating aspects of cultural history, background and experiences. This is most commonly found in generations that are U.S. born and have a distant relationship with their families’ country of origin. Early qualitative testing and probing results indicate that retro-acculturation is a process with several phases: Awareness – The very first sign of retro-acculturation is awareness – a child or grandchild of immigrants who becomes aware of the transitioning nature of their parents/grandparents culture to that of the new adopted country. This awareness may manifest itself in comparison to their peers either relatives, such as cousins, or school friends who may be have different experiences – this can cause the REACT to begin to wonder why and how they are different. Awareness generally develops in a young person’s life at a point in time when they are also becoming aware of themselves and their future – it is common even in non-immigrant families for young people to begin to research their roots – asking grandparents for family recipes and photos. With REACTs, this awareness develops into an acute alertness – searching for cultural cues with intense radar to scoop up any lessons and information. They will ask many questions and pursue learning anything they can about their family history. Action – Once aware, a REACT embarks on a mission that drives many choices they make as they proceed into adulthood. They may make firm resolutions to “catch up” on any life events they may have missed such as celebrating religious ceremonies and commit to maintaining those traditions throughout their life. Their future plans may be guided strongly by this desire to reconnect to their roots – for example marrying only within their culture or even marrying someone less acculturated than themselves. A key driver can be language – not only will the REACT make focused efforts to speak the language of their heritage but they may insist on raising their children with the language as well so that they can be sure to slow the process of total assimilation in their generation. Acceptance – a key driver for a REACT is their desire to be accepted. They may feel that they are not close enough to their source heritage to be considered “one of them” yet they may feel very strongly that they are not completely mainstream either. REACTs may feel that even their immediate family is unable to accept their unique situation because they have not experienced it – in fact, immigrant parents may have strongly urged their children to acculturate as they were eager to adapt to the American context. As such, REACTs may actively seek other individuals in similar circumstances to reassure themselves and share their experiences. Affinity – the key opportunity for marketers lies in the REACTs sincere appreciation of messages that reflect their unique experience. Messages should be inclusive and accepting – acknowledging that this segment, while growing, is sandwiched between two very large, very focused segments (language dominant, less acculturated on one side and English dominant mainstream on the other). Messages should help the REACT feel that they are achieving a very personal and prominent goal – maintaining their heritage for themselves and their children. Companies that can find a way to invite them in, reinforce their commitment to their cultural heritage while still addressing the functional and practical features/ benefits that any consumer looks for will have a solid connection with this growing and lucrative segment. In short, REACTs strive to live successfully in a world that combines their history with their reality, or rather synthesize the world they come from and the one that they are in now. It is imperative to maintain respect and tolerance for both worlds. Any product/service that reflects this phenomenon and living situation will penetrate the REACT mindset by reaching the core of their unique existence. Acculturation is not an exact science and there are many models to choose from in exploring any consumer base. This information has been compiled from a variety of sources including, but not limited to – • • • •

Nielsen, State of the Hispanic Consumer: The Hispanic Market Imperative, Q2 2012 Geoscape, American Marketscape Datastream User Guide, 2013 Pew Hispanic Center, When Labels Don’t Fit: Hispanics and Their Views of Identity, April 4, 2012 Symphony IRI Group, Diverse and Distinct: The Hispanic Population Delivers Numerous Segments and Opportunities – and an Exceptionally Fast-Growing Market, 2012

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SEGMENTATION

SEGMENTATION

• GETTING STARTED

Getting Started with Segmentation The goal of any segmentation is to best understand how to optimize communications and product development for your company’s goods and services. An ideal segmentation will take into consideration the specific ways in which your customers interact with your offers and where those fit into their lives. Generally, you’ll want to a solid research organization with segmentation experience to help deploy the approach that fits your specific needs best. However the following can provide a general outline of steps and factors to consider as you get started segmenting your customer base. Align – Make sure that you and your internal team are completely aligned on the precise goal of your segmentation. There are many ways you can filter your base of opportunity so you’ll want to define this as narrowly as possible and keep everyone on track as the project unfolds. A key step in this process is to consider your success metric – how will you know you have succeeded once this process is completed? Assess – Examine your internal data sources for any variables/factors that you can mine to draw into the analysis. Do you currently capture key points on your customers related to their shopping or purchase behavior? Are there other demographic or geographic variables you can or would like to expand on? You will want to identify the most telling variable that is a determining factor in how your products or services are consumed. Analyze – Next conduct an in-depth analysis to identify the groups that exhibit the greatest degree of variance in how they use or consume your products/services. These segments should be distinct enough that individual strategies will resonate with them. However, there should not be so many segments that the opportunity is too narrow and therefore not efficient or manageable to approach. Evaluate – From among the identifiable targets that were identified, determine which present the greatest opportunity and prioritize them. Some areas to consider in this prioritization include the number of customers in the segment, how each group fits with the direction of your organization and its goals and also your ability to impact market share within that segment. Work closely with your marketing communications team to develop strategies that can be tracked and adjusted as needed. This is a key time to revisit the success metrics that were developed in the initial phase to ensure the goal is centered and on point. Evolve – Finally be sure to monitor the market to watch for changes in your key segments related to any trends in the industry or economy. You may also identify additional segments of emerging opportunities that have appeared.

