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IN THIS ISSUE EXPLORE THE NEW HOT SPRINGS IMBIBE: OUR GUIDE TO WHISKEY

ARKANSAS’ LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE

Tiny Home Amplified WORLD-RENOWNED VIOLINIST BUILDS MUSICAL RETREAT IN FAYETTEVILLE

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contents JUNE 2017

34

40

89

features

departments

46 AY’S BEST LAWYERS

08 Publisher’s Note 10 Plugged In 12 Agenda

AY is proud to honor the many Arkansas attorneys who work tirelessly to stand on the side of justice. We have a legal community comprised of the best and the brightest professionals who deserve recognition and help make justice a reality for all. Celebrate with us as we reveal AY’s Best Lawyers and congratulations to our winners.

dwell 16 Home: Tiny Home Amplifies Community 22 P. Allen Smith: Go Wild with Native Plants

interests 40 70 76 80 89

on the cover World-renowned violinist builds a tiny musical retreat in Fayetteville. Photo by Don Shreve.

Excursion: The New Hot Springs Art & Culture: Students Take Over Arts Center Fathers Day Gift Guide Travel: The Buffalo National River Historical Gem: A Car Lover’s Dream

edibles 26 See the Dynamic Petit & Keet Bar and Grill 34 Libations: A Whiskey Revival 72 Son of a Preacher Man: Chef Matt Cooper

about you 94 Men’s Health: Preventive Screenings Save Lives

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contributors

WRITERS & PHOTOGRAPHERS

JUNE 2017 | VOLUME XXX| ISSUE 2| AYMAG.COM

JOE DAVID RICE

P. ALLEN SMITH

P. Allen Smith is an author, television host and conservationist with a passion for American style. His show “Garden Home” airs on public television. Check your local listings for “Garden Style.” Smith uses his Arkansas home, Moss Mountain Farm, as an epicenter for promoting the local food movement, organic gardening and the preservation of heritage poultry breeds. He created his farm to serve as a place of inspiration, education and conservation and provides visitors from around the country with tours of his property, which may be booked at pallensmith.com/tours.

Joe David Rice serves as Arkansas’s Tourism Director, a position he’s held since 1987. He and his team of 65 employees have two major responsibilities: enhancing the image of Arkansas and enticing more visitors to the state. Rice, a northeast Arkansas native, graduated from the University of Arkansas in 1974. He also obtained a master’s degree – with an environmental planning emphasis – from the University of Illinois.

VICKI VOWELL • VOWELL, INC. CEO Daughter of Dr. Don Vowell

PUBLISHER Heather Baker • Daughter of John Hardwick hbaker@aymag.com EDITOR Melanie Kramer • Daughter of Allen Jarrett mkramer@aymag.com ART DIRECTOR Jamison Mosley • Son of the late Joe Mosley jmosley@aymag.com GRAPHIC DESIGNER Marissa Miller • Daughter of Jack Miller Jr. mmiller@aymag.com

JILLIAN MCGEHEE

A former newspaper reporter and magazine writer, Jillian McGehee enjoys writing about the region’s people and places. She lives in Little Rock, operating her own business as a writer and editor for various publications and businesses. The river trail helps her stay healthy with bike rides and runs as does her CrossFit family at CrossFit Align in North Little Rock.

L. LAMOR WILLIAMS

L. Lamor Williams is a Pine Bluff native who’s written professionally for 20 years. As a journalist he’s flown with the U.S. Air Force’s Black Knights, been nearly trampled by cattle while covering a Texas wildfire and was once lost in the Kenyan countryside while writing about the AIDS crisis in Africa.

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Blair Wallace • Daughter of Tom Wallace Jr. bwallace@aymag.com Linda Burlingame • Niece of Karl Hinds lindaaymag@aol.com Wendy Reed • Daughter of Dan Newman wendy@aymag.com Stephanie Brown • Daughter of Deborah Brown sbrown@aymag.com Becky Wisener • Daughter of George Belin bwisener@aymag.com

CONTRIBUTORS Kody Ford, Jillian McGehee, Meredith Mashburn, Sonny Rhodes, P. Allen Smith, Antoninette Grajeda, Dero Sanford, Don Shreve, and Janet Warlick

SONNY RHODES

Sonny Rhodes has been committing journalism for more than 35 years. After stints with four newspapers, he stays busy these days teaching journalism at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock. He lives in North Little Rock with his wife, Julie, and their daughter, Abby. In his increasingly rare spare moments, he pretends to loaf.

Postmaster: Send address changes to AY Magazine, 910 W. 2nd St., Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201.

ANTOINETTE GRAJEDA

Antoinette Grajeda is a reporter and producer at KUAF 91.3FM, the NPR affiliate in Fayetteville. She grew up in Northwest Arkansas and has enjoyed sharing the stories of her community and its residents through her work in newspaper, magazine and radio. In her free time, she loves exploring and believes a new adventure is just a road trip away.

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AY Magazine is published monthly, Volume XXX, Issue 2 AY Magazine (ISSN 2162-7754) is published monthly by Vowell, Inc., 910 W. 2nd St., Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201. Periodicals postage paid at Little Rock, AR and additional mailing offices.

Subscription Inquiries: Subscription rate is $15 for one year (12 issues). Single issues are available upon request for $5. For subscriptions, inquiries or address changes, call 501-244-9700.

MEREDITH MASHBURN

Meredith Mashburn has worked as a professional photographer for over 15 years. She began her career as a portrait photographer in 1997, where she refined her style and lighting techniques in a commercial family-friendly studio and quickly opened a business.

The contents of AY are copyrighted, and material contained herein may not be copied or reproduced in any manner without the written permission of the publisher. Articles in AY should not be considered specific advice, as individual circumstances vary. Products and services advertised in the magazine are not necessarily endorsed by AY.

Please recycle this magazine.


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Publisher’s Note

WRITE THE PUBLISHER : hbaker@aymag.com

Only the Best for Dad This month we honor the strong, determined and hardworking fathers of Arkansas with a truly remarkable AY issue. I was lucky enough to grow up with two dads to celebrate on Father’s Day. I had my dad, Rick Harkins, and my step-father, John Hardwick, who came into my life when I was four years old and never looked back. He always treated me as if I were his own. The year I turned 23 I lost my father and married the love of my life, Joel. He gives 210 percent to his family and our son, Hunter, and daughter, Savvy, who adore him. In our house, he’s often the favorite and he’s our go-to guy for everything. After all, what would we do without the magnificent men in our lives? There are so many things I’m excited about in our June magazine. I’m a complete gear-head (thanks again, Dad) and am totally in love with our article about the Museum of Automobiles and Swap Meet. It’s one of those things you must go see if you care about classic cars at all.

Cars are everything to me and this month’s spread featuring some timehonored classics is sure to be a hit.

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Are you looking for a fun trip this summer? Our tour of Hot Springs has everything you’ll need: where to stay, what to eat, what to see and plenty of potential for family fun. We always like to bring you what’s new in food in Arkansas, and this month will not disappoint. Whether you’re looking for upscale casual in Little Rock or finedining favorites in Northwest Arkansas, we’ll guide you in the right direction. We’re also adding a fabulous monthly feature on liquors and cocktails. This month we’re bringing you our guide to whiskey – just in case you want to make sure you pick the right one for Dad. Speaking of gifts, we have the best Father’s Day gift guide with hand-picked items to fit any budget. I’m so proud of the changes we’ve made so far at Vowell, Inc., and the future changes we have in store. This month we welcome Melanie Kramer as our new editor. Melanie’s love for our state really shines through in this issue. I look forward to working with her more and working with our wonderful staff to continue to bring our readers the most extraordinary stories from around our beautiful state. Happy summer and happy Father’s Day!

Heather Baker

I’m always looking for amazing spots around the state to see with family. The Buffalo is fun to visit any time of the year.

The cocktails at Petit & Keet Bar and Grill are divine. I can’t wait to see what the talented mixologist comes up with next.


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plugged in GO ONLINE: aymag.com

feedback

instagram

Contest deadline is June 15! Go to aymag.com, Issues, then the magazine tab-contests to enter.

Join in on the fun! @ayisaboutyou

MISSING FINAL THOUGHT I was excited to get the May edition of AY, Best of 2017. Headed straight to the inside back page for some best of Final Thought. No, just an advertisement. Turn back a page and another all the way to front cover. Surely I must have missed the article, let’s look again. Saw a great picture of my son-in-law in an ad for best dermatology clinic. Read about McClard’s BBQ. Tore out a couple recipes to try in the kitchen. Reached the end and still no Final Thought. I have enjoyed Mr. Rhodes looks on life, from here in Arkansas to Vietnam. Makes me think about things in new ways. So in your Best of 2017 it seems you forgot one.... hope Final Thought is back next month, Rex Winkley

CORRECTION We misspelled the name of top orthopedist C. Lowry Barnes, MD - UAMS in our Best of AY 2017, May Issue.

giveaways Contest deadline is June 15! Go to aymag.com, then the magazine tab-contests, to enter!

1. SAMANTHA’S TAP ROOM & WOOD GRILL

2. OUTLETS OF LITTLE ROCK, J.CREW

3. TAKE THE KIDS TO ALL ABOARD

Dine on wood fired food at Samantha’s. They are the the only Arkansas restaurant to have all beer and wine offerings available on tap. Enter to win a $25 gift card. CODEWORD: TAPROOM

Nab an update to your closet or grab a gift for dad. Enter to win a $50 gift card at J.Crew at the Outlets of Little Rock. CODEWORD: CREW

Don’t miss a chance to take the kids out to eat at a central Arkansas favorite. One winner will receive a $50 gift certificate. CODEWORD: FAMILY

winners Congratulations to our previous winners:

Ms. Anita Lyle of Hot Springs, winner of a $50 gift card to El Porton, any location. Mr. Heath Shaffett of Hot Springs, winner of a $50 gift card to Tommy Hilfiger at the Outlets of Little Rock. Mrs. Debbie Scott of Benton, winner of a $100 gift card to The Good Earth Garden Center, Little Rock.

FIND US ON: 10 . JUNE 2017

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agenda JUNE 2017

TOP

10

THINGS TO DO

1

RIVERFEST LITTLE ROCK

June 1-4

This year the iconic music event will celebrate its 40th anniversary on the banks of the Arkansas River. The festival kicks off June 1 with a party (tickets required) featuring tastings of hundreds of wines and local craft beers, food and, of course, live music. Headliners to this year’s festival include Wiz Khalifa and Justin Moore. More than 30 bands are scheduled to perform. The celebration concludes on Sunday with a fireworks display.

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www.riverfestarkansas.com

HEIFER URBAN FARM FEST LITTLE ROCK

June 8

Head over to Heifer International headquarters for Urban Farm Fest – a new festival that features food trucks, local brews and lawn games. Visit the animals and walk through the gardens at Heifer’s Urban Farm. A portion of ticket proceeds go toward the organization’s work in Arkansas supporting small-scale farmers. The event kicks off at 6:30 p.m.

Debuts June 3

Patrons will be able to experience two stunning exhibitions featuring the work of artist Dale Chihuly. Presented for the first time in an Ozark woods setting and in the museum’s special exhibition galleries, it’s a world of wonder, waiting to be explored, only at Crystal Bridges.

61ST ANNUAL BRADLEY COUNTY PINK TOMATO FESTIVAL WARREN

June 9-10

The World Famous Bradley County Pink Tomato Festival is the oldest running festival in the state of Arkansas. Family fun includes a tomato eating contest, a parade, live entertainment, an all-tomato luncheon, turtle races, a carnival, a steak cook-off and more. www.pinktomatofestival.com

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MOTOWN THE MUSICAL

BATESVILLE

June 27 – July 2

FAYETTEVILLE

June 24

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BENTONVILLE

www. crystalbridges.org/exhibitions/chihuly

SOUTHERN FOOD FESTIVAL

w w w.mainstreetbatesville.org / new-blog/southernfoodfestival

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www.heifer.org/beyond-hunger/urban-farm-fest.html

What better way to celebrate the grand re-opening of Main Street Batesville than enjoying a sampling of southern food? The event will feature live folk music, circus performers and more.

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CRYSTAL BRIDGES: CHIHULY IN THE GALLERY AND IN THE FOREST

Motown the Musical is the true American dream story of Motown founder Berry Gordy’s journey from featherweight boxer to the heavyweight music mogul who launched the careers of Diana Ross, Michael Jackson and Smokey Robinson, just to name a few. www.waltonartscenter.org/motown


3

BRIT FLOYD: IMMERSION WORLD TOUR NORTH LITTLE ROCK

June 5

Verizon Arena will be host to the world’s greatest live tribute to Pink Floyd. The Brit Floyd show has truly become a phenomenon. A Brit Floyd show really is as close as fans will ever get to experiencing the magnificence of a Pink Floyd show live. www.britfloyd.com/

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EUREKA SPRINGS BLUES WEEKEND EUREKA SPRINGS

June 15-18

Don’t miss the music festival lauded as ”the who’s who of the blues.” This year’s lineup features local, regional, national and Grammyaward-winning blues acts from all over America and even around the world. www.eurekaspringsblues.com

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JUNETEENTH CELEBRATION OF FREEDOM LITTLE ROCK

June 17

Hosted by the Mosaic Templars Cultural Center, this annual commemoration of the end of slavery is an event rooted in history and focused on the future. Juneteenth is a time for reflection and forward thinking. This free block party style celebration has something for everyone — live music, children’s activities, food trucks and more.

www.mosaictemplarscenter.com/events/

PICK YOUR OWN BERRIES ALL-AROUND ARKANSAS

Month of June

Stop by one of the numerous pick-yourown-berry farms and take part in this time-honored summer activity. June will be prime season for harvesting blueberries and blackberries in some some areas. Find a farm near you! http://www.pickyourown.org/AR.htm

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dwell

HOME

TINY HOME AMPLIFIES COMMUNITY BY ANTOINETTE GRAJEDA :: PHOTOGRAPHY BY DON SHREVE

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tiny home is quickly becoming a big attraction in south Fayetteville. An expansive deck surrounds the front of the L-shaped structure that’s comprised of brown Abaco wood and black, metal siding. The home actually consists of two buildings on a corner lot. A bright, teal door welcomes guests into the living quarters. A recording studio runs perpendicular to the tiny house. The structure’s facade is designed to look like an oversized guitar amplifier. This small, but unique addition to an otherwise quiet neighborhood, belongs to Asha Mevlana, a woman who’s lived life largely. She’s performed in front of big crowds as a violinist in the Trans-Siberian Orchestra. She’s lived in large cities like Los Angeles, New York and Sydney. The Boston native has always had big dreams. “I used to think ‘I want more, more, more,’” Mevlana says. “I was going to be in business and I was going to make a lot of money and I was going to have big houses all over the world. That was my mindset.” All of that changed when Mevlana was diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 24. It was then that she realized life is not about having things. “It’s about experiences and family and being around people you love,” she says. “That became so clear to me. That was what was important.” A few years ago Mevlana was inspired to purge her possessions after reading “The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing” by Marie Kondo. Mevlana says it felt so freeing to get rid of her things. “That’s what I want my lifestyle to be, I don’t want to have so many things,” she says. “I don’t want to have this huge house where I actually have to go buy all these things. I just want what is necessary.”

Keeping Family Close

The interior of the main house features a custom-made Abaco wood coffee table.

Her desire for downsizing is embodied in her new tiny home in Fayetteville. The touring musician has moved to Northwest Arkansas to be closer to her brother, his wife and their two sons. During previous visits to the region, Mevlana says she discovered a community feeling that she’s never found in any of the other place that she’s lived. “I really love that welcoming feeling and the sense of community,” she says. “That was really important to me.” In the summer of 2016, Mevlana applied to be on “Tiny House Nation,” a television show on the FYI network. The program follows renovation experts and hosts as they travel across the country highlighting people living in inventive, small spaces. The show also helps families design and construct their own home in a space no larger than 500 square feet. Mevlana is friends with co-host Zack Giffin so she’d been watching the show for some time and was fascinated with the concept. When she was selected to appear on the program, Mevlana set to work designing her 400-square-foot home. “I didn’t want it to be impractical,” she says. “I really wanted it to be a place I could actually live and grow into and be there for a long time. That was important to me, too.” During the construction process, Mevlana enlisted the help of her brother-in-law, Stefan Vickery, who owns Vickery AYMAG.COM . 17


Construction in Little Rock, as well as her brother and new neighbor, Z Niederman. Niderman lives around the corner from his sister and is the owner of a development and construction company called 3VOLVE Community Ecosystem Development. Niederman says he was glad to have the opportunity to assist his sister with her tiny house project. “We were really excited to have my sister move here, but also it’s a cool thing in the neighborhood that we get to work on,” he says.

Opting for Openness

Mevlana grew accustomed to living in small spaces in New York. Apartments there usually only have one small window, so Mevlana says her number one priority was to make sure her tiny home had lots of windows. “I love light. It makes me feel happy, it makes me feel open,” she says. “And I felt like in such a small space it’s so important to not feel closed in.” From her living room, Mevlana can sit on her couch and gaze out at her neighborhood through a glass garage door that can roll open to remove the barrier between the indoors and the outdoors. When she wants a little less light, the home’s many windows can be covered with bluish gray shades that really pop against the cream colored walls. High ceilings and an efficient use of storage space also help the house feel more spacious. The washer and dryer are stacked. Four barstools with wooden seats are stowed beneath the bar. White cabinets located above and below black, Silestone countertops in the galley kitchen provide ample storage. A pot rack that hangs overhead can be raised or lowered 18 . JUNE 2017

using a pulley system. “Tiny House Nation” co-host Zack Giffin fashioned a crank for the pulley system from the spokes and gears of an old bike he found in a dumpster. Another unique feature of the house is a custom-made, multipurpose coffee table constructed from some of the home’s leftover Abaco wood. The table folds open to become a video editing desk with two mounted screens and built-in drawers. While sitting on her couch, Mevlana can use the coffee table as a workspace while editing videos. The home’s sole bedroom is located in a loft above the bathroom. Instead of a traditional staircase, the loft can be accessed by ascending a series of alternating tread stairs.

Creating Community One of the most striking features of the home’s exterior is a large, wooden deck that expands out from the house toward the street. “I love the outdoor porch because in a tiny house that just makes it so much bigger,” Mevlana says. “It makes it feel so much more spacious having this expansive deck.” During the design process, she argued against a suggestion to build the porch in the backyard. Mevlana was adamant that the deck should face the street because she wanted it to feel welcoming and inclusive to passersby. “Asha was really keen on having a big porch out here where she could perform and have friends over and just play,” her brother says. “So that was key to her.” Mevlana has already hosted a jam session, but she wants to do more. Inspired by NPR’s “Tiny Desk Concert Series,”


Mevlana intends to curate a Tiny Deck Concert Series where local musicians can come perform on her porch. Her brother says having that community space in the front yard is a great addition to the neighborhood. “For a lot of people life is about connections with people and so we can minimize our things and maximize our connections with other people and I think that’s real valuable and special that she wanted to do that,” Niederman says. The music can be projected through marine speakers installed inside the guitar amp facade of the 120-square-foot recording studio. The soundproofing insulation used inside the studio is made from recycled denim. Unlike the main house, which is built on a foundation, this structure was built atop a trailer. “The idea behind that is that it could be transported,” Mevlana says. “I could take that on the road. I could go to music festivals.” The interior of the music trailer, which could also double as a guest bedroom, has wood flooring and a large, glass garage door that mirrors the one installed in the living quarters. Cabinets provide storage inside the studio and Mevlana’s collection of violins can be mounted to the walls for storage as well as for display. In addition to performances, Mevlana can also enjoy her deck while simply sitting on some large wooden chairs built by EcoVet Furniture. This Northwest Arkansas-based company employs veterans who design and build handcrafted furniture using reclaimed wood. “I really wanted to be able to showcase their work and help what they’re doing,” Mevlana says. “I just love their mission.” Several of the materials used for this project were purchased from local businesses. Mevlana says she appreciates every part of

her house because she knows what went into creating it. “It was really important for me to try to use as many local vendors as possible,” she says. “I felt like that was the whole reason I was moving to Arkansas, for this community, and I wanted to use that as much as I could.” Mevlana says part of her motivation for building her house is so she can have a place to come home to and have more incentive to stay put. “To have a place that’s actually mine, it makes me feel more settled,” she says. Asha Mevlana will continue touring for performances, but Northwest Arkansas is now her home. By creating a welcoming space for her neighbors to come enjoy, Mevlana’s tiny home looks to play a big part in building upon that sense of community that brought her to Fayetteville in the first place.

(Opposite page) Mevlana, an electric violinist for the Trans Siberian Orchestra made sure any electric instrument could “plug” into her outdoor amp. (This page) The “music room” is soundproofed with recycled denim. Marine speakers on top face the deck to help amplify sound.

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The tiny kitchen features full-sized appliances and a recycled old bicycle wheel is used to crank the pot rack up and down in the kitchen.

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dwell

P. ALLEN SMITH

GO WILD WITH NATIVE PLANTS BY P. ALLEN SMITH

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hen establishing Moss Mountain Farm, preserving the native landscape was at the forefront of my mind. I always recall a quote from English poet Alexander Pope when I begin to build or design: We should first “consult the genius of the place.” To me, that means understanding the land and working with its inherent properties. This idea can also encourage us to consider native plants and other species when choosing items for the garden. I try to plant a diverse range of vegetables, flowers and fruits to attract beneficial insects and pollinators, but I’m also making a concentrated effort to cultivate the native wildflowers and species into the landscape. These are the flowers pollinators feel most at home with, so it makes sense to include them. PRECARIOUS PLANTS Wildflowers are more difficult than you might think. Keeping them thriving can be tricky work. We live under the illusion you can take a packet of wildflower seed, throw them on the ground, and suddenly they emerge and bloom at your feet. That’s hardly the case. Much more is involved in getting those plants established and integrating them into the ecology. For example, the pasture at Moss Mountain farm had cattle grazing for many years, so it’s a challenge to re-establish native wildflowers. But I still try! Another benefit to native plant species is they rarely require pesticides and use less water, because they’re already adapted to the landscape. Reducing those two factors can improve the water quality of a community and its aquatic life. ARKANSAS NATIVES In the Natural State, I’ll often find wildflowers on the road nearby and gather seed before they mow. I did that this year with baptisias and with echinacea pallida, which is one of our native coneflowers. I planted those along my driveway to get them started. I also harvested seeds from the native coreopsis and rudbeckias and sowed them in different places around the farm. Usually, I leave with a good case of chiggers, but it’s worth it. When gathering seeds, a good rule of thumb is to use around 40 or more seeds per square foot, depending on your landscape. Not all will germinate and this is a good place to start. You must also consider the land. If there’s runoff in the area or if it’s on a slope, you may need more. TIPS FOR “WILDSCAPING” Despite the hazards, I’d encourage you to cultivate your native plants as well. Here are a few ideas to get started with “wildscaping” or incorporating more native flowers into your homestead to offer shelter and food for pollinators and other wildlife:

∙ Tubular-shaped flowers such as honeysuckle and cardinal flower attract hummingbirds. Songbirds will feed on mulberry, hackberry, black cherry trees and beautyberry, which can be found in the most surprising places at the farm. ∙ Lemon mint, or purple horsemint, is a native annual wildflower that grows to be 2 or 3 feet tall and is attractive to many butterflies and bees. It’s drought-tolerant but does need

re-seeding each year. It’s a wonderful “nurse crop,” which, once established, can make way for other plants in the coming year. ∙ Bee balm is as Southern as chocolate gravy, in my opinion, and it’s a magnet for butterflies and hummingbirds. However, in most cases, it’s not appealing to deer or rabbits. ∙ Northern sea oats is an ornamental grass, which will tolerate part-shade, and the oat-like heads provide winter interest. ∙ Asters are another tough perennial that soak up any attention you bestow on them and reciprocate with pretty Xxxxx xxxxxx xxxxx xxxxxxlittle xxxxxx xxxx xxx blue and lavender flowers in summer andxxxx fall. xx. ∙ Woodland phlox is a delicate wildflower that’s more fragrant than you might expect. It’s hardy and disease-resistant, and I think clusters of this beautiful gem are so romantic. Hopefully, that’s enough to get you started. And while you’re traveling the back roads and highways of our lovely state, keep an eye out for the plants and flowers that seem to thrive and consider taking a few home with you. If you’d like to see how I incorporate flowers into my landscape, consider taking a tour of Moss Mountain Farm. Visit pallensmith.com/tours for more information. P. Allen Smith is an author, television host and conservationist with a passion for American style. His show “Garden Home” airs on AETN. You can watch “Garden Style” on KATV. Smith uses his Arkansas home, Moss Mountain Farm, as an epicenter for promoting the local food movement, organic gardening and the preservation of heritage poultry breeds. He created his farm to serve as a place of inspiration, education and conservation and provides visitors from around the country with tours of his property, which may be booked at pallensmith.com/tours.

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Jake , Tommy and Jim Keet opened Petit & Keet with long time family friend Louis Petit (center).

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The newly constructed dining room offers a casual yet refined feel.

IN PERFECT DETAIL Setting their sites on the building that housed the former 1620 Savoy in the Market Place Shopping Center, Petit and Keet set about working with Luke O’Gary of KO Construction and Garry Mertins of Garry Mertins Design to make their vision for Petit & Keet Bar and Grill a reality. “It was supposed to be a simple redesign,” says O’Gary, whose expertise helped lead and guide the project. “But, it turned out to be a total renovation.” Mertins, who has designed other Little Rock restaurants wanted to make the space beautiful, but also keep it casual. “We want you to feel comfortable walking in here in shorts and a T-shirt or in a jacket and tie.” Petit and Keet both feel the upscale, casual dining idea is unique to Little Rock. “There’s not really anything else like it,” says Keet. “It’s not fine dining, but the food is magnificent.” What everyone involved in the conception, planning and execution of Petit & Keet Bar and Grill have in common is their laser-focused attention to detail. O’Gary and his team painstakingly rebuilt not only much of the interior of the original restaurant, but also the exterior. “We actually took blowtorches to the Arkansas-milled cypress planks that surround the building and hand burned every single one,” he says. “And we added reinforced steel to the corners to give the building an ‘edge.’” Why blacken a restaurant, you may ask? The idea came from Mertins. “I noticed a trend in Europe – particularly France. There were all these beautiful black houses. It was like nothing I’d ever seen. It’s really different and beautiful,” he says.

Garry Mertins of Garry Mertins Design is the creative genius behind the restaurant's unique interior and exterior. AYMAG.COM . 29


The Charred Miso Salmon grilled to perfection.

“We want people to feel like they could be eating in any city in the world,” said Mertins. O’Gary concedes that working on Petit & Keet is most likely the most complex project KO construction has completed.

A FAMILY AFFAIR Keet has been in the restaurant industry since the 1970s. He and his former business partner brought the first Wendy’s to Arkansas and he has run Wendy’s and Wendy’s and Sisters restaurants in Arkansas and Texas. Keet and sons currently own and operate Taziki’s restaurants in Little Rock and recently opened Panini’s & Company in Midtown, as well. “My wife and my daughter are both lawyers,” says Keet. “They help us with leases, contracts – our entire family is part of this business.” Louis Petit, who once co-owned Little Rock’s first fine dining establishment, Jaques and Suzannes, also works with his his three sons in his two restaurants in Destin. “We have similar family values,” says Petit. “That’s one reason we wanted to work together,” says Keet. 30 . JUNE 2017

The family atmosphere doesn’t just extend to actual relatives. “To us, the restaurant is about more than just making and selling food to patrons,” says Keet. “The staff is treated as family. We want them to feel pride in the restaurant just as we do. We are proud of them and what we have all created together.” It just so happens that the search for the restaurant general manager stayed on track with the family theme. Keet and Petit cast a wide net for the position. “We vetted a lot of people,” says Keet. “We really wanted the perfect person for the job.” Instead of a single general manager they discovered husband and wife restaurant industry team Brent and Tyler Lenners in Shreveport. The Lenners have been working in restaurants together as a team for years and they quickly fell into place with the rest of the family. Brent will run the house as general manager and Tyler is assistant general manager and special event coordinator. “We went through over 50 applicants before we landed on Brent,” said Keet. The GM is the most important hire in a restaurant.”


“It all started over a very, very nice bottle of wine.” - Jim Keet

Mixologist Ben Franks pours a specialty cocktail behind the newly redesigned bar.

CULINARY EXCELLENCE The hunt for the right chef was as painstaking of a process as you would expect from this group of self-proclaimed perfectionists. They started with a competitive list of 40 chefs. “We interviewed 20,” says Keet. Eight made it to a second interview. Finally, two chefs were left to cook a full tasting for a panel comprised of local culinary experts. “Mateo’s food was magnificent,” says Keet. “Ben Brainard of the Local Lime and Big Orange restaurant group was on our tasting panel. After eating Mateo Vannucci’s food Ben leaned over to me and said ‘if you don’t hire him, I will.’” And that was that. Chef Vannucci and his sous chef Steven Binotti got to work on creating an exceptional menu. “We’re proud of every plate,” says Petit. When asked about the meal and the level of cooking for the panel Vannucci says he knew he had to,”make sure that each bite stayed as good as the first.” One of the dishes he cooked ended up making it onto the final menu. “It’s the mussels & chorizo. I literally drove to 10 different grocery stores to find fresh mussels and it seems

to have been worth the extra time and effort to have not just changed the dish,” he says. Vannucci is also excited for patrons to taste the barbecue shrimp & rice grits. “It’s a combination of two separate dishes I'd done in the past, but it was never intended to be served together,” he says. “The flavor profile is so unique with the shiitake mushrooms, basmati rice and Louisiana style barbecue sauce. I really enjoy grabbing my favorite ingredients from different cultures and being able to combine the three worlds to make something special like this dish.” To find the best ingredients to fill the menu the team didn’t look far. “Blake Adams from Ben E. Keith has been our trusted ally and go-to guy for over eight years,” says Keet. “He finds and provides the best proteins, spices and other ingredients so we’re providing the freshest dish possible.” “I knew that one of the main goals for Petit & Keet was offering high quality food at affordable prices,” says Adams. “We are proud to offer Markon produce which comes with a 5-star safety rating and their menu will also feature Creekstone beef, which is a truly premium product.” “Every item on our menu has been put through a series of tests,” says Keet, “and every item has its own unique twist.” AYMAG.COM . 31


THE EXCEPTIONAL BAR AND PATIO If you’re looking for an inviting and relaxing bar to wind down, Petit & Keet have outdone themselves to create the perfect place. Hanging above the center of the cloud-ceilinged bar, is a truly inspired lighting feature Mertins created with the help of a lighting design firm in Tennessee. “It is a steel pipe I salvaged from an old record store in downtowen Nashville and thought it would be perfect,” he said. The piece, which is wrapped and illuminated by Edison lights, is highlighted by similarly designed Edison light and steel sconces throughout the bar and bar restroom area. “We wanted a sturdy bar so we went with three inches of 32 . JUNE 2017

poured and polished concrete,” says Mertins. “We wrapped the bar in cold-rolled steel and we duplicated the effect on the hostess stand at the front of the restaurant.” To the right of the bar is an outdoor patio that also features an impressive retractable canopy in case of rain. The cozy, yet chic, patio is decked out with comfortable lounge furniture, carefully selected pillows and it all surrounds a blazing fire pit. Between the bar and the patio is a large glass garage doors that can be opened when weather permits. “We really wanted to enhance comfort and variety,” says Mertins. The great thing about the entire restaurant is that we have so many ways we change the flow. Behind the bar you’ll find top-notch bartenders including lead mixologist Ben Franks, aptly nicknamed


Xxxxx xxxxxx xxxxx xxxxxx xxxxxx xxxx xxx xxxx xx.

“The Lieutenant” by Keet. “Ben is so passionate about what he does,” says Keet. “He actually worked with a level 2 sommelier and painstakingly helped us develop our fine wine list with a fantastic pricing structure." “We’ve put together an exceptional team,” says Keet, “It’s such a great mix of seasoned professionals and new blood and we all get to be a part of something special.”

(This page starting from the left)

The Nasheville Hot Chicken Braised Pork Cheeks and Sourdough The House Green with Champagne Vinaigrette

Petit & Keet Bar and Grill opened to the public May 18th. The restaurant will seat 240 people. Reservations are not required, but are suggested. This content is sponsored by Petit & Keet Bar and Grill, Garry Mertins Design, KO Construction and the Ben E. Keith Company. AYMAG.COM . 33


34 . JUNE 2017


Whiskey Revival Your Guide to Imbibing This Rebellious Spirit BY MELANIE KRAMER :: PHOTOGRAPHY BY JAMISON MOSLEY STYLING BY TANARAH LUXE FLORAL

I

t’s a true Southern staple and if you’ve grown up in Arkansas, it’s quite likely you have at least a minimal education about this classic spirit. Old Fashioneds and Whiskey Sours don’t really ever go out of style in the deep south, do they? Xxxxx xxxxxx xxxxx xxxxxx xxxxxx xxxxliquor xxx xxxx For a time, it seemed that this thatxx.helped fuel a violent rebellion, prohibition and many a tortured, yet prolific writer, might be on the decline. But, in recent years whiskey has rebelled once again and overtaken vodka as the No. 1 spirit in the United States. To uncover reasons behind this whiskey business boom, we turned to Larry Williams, co-owner of Macadoodle’s Liquor Store in Springdale and Ryan Mulcahy, Macadoodle’s spirits and wine manager.

|(Opposite page and this page)

Whiskey has recently gained the No. 1 spot as the most popular spirit in the United States. The Irish Whiskey 2 Gingers is quickly gaining popularity in Arkansas and good scotch has remained a staple for consumers.

AYMAG.COM . 35


Know Your Spirits Let’s start with the basics. What are the main regions where whiskey is produced? Williams: It’s produced in the United States, Ireland, Scotland, Japan and Canada.

Can you explain the difference between bourbon and whiskey? Williams: You can only call it bourbon if it comes from Kentucky. It’s relative to where it's made and Kentucky has the patent on the name. It's kind of like France and Champagne, you can't call it Champagne unless it's from a particular region in France.

What are the major trends you’re seeing in consumer whiskey consumption? Williams: Small batch products are on the rise. That means is there’s a limited amount made and there’s a distinct way it’s distilled that makes it special. We are also seeing a rise in ‘blended whiskey.’ Those are whiskeys that are blended with flavoring like Crown Royal Maple or Apple. Then, of course, you have Fireball – a whiskey mixed with cinnamon which is very popular.

The Tricks to Tasting If you are new to whiskey, or trying something different, what should you know? Mulcahy: I would suggest starting by region. Start with the base blends and then work yourself up to small batch or single barrel. If you start with higher proofs, you're going to take away from your palate, so you won't be able to taste all the flavors in the blend. Start with a blended Canadian or blended whiskey and then work yourself up to scotch. If you start with a scotch – because they have a lot of peak to them, a lot of smoke, it's going to take away from the other whiskeys. Williams: Whiskey is blended with so many different kinds of things and it's distilled so many different ways. Get familiar with how it’s blended and how it’s distilled. Is it corn, is it barley, is it maple, is it all different things? If you taste Jameson Irish whiskey, some have a banana taste, then others will have another fruity taste or a certain woody taste to them. If somebody puts whiskey in front of you, you want to know what it's made with and what the base is.

A Re c i pe from t he Ex per ts

SAZERAC (Recommended by Ryan Mulcahy, Macadoodle’s Springdale spirits and wine manager. ) Ingredients ∙ 1 sugar cube ∙ 3 dashes of Peychaud Bitters ∙ 2 oz. rye whiskey Directions ∙ Place the sugar cube and add the Peychaud's Bitters and rye whiskey in a cocktail shaker with ice. ∙ Use just enough absinthe to coat the inside of a chilled low-ball glass. ∙ Strain through ice into the low-ball glass with or without ice. ∙ Garnish with an orange rind.