Source: Compiled and edited from work of Geoscape and ResearchByDesign

93


RESOURCES

DATOS

Resources Arbitron, Hispanic Radio

Forbes.com, Brett nelson/

Latino Consumers, Executive

Today 2012 Report

March 23,2011/best-cities-

Summary, Chapter 5, pg. 86;

for-minority-entrepre-

2011; Latino Consumers,

neurs-2012/2/

Executive Summary, Chapter

Arizona Department of Education, 2012; February

1, pg. 19; 2011; Latino

2012; Research and

Hispanic Executive and

Consumers, Overview of

Evaluation Section, April 2013

USHCC Sync Up for Media

Latino Shopping Behavior,

Partnership, PRWeb: Online

Chapter 7, pg. 116; 2011;

Visibility from Vocus. N.p., 30

Latino Consumers, Executive

Jan 2013. Web. 14 May 2013.

Summary, Chapter 1, pg. 15;

BIGinsight

Bloomberg BusinessWeek 2012

2011 IAB Hispanic Consumers & Digital Report: Hispanic

Pew Hispanic Center; Gallup

Brand-centric Hispanics

Consumers & Purchase

2011; 2012; 2013; tabulations

Impact CPG Shopping

Decisions, October 2012

of the March 2011 and

Trends, [Hispanic] Market

August 2012 Current

Weekly. 17.8 (2013): 6-7. 29

Ipsos Public Affairs, Julio

Population Surveys and Pew

May. 2013.

Franco, associate vp, 31 Milk

Hispanic Center Hispanic

St., #1100, Bostan MA 02109;

vote estimate based on the

www.ipsos-pa.com

National Election Pool

ComScore 2012, Terra Digital Consumer Study

national exit poll and the Nielsen, Latina Power shift

number of votes tallied as

Emerging Majorities,

2013, State of the Hispanic

reported by media outlets

Demographics, Family; April

Market Q2 2012

and election turnout experts;

2012

94

tabulations of the August Packaged Facts; Financial

2012 Current Population

Experian Simmons National

Profile of Latino Consum-

Survey and Pew Research

Consumer Study, Spring 2010

ers, Chapter 6, pg. 90; 2011;

Center projections, 2012;


RESOURCES

DATOS

Resources Hispanic Center tabulations

Scarborough, Release 1 2013,

U.S. Census Bureau, Quick

of augmented March

Feb12-Jan13, Phoenix Metro,

Facts 2012

supplements to the

Adults 18+, Banks HH Uses;

Current Population Survey;

Financial Services HH has/

Russ Oates, 2012; 2012

uses;

National Survey of Latinos; The Demographics of Social

Scarborough, Release 1 2013,

Media Users; 2012; Second

Feb12-Jan13, Phoenix Metro,

Generation Americans: A

Adults 18+, Credit Cards used

portrait of the Adult Children

in last 3 months

PolicyLink

Statistics Administration

U.S. Department of Education, NCES, Common

Selig Center for Economic

State Public Elementary and

Growth, Terry College of

Secondary Enrollment Model

Business, The University of Georgia, 2010; 2012

U.S. Department of Labor, Consumer Expenditure Survey

Research Alert, Focus On Emerging Majorities, 30.8

commerce: Economics and

Core of Data surveys and

of Immigrants, February 7, 2013

U.S. Census â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Department of

Siemens

2011

(2011); Focus On Emerging Majorities, 30.13 (2011); Focus

Targetspot

On Emerging Majorities, Vol. 31, No. 10 (2013); Emerging

The Futures Company

U.S. Hispanic Market 2010, Strategy Research Corporation

Majorities, Marketing/ Advertising, Digital Life

The Integer Group and M/A/R/C Research

Second generation Ameri-

White Horse and Sensis

cans: A portrait of the Adult

U.S. Bureau of Census, 2012;

Why Latinos Are Leading

Children of Immigrants, Pew

National Populations

Retail Trends, [Hispanic]

Hispanic Center, February 7,

U.S. Census Bureau & Pew

Market Weekly. 17.6 (2013):

2013

Research Center

3-4. Web. 29 May. 2013.

95


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