36 . JUNE 2017


The Flavor Profiles Decoded: CANADIAN WHISKEY:

A little sweeter, they're usually aged in a maple-esque kind of barrel.

KENTUCKY BOURBON:

Contains bold hints of vanilla and oak. Depends on if it's wheat based, corn or barley based. Wheat is warmer, corn is sweeter.

IRISH WHISKEY:

Notes of oak with a creamy finish.

SCOTCH:

Tends to have a smoky finish.

WHAT'S YOUR STYLE? STRAIGHT UP

ON THE ROCKS

POURED FROM THE BOTTLE TO THE GLASS. NO ICE OR WATER OR ANYTHING ADDED TO IT.

ON ICE

A ONE OUNCE POUR

WITH WATER

WHISKEY VS. WHISKY

IF YOU’RE ADDING WATER IT’S USUALLY FOR HIGHER PROOF TO RELEASE SOME OF THE FLAVORS.

WITH AN “E” IS GENERALLY IMPORTED.

SHAKEN USUALLY MIXED WITH A MIXER OR ANOTHER SPIRIT TO MAKE A COCKTAIL.

SHOT

This content is sponsored by Macadoodles Fine Wine, Beer & Spirits in Springdale, AR. Macadoodles also has locations in Joplin, Branson, Pineville, Republic and Columbia, MO. AYMAG.COM . 37


38 . JUNE 2017


AYMAG.COM . 39


interests

EXCURSION

Cultural, Culinary & Calming Opportunities Abound in Hot Springs BY JILLIAN MCGEHEE :: PHOTOS BY JAMISON MOSLEY

40 . JUNE 2017


H

ot Springs is a prime spot for spa pampering or a lazy lake day. The Spa City, known for its therapeutic waters, is also booming with culture and culinary delights to satisfy a myriad of tastes and likes. As Steve Arrison, executive director of the city’s Advertising & Promotion Commission, says, for more than 150 years, Hot Springs has been welcoming visitors to “The Valley of the Vapors.” Many attractions and establishments have become legendary mainstay tourism destinations. “The thermal waters and Hot Springs National Park have been the bedrock of those attractions for over a century,” he said. “Over time, others have become established visitor landmarks: Oaklawn Racing & Gaming, the Arkansas Alligator Farm, the Arlington Resort Hotel & Spa, the Ohio Club, McClard’s Barbecue, Garvan Woodland Gardens, Lakes Hamilton, Catherine and Ouachita, the Pancake Shop and the historic Buckstaff Bathhouse, just to name a few.” Now, he added, “an enticing group of newer attractions and establishments are demonstrating their own unique contributions to the menu of places and things that go into making Hot Springs a top tourist destination.” There is DeLuca’s Pizzeria, for example, which has rapidly established a national reputation for great pies, Arrison said. It would be hard to leave there hungry with the big, New York-style slices accompanied by delicious sides like the caprese salad served on a wooden platter in the shape of Arkansas. Owner Anthony Valinoti makes the pizzas by hand every day, but that doesn’t stop him from coming out of the kitchen to visit with each customer, share laughs and make each feel welcome. Taken as a whole, Arrison said, “Hot Springs continues to offer the best of the well-established attractions and an increasing array of newer reasons to visit the city.”

FINE DINING

A breath-taking view of downtown Hot Springs as observed from a nearby rooftop.

New hotel The Waters with its accompanying restaurant, The Avenue, add to the city’s accommodating amenities. Located on Central Avenue across from world-famous Bathhouse Row, The Waters adds boutique lodging to the dozens of other Hot Springs hotels and motels. The Avenue’s executive chef, Casey Copeland, is filling plates and palates with top-quality food prepared in the most artistic way. The offerings are small, think tapas, and are meant to be shared. Whether you’re a meat lover or a vegetarian, a foodie or a homecooking kind of diner, you’re sure to find something satisfying to nosh on. The fare is definitely Southern inspired, Copeland said, but he can’t define his cuisine in one way. “We’re a tapas artisan restaurant that pairs with local farmers to prepare artful plates,” he said. “We can meet different tastes so if a family comes in and one person is in the mood for Mexican and the other in the mood for Italian, chances are everyone can find something they want.” The menu changes every six to seven weeks and options could also be French- or Spanish-inspired, Copeland said. The young Cordon Bleu chef that earned the coveted Diamond Chef title in 2015 comes to The Avenue with experience from different types of kitchens, from country club to upscale city. He was looking for a place to lend him culinary creative freedom and has been unleashing his artistic talents at The Avenue since it AYMAG.COM . 41


opened in February. “Things have been going really well and we have plans to expand,” he said. On the rooftop of the century-old building that houses The Waters and The Avenue, Copeland has two bee houses. The plan is to turn the roof, which overlooks historic Central Avenue and the area’s mountain range, into a rooftop bar where Copeland also will grow herbs and produce. The bees will pollinate the plants. The roof also backs up to a mountain bike trail, Copeland pointed out, so part of the grand plan is to connect it to the rooftop bar, giving cyclists a resting stop on their bike treks. With each dish he prepares Copeland hopes to highlight the ingredients without covering them up with a lot of spices and sauce, he said. He definitely achieved that goal in the dishes he prepared for us. Appetizers (or “snapps”) Almond Gremolata, Ouacker Jacks and Oysters de jour could be their own meal. The almond dish was served with crusty bread, spiced mascarpone and citrus herb oil, while the popcorn app featured house cured bacon, peanuts and caramel. For another course, we sampled the Drunken Pimento, which comprises melt-in-your-mouth bourbon cheddar complemented by a watercress chimichurri and served with lavash. The Brussel Salad was a surprise treat with the buttered Brussel sprouts coming apart perfectly in your mouth. Deceivingly small, yet filling, the Duck Confit Tacos are made with citrus confitted duck leg, carrot cabbage slaw, grilled scallion and charred lime barbecue sauce and are a good main course selection.

Photo by jamison Mosley 42 . JUNE 2017

Anthony Valinoti, owner of the very popular DeLuca’s Pizzeria, makes handmade and tossed dough every day.

EDUCATIONAL FUN Mid-America Science Museum is booming with mindboggling activities for children and the young at heart. This summer is filled with educational fun. June marks the 5th Annual Tinkerfest and a messy hands-on science experiment event will bid farewell to summer in Augusts. On Saturday, June 17, the museum will be “taken over by more than 50 hands-on tinkering stations that explore science, technology, engineering, art and mathematics,” said Jim Miller, director of marketing at the museum. Other special attractions include the Mindbender Mansion, an Arkansas Discovery Network exhibit designed by the Oregon Museum Science and Industry. “It’s an eclectic puzzle/brainteaser-themed exhibit that will be available at the museum throughout the summer,” Miller said. Tesla Fest will be held Saturday, July 8, in celebration of Nikola Tesla to showcase the science behind his inventions. Special Tesla shows will feature the world’s most powerful conical tesla coil. The Science Summer Smash presented by Alliance Rubber Company on Saturday, Aug. 19, will send the museum’s summer activities out with a bang. For the most up-to-date information, visit www. midamericamuseum.org.

MAGICAL FUN For some magical fun, don’t miss one of several theatrical performances at Maxwell Blade Theatre of Magic. By the end of this month, Blade hopes to be in his new home at the historic Malco Theatre, currently undergoing a complete overhaul. Blade originally performed his shows out of the theater but left in 2008. He’s occupied a smaller venue on Central Avenue past the Arlington Hotel & Spa and looks forward to having a larger space again. “We’re restoring the Malco Theatre back to how it was in the 1940s and giving it a complete remodel,” he said. There will be seating for 350 people, as opposed to the 112 capacity that he currently has. “I’m excited that I will be able to do the larger illusion shows that I once performed.” “It mainly will be a performing arts theatre for magic, but we will allow other groups to use it as well,” Blade noted. “We’re keeping a lot of the original aesthetics and historical integrity of the building but it will be coupled with state-ofthe-art lights and sound.” Blade came to Hot Springs more than 20 years ago with his family “to get off the road,” he said, after years in the bigger-city and Las Vegas limelight. “We were looking for a community to raise a family and a community with good tourism that could use some entertainment expansion.” Information about current shows and more can be found at www.maxwellblade.com.

OUTDOOR RETREAT Outside the bustle of Central Avenue and away from the recreational fun Hot Springs’ lakes provide is a garden oasis.


Garvan Gardens is adding to its many splendors. It will be located in the Evans Children's Adventure Garden. Photo by Dero Sanford

Executive Chef Casey Copeland pristinely plates Oysters de jour, one of many fine appetizers offered at The Avenue.

Garvan Woodland Gardens provides a retreat filled with walking paths of any given season’s beautiful blooms. The site is the botanical garden of the University of Arkansas with a mission to, in part, preserve and enhance a unique part of the Ouachita environment and provide people with a place of learning, research, cultural enhancement and serenity. The landscape is filled with unique gardens and architecture such as the Anthony Chapel. A new structure in the works is a tree house to be built in the Evans’ Children Adventure Garden. Becca Ohman, garden director, said the main tree house structure is about 28 feet tall, with the tallest point 41 feet off the ground and the lowest at 13 feet. It’s 45-feet long and four stories tall, including the crow’s nest. The tree house’s architecture draws from the “architectural wonders of Garvan Woodland Gardens, the Fay Jones’ Garvan Pavilion and the Anthony Chapel,” Ohman said. “The design responds to the site by ending and curing around statuesque shortleaf pines and provides constant view of its inspiration, the surrounding woodlands.” The idea of the tree house is a natural evolution of the children’s garden, Ohman said, noting a start date to construction should be announced soon. “We are currently working out the construction schedule with the design team.” Donors Bob and Sunny Evans, Garvan Gardens Design Review Board members, Garvan staff and Modus Studios Architects played a vital role in developing the theme and design of the tree house, Ohman noted.

JIVING AND CONNECTING

It’s all about the details, even with the cocktails, at The Avenue, Hot Springs’ new hot spot for eclectic, fine dining.

Back on Central Avenue, Kollective Coffee & Tea is the premier spot to get a jolt of energy for all of this Spa City fun with their coffee from renowned Onyx Coffee Lab in Northwest Arkansas and award-winning teas from the Art of Tea. You can also nab a homemade sweet treat or a savory snack made from fresh ingredients Owned by coffee aficionados and active community members Agnes and Kevin Rogers, Kollective Coffee prides itself in using local and organic products. They spell it with a “K” as a nod to Agnes’ European heritage. She is from Poland. AYMAG.COM . 43


The coffee joint is a relaxing landing pad for students and faculty of nearby Arkansas School for Mathematics, Sciences & the Arts and Hot Springs visitors and residents alike. It also hosts poetry night every Wednesday. This particular group hasn’t let varying locations halt it and hasn’t missed a night since 1989. Whether you’re looking for coffee, dessert, or outdoor fun, Hot Springs accommodates with its welcoming and unique people, places and things.

„ (Right image)

French-style pastries are made in-house at Central Avenue’s Kollective Coffee & Tea.

Maxwell Blade performs in front of an enthusiastic crowd. Photo courtesy of Eric Manuel - EMM Productions 44 . JUNE 2017


AYMAG.COM . 45


46 . JUNE 2017


Arkansas' Best Lawyers Administrative / Regulatory Law

Appellate Practice

Mitchell Williams

Overton S. Anderson 501-372-1887

Frederick K. Campbell 501-688-8800

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings John D. Davis 501-371-0808

Mitchell Williams Doak Foster 501-688-8800

Dover Dixon Horne Allan W. Horne 501-375-9151

Mitchell Williams T. Ark Monroe III 501-688-8800

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings Lee J. Muldrow 501-371-0808

Barber, McCaskill, Jones & Hale Frank B. Newell 501-372-6175

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings N. M. Norton 501-371-0808

Mitchell Williams Derrick W. Smith 501-688-8800

Mitchell Williams Jeffrey Thomas 501-688-8800

Admiralty and Maritime Law Hardin, Jesson & Terry Rex M. Terry 479-452-2200

Antitrust Law Williams & Anderson Philip S. Anderson 501-859-0575

Williams & Anderson Peter G. Kumpe 501-859-0575

Shults & Brown Robert Shults 501-375-2301

Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins

Williams & Anderson Philip S. Anderson 501-859-0575

Barber, McCaskill, Jones & Hale Frank B. Newell 501-372-6175

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings Troy A. Price 501-371-0808

Kutak Rock

Lax, Vaughan, Fortson, Rowe & Threet

Jess L. Askew III 501-975-3000

Roger D. Rowe 501-376-6565

Watts, Donovan & Tilley

Friday, Eldredge & Clark

Staci Dumas Carson 501-372-1406

Robert S. Shafer 501-376-2011

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull

Brett D. Watson, Attorney at Law

E. B. Chiles IV 501-379-1700

Brett D. Watson 501-281-2468

Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor

Arbitration

Constance G. Clark 479-521-7600

Cullen & Company Timothy Cullen 501-370-4800

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull Joseph R. Falasco 501-379-1700

Barber, McCaskill, Jones & Hale G. Spence Fricke 501-372-6175

Hamlin Dispute Resolution

PPGMR Law

Julie DeWoody Greathouse 501-603-9000

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull Michael B. Heister 501-379-1700

Williams & Anderson Philip E. Kaplan 501-859-0575

Friday, Eldredge & Clark R. Christopher Lawson 479-695-2011

Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins David A. Littleton 501-372-1887

Mitchell Williams

Williams & Anderson

Streetman, Meeks & Gibson

Todd P. Lewis 479-582-5711 David F. Menz 501-859-0575

Stan D. Smith 501-688-8800

Thomas S. Streetman 870-229-0604

Bankruptcy and Creditor Debtor Rights / Insolvency and Reorganization Law

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull

Rose Law Firm

Bet-the-Company Litigation

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull

Allen Law Firm

Brian Rosenthal 501-375-9131

David B. Vandergriff 501-379-1700

Waddell, Cole & Jones Ralph W. Waddell 870-931-1700

Geoffrey B. Treece 501-379-1700

H. William Allen 501-374-7100

Williams & Anderson Philip S. Anderson 501-859-0575

Blair & Stroud

Frank S. Hamlin 501-850-8888

Rose Law Firm

Robert E. Hornberger Attorney/Mediator

Friday, Eldredge & Clark

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings

James F. Dowden

Friday, Eldredge & Clark

Hardin & Grace

Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor

Robert E. Hornberger 479-459-7878

ADR, Inc.

Sidney H. McCollum 501-376-2121

ADR, Inc.

John Dewey Watson 501-376-2121

Rose Law Firm Patrick J. Goss 501-375-9131

Conner & Winters

Banking and Finance Law Dover Dixon Horne

Garland W. Binns, Jr. 501-375-9151

Kutak Rock

Randal B. Frazier 501-975-3000

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull Timothy W. Grooms 501-379-1700

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull Jeb H. Joyce 501-379-1700

Williams & Anderson John Kooistra III 501-859-0575

Charles W. Baker 501-375-9131

Jason N. Bramlett 479-695-2011

Charles T. Coleman 501-371-0808 James F. Dowden 501-324-4700 David A. Grace 501-378-7900

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings Judy Simmons Henry 501-371-0808

Jacoway Law Firm Jill R. Jacoway 479-521-2621

Keech Law Firm Kevin P. Keech 501-221-3200

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Harry A. Light 501-376-2011

Mitchell Williams Lance R. Miller 501-688-8800

Eichenbaum Liles

H. David Blair 870-793-8350

E. B. Chiles IV 501-379-1700

Charles T. Coleman 501-371-0808 Kevin A. Crass 501-376-2011

Sidney P. Davis, Jr. 479-521-7600

Rose Law Firm

Richard T. Donovan 501-375-9131

Timothy O. Dudley Timothy O. Dudley 501-372-0080

Everett Wales & Comstock John C. Everett 479-443-0292

Friday, Eldredge & Clark William Mell Griffin III 501-376-2011

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Christopher J. Heller 501-376-2011

Richard L. Ramsay 501-376-4531

AYMAG.COM . 47


48 . JUNE 2017


PRESIDENTIAL AWARDS OF EXCELLENCE Dean John DiPippa

Jim Hathaway III

UALR William H. Bowen School of Law, Little Rock, for work on the Drafting Task Force

Glen Hoggard

Attorney at Law, Little Rock, for work on the Drafting Task Force

Kutak Rock LLP, Little Rock, for work on the Drafting Task Force.

Jamie Jones

Cynthia Nance

Friday, Eldredge & Clark, LLP, Little Rock, for work on the Drafting Task Force

University of Arkansas School of Law, Fayetteville, for work on the 2017 Annual Meeting

Brant Perkins

Perkins Law Firm, Jonesboro, for work on the Drafting Task Force.

JOINT AWARDS William A. Waddell, Jr. Outstanding Lawyer Award

Friday, Eldredge & Clark, LLP, Little Rock, received the award in recognition of excellence in the practice of law and outstanding contributions to the profession.

Caitlin Savage Equal Justice Distinguished Service Award

Wilson & Associates, PLLC, Little Rock, received the award in recognition of her commitment to and participation in equal justice programs, including pro bono efforts through legal services programs.

Gary Speed Outstanding LawyerCitizen Award

Speed Law Firm Little Rock, received the award in recognition of outstanding participation in and for excellent performance of civic responsibilities and for demonstrating high standards of professional competence and conduct.

Charles C. Owen James H. McKenzie Professionalism Award

Charles C. Owen, Gill Ragon Owen, P.A., Little Rock received the award in recognition of sustained excellence through integrity, character and leadership to the profession and the community.

Jeff Rosenzweig Special Award of Merit

Attorney at Law, Little Rock, for distinguished services and accomplishments in the legal profession.

Scott C. Trotter C.E. Ransick Award of Excellence

Trotter Law Firm, PLLC, C. E. Ransick Award of Excellence: received the award in recognition of outstanding contributions to the profession.

Terry Goodwin Jones Outstanding LawyerHumanitarian Award

Attorney at Law, Jonesboro, received the award in recognition of outstanding humanitarian service.

Outstanding Local Bar Associations:

Craighead County Independence County Washington County

AYMAG.COM . 49


T

he practice of law is a time-honored profession that has historically attracted to it the best and brightest. Keeping in that tradition, Arkansas has attracted quality attorneys who work tirelessly to stand on the side of justice for Arkansas and the client’s they represent. We have been blessed with lawyers who seek truth, and maintain integrity in all situations – even outside of the courtroom. It is part of our commitment that we give back. We have a legal community and professionals of which we can be proud. Knowing this about Arkansas attorneys, I can confidently say the individuals being honored in this addition of AY Magazine have rightfully earned the title of “The Best Lawyers in America.” Each has proven to their peers and our state that they exemplify qualities of civility, professionalism and civic duty. The Annual Arkansas Bar Association meeting will be held in Hot Springs, AR June 14-16. The theme for the 2017 meeting will be “Lawyers Leading in Times of Change.” We will focus on many critical legal issues facing our state and our nation in 2017. The agenda includes discussion about the death penalty in Arkansas, new medical marijuana law, conceal v. open carry, tort reform; voting rights issues, and more. We also will present legislative updates, perspectives from our judges, and insights into the practical skills attorneys need to hone. At the annual meeting, the Arkansas Bar Foundation and the Arkansas Bar Association will recognize several persons to honor because of their outstanding contributions. Those selected are: • Outstanding Lawyer Award: William A. Waddell, Jr. • Outstanding Lawyer-Citizen Award: Gary Speed • James McKinzie Professionalism Award: Charles C. Owen • C.E. Ransick Award of Excellence: Scott C. Trotter • Equal Justice Distinguished Service Award: Caitlin Savage • Special Lawyer-Humanitarian Award: Terry Goodwin Jones • Special Award of Merit: Jeff Rosenzweig • Outstanding Local Bar Associations: Craighead County, Independence County and Washington County

Also during the meeting, I will award the following award recipients for their work over the past year: Golden Gavel Awards: • Brian M. Clary • Lynn Foster • Barrett S. Moore • Kristen Pawlik • Shaneen K. Sloan

Presidential Awards of Excellence: • Dean John DiPippa • Jim Hathaway III • Glen Hoggard • Jamie Jones • Cynthia Nance • Brant Perkins

Other Awards: • Jon B. Comstock: Charles Carpenter Award • John Rainwater Judith Ryan Gray Outstanding Young Lawyer award. • Dr. Casey Rockwell, CLE Award • Brian M. Rosenthal, Outgoing Board of Governors Chair Award.

Our state is enriched by having the lawyers listed in this edition of AY Magazine, and listed above. These are only a sampling of the fine attorneys available in Arkansas who zealously represent their clients and help make justice a reality for all.

Mitchell Williams M. Samuel Jones III 501-688-8800

Conner & Winters Robert L. Jones III 479-582-5711

Barber Law Firm Jim L. Julian 501-372-6175

Williams & Anderson Philip E. Kaplan 501-859-0575

Williams & Anderson Peter G. Kumpe 501-859-0575

Bridges Law Firm

Stephen A. Matthews 870-534-5532

Mitchell Williams Lance R. Miller 501-688-8800

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Elizabeth Robben Murray 501-376-2011

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Clifford W. Plunkett 479-695-2011

Williams & Anderson

David M. Powell 501-859-0575

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull Steven W. Quattlebaum 501-379-1700

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings Gordon S. Rather, Jr. 501-371-0808

Lax, Vaughan, Fortson, Rowe & Threet Roger D. Rowe 501-376-6565

Munson, Rowlett, Moore & Boone Beverly A. Rowlett 501-374-6535

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull Michael N. Shannon 501-379-1700

Shults & Brown Steven T. Shults 501-375-2301

Friday, Eldredge & Clark James M. Simpson 501-376-2011

Taylor Law Partners Warner H. Taylor 479-316-6300

Thomas Law Firm Floyd M. Thomas, Jr. 870-866-8451

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull

Denise Reid Hoggard Rainwater, Holt & Sexton, Arkansas Bar Association President 50 . JUNE 2017

John E. Tull III 501-379-1700


Friday, Eldredge & Clark William A. Waddell, Jr. 501-376-2011

Watts, Donovan & Tilley Richard N. Watts 501-372-1406

Business Organizations (including LLCs and Partnerships) Dover Dixon Horne James C. McCastlain 501-375-9151

Kutak Rock

David A. Smith 501-975-3000

Civil Rights Law Fuqua Campbell David M. Fuqua 501-374-0200

Williams & Anderson Philip E. Kaplan 501-859-0575

Porter Law Firm Austin Porter, Jr. 501-244-8200

Closely Held Companies and Family Businesses Law

Kutak Rock

David A. Smith 501-975-3000

Commercial Finance Law Wright, Lindsey & Jennings Fred M. Perkins III 501-371-0808

Commercial Litigation Allen Law Firm

Shults & Brown

Deacon Law Firm

Rose Law Firm

Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins

Watts, Donovan & Tilley

Friday, Eldredge & Clark

Rose Law Firm

Rose Law Firm

Timothy O. Dudley

Mitchell Williams

Conner & Winters

Conner & Winters

Barber Law Firm

Debra K. Brown 501-375-2301

Jason J. Campbell 501-372-1887

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull Brandon B. Cate 479-444-5200

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull

Barry Deacon 479-582-5353

David M. Donovan 501-372-1406

Richard T. Donovan 501-375-9131 Timothy O. Dudley 501-372-0080

H. William Allen 501-374-7100

E. B. Chiles IV 501-379-1700

Williams & Anderson

Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor

Friday, Eldredge & Clark

Constance G. Clark 479-521-7600

Edie Ervin 501-376-2011

Clark Law Firm

Everett Wales & Comstock

Suzanne G. Clark 476-856-6380

John C. Everett 479-443-0292

Corum-Law

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull

Philip S. Anderson 501-859-0575

Kutak Rock

Jess L. Askew III 501-975-3000

Mitchell Williams John Keeling Baker 501-688-8800

Bassett Law Firm Woodson Bassett III 479-521-9996

Mitchell Williams R. T. Beard III 501-688-8800

Blair & Stroud H. David Blair 870-793-8350

Gary D. Corum 501-375-6454

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Kevin A. Crass 501-376-2011

Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor Sidney P. Davis, Jr. 479-521-7600

John R. Elrod 479-582-5711

Joseph R. Falasco 501-379-1700

Rose Law Firm Patrick J. Goss 501-375-9131

Friday, Eldredge & Clark William Mell Griffin III 501-376-2011

John T. Hardin 501-375-9131

Christopher J. Heller 501-376-2011 Stephen N. Joiner 501-375-9131 M. Samuel Jones III 501-688-8800 Robert L. Jones III 479-582-5711 Jim L. Julian 501-372-6175

Williams & Anderson Philip E. Kaplan 501-859-0575

Williams & Anderson Peter G. Kumpe 501-859-0575

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings Stephen R. Lancaster 501-371-0808

Conner & Winters Todd P. Lewis 479-582-5711

Lingle Law Firm James G. Lingle 479-636-7899

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Bridges Law Firm

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull

Jeffrey H. Moore

Friday, Eldredge & Clark

Stephen A. Matthews 870-534-5532 Jeffrey H. Moore 501-414-6894

Munson, Rowlett, Moore & Boone Bruce E. Munson 501-374-6535

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Elizabeth Robben Murray 501-376-2011

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Marshall S. Ney 479-695-2011

Kutak Rock

Edward T. Oglesby 501-975-3000

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull Chad W. Pekron 501-379-1700

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Clifford W. Plunkett 479-695-2011

Williams & Anderson David M. Powell 501-859-0575

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull Steven W. Quattlebaum 501-379-1700

PPGMR Law

Brian H. Ratcliff 870-862-5523

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings Gordon S. Rather, Jr. 501-371-0808

Lax, Vaughan, Fortson, Rowe & Threet Roger D. Rowe 501-376-6565

Munson, Rowlett, Moore & Boone Beverly A. Rowlett 501-374-6535

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull Michael N. Shannon 501-379-1700

Shults & Brown Steven T. Shults 501-375-2301

Smith Cohen & Horan Don A. Smith 479-782-1001

Thomas Law Firm Floyd M. Thomas, Jr. 870-866-8451

Branch, Thompson, Warmath, & Dale Robert F. Thompson III 870-239-9581

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull John E. Tull III 501-379-1700

David B. Vandergriff 501-379-1700

William A. Waddell, Jr. 501-376-2011

Everett Wales & Comstock Jason Wales 479-443-0292

Brett D. Watson, Attorney at Law Brett D. Watson 501-281-2468

Watts, Donovan & Tilley Richard N. Watts 501-372-1406

Friday, Eldredge & Clark David D. Wilson 501-376-2011

Kutak Rock

H. Watt Gregory III 501-975-3000

Corporate Law

Williams & Anderson Philip S. Anderson 501-859-0575

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Paul B. Benham III 501-376-2011

Dover Dixon Horne Garland W. Binns, Jr. 501-375-9151

Mitchell Williams

C. Douglas Buford, Jr. 501-688-8800

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Walter M. Ebel III 501-376-2011

Teresa M. Wineland 501-975-3000

Friday, Eldredge & Clark

Commercial Litigation

Kutak Rock

Kutak Rock

Jess L. Askew III 501-975-3000

Construction Law Jack East III

Jack East III 501-372-3278

Hardin & Grace David A. Grace 501-378-7900

Dover Dixon Horne Cyril Hollingsworth 501-375-9151

Jeffrey H. Moore Jeffrey H. Moore 501-414-6894

Kutak Rock

Edward T. Oglesby 501-975-3000

Williams & Anderson David M. Powell 501-859-0575

Conner & Winters John M. Scott 479-582-5711

Copyright Law Wright, Lindsey & Jennings J. Charles Dougherty 501-371-0808

Mitchell Williams

Price C. Gardner 501-376-2011

H. Watt Gregory III 501-975-3000

Jack, Nelson & Jones Donald T. Jack, Jr. 501-375-1122

Mitchell Williams D. Nicole Lovell 501-688-8800

Mitchell Williams Walter E. May 501-688-8800

Dover Dixon Horne James C. McCastlain 501-375-9151

Mitchell Williams T. Ark Monroe III 501-688-8800

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings Fred M. Perkins III 501-371-0808

Dover Dixon Horne Steve L. Riggs 501-375-9151

Conner & Winters Greg S. Scharlau 479-582-5711

Mitchell Williams John S. Selig 501-688-8800

Shults & Brown Robert Shults 501-375-2301

Waddell, Cole & Jones

Timothy O. Dudley

The Blagg Law Firm

Everett Wales & Comstock

Everett Wales & Comstock

John Wesley Hall

Norwood & Norwood

Fuqua Campbell

The Law Office of David H. Williams

Timothy O. Dudley 501-372-0080 John C. Everett 479-443-0292

John Wesley Hall, Jr. 501-295-4010 J. Blake Hendrix 501-374-0200

Lassiter & Cassinelli Jack T. Lassiter 501-370-9300

McDaniel Law Firm Bobby R. McDaniel 870-336-4747

Norwood & Norwood Doug Norwood 479-636-1262

Jeff Rosenzweig Jeff Rosenzweig 501-372-5247

Taylor Law Partners

Doug Norwood 479-636-1262

David H. Williams 501-372-0038

Education Law Mitchell, Blackstock, Ivers, Sneddon & Marshall Clayton R. Blackstock 501-378-7870

Laser Law Firm Dan F. Bufford 501-376-2981

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Khayyam M. Eddings 501-376-2011

Criminal Defense: White-Collar

Friday, Eldredge & Clark

Bristow & Richardson Bill W. Bristow 870-935-9000

Corum-Law

Gary D. Corum 501-375-6454

Timothy O. Dudley Timothy O. Dudley 501-372-0080

Everett Wales & Comstock John C. Everett 479-443-0292

John Wesley Hall

John Wesley Hall, Jr. 501-295-4010

Fuqua Campbell J. Blake Hendrix 501-374-0200

Lassiter & Cassinelli Jack T. Lassiter 501-370-9300

McDaniel Law Firm Bobby R. McDaniel 870-336-4747

Jeff Rosenzweig Jeff Rosenzweig 501-372-5247

Corporate Compliance Law

Criminal Defense: General Practice

Thomas Law Firm

Kutak Rock

Bristow & Richardson Bill W. Bristow 870-935-9000

Christina D. Comstock 479-443-0292

Friday, Eldredge & Clark

Taylor Law Partners

Hermann Ivester 501-688-8800

Ralph Blagg 501-745-4302

Warner H. Taylor 479-316-6300

Ralph W. Waddell 870-931-1700

H. Watt Gregory III 501-975-3000 52 . JUNE 2017

Kutak Rock

Warner H. Taylor 479-316-6300

Floyd M. Thomas, Jr. 870-866-8451

DUI/DWI Defense

Christopher J. Heller 501-376-2011 Ellen Owens Smith 501-376-2011

Elder Law Raymon B. Harvey Raymon B. Harvey 501-221-3416

Electronic Discovery and Information Management Law Roberts Law Firm Karen S. Halbert 501-476-7391

Eminent Domain and Condemnation Law Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull Brandon B. Cate 479-444-5200

Kutak Rock

Randal B. Frazier 501-975-3000

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull Timothy W. Grooms 501-379-1700

Employee Benefits (ERISA) Law Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull E. B. Chiles IV 501-379-1700


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Rose Law Firm

Friday, Eldredge & Clark

Friday, Eldredge & Clark

Khayyam M. Eddings 501-376-2011

Oscar E. Davis, Jr. 501-376-2011

Friday, Eldredge & Clark

Kendall Law Firm

Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon & Galchus

Bryant Cranford 501-375-9131 David M. Graf 501-376-2011

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Joseph B. Hurst, Jr. 501-376-2011

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Alexandra A. Ifrah 501-376-2011

Friday, Eldredge & Clark A. Wyckliff Nisbet, Jr. 501-376-2011

Overbey, Strigel, Boyd & Westbrook

Susan Keller Kendall 479-464-9828

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Elizabeth Robben Murray 501-376-2011

Mitchell, Blackstock, Ivers, Sneddon & Marshall

Waddell, Cole & Jones Paul D. Waddell 870-931-1700

Rose Law Firm Tim Boe 501-375-9131

McMath Woods

John L. Burnett 501-376-2269

McMath Woods John D. Coulter 501-396-5400

Mitchell Williams

Kutak Rock

Overbey, Strigel, Boyd & Westbrook

Lavey and Burnett

Khayyam M. Eddings 501-376-2011 Byron L. Freeland 501-688-8800

Employment Law Management

Employment Law Individuals

Friday, Eldredge & Clark

Janet L. Pulliam 501-378-7870

Thomas L. Overbey 479-442-3554

Craig H. Westbrook 501-664-8105

Melissa McJunkins Duke 501-371-9999

John D. Coulter 501-396-5400

Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon & Galchus J. Bruce Cross 501-371-9999

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings John D. Davis 501-371-0808

James M. Gary 501-975-3000

Mitchell Williams Kathlyn Graves 501-688-8800

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Christopher J. Heller 501-376-2011

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Daniel L. Herrington 501-376-2011

Rainwater, Holt & Sexton Denise Reid Hoggard 800-767-4815

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings William Stuart Jackson 501-371-0808

Gilker & Jones

Michael R. Jones 479-369-4294

54 . JUNE 2017

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings

Waddell, Cole & Jones

Williams & Anderson

Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon & Galchus

Michelle M. Kaemmerling 501-371-0808 Philip E. Kaplan 501-859-0575

Rose Law Firm David P. Martin 501-375-9131

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Michael S. Moore 501-376-2011

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Elizabeth Robben Murray 501-376-2011

Mitchell, Blackstock, Ivers, Sneddon & Marshall Janet L. Pulliam 501-378-7870

Ramsay, Bridgforth, Robinson and Raley Spencer F. Robinson 870-535-9000

Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon & Galchus Richard A. Roderick 501-371-9999

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Frederick S. Ursery 501-376-2011

Cox, Sterling, McClure & Vandiver Brian A. Vandiver 501-954-8073

Paul D. Waddell 870-931-1700

Amber Wilson Bagley 501-371-9999

Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon & Galchus Carolyn B. Witherspoon 501-371-9999

Friday, Eldredge & Clark H. Wayne Young 501-376-2011

Energy Law Barber Law Firm

Lawrence E. Chisenhall, Jr. 501-372-6175

Gill Ragon Owen

Stephen K. Cuffman 501-376-3800

Rose Law Firm

Stephen N. Joiner 501-375-9131

Matthews, Campbell, Rhoads, McClure, Thompson & Fryauf David R. Matthews 479-282-2586

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings N. M. Norton 501-371-0808


Trotter Law Firm Scott C. Trotter 501-353-1069

Mitchell Williams Marcella J. Taylor 501-688-8800

Mitchell Williams

Environmental Law

Walter G. Wright, Jr. 501-688-8800

Dover Dixon Horne Mark H. Allison 501-375-9151

Family Law

Mitchell Williams

Marcia Barnes & Associates

Sherry P. Bartley 501-688-8800

Conner & Winters John R. Elrod 479-582-5711

PPGMR Law

Julie DeWoody Greathouse 501-603-9000

McMath Woods

Samuel E. Ledbetter 501-396-5400

Barber Law Firm Charles R. Nestrud 501-372-6175

PPGMR Law

John F. Peiserich 501-603-9000

PPGMR Law

G. Alan Perkins 501-603-9000

Rose Law Firm Brian Rosenthal 501-375-9131

Marcia Barnes 501-492-3438

Coplin & Hardy Barry E. Coplin 501-707-0300

Stephen Engstrom Law Office Stephen C. Engstrom 501-375-6453

Hicks & Associates Carrol Ann Hicks 501-771-1817

Hilburn, Calhoon, Harper, Pruniski & Calhoun Sam Hilburn 501-372-0110

Henry Hodges

Matthews, Campbell, Rhoads, McClure, Thompson & Fryauf David R. Matthews 479-282-2586

Goodwin Moore

Harry Truman Moore 870-239-2225

Legacy Law Group Bryan J. Reis 501-525-3130

Dover Dixon Horne Gary B. Rogers 501-375-9151

Wagoner, Mann & Kemp Jack Wagoner III 501-663-5225

Financial Services Regulation Law Kutak Rock

H. Watt Gregory III 501-975-3000

Mitchell Williams Donald H. Henry 501-688-8800

Kutak Rock

Andreoli Law

Friday, Eldredge & Clark

Mitchell Williams

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull

Mitchell, Blackstock, Ivers, Sneddon & Marshall

Jess L. Askew III 501-975-3000 James M. Simpson 501-376-2011

John E. Tull III 501-379-1700

David L. Ivers 501-378-7870

Franchise Law

Donald T. Jack, Jr. 501-375-1122

Williams & Anderson

Kutak Rock

David M. Powell 501-859-0575

Lax, Vaughan, Fortson, Rowe & Threet Roger D. Rowe 501-376-6565

Friday, Eldredge & Clark William A. Waddell, Jr. 501-376-2011

Bryan G. Looney 479-973-4200

Mitchell, Blackstock, Ivers, Sneddon & Marshall Michael W. Mitchell 501-378-7870

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings Lee J. Muldrow 501-371-0808

Government Relations Practice

Kutak Rock

Mitchell Williams

The Health Law Firm

First Amendment Law

T. Ark Monroe III 501-688-8800

Dodds, Kidd & Ryan

Philip S. Anderson 501-859-0575

Health Care Law

Judson C. Kidd 501-386-9508

Charles B. Cliett, Jr. 501-688-8800

Jack, Nelson & Jones

Henry Hodges 501-375-0400

Williams & Anderson

Elizabeth Andreoli 501-690-5069

Debby Thetford Nye 479-973-4200 Harold H. Simpson 501-221-7100

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Bruce B. Tidwell 501-376-2011

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Immigration Law

501-372-6175

Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon & Galchus

Mitchell Williams

Melissa McJunkins Duke 501-371-9999

Kathy Woodward Goss

Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins

Kathy W. Goss 501-676-6522

Michael P. Vanderford 501-372-1887

Information Technology Law

Labor Law Management

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings

Rose Law Firm

N. M. Norton 501-371-0808

Insurance Law Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins Overton S. Anderson 501-372-1887

Friday, Eldredge & Clark James C. Baker, Jr. 501-376-2011

Mitchell Williams

Frederick K. Campbell 501-688-8800

Mitchell Williams Doak Foster 501-688-8800

Tim Boe 501-375-9131

McMath Woods John D. Coulter 501-396-5400

Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon & Galchus J. Bruce Cross 501-371-9999

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings John D. Davis 501-371-0808

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Oscar E. Davis, Jr. 501-376-2011

Mitchell Williams Byron L. Freeland 501-688-8800

Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins

Kutak Rock

Mariam T. Hopkins 501-372-1887

James M. Gary 501-975-3000

Dover Dixon Horne

Mitchell Williams

Allan W. Horne 501-375-9151

Kathlyn Graves 501-688-8800

Roy, Lambert, Lovelace, Bingaman & Wood

Friday, Eldredge & Clark

Jerry L. Lovelace 479-756-8510

Mitchell Williams T. Ark Monroe III 501-688-8800

Munson, Rowlett, Moore & Boone John E. Moore 501-374-6535

Mitchell Williams

Scott D. Provencher 501-688-8800

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull Steven W. Quattlebaum 501-379-1700

Munson, Rowlett, Moore & Boone Beverly A. Rowlett 501-374-6535

Munson, Rowlett, Moore & Boone Emily Runyon 501-374-6535

Barber, McCaskill, Jones & Hale Scott E. Strauss 56 . JUNE 2017

Jeffrey Thomas 501-688-8800

Daniel L. Herrington 501-376-2011

Gilker & Jones

Michael R. Jones 479-369-4294

Kendall Law Firm

Susan Keller Kendall 479-464-9828

Rose Law Firm David P. Martin 501-375-9131

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Michael S. Moore 501-376-2011

Ramsay, Bridgforth, Robinson and Raley Spencer F. Robinson 870-535-9000

Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon & Galchus Richard A. Roderick 501-371-9999

Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon & Galchus Carolyn B. Witherspoon 501-371-9999


Labor Law - Union Lavey and Burnett John L. Burnett 501-376-2269

Melva Harmon Melva Harmon 501-372-1133

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings Michelle M. Kaemmerling 501-371-0808

Kendall Law Firm

Susan Keller Kendall 479-464-9828

Mitchell, Blackstock, Ivers, Sneddon & Marshall

Williams & Anderson Philip S. Anderson 501-859-0575

Rose Law Firm

Richard T. Donovan 501-375-9131

Kutak Rock

Randal B. Frazier 501-975-3000

Mitchell Williams Donald H. Henry 501-688-8800

Williams & Anderson Philip E. Kaplan 501-859-0575

Janet L. Pulliam 501-378-7870

Friday, Eldredge & Clark

Land Use and Zoning Law

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings

Kutak Rock

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull

Randal B. Frazier 501-975-3000

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull Timothy W. Grooms 501-379-1700

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull J. Cliff McKinney II 501-379-1700

Marshall S. Ney 479-695-2011

Kimberly Wood Tucker 501-371-0808

John E. Tull III 501-379-1700

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull David B. Vandergriff 501-379-1700

Friday, Eldredge & Clark William A. Waddell, Jr. 501-376-2011

Legal Malpractice Law - Defendants

Litigation - Bankruptcy

Friday, Eldredge & Clark

Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor

Donald H. Bacon 501-376-2011

Barber, McCaskill, Jones & Hale G. Spence Fricke 501-372-6175

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings

Constance G. Clark 479-521-7600

Cypert, Crouch, Clark & Harwell William M. Clark, Jr. 479-751-5222

Edwin L. Lowther, Jr. 501-371-0808

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings

Leveraged Buyouts and Private Equity Law

James F. Dowden

Kutak Rock

Hardin & Grace

H. Watt Gregory III 501-975-3000

Litigation - Antitrust Williams & Anderson Philip S. Anderson 501-859-0575

Friday, Eldredge & Clark James M. Simpson 501-376-2011

Litigation - Banking and Finance Allen Law Firm

Charles T. Coleman 501-371-0808 James F. Dowden 501-324-4700 David A. Grace 501-378-7900

Keech Law Firm Kevin P. Keech 501-221-3200

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Harry A. Light 501-376-2011

Mitchell Williams Lance R. Miller 501-688-8800

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Marshall S. Ney 479-695-2011

H. William Allen 501-374-7100

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Kutak Rock

Edward T. Oglesby 501-975-3000

Everett Wales & Comstock Jason Wales 479-443-0292

ADR, Inc.

John Dewey Watson 501-376-2121

Philip E. Kaplan 501-859-0575

Lingle Law Firm James G. Lingle 479-636-7899

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings Troy A. Price 501-371-0808

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull

Watts, Donovan & Tilley John E. Tull III Richard N. Watts 501-372-1406

Litigation Environmental Mitchell Williams Sherry P. Bartley 501-688-8800

501-379-1700

Litigation - Insurance Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon & Galchus M. Stephen Bingham 501-371-9999

Munson, Rowlett, Moore & Carney Bates & Pulliam Boone Joseph Henry Bates III 501-312-8500

Mark Breeding 501-374-6535

Conner & Winters

Kutak Rock

Mitchell Williams

Munson, Rowlett, Moore & Boone

John R. Elrod 479-582-5711 Allan Gates 501-688-8800

PPGMR Law

Julie DeWoody Greathouse 501-603-9000

McMath Woods

Samuel E. Ledbetter 501-396-5400

Lingle Law Firm James G. Lingle 479-636-7899

PPGMR Law

John F. Peiserich 501-603-9000

PPGMR Law

G. Alan Perkins 501-603-9000

Mitchell Williams Marcella J. Taylor 501-688-8800

Litigation - ERISA Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull Mitchell Williams

Blair & Stroud

Jack East III

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull

Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins

Hardin & Grace

Stan D. Smith 501-688-8800

Geoffrey B. Treece 501-379-1700

Litigation Construction Kutak Rock

Russell C. Atchley 479-973-4200

H. David Blair 870-793-8350

Jason J. Campbell 501-372-1887

Junius Bracy Cross, Jr. Junius Bracy Cross, Jr. 501-374-2512

Rose Law Firm

Richard T. Donovan 501-375-9131

Jack East III 501-372-3278

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull

John E. Moore 501-374-6535

Kutak Rock

Edward T. Oglesby 501-975-3000

Litigation - Intellectual Property Allen Law Firm H. William Allen 501-374-7100

Mitchell Williams Hermann Ivester 501-688-8800

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Marshall S. Ney 479-695-2011

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings N. M. Norton 501-371-0808

Litigation - Labor and Employment Robertson, Beasley, Shipley & Redd Alfred F. Angulo, Jr. 479-782-8813

E. B. Chiles IV 501-379-1700

Lavey and Burnett

Cyril Hollingsworth 501-375-9151

Litigation - First Amendment

James, Carter & Priebe

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings

Williams & Anderson

David A. Grace 501-378-7900

Dover Dixon Horne

Stephen R. Lancaster 501-371-0808

Lingle Law Firm James G. Lingle 479-636-7899

58 . JUNE 2017

Brandon B. Cate 479-444-5200

Mark W. Dossett 479-973-4200

Philip S. Anderson 501-859-0575

Williams & Anderson

John L. Burnett 501-376-2269

Daniel R. Carter 866-716-3242

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull E. B. Chiles IV 501-379-1700


McMath Woods

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings

Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon & Galchus

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings

John D. Coulter 501-396-5400

J. Bruce Cross 501-371-9999

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings John D. Davis 501-371-0808

Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor Sidney P. Davis, Jr. 479-521-7600

Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon & Galchus Melissa McJunkins Duke 501-371-9999

Kutak Rock

James M. Gary 501-975-3000

Mitchell Williams Kathlyn Graves 501-688-8800

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Christopher J. Heller 501-376-2011

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Daniel L. Herrington 501-376-2011

Rainwater, Holt & Sexton

William Stuart Jackson 501-371-0808

Michelle M. Kaemmerling 501-371-0808

Williams & Anderson Philip E. Kaplan 501-859-0575

Kendall Law Firm

Susan Keller Kendall 479-464-9828

Littler Mendelson Eva C. Madison 479-582-6100

Rose Law Firm David P. Martin 501-375-9131

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Michael S. Moore 501-376-2011

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Elizabeth Robben Murray 501-376-2011

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Marshall S. Ney 479-695-2011

Mitchell, Blackstock, Ivers, Sneddon & Marshall Janet L. Pulliam 501-378-7870

Denise Reid Hoggard 800-767-4815

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Ramsay, Bridgforth, Robinson and Raley Spencer F. Robinson 870-535-9000

Robertson, Beasley, Shipley & Redd Benjamin H. Shipley III 479-782-8813

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Frederick S. Ursery 501-376-2011

Daily & Woods Thomas A. Daily 479-782-0361

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull Joseph R. Falasco 501-379-1700

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull Timothy W. Grooms 501-379-1700

Waddell, Cole & Jones

Mitchell Williams

Friday, Eldredge & Clark

Mitchell Williams

Paul D. Waddell 870-931-1700

H. Wayne Young 501-376-2011

Litigation - Mergers and Acquisitions Clark Law Firm Suzanne G. Clark 476-856-6380

Litigation - Real Estate Mitchell Williams John Keeling Baker 501-688-8800

Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor Constance G. Clark 479-521-7600

L. Kyle Heffley 479-464-5650

M. Samuel Jones III 501-688-8800

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings Stephen R. Lancaster 501-371-0808

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull David B. Vandergriff 501-379-1700

Litigation - Securities Allen Law Firm H. William Allen 501-374-7100

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Kevin A. Crass 501-376-2011

Rose Law Firm

Richard T. Donovan 501-375-9131

Mitchell Williams M. Samuel Jones III 501-688-8800

Litigation - Trusts and Estates Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor William Jackson Butt II 479-521-7600

Mitchell Williams John Keeling Baker 501-688-8800

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Price C. Gardner 501-376-2011

Allison J. Cornwell 501-376-2011

Richard F. Hatfield Richard F. Hatfield 501-374-9010

Waddell, Cole & Jones Robert S. Jones 870-931-1700

Rose Law Firm Craig S. Lair 501-375-9131

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings Stephen R. Lancaster 501-371-0808

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Sarah Cotton Patterson 501-376-2011

Munson, Rowlett, Moore & Boone John E. Moore 501-374-6535

Mitchell Williams Lyn P. Pruitt 501-688-8800

Rose Law Firm

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull

Dover Dixon Horne

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings

Craig S. Lair 501-375-9131

Michael O. Parker 501-375-9151

Friday, Eldredge & Clark

Mass Tort Litigation / Class Actions Defendants

Steven W. Quattlebaum 501-379-1700 Gordon S. Rather, Jr. 501-371-0808

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull John E. Tull III 501-379-1700

Mitchell Williams Sherry P. Bartley 501-688-8800

Bassett Law Firm Woodson Bassett III 479-521-9996

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull E. B. Chiles IV 501-379-1700

Conner & Winters John R. Elrod 479-582-5711

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings

Litigation and

60 . JUNE 2017

Controversy - Tax

Edwin L. Lowther, Jr. 501-371-0808

Mass Tort Litigation / Class Actions Plaintiffs Johnson & Vines

Anthony C. Johnson 501-777-7777

Turner & Associates Clyde Talbot Turner 501-791-2277

Media Law Kutak Rock

Jess L. Askew III 501-975-3000


AYMAG.COM . 61


Friday, Eldredge & Clark James M. Simpson 501-376-2011

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull John E. Tull III 501-379-1700

Mediation Hamlin Dispute Resolution Frank S. Hamlin 501-850-8888

Robert E. Hornberger Attorney/Mediator Robert E. Hornberger 479-459-7878

ADR, Inc.

John Dewey Watson 501-376-2121

Medical Malpractice Law - Defendants Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins Overton S. Anderson 501-372-1887

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Michelle Ator 501-376-2011

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Donald H. Bacon 501-376-2011 62 . JUNE 2017

Munson, Rowlett, Moore & Boone Timothy L. Boone 501-374-6535

Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins Jason J. Campbell 501-372-1887

Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor Kelly Carithers 479-521-7600

Mitchell Williams Ken Cook 501-688-8800

Cox, Cox & Estes Walter B. Cox 479-251-7900

Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor Sidney P. Davis, Jr. 479-521-7600

Cox, Cox & Estes James R. Estes 479-251-7900

Bassett Law Firm Walker Dale Garrett 479-521-9996

Hardin, Jesson & Terry Jeffrey W. Hatfield 501-850-0015

Mitchell Williams

Waddell, Cole & Jones

Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins

Friday, Eldredge & Clark

L. Kyle Heffley 479-464-5650

Mariam T. Hopkins 501-372-1887

Mitchell Williams M. Samuel Jones III 501-688-8800

Roy, Lambert, Lovelace, Bingaman & Wood Robert J. Lambert, Jr. 479-756-8510

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings Edwin L. Lowther, Jr. 501-371-0808

RMP

Paul D. McNeill 870-394-5200

Munson, Rowlett, Moore & Boone Bruce E. Munson 501-374-6535

Mitchell Williams

Scott D. Provencher 501-688-8800

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Bradley S. Runyon 501-376-2011

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Laura Hensley Smith 501-376-2011

Paul D. Waddell 870-931-1700 J. Adam Wells 501-376-2011

Medical Malpractice Law - Plaintiffs Blair & Stroud H. David Blair 870-793-8350

McDaniel Law Firm Bobby R. McDaniel 870-336-4747

Mergers and Acquisitions Law Friday, Eldredge & Clark Paul B. Benham III 501-376-2011

Mitchell Williams

C. Douglas Buford, Jr. 501-688-8800

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Walter M. Ebel III 501-376-2011

Kutak Rock

H. Watt Gregory III 501-975-3000

Kutak Rock

David A. Smith 501-975-3000

Smith Hurst

James W. Smith 479-301-2444

Lax, Vaughan, Fortson, Rowe & Threet Thomas C. Vaughan, Jr. 501-376-6565

Mortgage Banking Foreclosure Law Wilson & Associates Jennifer Wilson-Harvey 501-216-9388

Municipal Law Rose Law Firm M. Jane Dickey 501-375-9131

Williams & Anderson David F. Menz 501-859-0575

Friday, Eldredge & Clark J. Shepherd Russell III 501-376-2011

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings John William Spivey III 501-371-0808

Kutak Rock

Gordon M. Wilbourn 501-975-3000


Non-Profit / Charities Law Friday, Eldredge & Clark Byron M. Eiseman, Jr. 501-376-2011

Rose Law Firm W. Wilson Jones 501-375-9131

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Sarah Cotton Patterson 501-376-2011

Mitchell Williams R. T. Beard III 501-688-8800

Munson, Rowlett, Moore & Boone Timothy L. Boone 501-374-6535

Clark S. Brewster Clark S. Brewster 501-315-6000

Friday, Eldredge & Clark

Bristow & Richardson

K. Coleman Westbrook, Jr. 501-376-2011

Bill W. Bristow 870-935-9000

Oil and Gas Law

Mitchell Williams

Keith & Clegg

Carolyn J. Clegg 870-234-3550

Daily & Woods Thomas A. Daily 479-782-0361

Hardin, Jesson & Terry Robert M. Honea 479-452-2200

Michelle L. Browning 501-688-8800

Laser Law Firm Dan F. Bufford 501-376-2981

Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor Kelly Carithers 479-521-7600

PPGMR Law

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull

G. Alan Perkins 501-603-9000

E. B. Chiles IV 501-379-1700

PPGMR Law

Cox, Cox & Estes

James D. Rankin III 501-603-9000

Walter B. Cox 479-251-7900

Patent Law

Friday, Eldredge & Clark

Carver Patent Law Stephen D. Carver 501-224-1500

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings J. Charles Dougherty 501-371-0808

Henry Law Firm

Mark Murphey Henry 479-695-1330

Personal Injury Litigation - Defendants Robertson, Beasley, Shipley & Redd Alfred F. Angulo, Jr. 479-782-8813

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Michelle Ator 501-376-2011

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Donald H. Bacon 501-376-2011

Friday, Eldredge & Clark James C. Baker, Jr. 501-376-2011

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings Michael D. Barnes 501-371-0808

Mitchell Williams Sherry P. Bartley 501-688-8800

Kevin A. Crass 501-376-2011

Barber, McCaskill, Jones & Hale

Friday, Eldredge & Clark William Mell Griffin III 501-376-2011

Hardin, Jesson & Terry

J. Cotten Cunningham 501-372-6175

Jeffrey W. Hatfield 501-850-0015

Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor

Barber, McCaskill, Jones & Hale

Sidney P. Davis, Jr. 479-521-7600

Robert L. Henry III 501-372-6175

Watts, Donovan & Tilley

Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins

David M. Donovan 501-372-1406

Mariam T. Hopkins 501-372-1887

Barber, McCaskill, Jones & Hale

Huckabay Law Firm

William H. Edwards, Jr. 501-372-6175

Cox, Cox & Estes James R. Estes 479-251-7900

Barber, McCaskill, Jones & Hale G. Spence Fricke 501-372-6175

Bassett Law Firm Walker Dale Garrett 479-521-9996

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings Roger A. Glasgow 501-371-0808

D. Michael Huckabay, Jr. 501-375-5600

Conner & Winters Robert L. Jones III 479-582-5711

Barber Law Firm Jim L. Julian 501-372-6175

Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins David A. Littleton 501-372-1887

Roy, Lambert, Lovelace, Bingaman & Wood Jerry L. Lovelace 479-756-8510

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings Edwin L. Lowther, Jr. 501-371-0808

Bridges Law Firm

Stephen A. Matthews 870-534-5532

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Joseph P. McKay 501-376-2011

RMP

Paul D. McNeill 870-394-5200

Mitchell Williams Stuart P. Miller 501-688-8800

Munson, Rowlett, Moore & Boone John E. Moore 501-374-6535

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings Rodney P. Moore 501-371-0808

Munson, Rowlett, Moore & Boone Bruce E. Munson 501-374-6535

Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins Randy P. Murphy 501-372-1887

Womack Phelps Puryear Mayfield & McNeil John V. Phelps 870-932-0900

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Clifford W. Plunkett 479-695-2011

Mitchell Williams

Scott D. Provencher 501-688-8800

Mitchell Williams Lyn P. Pruitt 501-688-8800

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull Steven W. Quattlebaum 501-379-1700

PPGMR Law

Brian H. Ratclif 870-862-5523

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings Gordon S. Rather, Jr. 501-371-0808

Munson, Rowlett, Moore & Boone Beverly A. Rowlett 501-374-6535

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings Jerry J. Sallings 501-371-0808

Bassett Law Firm Curtis L. Nebben 479-521-9996

AYMAG.COM . 63


Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull Michael N. Shannon 501-379-1700

Friday, Eldredge & Clark James M. Simpson 501-376-2011

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings Jeffrey L. Singleton 501-371-0808

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Laura Hensley Smith 501-376-2011

Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor Don A. Taylor 479-521-7600

Thomas Law Firm Floyd M. Thomas, Jr. 870-866-8451

Watts, Donovan & Tilley James W. Tilley 501-372-1406

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull John E. Tull III 501-379-1700

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Frederick S. Ursery 501-376-2011

Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins Michael P. Vanderford 501-372-1887

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Guy Alton Wade 501-376-2011

Everett Wales & Comstock Jason Wales 479-443-0292

Watts, Donovan & Tilley Richard N. Watts 501-372-1406

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull Thomas G. Williams 501-379-1700

Friday, Eldredge & Clark David D. Wilson 501-376-2011

Kutak Rock

Teresa M. Wineland 501-975-3000

Conner & Winters G. Alan Wooten 479-582-5711

Dover Dixon Horne Todd Wooten 501-375-9151

Personal Injury Litigation - Plaintiffs Bailey & Oliver Frank H. Bailey 479-202-5200 64 . JUNE 2017

Blair & Stroud H. David Blair 870-793-8350

McMath Woods Will Bond 501-396-5400

The Boswell Law Firm Ted Boswell 501-847-3031

Bristow & Richardson Bill W. Bristow 870-935-9000

Cearley Law Firm

Robert M. Cearley, Jr. 501-372-5600

Rainwater, Holt & Sexton Thom Diaz 800-767-4815

Timothy O. Dudley Timothy O. Dudley 501-372-0080

Easley & Houseal B. Michael Easley 870-633-1447

James, Carter & Priebe Paul J. James 866-716-3242

Ken Kieklak, Attorney at Law Ken Kieklak 479-251-7767

Roy, Lambert, Lovelace, Bingaman & Wood Jerry L. Lovelace 479-756-8510

McDaniel Law Firm Bobby R. McDaniel 870-336-4747

McMath Woods

James Bruce McMath 501-396-5400

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings Rodney P. Moore 501-371-0808

Rainwater, Holt & Sexton Michael R. Rainwater 800-767-4815

Rainwater, Holt & Sexton Robert Sexton 800-767-4815

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull Michael N. Shannon 501-379-1700

Law Offices of James F. Swindoll James F. Swindoll 501-374-1290

Thomas Law Firm Floyd M. Thomas, Jr. 870-866-8451

Turner & Associates Clyde Talbot Turner 501-791-2277

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Frederick S. Ursery 501-376-2011

Everett Wales & Comstock Jason Wales 479-443-0292

Wells & Wells Phillip J. Wells 870-782-4084

Whetstone Law Firm Bud B. Whetstone 501-376-3564

The Law Office of David H. Williams David H. Williams 501-372-0038

Product Liability Litigation - Defendants Wright, Lindsey & Jennings Michael D. Barnes 501-371-0808

Munson, Rowlett, Moore & Boone Mark Breeding 501-374-6535

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull E. B. Chiles IV 501-379-1700

Deacon Law Firm Barry Deacon 479-582-5353

Barber, McCaskill, Jones & Hale G. Spence Fricke 501-372-6175

Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins Julie M. Hancock 501-372-1887

Roy, Lambert, Lovelace, Bingaman & Wood Jerry L. Lovelace 479-756-8510

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull

Professional Malpractice Law Plaintiffs

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull

Blair & Stroud

Michael N. Shannon 501-379-1700

John E. Tull III 501-379-1700

Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins Michael P. Vanderford 501-372-1887

Watts, Donovan & Tilley Richard N. Watts 501-372-1406

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull Thomas G. Williams 501-379-1700

Munson, Rowlett, Moore & Boone Bruce E. Munson 501-374-6535

Mitchell Williams

Scott D. Provencher 501-688-8800

Mitchell Williams Lyn P. Pruitt 501-688-8800

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull Steven W. Quattlebaum 501-379-1700

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings Gordon S. Rather, Jr. 501-371-0808

Timothy O. Dudley Timothy O. Dudley 501-372-0080

The Law Office of David H. Williams David H. Williams 501-372-0038

Project Finance Law Mitchell Williams Harold W. Hamlin 501-688-8800

Product Liability Litigation - Plaintiffs

Mitchell Williams

Blair & Stroud

Williams & Anderson

Cearley Law Firm

Public Finance Law

H. David Blair 870-793-8350

Robert M. Cearley, Jr. 501-372-5600

Roy, Lambert, Lovelace, Bingaman & Wood Jerry L. Lovelace 479-756-8510

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull Michael N. Shannon 501-379-1700

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull John E. Tull III 501-379-1700

Turner & Associates Clyde Talbot Turner 501-791-2277

Whetstone Law Firm Bud B. Whetstone 501-376-3564

John Alan Lewis 479-464-5650 David F. Menz 501-859-0575

Friday, Eldredge & Clark J. Shepherd Russell III 501-376-2011

Williams & Anderson W. Jackson Williams 501-859-0575

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Robert B. Beach, Jr. 501-376-2011

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Ryan Bowman 501-376-2011

Rose Law Firm M. Jane Dickey 501-375-9131

Kutak Rock

James E. Hathaway III 501-975-3000

Friday, Eldredge & Clark

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings Edwin L. Lowther, Jr. 501-371-0808

H. David Blair 870-793-8350

Professional Malpractice Law Defendants Blair & Stroud H. David Blair 870-793-8350

Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins David A. Littleton 501-372-1887

Williams & Anderson David M. Powell 501-859-0575

Mitchell Williams

Scott D. Provencher 501-688-8800

Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins Michael P. Vanderford 501-372-1887

Thomas P. Leggett 501-376-2011

Williams & Anderson David F. Menz 501-859-0575

Friday, Eldredge & Clark J. Shepherd Russell III 501-376-2011

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings John William Spivey III 501-371-0808

Kutak Rock

Gordon M. Wilbourn 501-975-3000

Williams & Anderson W. Jackson Williams 501-859-0575


Railroad Law Deacon Law Firm Barry Deacon 479-582-5353

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Joseph P. McKay 501-376-2011

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Scott H. Tucker 501-376-2011

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Frederick S. Ursery 501-376-2011

Real Estate Law Dover Dixon Horne

James Paul Beachboard 501-375-9151

University of Arkansas School of Law Carl J. Circo 479-575-5601

Friday, Eldredge & Clark James C. Clark 501-376-2011

Eilbott Law Firm Don Eilbott 501-225-2885

Kutak Rock

Randal B. Frazier 501-975-3000

Friday, Eldredge & Clark

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings

Mitchell Williams

Friday, Eldredge & Clark

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull

J. Mark Spradley

Smith Hurst

Williams & Anderson

Friday, Eldredge & Clark

Friday, Eldredge & Clark

Securities / Capital Markets Law

Securities Regulation

Samuel R. Baxter 501-664-9555

Rose Law Firm

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Paul B. Benham III 501-376-2011

Friday, Eldredge & Clark

Mitchell Williams

Rose Law Firm

Kutak Rock

Rose Law Firm

Mitchell Williams

Bridges Law Firm

Price C. Gardner 501-376-2011

Timothy W. Grooms 501-379-1700

Mitchell Williams Harold W. Hamlin 501-688-8800

Hankins Law Firm Stuart W. Hankins 501-833-0168

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull Jeb H. Joyce 501-379-1700

Mitchell Williams John Alan Lewis 479-464-5650

Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull J. Cliff McKinney II 501-379-1700

John William Spivey III 501-371-0808 J. Mark Spradley 501-537-4290 Jay T. Taylor 501-376-2011

Robyn P. Allmendinger 501-375-9131

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Paul B. Benham III 501-376-2011

Dover Dixon Horne Garland W. Binns, Jr. 501-375-9151

Mitchell Williams

C. Douglas Buford, Jr. 501-688-8800

Friday, Eldredge & Clark

Rose Law Firm

Kutak Rock

Brian Rosenthal 501-375-9131

Friday, Eldredge & Clark James M. Saxton 501-376-2011

James W. Smith 479-301-2444 Robert T. Smith 501-376-2011

J. Shepherd Russell III 501-376-2011 W. Jackson Williams 501-859-0575

Tax Law Baxter Jewell & Dobson

McMullan Law Firm Marian M. McMullan 501-376-9119

John S. Selig 501-688-8800

Walter M. Ebel III 501-376-2011

H. Watt Gregory III 501-975-3000

Mitchell Williams D. Nicole Lovell 501-688-8800

C. Douglas Buford, Jr. 501-688-8800 H. Watt Gregory III 501-975-3000 John S. Selig 501-688-8800

Securitization and Structured Finance Law Kutak Rock

H. Watt Gregory III 501-975-3000

J. Lee Brown 501-376-2011

C. Brantly Buck 501-375-9131

Bryant Cranford 501-375-9131 Ted N. Drake 870-534-5532

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Bryan W. Duke 501-376-2011

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Walter M. Ebel III 501-376-2011

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Byron M. Eiseman, Jr. 501-376-2011

AYMAG.COM . 65


Friday, Eldredge & Clark Price C. Gardner 501-376-2011

Joseph Hickey Joseph Hickey 870-862-3478

Ramsay, Bridgforth, Robinson and Raley Anthony A. Hilliard 870-535-9000

Technology Law Wright, Lindsey & Jennings J. Charles Dougherty 501-371-0808

Trade Secrets Law Friday, Eldredge & Clark Elizabeth Robben Murray 501-376-2011

Waddell, Cole & Jones Robert S. Jones 870-931-1700

Trademark Law

Rose Law Firm

Carver Patent Law

W. Wilson Jones 501-375-9131

Stephen D. Carver 501-224-1500

Rose Law Firm

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings

Craig S. Lair 501-375-9131

J. Charles Dougherty 501-371-0808

John C. Lessel

Henry Law Firm

John C. Lessel 501-954-9000

Mark Murphey Henry 479-695-1330

RMP

Mitchell Williams

James Lee Moore III 479-443-2705

Hermann Ivester 501-688-8800

Overbey, Strigel, Boyd & Westbrook

Rose Law Firm

Thomas L. Overbey 479-442-3554

Dover Dixon Horne Michael O. Parker 501-375-9151

Dover Dixon Horne John B. Peace 501-375-9151

Kutak Rock

David A. Smith 501-975-3000

Smith Hurst

James W. Smith 479-301-2444

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Robert T. Smith 501-376-2011

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings John R. Tisdale 501-371-0808

Lax, Vaughan, Fortson, Rowe & Threet Thomas C. Vaughan, Jr. 501-376-6565

Overbey, Strigel, Boyd & Westbrook Craig H. Westbrook 501-664-8105

Womack Phelps Puryear Mayfield & McNeil Tom D. Womack 870-932-0900

Rose Law Firm Dan C. Young 501-375-9131

Kathryn Bennett Perkins 501-375-9131

Transportation Law Kendall Law Firm

Susan Keller Kendall 479-464-9828

Munson, Rowlett, Moore & Boone Bruce E. Munson 501-374-6535

Trusts and Estates Rose Law Firm Steve Bauman 501-375-9131

Friday, Eldredge & Clark W. Thomas Baxter 501-376-2011

Friday, Eldredge & Clark J. Lee Brown 501-376-2011

Rose Law Firm C. Brantly Buck 501-375-9131

Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor William Jackson Butt II 479-521-7600

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Allison J. Cornwell 501-376-2011

Rose Law Firm Adam H. Crow 501-375-9131

Eichenbaum Liles Jeffrey H. Dixon 501-376-4531 66 . JUNE 2017

Bridges Law Firm Ted N. Drake 870-534-5532

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Byron M. Eiseman, Jr. 501-376-2011

Haught & Wade

Womack Phelps Puryear Mayfield & McNeil Tom D. Womack 870-932-0900

Rose Law Firm Dan C. Young 501-375-9131

William Dixon Haught 501-375-5257

Utilities Law

Joseph Hickey

Trotter Law Firm

Joseph Hickey 870-862-3478

Ramsay, Bridgforth, Robinson and Raley Anthony A. Hilliard 870-535-9000

Waddell, Cole & Jones Robert S. Jones 870-931-1700

Rose Law Firm W. Wilson Jones 501-375-9131

Rose Law Firm Craig S. Lair 501-375-9131

John C. Lessel John C. Lessel 501-954-9000

Scott C. Trotter 501-353-1069

Venture Capital Law Kutak Rock

H. Watt Gregory III 501-975-3000

Water Law Rose Law Firm Brian Rosenthal 501-375-9131

Mitchell Williams

Walter G. Wright, Jr. 501-688-8800

RMP

Workers' Compensation Law Claimants

Bridges Law Firm

Moore, Giles & Matteson

Overbey, Strigel, Boyd & Westbrook

Ken Kieklak, Attorney at Law

James Lee Moore III 479-443-2705 James C. Moser, Jr. 870-534-5532

Thomas L. Overbey 479-442-3554

Dover Dixon Horne Michael O. Parker 501-375-9151

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Sarah Cotton Patterson 501-376-2011

Dover Dixon Horne John B. Peace 501-375-9151

Mitchell Williams Jennifer R. Pierce 501-688-8800

Mitchell Williams

Christopher T. Rogers 479-464-5650

Kutak Rock

David A. Smith 501-975-3000

Smith Hurst

James W. Smith 479-301-2444

Haught & Wade

John Cogan Wade 501-375-5257

Friday, Eldredge & Clark K. Coleman Westbrook, Jr. 501-376-2011

Gregory Giles 870-774-5191

Ken Kieklak 479-251-7767

Walker, Shock & Harp Eddie H. Walker, Jr. 479-783-7600

Wells & Wells Phillip J. Wells 870-782-4084

Philip M. Wilson Law Philip M. Wilson 501-374-4000

Workers' Compensation Law Employers Ledbetter, Cogbill, Arnold & Harrison

Bridges Law Firm Michael J. Dennis 870-534-5532

Coplin & Hardy Betty J. Hardy 501-707-0300

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings Lee J. Muldrow 501-371-0808

Anderson, Murphy & Hopkin Randy P. Murphy 501-372-1887

Bassett Law Firm Curtis L. Nebben 479-521-9996

Barber, McCaskill, Jones & Hale Frank B. Newell 501-372-6175

Dover Dixon Horne Joseph H. Purvis 501-375-9151

PPGMR Law

Brian H. Ratcliff 870-862-5523

Ryburn Law Firm Michael E. Ryburn 501-228-8100

Friday, Eldredge & Clark Guy Alton Wade 501-376-2011

Ledbetter, Cogbill, Arnold & Harrison R. Scott Zuerker 479-782-7294

ALABAMA Hare Wynn Newell & Newton, LLP

Appellate Practice Bruce McKee

Arbitration

James R. Pratt III

Bet-the-Company Litigation D. Leon Ashford Scott A. Powell James R. Pratt III

James A. Arnold II 479-782-7294

Commercial Litigation

Bassett Law Firm

John W. Haley

Tod C. Bassett 479-521-9996

Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor Constance G. Clark 479-521-7600

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings John D. Davis 501-371-0808

D. Leon Ashford Don McKenna James R. Moncus III Scott A. Powell

Litigation - Securities John W. Haley


Mass Tort Litigation / Class Actions Plaintiffs Don McKenna

Mediation James R. Pratt III

Medical Malpractice Law - Plaintiffs D. Leon Ashford S. Shay Samples

Personal Injury Litigation - Plaintiffs D. Leon Ashford Michael D. Ermert Matthew C. Minner Scott A. Powell James R. Pratt III S. Shay Samples

Product Liability Litigation - Plaintiffs D. Leon Ashford James R. Pratt III

Transportation Law D. Leon Ashford

Woodward/White Inc., has used its best efforts in assembling material for this list but does not warrant that the information contained herein is complete or accurate, and does not assume, and hereby disclaims, any liability to any person for any loss or damage caused by errors or omissions herein whether such errors or omissions result from negligence, accident, or any other cause. All listed attorneys have been verified as being members in good standing with their respective state bar associations as of July 1, 2016, where that information is publically available. Consumers should contact their state bar for verification and additional information prior to securing legal services of any attorney. Copyright 2016 by Woodward/ White, Inc., Aiken, SC. All rights reserved. This list, or parts thereof, must not be reproduced in any form without permission. No commercial use of this list may be made without permission of Woodward/White, inc. No fees may be charged, directly or indirectly, for the use of this list without permission. “The Best Lawyers of America” and “Best Lawyers” are registered trademarks of Woodward/White, Inc.

AYMAG.COM . 67


68 . JUNE 2017


interests

ARTS & CULTURE

YOUNG TALENT TAKES OVER ARTS CENTER BY MELANIE KRAMER

1st Grade Jackson Brown

12th Grade Victor Gomez

3rd Grade Thomas Miller

8th Grade Logan Babel

I

n 1961, the Arkansas Arts Center held the first statewide Young Arkansas Artists Exhibition. Now in its sixth decade, this annual children’s art exhibition showcases artwork by students in kindergarten through 12th grade from across the state. AYMAG.COM . 69


Arkansas Art's Center patrons view 3-D art at the Young Artist Exhibition reception.

The Arkansas Arts Center does a lot to honor and enrich children’s lives with art, but the Young Artists Exhibition is the highlight of the year for the Art Center and the talented children who work so hard.

Elevating and Inspiring

Arkansas art teachers work with students to submit art for possible selection to be displayed as part of this temporary exhibit. A favorite among art teachers and art patrons, the competition and pool of talent continues to wow every year. Noel E. Cole, the long-time art teacher at Norfork High School says she sends at least three works from her students every year. “I believe that competitions do motivate students to do their best as long as you instill in them that it’s not the product that matters, but the process and how they are connected to their work,” says Cole. “This exhibition brings awareness to how important art is in the classrooms,” says Jessica Wright, senior education specialist state services. “It reinforces the hard work the teachers are putting into forming their curriculum and the hard work the students put into their work. It can even help inspire other teachers who maybe don’t have as strong of a program to elevate their own.” The juried competition is judged by a panel of art professionals from around the state. This year 124 schools participated and selections were chosen from 58. “We have the most participation from the Little Rock and Pulaski County area, but really we get submissions from all over,” says Wright. They received a total of 495 submissions. 70 . JUNE 2017

10th Grade Carrera Abel


Making a Difference “IThe students work so hard on their artwork throughout the year and Wright believes that the show helps reinforce that hard work is important. “It’s really amazing to see the kids when they come in and see their art displayed in the gallery,” says Wright, who helped plan an awards ceremony for the students and their families on May 20. “We get to honor them and give out awards and it gives them the opportunity to see what their peers are doing.” The awards handed out at the ceremony include "Best of Class" and two "Honorable Mentions" for each grade. Monetary awards are provided to each winner's school. “I know I would have enjoyed, if I were in that position, to see my work displayed in a museum in the gallery next door to works by Monet, Cezanne, Rivera and to think this is really an honor and something I will remember,” says Wright. Not to mention it really is a crowd pleaser. “We have so many people who say ‘this is my favorite exhibition at the Arts Center,” says Wright. Regular patrons come in every year just to see the student art. This year Cole had two students selected for the Young Arkansas Artists award. Ninth-grader Hannah Bradbury, was selected for her fabric-art batik, “Keelbilled Toucan” and received an honorable mention. Eleventh-grade student Sydney Lawhorn was awarded the Teachers Choice Award for her batik, “Moored Adventure.” “Both girls were surprised and delighted to receive this award and I could tell they were filled with pride in this accomplishment,” says Cole. “When I found out I got accepted into the show I felt extremely honored; and to know that some of Arkansas best art teachers chose my work is very motivational,” says Lawhorn. Bradbury added, “I was very ecstatic to receive this award. It is such an honor to have my work displayed at the Arkansas Art Center, just like a real artist!”

ART ON THE ROAD Can’t make it to the Arts Center to see this year’s exhibit? Catch it on the road. “Right now, we’ve got several of the Young Artist pieces exhibited at the Clinton National Airport and in other galleries around the state,” says Wright. The Artmobile tour is another way to expose less populated areas of the state to art. “We have four mobile regional tours and we typically display 19 pieces from the Young Artists,” says Wright.

This year’s exhibit at the Arkansas Arts Center starts May 16 and runs through July 24.

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Son of a Preacher Man BY KODY FORD PHOTOGRAPHY BY MEREDITH MASHBURN

Chef Matt Cooper came from a long line of ministers, but decided to pursue the culinary arts instead. Then he found a church of his own in one of Bentonville’s hottest new restaurants.

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att Cooper believes in bringing people together, and his method is one steeped in tradition — food. Growing up, his family never ate out, unless they were on vacation. He found himself drawn to the welcoming atmosphere of the dinner table as they gathered to discuss their day. Even the process of seeing vegetables go from seed to the plate resonated with him on a deeper level, and that connection stayed with him.

THE ROAD TO CHEFDOM The Arkansas native comes from three generations of Methodist ministers on his father’s side, but he found himself drawn to the pursuits of his maternal lineage. “My mother’s side of the family were all food technologists,” he said. “My grandfather helped start the food technology program at the University of Arkansas. My mother did it at Riceland and my uncle did it at Mars and other companies. Food science has always been a big part of that half of my family.” Initially, the culinary bug didn’t bite. In college, he majored in biology while working at restaurants to make ends meet. Little did he realize that learning about chemistry and biology was giving him a different kind of education. After marrying his wife, Priscilla, and becoming a father, he decided to relocate to Portland, Ore., and take the plunge to become a chef with her encouragement. Having cooked on his own for 13 years and studied science in college, Cooper became a quick study at the Western Culinary Institute of the Le Cordon Bleu College of the Arts. He worked at restaurants that served a variety of food such as German at Gustav’s, French at Everett Street Bistro in the Pearl District and Italian at Aquariva. It wasn’t just the types of food that were important, but the way they were made. Xxxxx xxxxxx xxxxx xxxxxx xxxxxx xxxx xxx xxxx xx.

SUSTAINABLE COOKING Much like his boyhood days working in his grandfather’s garden, Cooper found himself exploring the origins of what he cooked. He knew the fishermen and the farmers, and sometimes he even planted seeds himself. The farm-totable movement has since gone nationwide, but at the time, Portland was at the forefront, which gave the burgeoning chef an unofficial doctorate in sustainability. “When I was there, we would come to work and sometimes go to the farm and literally handpick what we wanted – it’s amazing. The allure of the entire process is that you know where the food is coming from and you know what you’re doing,” he said.

RETURNING TO THE NATURAL STATE After graduating, Cooper found himself restless and decided he needed to return to his roots. “In Portland, I was one of many chefs doing the local, organic, sustainable movement so I couldn’t really make a difference,” he said. “We decided to move back [to Arkansas] so my wife could finish her master’s degree, and I could also

(This page starting from the top) The restaurant is housed in one of the oldest churches in Bentonville. Brussels salad with Gorgonzola mousse, marcona almond, and pomegranate honey

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During this time, the direction changed and Belfry became The Preacher’s Son, which finally opened in fall 2016.

A UNIQUE AND ARTFUL EXPERIENCE

The windows of the The Preacher's Son were created by the legendary artist George Dombek.

really start to dive into the community and make a difference.” Back in Arkansas, Cooper took a job as the executive sous chef at Chenal Country Club to get his foot in the door. He worked there for two years before moving on to Lulav Modern Eatery to serve as executive chef. Eventually, another opportunity arose and he got into Cache Restaurant on the ground floor and ran it for a year after it opened. During those years, he developed quite a reputation as a chef and caught the attention of Bentonville’s Ropeswing Group. According to Rob Apple of Ropeswing, the restaurant had undergone a national search to find a chef for a new project, and after putting out a call for potential Arkansas candidates, Cooper’s name kept popping up. They hired him for an upcoming restaurant tentatively called the Belfry. As planning for this establishment was underway, Cooper worked as front of the house manager with Chef Mike Robertshaw in the new version of Pressroom, which Apple founded with his wife, Bea, before it was acquired by Ropeswing. This opportunity gave Cooper the chance to work side-by-side with his new employers and their brand development company, FÖDA Studio, to revamp the former First Christian Church in downtown Bentonville into a unique culinary experience. 74 . JUNE 2017

The restaurant stands out on its own among a town that has become known for top-notch eats. The group worked with FÖDA Studio and their architects to develop a multilayered, visual experience – the upstairs restaurant, Preacher’s Son, feels like a Sunday morning with it’s hardwood floors and art glass windows by the legendary George Dombek. The downstairs bar, Undercroft, has a dark, speakeasy vibe that lends itself to a night of fun without the guilt. While it stands out in terms of design, Cooper’s menu truly adds the finishing touches. “My biggest goal, because of beauty in this space, was to create a casual menu where anyone and everyone can come in dressed the way they want and enjoy a casual dinner that’s very thoughtful and sustainable in a beautiful space,” he said. Cooper utilizes his connections to the Pacific Northwest to purchase fish from boats that he knows personally and has it flown in weekly. He works with Arkansas-based farms for produce, much like he did in his Portland days. Dishes like the gnocchi and the pork shank have become favorites, while he feels the tuna tacos are also worth checking out. The biggest challenge for Cooper came, not from any outside restrictions, but rather his own dietary ones. Throughout his life, Cooper found himself dealing with pain of unknown origin. It wasn’t until he moved to Portland and had tests run that he realized his Southern wheat-based staples were the culprit. Being diagnosed with Celiac Disease came as a blow to someone who dealt with pastas and breads on a regular basis. Over time, he adjusted his diet and cooking style to accommodate. Now Preacher’s Son boasts a delicious, gluten-free menu – a source of pride for Cooper. “Coming from Southern and European training, it’s all pasta and bread,” he said. “The challenge was being able to do all those things in a gluten-free environment and still be able to create things like those pillow-like gnocchis or that really good ravioli and maintain the standards of my training. It was a challenge sometimes but still fun.” Besides excelling as a chef, Cooper has developed a solid reputation as a leader at work. “His personal leadership style is different from a lot of kitchens,” said Apple. “He has a gentle approach to leadership that’s very developmental and educational. I really appreciate that about him. His staff does too.”

FOR COOPER, THE ADMIRATION IS MUTUAL. “My entire kitchen staff challenges me on a daily basis,” he said. “We come together as a group to plan. All of my cooks are my teachers as well. We maintain constant communication on how we can continue to improve. It’s the teamwork that keeps me from being complacent.”

thepreachersson.com IG: @preachers_son_bentonville


Beautiful hardwood floors and cathedral ceilings, mixed with the etheral work of Dombek, give the restaurant a serene quality. AYMAG.COM . 75


This Father's Day, thank the man who has always been your hero. Treat him to a gift from our carefully curated and exclusive gift guide. WEATHERTECH FLOOR LINERS

FATHER'S DAY GIFT GUIDE

In the quest for the most advanced concept in floor protection, the talented designers and engineers at Weathertech have worked tirelessly to develop the most advanced floor liner protection available today! The Weathertech floor liner accurately and completely lines the interior carpet, giving “Absolute Interior Protection”! Goodsell keeps these liners in stock! www.goodselltruck.com • 401 Municipal Drive, Jacksonville

(501) 982-2245

WINCH, LIFT/LEVELING KITS, & LED LIGHTBARS Give dad a little bit of everything for his favorite 4x4. You can give him all-terrain tires professionally installed by MUD Connection, light it up with LED lightbars, and help him get ready for some serious mudding with a winch. www.mudconnectionlr.com • 6104 Young Road, LR

(501) 562-6494

LIPOSCULPTURE

TRAEGER PRO 22 GRILL $799.00 Let dad take his wood-fired cooking skills to the next level with the Pro series from Traeger. With more precise temperature control, rugged allterrain wheels and a stronger body, the Pro Series pellet grill can tackle any grilling challenge. The Pro series 22 pellet grill is constructed with a stamped bronze lid, durable powder coated steel, and boasts 20,000 BTUs of cooking power. The 572 square inches (22 X 19) of porcelain coated grilling surface produce excellent sear marks, while being easy to clean.

Even if he exercises and has a healthy diet, dad may still have trouble getting rid of unwanted areas of fat. Liposuction removes these fat deposits and sculpts his body into the figure he desires! Liposuction is a great solution for people who experience localized fat deposits that will not respond to regular diet and exercise and disproportionate areas of the body. www.littlerockplasticsurgery.com 2200 N. Rodney Parham Rd. Suite 200, Little Rock

(501) 219-8000

Congo Fireplace & Patio www.congofp.com 19650 Interstate 30, Benton

(501) 316-4328 76 . JUNE 2017

SPECIAL PROMOTION


2017 SYLVAN S3 EXTREME WITH A 250HP YAMAHA $553 per month (WAC and 10% down- payment includes all taxes) 240 months Nothing says "perfect for dad" like a Luxury Sport Tritoon with a wakeboard tower and amazing lighting package. Make sure dad takes you out on the water with this Sylvan S3 Extreme.

www.greggorrmarinehotsprings.com 4903 Central Ave. Hot Springs

(501) 525-1818

2017 FLEETWOOD PACE ARROW 36U $169,500 Make sure dad has an RV with a little bit of everything. Cummins® ISB 6.7L Engine w/Exhaust Brake 300HP 90-Gallon Fuel Tank • Impressive Pass-Through Storage 84" Interior Height • Hardwood Window Valance • 12" x 24" Composite Plank Style Flooring • Hardwood Cabinets, Doors, & Drawers • Hide-A-Loft™ Drop Down Queen Bed • Central Vacuum System • Residential Refrigerator Queen Bed Memory Foam Mattress • Exterior Entertainment Center www.rivercityrvs.com 6721 Warden Road, Sherwood

KYBELLA CHIN INJECTIONS Help dad change his look with Kybella Chin Injections! Contour and improve the appearance of a double chin for good! Submental fullness or "double-chin" may be caused by weight gain, genetics, or aging and sometimes, no matter how much you exercise or diet, the condition may not go away. See if Kybella is for dad!

(501) 833-1420 www.littlerockplasticsurgery.com 2200 N. Rodney Parham Rd. Suite 200, Little Rock

(501) 219-8000

MERCEDES S-CLASS SEDAN For generations, an S-Class Sedan has been instantly recognizable not just for its iconic design, but for predicting the future of the automobile. Strong, powerful and majestic, it's also sleek, lithe and decidely athletic. It slips through the wind with quiet ease, yet stands out in any crowd. In fact, it stands above. www.mercedesbenzoflittlerock.com • #8 Colonel Glenn Plaza Dr., Little Rock

(501) 666-9457 SPECIAL PROMOTION

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interests

TRAVEL ARKANSAS

THE BUFFALO NATIONAL RIVER: More than just a Canoeist’s Paradise BY JOE DAVID RICE PHOTOGRAPHY BY THE ARKANSAS DEPARTMENT OF PARKS AND TOURISM

Canoeists float down the mighty Buffalo River in early spring.

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s a former outfitter on the Buffalo National River, I can fondly recall a number of memorable incidents over the years. Our modest operation was located at Silver Hill, not much more than a wide spot on U.S. Highway 65 a few miles north of Marshall in Searcy County, and we’d host guests from all over the country. My favorite goes back to the time a middle-aged couple from Louisiana walked through the front door and asked about a canoe trip. They’d arrived on a perfect spring morning in late May, a day with fluffy white clouds floating across a brilliant blue sky, temperatures in the mid-70s, and low humidity. And the water conditions were ideal. Neither of our guests had been canoeing before and were eager to give it a try. Once they signed the liability waiver forms and their credit card cleared, we climbed into the Suburban and headed north on Highway 65, soon crossing the Buffalo. “In a few hours you’ll float under this bridge,” I said, “and then I’ll meet you at Gilbert an hour or so after that. You’ll recognize the take-out spot because of all the canoes and trailers.” We drove upstream to the put-in point at Woolum. It’s located opposite the mouth of Richland Creek on one of the prettiest gravel bars along the entire river. There was so much water going through and across the shoals that it was difficult to talk. I placed their canoe on the shore, tied in the ice chest, and handed them each a paddle and a life vest. After the man carefully took his seat in the stern, his wife stepped aboard and sat in the bow. As I leaned forward to gently shove them into the current, the man raised his hands, gave me the classic “Time Out” gesture, and, over the roar of the rushing water, yelled, “Which way do we go?” I refrained from saying something I’d regret, smiled and pointed to the left, and then watched as they successfully negotiated the minor rapids and rounded a bend, disappearing from sight. Luckily for them, we had a special on downstream excursions that day. When I picked up my new Louisiana friends later that afternoon, they were grinning from ear to ear, almost giddy after spending several hours on the Buffalo’s crystal clear waters. They’d fallen in love with the Ozarks and were ready to buy a piece of paradise. That was the case with about 95% of our customers. It’s just hard to beat a float trip on the country’s first national river. If there are any math wizards reading this piece, they’re probably curious about that other 5%. After careful observation and analysis, I determined these were generally couples having troubles of one sort or another in their relationships. For some reason, they thought a day together in a canoe would be a great way to patch things up. They soon realized that was a terribly misguided assumption. Decades have passed and I still enjoy a float trip on the Buffalo. But I’ve come to realize that there’s more than one way to collect lasting memories along this legendary stream. In the paragraphs that follow I’ll share some of them with you. AYMAG.COM . 81


History Buffs I understand, for instance, that a water-based experience is not on everyone’s bucket list. For history buffs I’ll recommend a trip to Rush, allegedly the only ghost town between the Mississippi River and the Rocky Mountains. Located toward the river’s lower end and a few miles east off Arkansas Highway 14, this abandoned community once housed nearly 5,000 residents – many of them prospectors searching for zinc. The mining frenzy began in the early 1880s and civilizing influences – hotels, restaurant, bakery, theater, general stores, saloons, post office, dance halls, and perhaps a few churches – soon followed, but the end of World War I brought a crash in the zinc market and the town died. A dozen or so buildings still stand and are recognized by the National Register of Historic Places as the Rush Historic District. Photographers will find it an interesting stop.

Photographers

(This page starting from the top) A beautiful waterfall cascading off the Buffalo. Hikers enjoy the beauty and foliage surrounding the river.

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Photographers will also enjoy a great collection of waterfalls within the Buffalo River’s 856,000-acre watershed (of which 94,000 acres are within the national river boundaries). HemmedIn Hollow Falls, of course, is the best known of the lot. Shooting this iconic 209-foot-tall favorite requires a good bit of work and a serious commitment of time. There are two options to reach the falls by foot: the Centerpoint Trail and the Compton Trail (with trailheads for each on Arkansas Highway 43 north of Ponca). At 2.5 miles (one-way) the latter is by far the shorter of the two, but the hike out from the falls isn’t for the faint of heart. A third possibility is to canoe to the trailhead along the river and then hike half a mile up the creek to the base of the falls. Spring is the best time to grab a dramatic shot. Lost Valley, a former Arkansas State Park and now a day-use area operated by the National Park Service, features several nice waterfalls. The first, about three-fourths of a mile up an easy trail, is actually a gaping hole in the canyon wall where Clark Creek pours five or six feet into a shallow pool. Another quarter of a mile or so north is a series of waterfalls just beyond the enormous Cob Cave bluff shelter. The most visible is Eden Falls, which plunges approximately 50 feet, landing in a spray of water. Above this cascade is yet another falls, which pours from the mouth of a cave (and the adventurous may want to check out the 30-foot waterfall inside the cave). Lost Valley is located in Newton County between Ponca and Boxley on Arkansas Highway 43. Although the next four waterfalls on my recommended list aren’t within the Buffalo National River’s boundaries, they’re all on streams that flow into the Buffalo. And given that they’re in the Ozark National Forest, each one is on public property owned by you and the other 325 million American citizens. Strangely enough, Falling Water Falls is one of those rare cascades that can be viewed from your vehicle. It’s located in extreme southwestern Searcy County a few miles southeast of the community of Ben Hur on Forest Service Road 1205. Continuing north on this same gravel road will bring you to the Richland Creek campground. A long and arduous trek up the creek (plan on a full day on the trail) will eventually bring you to the mouth of Devil’s Fork Creek. A quarter-mile hike up this tributary will yield one of the best spectacles in Arkansas: Twin Falls. Returning to Richland Creek and heading upstream for a short distance will bring you to another


(This page) The sun sets in the Buffalo River wilderness area near Ponca.

amazing sight: Richland Falls. For complete details on these cascades and others, consult the Arkansas Waterfalls Guidebook by writer/photographer Tim Ernst.

Hikers Hiking enthusiasts have several appealing options in the Buffalo River country. Located entirely within the boundaries of the national river is the Buffalo River Trail, which begins about a mile south of the Arkansas Highway 21 bridge at the old Whitely Homestead. This rugged and scenic trail passes alongside historic homesites, farmsteads, and cemeteries and also provides great views of the riparian landscape. Over 50 miles of trail are in place and work is underway on other sections. Also, the nationally recognized Ozark Highlands Trail passes through a good stretch of wild and remote Buffalo River country, particularly in the Richard Creek valley. Additional information on both trails can be found in the Arkansas Adventure Guide available through the Arkansas Department of Parks and Tourism’s www.arkansas.com website. Serious outdoor adventurers will want to explore the Congressionally-designated wilderness areas along the Buffalo River. The Ozark National Forest and the Buffalo National River manage a combined 13,300-acre Upper Buffalo Wilderness that includes bluffs, caves, waterfalls, and the river’s headwaters. Downstream is the 11,300-acre Ponca Wilderness with such highlights as Hemmed-In Hollow, Indian Creek, and Big Bluff.

Near the river’s confluence with the White River is the Lower Buffalo Wilderness Area, a 22,500-acre unit next door to the Xxxxx xxxxxx xxxxx xxxxxx xxxxxx 16,900-acre Leatherwood Wilderness of the Ozark National xxxx xxx xxxx xx. Forest – which together form one of the largest and most remote wilderness areas in the eastern half of the country. Popular with both backpackers and horseback riders, this area is perfect for those truly wanting to get away from it all.

Foodies I’ll close with a reminder that good food can be found near the Buffalo. Coursey’s Smoked Meats (on U.S. Highway 65 south of St. Joe) has long had a reputation for delicious sandwich “fixings.” Many customers will then enjoy a picnic at Tyler Bend just a few more miles to the south. In Jasper, I’ve frequently eaten at the Ozark Café and Arkansas House – and have never been disappointed. A few miles to the south on Scenic Arkansas Highway 7 is the Cliff House Inn and Restaurant, home of the celebrated Company’s Comin’ pie. A dozen or so miles northwest of Jasper on Arkansas Highway 74 is the quaint but delightful Low Gap Café where the Bottini family serves a nice selection of outstanding Italian dishes. Don’t be surprised if a few horses are tethered out front! In short, the Buffalo River isn’t just for canoeists. It’s also a wonderful destination for photographers, hikers, backpackers, equestrians, and foodies. AYMAG.COM . 83


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HISTORICAL GEMS

A Car Lover’s Dream: The Annual Petit Jean Car Show and Swap Meet BY SONNY RHODES PHOTOGRAPHY BY JANET WARLICK

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t’s probably not possible to overstate the impact of automobiles on American culture. Consider just one cultural aspect – music – and think of some of the songs that mention cars: “Maybellene,” “Hey Little Cobra,” “Little Deuce Coupe,” “Little Old Lady (From Pasadena),” “Little Red Corvette” “Pink Cadillac,” “Mustang Sally.” The list goes on and on. And speaking of “Maybellene,” to borrow a little phraseology from that Chuck Berry classic, thousands of drivers will be motivatin’ over the hills in mid-June toward Petit Jean Mountain for the 59th annual Auto Show and Swap Meet. Talk about cars and culture!

A Car Lover’s Dream Co-hosted by the Mid-America Old Time Auto Association and the Museum of Automobiles, the five-day event attracts not only people with a multitude of cars to show off but also vendors offering a dizzying selection of car-related items. Admission is free, and visitors are welcome to stroll to their heart’s content among the more than 1,400 display spaces scattered around the museum grounds’ 57 shady acres. Traditionally held in the week leading up to Father’s Day, this year’s event will run Tuesday through Saturday, June 13-17, capped by two car shows – an antique division and an open division. If you’re thinking an auto show and swap meet are only for car enthusiasts, you might want to reconsider. Folks with merely a mild interest in history will likely find plenty of things to capture their imagination and maybe cause them to get a bit wistful about the past. Buddy Hoelzeman, the museum’s executive director, says just about anything related to cars can be found each year at the swap meet, including parts, supplies, petroleum company signs, even hand-cranked gas pumps. License plates are big collectible items, he says. He predicts there will be 500 to 600 cars for sale, about half in an area known as the car corral, and the other half scattered around the grounds. They’ll range from fully restored antiques to “parts cars,” meaning you’d only buy them for parts to put on other vehicles. Besides all that, there will be arts and crafts displays and food concessions.

| This 1941 Chevrolet 1/2 Ton Truck was purchased in Waco, Texas

just three days before Pearl Harbor. It was stored while it’s owner served in World War II.

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This 1951 Cadillac Fleetwood Seventy Five was owned and donated by Winthrop P. Rockefeller.

The Rockefellers and a Unique Museum Throughout the year, the museum plays host to a total of five shows, but “there’s nothing like the show in June,” Hoelzeman says. He should know. He’s been a driving force behind the Museum of Automobiles since the mid-1960s. The show and swap meet’s roots go back slightly further – to Tennessee in the late 1950s. Antique auto enthusiasts in Arkansas, Mississippi, Missouri and Tennessee came up with the idea for the Mid-America Old Time Auto Association (MOTAA) in 1958. They incorporated the next year as a nonprofit organization in Tennessee and began holding shows. Meanwhile over in Arkansas, Winthrop Rockefeller, who had moved from New York to the “Land of Opportunity” in 1953, was looking for a place to house antique vehicles he owned. This led to the Museum of Automobiles, which opened its doors in 1964 and put on a car show to help kick start things. The museum also had a car show in 1965. But, a third show, planned in 1966, was canceled, and there was no show in 1967. In 1968 MOTAA was invited to have its annual show at the Museum of Automobiles. “They [MOTAA] found a home in ’68, and they’ve been here ever since,” Hoelzeman says. By the time the show came to Petit Jean, Hoelzeman had 90 . JUNE 2017

been on the museum staff for a few years, having been hired as the museum’s accountant in 1966. He was promoted to office manager in 1968 and made director about 1970. In 1973, Rockefeller died, and two years later the trustees of his estate closed the museum and began selling the cars, donating the building and grounds to the state. “I thought the museum fit well with his legacy,” says Hoelzeman of Rockefeller, who served two terms as governor and worked to bring political, economic and cultural changes to his adopted state. So, Hoelzeman and others quickly formed a nonprofit organization to reopen the museum. “We didn’t own a single car,” he recalls, “but we began making calls and in two weeks’ time, we gathered up 33 cars.” Thanks to that fast action, the museum wasn’t closed long, reopening shortly before the 1976 car show. Since then, the museum has acquired 38 cars that are part of its permanent exhibit. It has others on display that are on loan.

Arkansas’ Auto Production Past

One morning in May, Hoelzeman gave me a tour of the museum. A fascinating array of 48 cars were on display, providing not just a look at auto history, but Arkansas history as well. The oldest car was a 1904 Oldsmobile. Known as a Runabout, it had a one-cylinder engine and could reach a speed of 20 miles per hour. Among its fancy features was a pair of


oil lamps made of brass. The car cost $750 brand new. It was donated by the late Elbert L. Fausett of Little Rock, a successful real estate developer. Another vehicle was a 1923 Climber, produced in Little Rock. “Little Rock?” you might be saying to yourself. Yes, Arkansas’ capital city. The Climber Motor Corporation was founded in 1919 with the idea of building vehicles that could cope with the state’s primitive road system, according to the Encyclopedia of Arkansas History and Culture. The company’s owners “envisioned a car that could drive well on pavement as well as on unimproved roads and that could handle the terrain of the Ozark Mountains as well as the flat straight stretches of road found in the Delta.” The company succeeded in building sturdy vehicles, but it was plagued by capital and parts shortages. It was bankrupt by early 1924, producing only about 200 cars and 75 to 100 trucks. Just two Climbers are known to exist, Hoelzeman says. “Fortunately for us, we own them both.” That’s only a sampling of the automobiles you can find at the museum.

What to Know About the Show Admission is free. It’s open to the public from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. daily. If you’re motivated to go to the show, be prepared for traffic. Attendance throughout the week is estimated between 75,000 to 80,000. Hoelzeman likens the parking situation to that on a Razorback game day. A nearby field can handle at least 1,000 cars, plus there’s an area with 100 RV spaces (no hookups), a nearby church parking lot and neighbors who allow parking at their places.

Visiting the Museum Can’t make it up for the show, but feel driven to see the museum? You can tour it from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily, except Christmas Day. Admission is $10 for adults, with discounts for seniors and students. Kids five and under are free. Much more information about the museum can be found at www.museumofautos.com.

A 1954 Chevrolet Bel Air cost $1,830 brand new. AYMAG.COM . 91


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about you HEALTH

Preventive Screenings Can Help Improve Men’s Health

SAVE LIVES BY JILLIAN MCGEHEE

T

he Friday before Father’s Day men and their loved ones are encouraged to wear blue in celebration of June as Men’s Health Month. While our husbands and fathers can be reluctant to make a routine doctor visit, such a simple act can help prevent debilitating diseases and save lives. The purpose of Men’s Health Month is to bring awareness of preventable health problems and encourage early detection and treatment of disease among men and boys, according to menshealthmonth.org. This month gives healthcare providers, public policy makers, the media and individuals an opportunity to encourage men and boys to seek regular medical advice and early treatment for disease and injury. 94 . JUNE 2017

The Importance of Regular Checkups Two of the leading causes of sickness in men in the United States are prostate cancer and heart disease. These ailments can be prevented, or at least their effects at can be lessened, through early detection and lifestyle choices. Dr. Tim Langford has been with Arkansas Urology for 24 years. The top five issues he sees in men are:

∙ Enlarged prostate ∙ Prostate cancer ∙ Erectile dysfunction ∙ Kidney stones ∙ Prostate infection


And, he says, the best way to prevent any of it is through screenings and regular checkups. “In close to 50 percent of our patients we’re treating men with enlarged prostates and prostate disease,” Langford said. These are symptomatic issues resulting in things like slowed urination stream and trouble urinating. With prostate cancer, there are no symptoms in the beginning, and once symptoms appear, that means the cancer has become aggressive, he said, noting the importance of early detection through screenings. Cancer typically isn’t suspected in a regular prostate exam and is found through a PSA blood count exam, Langford said. An MRI of the prostate is relatively new method to detect cancer. “It gives us a much better detailed picture of the anatomy of the prostate, unlike an ultrasound, for example.” Rather than blind biopsies, medical professionals like Langford now do MRI fusion biopsies, which points physicians directly to where the cancer is, leading to fewer side effects. “For years, we had to treat the whole prostate, and now, like lumpectomies in breast cancer cases where you don’t have to remove the whole breast, we can use focal therapy and treat the affected area, which reduces the risks of incontinence and impotence,” Langford said. This treatment is ideal for cancer tumors that are an inch or smaller, he noted.

How Loved Ones Can Help It’s really up to the patient to be ahead of the game and get checked. “Men are typically not as good at going to physician as women,” Langford said. “They’re gonna wait until they feel bad to go to the doctor. And a lot of men with low testosterone may be depressed and have a low sex drive, but they just put up with it.” A common hesitation stems from fear, Langford said. “They’re afraid to have a procedure and see going to the doctor when they don’t necessarily feel bad as a weakness, but it’s so important to be proactive.” Loved ones of men in their 30s, 40s and 50s can nudge them to go in for routine screenings so they don’t have to face a prospectively debilitating future. “It’s so important to get men in this age range in to have their levels checked and get screened,” Langford said. There is such glamour and hype around many of women’s health issues and men’s health issues may get overlooked, but that doesn’t make them any less important.

Attracting Men to Better Health To help entice and encourage men to make screenings and checkups a part of their lifestyle, Arkansas Urology hosts a kickoff to men’s health every September. It’s held in conjunction with Prostate Cancer Awareness Month as well as the start of football season. Flat screen TVs are given away every 15 minutes, and there’s typically something extraordinary showcased like Mark Martin’s racecar. The real purpose of the free event, which attracted 200-300 men last year, is to provide a complete panel of screenings to men and bring home the importance of taking care of their health, Langford said. And so many health concerns facing men are caused by obesity and can be prevented. Many ailments associated with obesity may eventually contribute to urological disorders, Langford said. “When they

come in for a urological problem, we may find they have diabetes, their thyroid levels are low or they have high blood pressure,” he said. “Urologists are often the first to see men for health concerns because of things like kidney stones, problems urinating or infertility. They almost come to us more than a primary care physician, but we want to work in collaboration with their primary physicians.” Langford suggests a few things men can do to take control of their own health:

∙ Follow a healthy diet and exercise regimen. ∙ Stay properly hydrated with water. ∙ By the age of 35 or 40, undergo a general screening from a physician to have their blood sugar, cholesterol, blood pressure and other levels checked.

Heart Disease – Still the No. 1 Killer Heart disease is another major health issue facing men. In fact, it’s the No. 1 killer among men in the state and in the country, according to the American Heart Association. Dr. William A. Rollefson, a cardiologist at Arkansas Heart Hospital, knows this fact all too well and it’s a main reason Little Rock has one of the highest number of cardiologists per capita. Preventative measures are key in reversing this mortal trend. He brings home the point with this statistic: “A third of people who die from heart disease didn’t even know they had a problem.” For $100, people can participate in the Heart Hospital’s Keep the Beat program to get screened for things such as high blood pressure and cholesterol. These are two major risk factors of heart disease, as are cigarette smoking and family history. Participants don’t have to have any warning signs or symptoms appear before getting screened, Rollefson said. As Langston pointed out, Rollefson said many times men are reluctant to take precautionary measures toward their health. “Men are often prompted to have their heart health checked by their spouse or after their mother, sister, father, brother or other family member has a heart episode.” Rollefson shared an example of a seemingly unlikely heart disease candidate. This relatively healthy man practiced on the tennis court every day and one day collapsed. “We were able to save him, but you just never know and that’s why it’s so important to get regular screenings.” Keep the Beat is a primary health measure, and a secondary measure for confirmed heart disease patients is the Strong Hearts program. According to the hospital website, the program provides intensive individualized management of heart failure patients, especially after a hospitalization. Rollefson said this program is one of the most state-of-theart heart rehabilitation services in the state and in the nation. It provides heart patients a “multidisciplinary approach” to leading a healthy lifestyle, he said. A chef helps change eating habits and guides patients as they adapt to new ones while trainers help patients learn the right exercise regime for them in the large workout room with high-quality equipment. Spouses may participate in the program as well, so healthier choices can be more easily practiced at home. AYMAG.COM . 95


96 . JUNE 2017


June 2017  

In This Issue: Explore the new Hot Springs, IMBIBE: Our Guide to Whiskey, Tiny Home Amplified (World-renowned Violinist builds musical retre...

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